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Letter from Joan Daves to Dr. V. E. Moray

Friday, April 14, 1967
INDIA, London, England

Joan Daves gives Dr. Moray permission to publish a Marathi edition of "Why We Can't Wait."

Montesquieu

Dr. King cites the political philosopher Montesquieu on his ideology of the weakness of laws. He further details the comparison of coexistence and consecutive social status. Dr. King concludes with the elaboration of Montesquieu's use of facts.

Origen

Dr. King records biographical information about Origen.

Letter from Ohio University at Portsmouth to MLK Regarding Choice '68

Tuesday, April 2, 1968
Ohio (OH)

The Public Affairs Forum of Ohio University at Portsmouth requests material from Dr. King for the university's participation in Time magazine's "Choice '68," a nationwide mock presidential election.

Letter from Dora McDonald and MLK to the United Federation of Teachers

Thursday, November 10, 1966
New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King congrats the United Federation of Teachers AFL- CIO on their Fifteenth Anniversary of serving school children.

Chicago Freedom Movement Tent-In

Thursday, June 22, 1967
Illinois (IL)

This flyer outlines the platform for the Chicago Freedom Movement's Tent-In. This organization, based out of Warrenville, Illinois, sought for equality in housing and was an initiative of the SCLC and Al Raby's Council of Federated Organizations.

"Negro Leader Looks Down Road Ahead"

Sunday, June 25, 1967
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY)

The Augusta Chronicle wrote this extensive review on Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" In this document, the review places special emphasis on Dr. King's views on the War on Poverty, the Black Power Movement and the state of the Civil Rights Movement.

Statement by MLK Regarding All-White Jury Trials

Friday, December 3, 1965
Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Florida (FL)

Dr. King approves of recent court cases where all-white juries convicted all-white defendants in murder and conspiracy cases. He calls these cases "rays of light and hope," but claims that federal legislation is needed to ensure that discriminatory practices are not involved in impaneling juries.

Enclosure to MLK - A Call for a National Fast by CALCAV

This is an enclosure that accompanied a letter dated March 22, 1968 from John C. Bennett to Dr. King. Dr. King spoke often of the need of fasting to repent for the sin of Vietnam, and was closely associated with the Clergy and Laymen Concerned about Vietnam (CALCAV). Between the writing of this letter and the event itself, Dr. King would be assassinated.

Letter from Claudia Grams to MLK

Friday, November 15, 1963
Wisconsin (WI)

Claudia Grams, a junior at Central High School in La Crosse, Wisconsin, has chosen Dr. King for her junior exposition project and writes him requesting information on his earlier life. She expresses how Dr. King's book, "Stride Toward Freedom," has inspired her and she inquires about how her organization can support his movement.

Letter from William M. Gray to Ralph Abernathy

Monday, April 8, 1968
Brooklyn, NY, New York (NY)

William Gray offers his prayers and support as Rev. Abernathy takes over command of the SCLC following Dr. King's death.

Letter from Mrs. Zabelle Tourian to MLK

Wednesday, April 19, 1967
New Jersey (NJ), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Florida (FL)

Zabelle Tourian expresses her support for Dr. King, relaying several short statements regarding famous African American persons of recent history.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mrs. Uvee Mdonana-Arbouin

Thursday, August 15, 1963
New York (NY)

On behalf of Dr. King, Dora McDonald expresses appreciation for the poem of Mrs. Uvee Mdonana-Arbouin of the Progressive National Baptist Convention in New York. She encloses fifty copies of one of Dr. King's letters as Mrs. Mdonana-Arbouin requested.

Telegram from President John F. Kennedy to MLK

Wednesday, June 12, 1963
Washington, D.C.

President John F. Kennedy invites Dr. King to a meeting of religious leaders to discuss the nation's civil rights problem.

Letter from Ronald F. Jockers and Ronald Schlossman to MLK

Tuesday, March 19, 1968
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

Ronald Jockers and Ronald Schlossman write Dr. King inviting him to participate in the National Collegiate Presidential Primary Choice of 1968.

Letter from MLK to Rev. W.C. Dobbins

Monday, October 21, 1963
Florida (FL), Birmingham, AL

Dr. King informs Rev. Dobbins that he is unable to meet with him in the next few months, but possibly will be able to in the coming spring.

Letter from Linda Robinson to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965
Berkeley, CA, California (CA)

Linda Robinson, a sixth grade student at Lincoln School in California, writes Dr. King expressing her admiration towards him for his work with the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Thomas Maloney to Dora McDonald

Saturday, May 22, 1965
ITALY

Rev. Maloney thanks Miss McDonald for her assistance and the materials that she sent.

Letter from Mildred Lynch to MLK

Saturday, November 25, 1967
CANADA, SOUTH AFRICA, Atlanta, GA

Secretary of the Canadian Anti-Apartheid Committee Mrs. Mildred Lynch inquires about Dr. King's availability to join group members for an upcoming 1968 public meeting to be held in Toronto.

Nobel Peace Prize Acceptance Speech Draft

Thursday, December 10, 1964
Philadelphia, MS, Montgomery, AL, Oslo, Norway, Mississippi (MS), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Alabama (AL)

In 1964, Dr. King became the first African-American to receive the Nobel Peace Prize. At age 35, he was also the youngest recipient of the award to date. Emphasizing a philosophy of nonviolence, Dr. King writes this acceptance speech commemorating the courageous work of the Civil Rights Movement. He highlights the brutality faced throughout the United States and addresses the irony of accepting a peace prize on behalf of a movement that has yet to obtain peace.

Telegram from Franklin D. Roosevelt, Jr. to MLK

Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Franklin Delano Roosevelt Jr. requests the presence of Dr. King to serve on a panel discussing Title VII and Equal Employment. The Department of Labor event also included civil rights lumaniaries such as A. Philip Randolph, Roy Wilkins, James Farmer and Whitney Young. Roosevelt, fifth child of the late president Franklin Delano Roosevelt, served as the Chairman of the United States Equal Employment Opportunity Commission from May 26, 1965 to May 11, 1966.

Letter from Mrs. W. Brown to MLK

Mrs. W. Brown proclaims that Dr. King should preach a colorblind love that is absent of hate and resentment toward white people. She further asserts that the contributions Dr. King received could have been used to improve substandard housing. Mrs. Brown continues to discuss her perception of the inadequacies within the black community in comparison to white people.

Black Americans Take the Lead in War Protest

New York (NY), New York, NY, VIETNAM, CHINA

In this press release, the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam has mustered a significant following of supporters who are in staunch opposition to United States involvement in Vietnam. Black community leaders such as Stokley Carmichael, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and Rev. James Bevel reflect the growing discontent of blacks who "view this war as a war against a colored people" merely serving the economic interests of America.

Letter from MLK to Robert L. Shirley

Tuesday, December 13, 1966
North Carolina (NC)

Dr. King writes to Robert Shirley to inform him that, if necessary, he will send a member of the SCLC to serve in the interm for Golden Frinks who has been reassigned to another location.

Why We Can't Wait Title

New York, NY

This document is a portion of a newspaper that contains the title "Why We Cant Wait" by Martin Luther King Jr.

Letter from John W. Wydler to MLK

Tuesday, January 5, 1965
Mississippi (MS), New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

Congressman Wydler of New York responds to Dr. King's letter on the seating of the Mississippi delegation to Congress. Dr. King's letter, sent to several government officials prior to the vote, urges House Representatives to vote against the seating of the current delegation.

Revelation

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr's "The Nature and Destiny of Man."

Letter to the Editor regarding Harris Wofford

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, INDIA

This letter to the editor comes to the defense of Harris Wofford, civil rights advisor to President Kennedy, who was inaccurately described in print.

Statement of Mrs. Ruthie Lee Watts Regarding Death Plot on Dr. King

Selma, AL

Mrs. Watts submits a statement regarding a plot to assassinate Dr. King. She informs the FBI that a man named Jim Clark planned to kill Dr. King.

MLK Index Card

New York (NY)

Dr. King highlights James Breasted's views on Man, according to the book, "The Dawn of Conscience."