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Race Role Urged For Girl Scouts

Saturday, February 3, 1962
Los Angeles, CA, Illinois (IL), Georgia (GA)

De. Harold Taylor, former president of Sarah Lawrence College, challenges the Girl Scouts of America to play a greater role in fighting racism in the South. He also suggest that the Girl Scouts work with the Peace Corps to help spread their teachings internationally.

Letter from Byron F. Mische to the Members of Congress Regarding Vietnam

Monday, March 20, 1967
Washington, D.C.

In this letter to the members of Congress, Byron E. Mische took the initiative to combine letters sent to government officials, editors of publications and congressmen regarding Vietnam. This letter was copied to Dr. King.

Leaders' Itinerary for August 28 March

Wednesday, August 28, 1963
Washington, D.C.

This document contains a detailed leaders' itinerary for the March on Washington for Freedom and Jobs. Throughout the day leaders will meet with government officials, including, the Speaker of the United States House of Representatives John McCormack and President John F. Kennedy.

Letter from Audrey Mingo to MLK

Tuesday, May 16, 1967
ISRAEL, New Jersey (NJ)

Mrs. Mingo asks for detailed information regarding Dr. King's trips to the Holy Land and Africa.

Schleiermacher, Friedrich

Dr. King outlines the life and ideologies of Friedrich Schleiermacher.

Letter from MLK to Reverend Robert Jacoby

Thursday, July 25, 1963
New Jersey (NJ)

Dr. King expresses his gratitude to Reverend Robert Jacoby for his kind letter concerning his use of the Letter From the Birmingham Jail.

Letter from James Gustafson to MLK

Thursday, April 27, 1967
Minnesota (MN), VIETNAM, New York (NY), Washington, D.C.

James Gustafson, President of 'O KAIROS, writes to Dr. King welcoming him to the University of Minnesota's St. Paul campus. 'O KAIROS is the campus Lutheran community of worship.

150 Religious Leaders March on OEO

Friday, October 14, 1966
Mississippi (MS)

This press release addresses Sargent Shrivers' decision not to refund the Child Development Group of Mississippi and to express concerns regarding the National War on Poverty.

Boston Sunday Herald: Martin King Discusses. . .

Sunday, May 7, 1967
VIETNAM, Boston, MA, Chicago, IL, New Jersey (NJ), Cleveland, OH, Louisville, KY, New York, NY

In Boston Sunday Herald article, Dr. King shares his views on mayoral candidate Mrs. Louise Day Hicks, Senator Edward Brooke, and the President's stance on the Vietnam War. Dr. King is adamant enough on the latter issue that he remarks he may change his policy regarding neutrality in elections.

Letter from Irving Frank to MLK

New York (NY)

Irving Frank urges Dr. King to continue speaking out against the Vietnam War. Frank also encloses a check in support of Dr. King.

Walter Reuther Remarks at the March on Washington

Wednesday, August 28, 1963
Washington, D.C.

Walter P. Reuther, President of the International Union, UAW, expounds upon the cause of freedom and democracy in America from the perception of the external world. Reuther highlights the rights guaranteed by the United States Constitution and how they have been denied to African Americas living as "second-class" citizens. He further discusses the necessary duties of the United States Congress to recognize and initiate civil rights programs.

"How To Make History"

Georgia (GA)

Mr. Eisenman acknowledges the irony of how America, which was created after a war of liberation, has now gone against everything it was founded upon.

Letter from G. Campbell-Westlind to MLK

Wednesday, July 21, 1965
SWEDEN, Atlanta, GA, Stockholm, Sweden, New York (NY)

G. Campbell-Westlind, Acting Consul General of the Royal Consulate General of Sweden, informs Dr. King that Simon & Schuster has asked the Nobel Foundation in Stockholm for permission to print his Nobel Award Acceptance Speech. The letter requests Dr. King's comments on the proposal.

Barth

Dr. King writes about Karl Barth's theology regarding revelation.

Nietzsche

Dr. King quotes German philosopher Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche.

Why We Can't Wait Book Review

Monday, June 22, 1964
Birmingham, AL, Montgomery, AL

This article highlights Dr. King's books "Why We Can't Wait" and "Stride Toward Freedom."

Telegram from Lawrence MacGregor to MLK

Wednesday, November 15, 1967

In this telegram, Lawrence J. MacGregor informs Dr. King that there will no longer be a memorial service for Rufus E. Clement.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Robinson to Rev. Abernathy

Thursday, April 25, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Michigan (MI)

Mr. and Mrs. Robinson send a sermon to Reverend Abernathy and his followers hoping to encourage them on their difficult days ahead.

Letter From Roberta S. Felton to Miss Dora McDonald

Thursday, March 1, 1962
Milwaukee, WI, Atlanta, GA

Roberta S. Felton writes to Dora McDonald in recognition and thanks for the letter she received.

Letter from Robert R. Janks to MLK

Monday, October 14, 1963
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, New York (NY), GERMANY, Washington, D.C.

Robert R. Janks writes Dr. King admiring his leadership during the fight for equality. Janks also recommends two additional quotes that Dr. King should use in his future speeches.

Letter from Evert Svensson to MLK

Wednesday, June 7, 1967
Stockholm, Sweden, VIETNAM, Atlanta, GA

Evert Svensson invites Dr. King to speak before the Christian Social Democrats Movement in Gotesborg, Sweden.

Telegram from Eddie S. Carter to MLK

Wednesday, November 1, 1967
Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Mr. Carter expresses his appreciation to Dr. King and the SCLC. He also informs Dr. King that he has recently made a contribution the organization and shall continuously do so.

Letter From Martin Peretz to MLK

Tuesday, November 8, 1966
Massachusetts (MA)

Martin Peretz asks Dr. King for an autograph while commending his courage in the struggle for justice and peace.

Statement by MLK on Segregation

Thursday, July 11, 1963
North Carolina (NC), Birmingham, AL

In this statement from Dr. King on segregation, he argues that it is "nothing but a new form of slavery."

Letter from Harl Douglass to MLK and the SCLC

Wednesday, March 9, 1966
Colorado (CO), Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

Harl Douglass writes in disgust at the position Dr. King has taken on Vietnam War. As a once full supporter of the civil rights movement, he believes that Dr. King "is somewhat unstable and he has made millions of enemies for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference....." Douglass warns Dr. King and SCLC officials that if they continue to go down the same track they will lose support of white moderates.

Introduction of MLK

Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL

These notes are from an introduction written about Dr. King and presumably delivered before he gave an address. Dr. King, who remains unnamed, is presented as a man whose record precedes him given that his life and work has had so profound an impact upon his time.

Mass Mailing from the Model Inner city Community Organization

Thursday, February 23, 1967
Washington, D.C.

This is a form letter from the Reverend Walter E. Fauntroy informing the Shaw neighborhood of Washington, D.C. about Dr. King's visit to help revitalize the area.

Letter from Alfred Duckett to MLK about Request

Monday, October 26, 1964
New York, NY

Alfred Duckett writes this letter to Dr. King in order to remind Dr. King of his desire to have a magazine article or television special done on him and stresses the need to present Dr. King's role "not only as a civil rights leader, but also as a father, pastor, husband, and administrator of a steadily-growing national organization." Mr. Duckett also presents the terms of a proposed publishing contract, should he wish to become a part of the project.

Sin (Isaiah)

Dr. King highlights the topic of sin, according to the Book of Isaiah.

Reverend Ralph D. Abernathy's Statement Following MLK's Assasination

Sunday, April 7, 1968
Memphis, TN, Washington, D.C., Tennessee (TN)

Rev. Abernathy acknowledges the deep pain and anger those in SCLC feel at the senseless taking of Dr. King’s life. They pledge that his work and commitment to nonviolence will continue. They are as much against violence, says Abernathy, as they are against racial and economic injustice. He announces that Mrs. King will join him in leading a march in Memphis in support of the sanitation workers and that the Poor People’s Campaign will proceed. He calls upon Congress to respond to the major loss represented by Dr.