Themes

The Archive

Search results for:
"SWITZERLAND"

Letter from Ann Pagenstecher to MLK

Wednesday, August 31, 1966

Ann Pagenstecher from Harvard College Library offers Dr. King a copy of a bibliography that lists publications, both, by and about him. She shares supportive words with Dr. King, applauding his crusade regardless of the outcome. The attached bibliography contains a brief biography of Dr. King's life and seven pages of literature including books and articles from prominent publications such as Ebony Magazine, The New York Times, and The Christian Century.

Letter from Carolyn Fewell to MLK

Monday, June 12, 1967

In this letter, Mrs. Fewell, secretarial assistant to the dean of the Wesley Theological Seminary, thanks Dr. King for his sending his book, "Where Do We Go From Here."

Letter from Jacob H. Gilbert to MLK

Tuesday, January 5, 1965

Congressman Gilbert writes Dr. King to thank him for his letter and copy of his book "Why We Can't Wait." Prior to the vote to seat the Mississippi delegation, Dr. King contacted several government officials urging them to vote against the seating. Congressman Gilbert states that he objected to the seating albeit unsuccessfully.

Letter to the SCLC from The United Church Board for World Ministries

Wednesday, April 10, 1968

In this document, is a note to request acknowledgement of a $50 dollar contribution, from Andrew C. Mills of New Delhi, India.

Letter from Agenzia Letteraria Internazionale to Joan Daves

Friday, March 17, 1967

Agenzia Letteraria Internazionale informs Joan Daves of an international meeting on the problems of New Africa in Palermo, Italy. It is noted that Santi Ando & Figli would like for Dr. King to lecture in Rome, Milan, Florence, Torino & Bolgna and provide photographs they may use in their promotion campaign for Dr. King's books.

Ebenezer Baptist Church

This picture depicts Ebenezer Baptist Church, where Dr. King pastored.

Proclaim Liberty...

Carl T. Rowan, one of the most prominent black journalists of the 20th century, is honored at the Progressive Club in Atlanta, GA. This reservation form was sent out to invited guests of the celebration.

Draft Letter from MLK to Mr. Smith

Dr. King writes Mr. Smith thanking him for his contribution to the SCLC. He expresses that contributions help American Negroes to "continue in the struggle for freedom and equality."

Appeal from Wyatt Tee Walker for Albany Support

Wednesday, July 25, 1962

Following the arrests of Dr. King and three others who held a prayer vigil at the Albany, Georgia City Hall, Rev. Wyatt Tee Walker issues this appeal for support from those active in the civil rights movement. He calls for telegrams to be sent to federal, state, and local officials, prayer vigils, and the wearing of black armbands.

Letter from Margo George to MLK

Friday, April 23, 1965

Margo George, a student at the Kent School, wrote to Dr. King requesting any suggestions on how she could help with the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from William S. Minor to MLK

Friday, July 16, 1965

William Minor, the Director of The Foundation for Creative Philosophy, invites Dr. King to speak at The Society for Creative Ethics meeting in New York.

Farewell Statement by MLK

Monday, March 9, 1959

Dr. King writes a farewell statement to the people of India thanking them for their hospitality towards him, Mrs. King and Dr. Reddick. Dr. King pleas for world peace and asserts that India should take the lead in the call for universal disarmament.

Letter from MLK to Takarekpenztar

Dr. King offers his gratitude to the workers of the Country Savings Bank XIII in Budapest for naming their socialist labor brigade after Dr. King. Unable to understand any of the names from the initial letter, Dr. King addresses this letter to "Takarekpenztar" or "savings bank" in Hungarian.

Letter from Maude to MLK

Thursday, September 25, 1958

Maude extends her wishes for the rapid recovery of Dr. King, following a stabbing in New York. She assures him that she is holding down the fort and provides him with a breakdown of correspondences that he has received.

Letter from Marc Pilisuk to MLK

Thursday, June 22, 1967

Marc Pilisuk, Associate Professor of Administrative Science and Psychology at Purdue University, requests Dr. King's permission to reprint the book "The Triple Revolution."

Machiavelli

Dr. King disagrees with Machiavelli's notion that political morality should be separated from social morality. Dr. King uses a quote from Heinrich von Treitschke to further analyze the issue.

Statement to SCLC Board: Alabama Movement

Friday, April 2, 1965

Dr. King discusses the various issues within the State of Alabama. Dr. King and the SCLC have maintained leadership in the Alabama Movement and have proposed a plan to continue the acts of nonviolence.

Draft Statement of Reverend Dr. MLK Jr.

This statement, not written in Dr. King's hand, responds to Joseph Alsop's syndicated column in the New York Herald Tribune. Dr. King clarifies that SCLC has no affiliation with the Communist Party. He also states the SCLC has not continued a relationship with Jack O'Dell since he was relieved of his responsibilities.

Evil

Dr. King outlines his views on evil and categorizes it into three types.

Letter from High School Senior Doris Magwood to MLK

Thursday, November 5, 1964

The senior class of Haut Gap School in John's Island, South Carolina invites Dr. King to deliver its baccalaureate sermon.

The Desegregated Heart

Sunday, July 1, 1962

Dr. King praises Sarah-Patton Boyle for her creation of the book, "The Desegregated Heart." Dr. King recommends that everyone reads the book, for it expresses the power of Christian love operating in the human heart.

Letter from Seventh Graders to Rev. Ralph Abernathy

Thursday, April 25, 1968

Five seventh grade boys wrote to Reverend Abernathy asking for information about the SCLC and the life of Dr. King.

Letter from M. R. Cherry to MLK

Friday, September 16, 1966

M. R. Cherry, Dean of the School of Theology of Acadia University, writes Dr. King on behalf of the University inviting him to deliver the Hayward Lectures.

Letter from Helen Harris to MLK

Wednesday, October 28, 1964

Helen Harris, Chairman of the First Unitarian Congregation of Toronto's Social Action Committee, congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Richard T. Andrews, Jr.

Monday, October 21, 1963

Dr. King express thanks for the Mt. Zion Congregational Church's contribution to the SCLC. Dr. King details and outlines how their financial assistance will further foster the improvement of the racial issues in the South. The SCLC would be "caught in a dungeon of despair" if they did not have any moral support from various individuals and organizations.

Interview with MLK for Radio Norway

Dr. King shares the way that Americans celebrate Christmas.

Letter from Samuel Kirk to President Johnson

Friday, December 30, 1966

Mr. Kirk, Director of the Institute for Research on Exceptional Children, writes to President Johnson expressing his desire for peace in Vietnam. Kirk suggests that Johnson appoint a Peace Commission consisting of Dr. King and others to help create solutions for ending the war.

Letter from Rabbi Joel S. Goor to MLK

Tuesday, July 28, 1964

Rabbi Joel Goor extends his appreciation to Dr. King for being able to participate in SCLC's 1964 desegregation campaign in St. Augustine, Florida. He feels that his involvement in the civil rights movement spirtitually enhances his role as an active religious leader. Rabbi Goor encloses a donation to the SCLC for assisting with his bail while being jailed in St. Augustine and a copy of "Why We Can't Wait" for Dr. King to autograph.

Letter from Dr. King to Rev. & Mrs. Sargent

Monday, November 8, 1965

In this letter, Dr. King thanks Rev. & Mrs. Sargent for their efforts in getting him to visit Paris and for their support of funding SCLC.

Appeal for Brotherhood to the City of Birmingham

On behalf of the Southern Alabama Movement for Human Rights and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, C. T. Vivian writes this appeal in the "spirit of nonviolent love" to the citizens of Birmingham. His purpose is to awaken conscientiousness and gain their support in creating brotherhood and a better city.