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Letter from MLK to Dr. James C. Gray

Monday, November 18, 1963
Washington, D.C., Birmingham, AL

Dr. King thanks Dr. James Gray for his generous contribution to the SCLC and states, "Without your dollars for freedom, the Conference would be unable to work effectively."

Letter from A. White to MLK

Chicago, IL

A. White reprimands the public use of fire hydrants and urges Dr. King to educate his "people" to avoid such actions.

Letter from Alice B. Bye to MLK

Friday, February 9, 1968
New York (NY)

Alice B. Bye requests that Dr. King send information and a picture for her school report.

Letter from Terrie to MLK

Saturday, March 2, 1968
Atlanta, GA

The author informs Dr. King of her
inability to continue working for the SCLC due to conflicting personal issues and emotional instability. She asserts that the work of the SCLC is too important for her to remain "jumping around in the organization." She also informs Dr. King that the SCLC is family and that she is only leaving for personal reasons. Lastly, she requests that other primary members of the organization are informed of this departure.

Letter from Joan Daves to Seong Hak Lee

Wednesday, October 21, 1964
SOUTH KOREA

Joan Daves responds to a request to translate Dr. King's books "Strength to Love" and "Why We Can't Wait" into the Korean language. She conveys Dr. King's gratitude about such an interest while also expressing hesitancy in granting permission immediately. The project can only be green lighted if specific procedures are followed which Daves lays out in her response.

Get Well Letter from Mr. David George Ball to MLK

Thursday, September 25, 1958
Connecticut (CT), Montgomery, AL

Mr. David George Ball, Chairman of the University Lecture Committee for the Yale University Christian Association, forwarded to Dr. King this get well letter.

Schedule of Buses for Pacem in Terris Participants and their Guests

Geneva, Switzerland

This schedule of bus routes is intended for Pacem in Terris participants and their guests. Trips include travel to Convocation sessions and a concert held at Victoria Hall.

Progressive National Baptist Convention Sixth Annual Session

Monday, July 31, 1967
Ohio (OH), Cincinnati, OH, South Africa, Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This news release outlines the events and participants for the Sixth Annual Session of the Progressive National Baptist Convention to be held in Cincinnati, Ohio. The theme of the conference is Spiritual Renewal in a Decaying Society.

Letter to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

This handwritten letter was written the day after Dr. King's assassination and is addressed to Mrs. King.

Letter from Ralph J. Bunche to MLK

Monday, March 18, 1968
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY)

Ralph J. Bunche sends an invitation to Dr. King, asking him to join the International Sponsors Committee at the New School for Social Research in New York City. This committee was developed in honor of Norman Thomas, an advocate for human rights.

Letter from William Rutherford to MLK

Friday, June 9, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Geneva, Switzerland, VIETNAM, Arkansas (AR), FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, RUSSIAN FEDERATION, CHINA, ISRAEL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, NEW ZEALAND

William Rutherford expresses his enthusiasm for being a new addition to Dr. King's team. Rutherford also encloses newspaper clipping on the Pacem in Terris meetings.

Letter from Donald W. Morgan to MLK

Thursday, December 31, 1964
Vermont (VT), Atlanta, GA

Donald Morgan informs Dr. King that northern locations such as New England and Vermont experience racial issues. Mr. Morgan serves as the chairman of the program committee for the 1964 Annual Meeting of the Vermont Congregational Conference. Dr. King is extended an invitation to speak at this conference which is located at the Rutland Congregational Church.

Letter from Andre Katz to MLK

Wednesday, January 3, 1968
GHANA, Chicago, IL

Andrea Katz, editor of Quadrangle Books, informs Dr. King about a book titled, "Where to, Black Man?" It is a diary of an African American man, Ed Smith, who traveled to Africa to reaffirm his American identity.

Full Opportunity Act Summary

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This summary outlines and provides the provisions of each section of the proposed Full Opportunity Act.

The Many Faces of Black Power

CHINA, CUBA, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR

The author identifies several approaches to the notion of Black Power. The author concludes that Black Power is "a programmatic concept capable of objective definition", "it presents many difficulties", and that the negatives have outweighed the positives.

Sin

Dr. King writes that Isaiah 1:18-20 indicates that sacrifices are not needed to be saved from sin; willingness and obedience are the way to be saved.

Monarchianism

Dr. King defines the doctrine monarchianism as "a doctrine stressing the unity of the Godhead as against the ultimately prevailing tendency to affirm personal distinctions within the Godhead."

Refinement by Fire

Mississippi (MS), Tennessee (TN), Georgia (GA), Virginia (VA), Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Michigan (MI), Detroit, MI, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Arkansas (AR), Florida (FL), Louisiana (LA), North Carolina (NC), South Carolina (SC), Texas (TX), New Orleans, LA

R. Elizabeth Johns describes the events surrounding voter registration in the South and tactics used by civil rights and opposition leaders.

Letter from John A. Race to MLK

Thursday, January 21, 1965
Wisconsin (WI), Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), Atlanta, GA

Congressman Race of Wisconsin thanks Dr. King for his letter concerning the seating of the Mississippi Delegates. Race seems to suggest that he was of the majority who "did authorize their formal acceptance" although he states that he was in the "minority."

Letter from Lillian Robertson to MLK

Monday, July 15, 1963
Pennsylvania (PA), Atlantic City, NJ, New York, NY, New York (NY), Detroit, MI, New Jersey (NJ), Michigan (MI)

The Baptist Pacifist Fellowship confirms that Dr. King will speak at its upcoming annual meeting. Lillian Robertson, Secretary-Treasurer of the Fellowship, also encloses a brochure about the organization.

Schleiermacher (Religion as More Than Outward Form)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher's "Speeches on Religion." The full title of this work is "On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.

Letter from Nona Collins to MLK

Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA), VIETNAM

Nona Collins, Legislative Chairman of the Germantown Branch of the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom, writes Dr. King in support of his stance on civil rights and the Vietnam War.

Worship

Dr. King quotes an excerpt from James Bissett Pratt's "Religious Consciousness," which focuses on the purpose of the Protestant sermon. Dr. King expands Pratt's analysis to encompass the entire Protestant service.

Letter from MLK and Associates to Mr. Grover Hall

Friday, January 11, 1957
Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Dr. King and associates write to Grover Hall, Editor of the Montgomery Advertiser, to express appreciation for an article the publication carried. The clergymen state that "law and order can be restored" if other periodicals throughout the South follow the newspaper's example.

Note Card on Hugo of St. Victor

This note card concerns Hugo of St. Victor's dealings with theology and mysticism.

America's Chief Moral Dilemma

Wednesday, May 10, 1967
Atlanta, GA

In this 1967 speech to the Hungry Club, Dr. King addresses America’s chief moral dilemma by focusing on three major evils: racism, poverty, and war.

Letter from Mary Mikutel to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Young Mary Mikutel offers her condolences to Mrs. King in the wake of Dr. King's assassination.

Invitation from the Ambassador of Ethiopia to MLK

ETHIOPIA

The Ambassador of Ethiopia extends an invitation for Dr. King to attend a reception honoring Haile Selassie I, the Emperor of Ethiopia.

Letter from Mr. Levison Regarding U.S. Congressman Adam Clayton Powell, Jr.

Monday, September 19, 1966

Mr. Levison expresses his support for Representative Powell during the controversial House of Representatives committee chairmanship and ethical dilemma. Levison goes on to defend the suggestion of race being the determining factor of his criticism by volunteering his support of any review of congressional systems.

I Sat Where They Sat Sermon Outline

This sermon draft of Dr. King's was never delivered, but focuses on the Christian themes of empathy and understanding. Dr. King claims that "if the white man was closer to the Negro he would... ...understand them" better.