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Fear

Dr. King quotes John Watson's "Behaviorism" on the two things that incite fear.

Telegram from MLK to Mr. Sylveter A. Okereke

Friday, August 6, 1965
New York (NY)

Dr. King regrettably informs Mr. Okereke that he will be unable to accept his invitation for an event held on August 18, 1965.

Letter from the Knox's Church to MLK

Friday, January 24, 1964
CANADA, Atlanta, GA

The Knox's Church of Canada expresses their excitement to see Dr. King's image in Time Magazine for 'Man of the Year.' The author asserts that after all John F. Kennedy may have not died "in vain." Robert A. Jackson expounds on the societal issues in Canada and how they experience some aspects of segregation in cities. Mr. Jackson invites Dr. King to the Knox church upon his availability.

A Minority of One

Thursday, June 1, 1967

In an attempt to enhance positive intergroup relations, Mrs. Porter was interviewed during "inservice education sessions" at a school of nursing. Because Mrs. Porter was "the first and only Negro who had been graduated from" the school, the faculty wanted insight into her experience of integration. Gloria M. Francis wrote this article covering the interview.

Letter from Hadley Executive Committee to MLK

Wednesday, November 18, 1964
Pennsylvania (PA)

Ernest Shaefer, Executive Director of the Hadley Executive Committee, requests Dr. King's participation in the Hadley Memorial Fund lecture.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Student Jacquelyn Gravely

Wednesday, March 18, 1964
North Carolina (NC)

Dora McDonald refers Allen High School student Jacquelyn Gravely to read "Stride Toward Freedom" and "Crusader Without Violence" for her school assignment. She conveys Dr. King's good wishes towards Gravely's academic career.

Letter from Myron Nelson, Minnie Cooper and Kathleen Roach to MLK

Tuesday, January 30, 1968
New York (NY)

In this letter, Myron Nelson as well as Kathleen Roach invites Dr. King to come speak to the people of Eastern Long Island to up lift the African-American race.

Letter from James D. Wyker to MLK

Wednesday, June 7, 1967
VIETNAM

James D. Wyker writes this letter to Dr. King and encloses his proposal for direct action against the Vietnam War. Wyker questions if 60% of the population really supports President Johnson's actions in Vietnam, implying that many citizens are just neutral and not wanting to fight the status quo.

Letter from Anna Cohen to MLK

Atlanta, GA

Anna Cohen inquires to Dr. King about the involvement of the Jewish community in the Civil Rights Movement.

Restorationism

Dr. King defines restorationism.

Letter from Richard K. Goidel

Friday, March 15, 1968
Brooklyn, NY

Mr. Goidel, a student editor, requests a photograph from Dr. King to be featuredd in an article referencing the recent Time Magazine's Choice "68. Dr. King was nominated as a candidate for by Time magazine's Choice '68 collegiate Presidency. Sadly, Dr. King was assassinated two weeks later.

Letter and Article from D. Parke Gibson to MLK

Wednesday, July 12, 1967
New York, NY, Philadelphia, PA, Cleveland, OH, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

D. Parke Gibson sends this article in Race Relations and Industry to Dr. King with the intention of including him in a future issue of the magazine. Those involved in the article agree that progress towards having minorities in leadership roles is on the rise, but not fast enough.

Criticism of MLK's Methods

Thursday, August 24, 1967
Los Angeles, CA

The Author of this letter is very critical of Dr. King and accuses him of hating the white race and requests he return the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Joan Sinkler to MLK

HUNGARY, CUBA, New York, NY, VIETNAM

Joan Sinkler writes Dr. King expressing that she is disappointed with him for not mentioning "the racist and colonialist character" of the Vietnam War. Sinkler asserts that the US did not go to war to protect Hungary, Cuba or Tibet.

Letter from University of King's College to MLK

Monday, February 3, 1964
CANADA, Atlanta, GA

The University of King's College sends a follow up letter to Dr. King inquiring if he will accept their offer to receive an Honorary Doctorate of Civil Law.

MLK Outline - "Beyond Condemnation"

This handwritten note of Dr. King's is one of many such notes and outlines he wrote in preparation for a speech or sermon. The body of this outline references the Biblical passage John 8:2-11.

Letter from Chester Sims to MLK

Monday, December 5, 1966
Chicago, IL

Chester Sims of the Chess Record Company, recommends Charles Souder to Dr. King. He attests that Mr. Soulder is a dedicated man who showed loyalty during his service with SCLC.

Support Letter to MLK

Thursday, February 1, 1962
California (CA), Ohio (OH)

A Jewish man sends Dr. King a letter expressing his support for "Stride Toward Freedom" and informing Dr. King about his connection to the black community.

Some Information About Black Africa Culture

EGYPT, CONGO / ZAIRE, GHANA, SUDAN, SOUTH AFRICA, NIGER, ZIMBABWE, BENIN, NIGERIA, RUSSIAN FEDERATION, FRANCE, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA

This document discusses various discoveries that have been made about African civilizations and their cultures.

Letter from Morris A. Morse to Rev. Abernathy

Sunday, April 28, 1968
Minnesota (MN), Atlanta, GA

Morris Morse sends his condolences regarding the death of Dr. King. Mr. Morse further explains his opposition of the idea of building a two million dollar church in Dr. King's honor, because he believes that the reverend would not want such a memorial when so many people are in need.

Article in the Martin Luther King Column

Dr. King recognizes that the Committee for United Negro Relief will sponsor a luncheon to honor Mrs. Daisy Bates at the Waldorf-Astoria. Dr. King calls her the "heroine of the Battle for the Soul of Little Rock." He further describes contributions made by Mrs. Bates and her husband, along with the hardships they endured "in retaliation for their temerity in writing, speaking and fighting for freedom."

Letter of Appreciation to MLK from Mrs. A.M.Digilio

Friday, July 30, 1965

In this letter, Mrs. A.M. Digilio writes to Dr. King. Along with her expressions of appreciation, she admits to being one of the millions of whites who have "prayerfully" followed Dr. King's work. Mrs. Digilio states that Dr. King has been a voice to those of the "inarticulate working class", both white and black. She speaks of the unfortunate decline of morality amongst Americans and the necessary Christian might to rectify it. Mrs. Digilio further compares Dr.

Letter from Ann Gallagher to Dr. King, January 31, 1967

Tuesday, January 31, 1967
New York, NY

In this correspondence to Dr. King, Ann Gallagher of the Catholic School Div. of Holt, Rinehart and Winston, Inc, was requesting the copyrights for "Letter from a Birmingham Jail," which would be featured in Father Joseph Novak's, "Christianity Today: A Book of Reading."

Letter from Laurence Pollinger to Joan Daves

Wednesday, May 3, 1967

In this letter, Laurence Pollinger Limited writes to Joan Daves, Literary Agent for Dr. King, to make an offer for the advances and royalties to be received from the publication of "Where Do We Go From Here?" A request is also made for permission to change the title to Chaos or Community.

Program - SCLC Presentation of Mahalia Jackson

Sunday, December 1, 1963
New Orleans, LA, Chicago, IL

This SCLC program is for Miss Mahalia Jackson's concert benefitting the organization.

SCLC 10th Anniversary Advertisement Order Form

Atlanta, GA

This letter serves as an order form for advertisement in a booklet commemorating the SCLC's ten-year anniversary.

Address by MLK to the Hungry Club

Wednesday, December 15, 1965
Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Virginia (VA), Alabama (AL), Philadelphia, PA, South Africa, Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King addresses the members of The Hungry Club on the dilemma of "Negroes" obtaining complete equality. He refers to several passages from his "I Have a Dream" speech.

How to Deal with Grief and Dissappointment

Dr. King discusses the many avenues and remedies for disappointment. He includes a verse from the Book of Jeremiah and describes disappointment to be a "hallmark of life." Dr. King asserts that the first proper reaction is acceptance. Furthermore he suggests that one must express their grief with a person of trust. Dr. King stresses that the third and most important resolution to disappointment is to refrain from rationalization.

Letter from Robert T. Handy to MLK

Wednesday, July 1, 1964
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Robert Handy of the Union Theological Seminary invites Dr. King to be the "major evening speaker" for their Conference on Race and Religion.

Letter from Sam Gasbarre to MLK

Monday, August 21, 1967
VIETNAM

Sam Gasbarre, identifying himself as a white American, writes Dr. King to support his opinion that the Vietnam War is evil and should end.