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Letter from Stanley Lavison to MLK Regarding Speeches

Thursday, March 17, 1966

In this letter to Dr. King, Stanley D. Levison references text books with Dr. King's speeches and The Chicago Rally.

Letter from MLK to Katharine Hightower

Tuesday, March 12, 1968

In this letter, Dr. King declines an invitation to speak at a community event hosted by the Saint James African Methodist Episcopal Church.

Letter from Canadian Friend's Service Committee to MLK

Tuesday, February 2, 1965

Murray Thomson invites Dr. King to attend an annual conference of world diplomats in Ontario, Canada. Some of the major topics of discussion include the future of military alliances, the growing role of the United Nations, and preventing the spread of nuclear weapons.

News from the American Jewish Committee

Wednesday, February 14, 1968

This news release announces that John Gardner, former Secretary of Health (among other positions) accepted the head position of the Urban Coalition, a campaign that combats urban poverty.

Telegram from MLK to the Letters Department at Newsweek Magazine

Tuesday, November 21, 1967

Dr. King praises Newsweek magazine for making a persuasive appeal to the conscience and sanity of the nation on the racial crisis which engulfs America.

Letter from MLK to a Former Supporter

Thursday, July 20, 1967

This is an edited copy of Dr. King's response to someone withdrawing support due to his position on the Vietnam War. King's detailed rewrites show efforts to avoid further misunderstandings about his position. He applies nonviolent philosophies to both the civil rights and peace movements, however, does not attempt to link the two. Rather than asking for Negroes to be exempt from the draft as a special privilege, he believes Negroes have an intimate knowledge of the effects of violence. As such, they should have a special moral obligation not to inflict violence on others.

Financial Document-Receipt from Ramparts Magazine

Wednesday, May 17, 1967

This note references a check sent to Dr. King by Ramparts Magazine for monies received for the use of his Riverside Church Speech.

The New Frontiersmen

William Miller recaps the recent presidential elections and the important issues President John F. Kennedy will have to address. President Kennedy has proposed a new program called the New Frontier, which for many African Americans, is believed to be a part of the nonviolent Civil Rights Movement. Miller states that the Civil Rights Movement is not one that can be overlooked by the President and must be seriously addressed if he wants to stay true to his political platform.

Temple Sholom Bulletin

Saturday, September 19, 1964

This issue of the Temple Shalom Bulletin highlights Dr. King and his accomplishments during the Civil Rights Movement.

Get Well Letter from Olive Andrews to Mrs. King

Tuesday, September 23, 1958

Dr. King received this kind get well letter from Mrs. Olive Andrews, noting that she and her family prayed for his healing. She, furthermore, expressed that something good might come out of his unfortunate situation.

Today's Hero - The Negro Child

The "Southern Patriot" newsletter of the Southern Conference Educational Fund published this advertisement featuring the photo of two small children. The advertisement includes a heartfelt thank you to those many Negro students (trailblazers) brave enough to endure racial harassment and physical danger in the struggle to integrate schools in the South.

Letter from Ernestine Comegys to SCLC

Monday, April 5, 1965

Ernestine Comegys writes the SCLC in hopes of obtaining commemorative plates of Dr. King containing his biography on the back. Comegys plans to sell the plates at her church.


Dr. King cites Aristotle's ideas regarding matter and form.

Letter from John Harrigan Jr. to MLK

Saturday, May 20, 1967

John Harrigan, Jr. describes his education and work experience to Dr. King, and explains his desire to transition to the social revolutionary movement. He offers his services to Dr. King, stating his reimbursement requirements. He ends his letter by outlining a four step process to solve poverty in the United States.

Kant Critiques Other Philosophers

Dr. King contemplates Immanuel Kant's critique of other philosophers. Kant finds limitations in the ideologies of Hume, Leibniz, and Locke. He believes Hume and Leibniz to fall short on their understandings of knowledge. Kant further reproaches Hume and Locke as ignorant for viewing the senses as a viable explanation of consciousness.

Chicago Urban League Golden Fellowship Dinner and Dance

The Chicago Urban League coaxes members and invitees to their Golden Fellowship Dinner and Dance with a night of privilege and a chance to win a 1967 Pontiac.

Letter from Dr. King to Miss Norwell

In this doucment, Dr.King apologizes for his delayed response and expresses gratitude for the song Miss Norwell sent him.

Sermon Text (Habakkuk)

Dr. King examines Habakkuk chapter 1, verses 2 through 4 to discuss whether the inequalities of life are justification to question God.

Telegram from Harold Willens to Dora McDonald

Friday, May 10, 1968

Mr. Willens forwards a telegram to Dora McDonald that he had previously sent to Andrew Young. Willens invited Ralph D. Abernathy to be a guest on "Issues and Answers." Abernathy initially declined the invitation only later to accept, which lead Willens to inform him of the potential "impact and consequences."

Telegram from the Nashville Student Movement to MLK

Wednesday, October 19, 1960

The Nashville Nonviolent Student Movement writes to Dr. King in jail commending him for his courageous act, while urging him to remain in jail for the cause.

Letter from Thomas H. Henderson to Rev. Wyatt T. Walker

Tuesday, February 20, 1962

Thomas Henderson, president of Virginia Union University, instructs Reverend Wyatt T. Walker to provide Dr. King with the check from the office of Mr. C. C. Grant.

Letter from Adie Marks to Harry Belafonte

Thursday, February 2, 1967

Adie Marks writes Harry Belafonte in an effort to organize an event consisting of several artists and organizations to combat issues African Americans face in America.

Letter Dated 11/14/62 from D. McDonald to Mel Arnold

Wednesday, November 14, 1962

Per Dr. King's request, Ms. Dora McDonald forwards the sermon "The Man Was A Fool," to Mr. Mel Arnold of Harper and Row Publishing. The sermon is to be included in a forthcoming book of Dr. King's sermons.

Letter from M. G. Greens to MLK

Saturday, November 23, 1963

Miss M. G. Green, member of the Church of the Open Door, informs Dr. King of her concern with the Civil Rights Movement and her desire to offer her services as contribution to the cause. She encloses two letters addressed to Reverend Andrew Young, who never responded to her request.

Letter from Canary McKay to MLK

Friday, February 4, 1966

Canary McKay shows her appreciation to Dr. King for the progress made as a result of the Civil Rights Movement. She also extends an invitation for King to speak at her church.

Letter From Joan Daves to MLK

Tuesday, August 4, 1964

Joan Daves writes Dr. King to inform him of her meeting, in Germany, with publishers before the Frankfurt Bookfair.

MLK's Public Statement Regarding Julian Bond

Tuesday, January 12, 1965

Dr. King expresses his indignation for the State Legislatures refusal to seat Representative-Elect Julian Bond. Dr. King asserts that there are obvious racial overtones in the State Legislatures decisions since Mr. Bond received 82 percent of the votes in his district. Dr. King will commence direct action due to the state of urgency.

Telegram from Nathaniel Tillman Jr. to MLK

Thursday, February 28, 1963

The Washington, D.C. chapter of Morehouse College Alumni invites Dr. King to speak at its first annual Public Affairs Forum. The organization suggests a topic of "The Negro 100 Years After Emancipation."

Letter to the Federal Housing Commissioner from MLK

Tuesday, November 7, 1967

This document is a Federal Housing Administration application from Dr. King concerning one of his many housing programs.

Draft Letter from MLK to Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. Gates

Dr. King composes a draft for a letter to Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. Gates. He expresses his appreciation for their contribution and encouraging words. He discusses the SCLC's support of other organizations that are consistent with Judeo-Christian values and conveys their dedication to equality.