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Letter from Sevy Powell to MLK

Wednesday, March 27, 1968

evy Powell expresses her view that President Johnson has done more for Negroes than President Kennedy did and Robert Kennedy or Sen. Eugene McCarthy can do because of his ability to influence Congress.

Statement Before the National Democratic Platform and Resolutions Committee

Saturday, August 11, 1956

Dr. King addresses the National Democratic Platform and Resolutions Committee. He calls for strong federal action in the South to prevent violence and to uphold the decisions of the Supreme Court pertaining to the end of segregation.

Telegram from MLK to Robert Kennedy

Dr. King alerts Attorney General Robert Kennedy of the brutal treatment against Negroes attempting register to vote in Greenville, Mississippi. He asks Kennedy to intervene in an effort to protect the lives of those individuals working for the right to vote.

Telegram from Elizabeth J. Miller to MLK

Thursday, November 2, 1967

Elizabeth Miller, the Executive Director of the Christian Social Concern division of the American Baptist Convention, extends support to Dr. King while he is in the Jefferson County Jail in 1967. She expresses gratitude for Dr. King's leadership and commends him for his non-violent action.

Telegram to Charles Wherry from Frances Lucas

Saturday, November 23, 1968

Frances Lucas writes to Mr. Wherry in Mrs. King's stead thanking him for his kindness and congratulating him on a film project. He also conveys appreciation from Mrs. King for the memorial of her husband at California State College.

Letter from Peter A. Minthom to Ralph D. Abernathy

Monday, April 29, 1968

Peter Minthom, an American Indian from Oregon, requests assistance in traveling to Washington D.C. for the Poor People’s March.

Telegram from Andrew Young to Moreland Griffith Smith

Thursday, February 25, 1965

Andrew Young informs Moreland Griffith Smith Sr. that he will be unable to attend a meeting in Montgomery, Alabama. Reverend James Bevel will attend the meeting instead.

Letter from August Schou to MLK

Thursday, October 22, 1964

August Schou, the Director of the Nobel Committee, sends Dr. King more information regarding the 1964 Peace Prize Award Ceremony. Logistics such as the time, location and instructions for his speech are described in this letter.

Draft Position Paper on Economic and Fiscal Policy

Saturday, April 1, 1967

The basis of this draft paper is about the proposed elimination of poverty in the United States within a ten-year span. A plan called the "Freedom Budget" has been endorsed by the A. Philip Randolph Institute. The premise of this paper is to "carry forward these developments in the economic and fiscal area, setting forth suggested policies which might be supported by all individuals and groups associated" with the goal of eradicating poverty in the United States.

Forgiveness and Repentance

Dr. King reviews a passage from the Book of Ezekiel regarding forgiveness and repentance. Summarizing the verse, he states that repentance involves an "actual change of attitude" and forgiveness includes forgetting past mistakes.

Letter from James Dombrowski to Mrs. King

Thursday, October 1, 1959

In this letter, James Dombrowski of the Southern Conference Educational Fund requests financial contributions from Mrs. Coretta S. King for a proposed publication to be entitled "The Color Line in Voting." The initial prototype publication would include the stories of Gus Courts and George W. Lee, who were assassinated, after refusing to remove their names from a voter registration list in Humphreys County, Mississippi.

Article Concerning Race Relation in Mississippi

Monday, March 23, 1964

In this article the author, Scott B. Smith, highlights two Civil Rights Workers who were recently released from prison in Madison county, Mississippi. Mr. Smith discusses the role of race in legal procedures and the community.

Letter from Huub Coppens to Dora McDonald

Friday, October 2, 1964

Huub Coppens, Secretary of "The Tribune" in the Netherlands, writes Dora McDonald in hopes of Dr. King accepting their invitation to visit their homeland in the near future.

Address to Members of the Hungry Club

Wednesday, December 15, 1965

Dr. King discusses the Negro's dilemma in an address to the members of the Hungry Club in Atlanta, Georgia. He argues that some of the challenges facing the Negro are: taking advantage of all the new federal programs, encouraging youth to go into higher education, and developing massive action programs to rid unjust systems. Dr. King also states three myths the Negro should explore: the myth of time, the myth of "exaggerated progress," and the myth of "total reliance on the boothstrap philosophy."

Telegram from MLK to Hugh Shearer

Dr. King sends a congratulatory telegram to Mr. Shearer for his elevation to Prime Minister of Jamaica.

Letter from Rabbi Israel Miller to MLK

Friday, November 11, 1966

On the eighteenth anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, Rabbi Israel Miller, Chairman of the American Jewish Conference on Soviet Jewry, invites Dr. King to speak over a national telephone hook-up.

Letter from MLK to Artist Committee for SCLC

Friday, May 5, 1967

This letter expresses Dr. King's regards and deep appreciation to the Artist Committee for their generous contribution. He communicates gratitude on behalf of so many who benefit from the work made possible from their support. Additionally, Dr. King communicates the continued strength and effectiveness of the SCLC in promoting negro-white unity, non-violence, justice and equality.

Telegram from MLK to H. Rap Brown

Tuesday, January 9, 1968

In this telegram, Dr. King tells H. Rap Brown that he will undertake all measures to stop Brown being denied free movement and basic constitutional rights.

Letter from Frank Jones to MLK

Tuesday, August 14, 1962

Reverend Frank Jones sends Dr. King a letter expressing his concern about the recent occurrences in Albany, Georgia.

Letter from Gardner Taylor to MLK

Thursday, September 30, 1965

Rev. Gardner C. Taylor sends a financial contribution to the SCLC on behalf of the Progressive National Baptist Convention.

Letter of Appreciation to MLK from Mrs. A.M.Digilio

Friday, July 30, 1965

In this letter, Mrs. A.M. Digilio writes to Dr. King. Along with her expressions of appreciation, she admits to being one of the millions of whites who have "prayerfully" followed Dr. King's work. Mrs. Digilio states that Dr. King has been a voice to those of the "inarticulate working class", both white and black. She speaks of the unfortunate decline of morality amongst Americans and the necessary Christian might to rectify it. Mrs. Digilio further compares Dr.

Letter from Mrs. Elsie Walker to the SCLF

Monday, April 15, 1968

In this letter, Mrs. Elsie Walker mentions the enclosure of $50 given in memory of Dr. King. She also commits her Church's Service Guild to making annual pilgrimages to Dr. King's burial site in order to pay homage to "our Leader."

Letter from Debby Hopper to MLK

Sunday, May 26, 1963

Debby Hopper, a 17-year-old from the Boston area, writes Dr. King to discuss prejudice in America and relates what she believes to be the hypocrisy of whites in her community. She also offers Dr. King words of encouragement in his fight for civil rights.

Letter to MLK from The Adult Education Council of Greater Chicago

Thursday, March 31, 1966

Emma Kramer, the Secretary of the Speakers Bureau, writes to Dr. King to negotiate the details of his presentation at the University of Illinois.

Inter-Faith Mass Meeting

Sunday, June 11, 1967

This program is for an Inter-Faith Mass Meeting that was co-sponsored by Mt. Zion Baptist Church and Zion Baptist Church. The meeting took place on June 11, 1967 and features Dr. King as the speaker.

Advertisement for "Why We Can't Wait"

Monday, May 25, 1964

Under the Additional Listings section of this magazine is a review about Dr. King's "Why We Can't Wait."

The Cultural Crisis

Dr. King quotes Edward Hallett Carr's "Conditions of Peace."

Letter from MLK to J. S. Beckington

Wednesday, June 15, 1966

Dr. King thanks Mr. J. S. Beckington for his contribution to the SCLC. King also expresses how important the loyal supporters are to his organization.

Eartha, Verbal Tempest, Flies to Los Angeles

This article references statements made by entertainer Eartha Kitt during a White House luncheon for women. Kitt expressed her concerns about the impact of the Vietnam War on American families and their sons.

Letter from MLK to Dr. M. R. Cherry

Tuesday, September 27, 1966

Dr. King informs Dr. M. R. Cherry that he will be unable to accept his invitation to speak at Acadia University in Nova Scotia. King states that his schedule is busy as he is trying to spread social justice in America.