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Letter from Dorothy Height to Dr. and Mrs. King

Thursday, December 8, 1966

Noted civil rights leader and women's activist Dorothy Height invites Dr. and Mrs. King to be special guests at the National Council of Negro Women's Life Membership Dinner. The event is also set to honor union leaders A. Philip Randolph, Walter Reuther and Mrs. Arthur Goldberg. Singer Lena Horne serves as a co-host to the dinner.

Letter from Julian Bond to Voters

Georgia State Representative Julian Bond requests support for his Georgia House of Representatives re-election bid. Mr. Bond elaborates on planks in his campaign platform concerning education, housing, and employment. Bond was also a long time civil rights activist who helped found the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Sandra Durlauf

Thursday, October 29, 1964

Dora McDonald encloses Dr. King's biographical information to help aid Sandra Durlauf in her studies. She also refers Mrs. Durlauf to read Dr. King's books "Stride Toward Freedom," "Crusader Without Violence," and "Strength to Love."

Newspaper Article "Negro Nation Ratified"

This article discusses a group of black nationalists who ratified a declaration of independence for a separate Negro nation. The new nation was named the "Republic of New Africa."

Homoionsios

Dr. King gives a definition of the Greek term "homoionsios."

Letter from Toni Harris to Mrs. King 4/5/68

Friday, April 5, 1968

Young Toni Harris, a student in NYC, wrote this letter to Mrs. King sharing her hope that Dr. King's killer would be caught. This letter is an example of the many levels of support shown towards the King family, from schoolchildren who loved Dr. King.

Man

Dr. King quotes Psalms 144:4 and comments briefly on this biblical passage.

Letter from Unknown to MLK

This letter from an unknown author advises Dr. King to conduct the largest voter registration drive in an effort to elimate poverty. According to the author, "Politicians understand the ballot."

Royalty Statement from Joan Daves to Dr. King

This royalty statement for the period of January 1, 1964 to December 31, 1964 is for the Dutch-language edition of "Strength to Love," published by Van Loghum Slaterus.

Letter from Rev. E. C. Smith to MLK

Monday, November 26, 1962

Rev. Smith informs Dr. King that the Testimonial Committee has made the assumption that Dr. King is unable to accept their previous invitation, so they have made other arrangements.

Schleiermacher (Religion & Ethics)

Dr. King quotes and writes about Friedrich Schleiermacher’s view in “Speeches on Religion” that criticizing a man’s actions is not criticizing his religion because he does not act from his religion. The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”

Letter from Henry Gonzalez to MLK

Tuesday, June 28, 1966

Representative Henry Gonzalez, a democratic politician representing Texas, responds to a request letter for donations from the SCLC. While he encloses a check, he criticizes the fact that the NAACP was excluded from the Mississippi March.

Letter from Mae Martin to MLK

Thursday, August 3, 1967

Mae Martin of Little Rock, Arkansas, writes to Dr. King in response to one of his public statements. She speaks about race relations in her city and points out that there is good and bad within both the white and black communities.

Letter from Tim Bowden to MLK

Tuesday, January 16, 1968

Tim Bowden requests an interview with Dr. King for the Australian Broadcasting Commission.

Adverse Letter from an Anonymous Sender

An unknown sender states their concerns about the direction Dr. King is leading the movement.

Descartes

Dr. King quotes Rene Descartes' discovery of his famous principle. The idea, "I think, therefore I am," Descartes says, is essential, irrefutable and fitting to be the first principle of his philosophy.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Geiser

Dr. King offers praise and support to Mrs. Geiser for her efforts to teach her children tolerance in the face of bigotry and racial hatred.

Letter from Horace Sheffield to MLK

Saturday, September 23, 1961

Mr. Sheffield sends Dr. King a press release that discusses a Trade Union Leadership Council telegram to Dr. J.H. Jackson in response to his remarks regarding Dr. King and the Freedom Movement.

Outline on Aristotle

In this outline, Dr. King documents elements of Aristotelian philosophy which deal with ethics and metaphysics. The outline includes a brief biography which chronicles Aristotle's life and a reference to his well known work "Nicomachean Ethics."

Letter from the American Embassy in New Delhi, India to MLK

Friday, September 24, 1965

The Embassy of the United States invites Dr. King to come and visit India for at least a month. He can lecture in his special areas of interests. The embassy states that the best time to come is between November and April.

Telegram from A. Philip Randolph to MLK

Friday, October 14, 1966

A. Philip Randolph expresses his discontent with the release of a manifesto from civil rights leaders without Dr. King's signature.

Letter from Elder A. S. Grant to MLK

Monday, November 1, 1965

Elder A.S. Grant, a member of The West Indies Laymen National Christian League Church and State, writes a letter to Dr. King. Grant states the need for solidarity among global Black leaders, both church and state. He requests monetary donations that would go towards a headquarters for his organization.

Letter from Samuel Abbott to MLK

Wednesday, December 4, 1963

Samuel Abbott asks Dr. King for a personal favor in writing the preface for his recent publication.

Letter from Helen G. Frumin to Coretta Scott King

Monday, December 5, 1966

Mrs. Frumin writes Mrs. King to request sponsorship for the Committee of Responsibility. She includes a list of others who have agreed to sponsor the organization among which is Dr. Benjamin Spock, affluent pediatrician and anti-war activist, and other prestigious figures.

A Knock at Midnight

Dr. King wrote this sermon for the Youth Sunday Services of the Women's Convention Auxiliary National Baptist Convention in Chicago on September 14, 1958. The sermon builds off of a biblical passage from Luke in which a friend visits a neighbor at midnight for three loaves of bread. Correlating the story to the modern world, Dr.

Letter to Dorothy Height from Dora McDonald

Thursday, January 5, 1967

Dora McDonald apologizes to Dorothy Height, President of the National Council of Negro Women, for not responding sooner to let her know that Dr. and Mrs. King would be unable to attend the Premier Life Membership Dinner. The invitation to the dinner came during Dr. King's sabbatical to write a new book.

Letter from Augusta Hill to MLK

Sunday, October 10, 1965

Augusta Hill, president of the newly formed Negro American Labor Council, requests that Dr. King visit Racine, Wisconsin in an effort to help address the employment discrimination occurring there.

Letter from MLK to Blaine Marrin

Wednesday, April 14, 1965

Dr. King thanks Blaine Marrin and the local 157 UAW members for their financial contribution to the SCLC. He explains the current efforts of the organization and the relationship between the labor and civil rights movements. He also discusses the financial needs of the SCLC and the importance of contributions.

What Moderation Means

Saturday, August 14, 1965

Dr. King explores the meaning of the word moderation, and shares his thoughts on its position in relation to nonviolence.

Letter from Elisabeth Leonard to MLK

Monday, April 3, 1967

Elisabeth Leonard expresses her support and gratitude for Dr. King's work, which includes his speeches about the Vietnam War as well as an upcoming speech on the Spring Mobilization.