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The Southern Patriot: Today's Hero The Negro Child

This column highlights the brave children who endured the hardships of hostile mobs as they blazed the trail for school integration.

The Danger of A Little Progress

Monday, February 3, 1964

This focuses on the issue of short term progress within the Civil Rights Movement because it does not offer long term lasting solutions.

Letter from Charles Merrill to MLK

Thursday, August 3, 1967

Charles Merrill, who was Chairman of the Board of Trustees of Morehouse College, informs Dr. King that he is sending a donation of $5000 to be used for "either peace or civil rights work" and he concludes by offering his view on Dr. King's philosophy.

Letter from Roger Dunloff, Jr. to MLK

Wednesday, September 5, 1962

Due to his inability to contribute financially, Roger G. Dunloff offers his prayers and moral support to Dr. King and the SCLC.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding "Stride Toward Freedom"

Friday, May 15, 1964

In this letter from Joan Daves, Dr. King is informed that Ballantine Books has the pocket rights to "Stride Toward Freedom" but they did not do much with the title. Harper & Brothers then got the rights back.The letter closes by saying that Harper & Brothers would like Dr. King's approval so the deal can be cleared.

Letter from Kivie Kaplan to MLK Regarding His NewBook

Wednesday, February 22, 1967

In this letter, Kaplan requests an autographed copy of Dr. King's new book enclosed with a personal message. Mr. Kaplan also requests that Dr. King autograph the books ordered from Harper & Row, since he gets a discount buying in bulk.

Letter from Thomas H. Rogers to MLK

Saturday, February 11, 1967

On Race Relations Sunday, Thomas H. Rogers writes this letter to express his brotherhood and prayers for Dr. King. Emphasizing that one live a life acceptable to God, Rogers believes that God, not man, makes the only judgement. Though of a different race than Dr. King, Rogers sees Dr. King as his brother in Christ and encourages him to do God's biding.

Letter from Paul D. Metzger to MLK

Tuesday, November 3, 1964

Paul D. Metzger, President of the Student Association at Central High School, writes Dr. King inviting him to speak at a forum concerning the issues of civil rights in America. Dr. King's response to this invitation is enclosed at the culmination of the letter.

Letter from William A. Geoghegan to MLK

Wednesday, March 10, 1965

William A. Geoghegan, US Department of Justice Assistant Deputy Attorney General, writes Dr. King acknowledging his previous telegram recommending L. N. D. Wells, Jr. to the U. S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit.

Letter from Walter P. Reuther to MLK

Monday, October 26, 1964

Walter P. Reuther extends an invitation to Dr. King to serve as a member of the Executive Committee for the Citizens Crusade Against Poverty.

MLK Flyer: "Integrated Bus Suggestions"

Wednesday, December 19, 1956

In this document, Dr. King and the Reverend W.J. Powell list under "The Montgomery Improvement Association" guidelines to mitigate potential conflicts in the transition to integrated buses. The principle of nonviolence is present throughout the document.

Marx

Dr. King references German philosopher Karl Marx regarding his teachings. King states, "Marx teaching resolves into three principal elements: a philosophy of history, and economic theory, and a practical program for the realization of a new social order."

Immortality

Dr. King quotes Alfred Tennyson on the topic of immortality.

Who is Truly Great

Dr. King addresses the subject of individual greatness within society and how to truly go about achieving such a status. He begins by dispelling common signifiers of greatness before indicating that greatness can only be substantively measured through the ability to put others before self. Dr. King cites the life of Jesus Christ as an example of humility culminating into greatness.

Interruptions: Man from Porlock

Sunday, January 21, 1968

Dr. King delivered this sermon, "Interruptions," on January 21, 1968 at Ebenezer Baptist Church. He describes how no one lives a life free of interruptions, and that the major problem of life is learning how to handle them.

Letter from Marcel Bernfeld to MLK

Tuesday, June 16, 1964

Mr. Bernfeld writes Dr. King, letting him know that he published some of his work. He also asks Dr. King's permission to publish the "Letter from Birmingham Jail," in its entirety, with an introduction and notes. He encloses copies of his own speech for Dr. King's reading pleasure and expresses his well-wishes in closing.

To Fulfill These Rights

Friday, June 1, 2012

The White House Conference on Civil Rights printed this program in preparation for their June 1966 conference. The theme of this agenda is entitled To Fulfill These Rights.

Letter from MLK to W. D. Mason

Tuesday, January 16, 1962

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak in support of the Mercer County Branch of the NAACP in Farrell, Pennsylvania. He expresses his appreciation for the invitation but explains that he has accepted his maximum number of speaking engagements for the spring.

Article Concerning Race Relation in Mississippi

Monday, March 23, 1964

In this article the author, Scott B. Smith, highlights two Civil Rights Workers who were recently released from prison in Madison county, Mississippi. Mr. Smith discusses the role of race in legal procedures and the community.

Letter from MLK to John Frink

Friday, January 5, 1968

In this letter, dated January 5, 1968, Dr. King writes to John A. Frink expressing his gratitude for his contribution to the S.C.L.C.

Letter from Matilda Ressy to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Matilda Ressy sends her condolences to Mrs. King following Dr. King's death.

Sin

In this set of notecards, Dr. King discusses "sin." Referencing Biblical verses of Psalms 53:2 and 53:3, he says that "these passages seem to be an explicit affirmation of the universality of sin."

Letter from Joseph P. Robinson to MLK

Friday, July 28, 1967

Reverend Joseph P. Robinson invites Dr. King to contribute to Robinson's book of sermons titled, "Pulpit Evangelism."

Letter from Betty Morton to MLK

Sunday, October 8, 1967

Betty Morton of Selma, Alabama writes to solicit help from Dr. King. She also informs him of her hardships with school and her family.

Letter from MLK to Gerald A. Feffer

Wednesday, October 23, 1963

Dr. King informs Gerald A. Feffer that he is unable to accept the invitation to speak at Lehigh University. King states, "I can think of nothing that I enjoy more than discussing some of the vital issues of the day with college and university students."

Permission Form from Friendship House to MLK for Signature

Sunday, December 11, 1966

This document, from James G. Duignan of Friendship House, is sent to Dr. King for his signature, granting permission to reproduce, distribute and or sell recorded copies of two speeches.

A Decade of SCLC

In this 10th Anniversary Journal for the SCLC, there are several topics covered to highlight the ten years of activity of the organization. Beginning with a story of the Civil Rights Movement's beginning, featuring Rosa Parks, to an article entitled "Where Do We Go From Here?"; this booklet summarizes many of the efforts made during the ten year existence of the SCLC.

MLK's Handwritten Note Card

On this note card, Dr. King contemplated the definition of "religion". This is an example of the many note cards that reflected Dr. King's research and consequently, influenced his writings.

Letter to MLK

Tuesday, October 4, 1966

Here Mrs. L. Schmidt, acting through the office of Joan Daves, requests that Dr. King write an inscription in his book "Why We Can't Wait" for her son, Joachim.

Letter to Franklin D. Roosevelt Regarding Discrimination In Employment

In this letter, Fred Poellnitz writes Franklin D. Roosevelt regarding his inability to obtain a job with the U.S. government. He claims that it is due to discrimination in employment.