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Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Harris to MLK

Monday, March 25, 1968

Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Harris write Dr. King expressing their appreciation for his role as a Civil Rights leader. They were moved to write to him after hearing him speak at the Masonic Temple in Memphis, Tennessee and request to meet with him the next time he visits.

Anonymous Postcard to MLK

This postcard refers to 5 men arrested for exhibiting "black power."

Ritschl, Albrecht

Dr. King provides a biographical sketch of German theologian Albrecht Ritschl.

Memo from Dora McDonald to MLK

Wednesday, December 6, 1967

Dora McDonald sends Dr. King a list of the letters, telephone calls and voice mails he received while out of the office. She also sent him information on public speaking arrangements and the publishing of books along with the royalties Dr. King would receive.

Letter from Joan Daves to Philip Hanson

Friday, December 11, 1964

Here Joan Daves gives permission to Mr. Phillip Hanson for the use of words from Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait", requested by Philip Hanson.

Letter from Bea Lazar to Dora McDonald

Friday, December 22, 1961

Bea Lazar thanks Miss McDonald for sending a copy of a recent speech given by Dr. King. She praises the speech as a lesson that Americans "sorely need." She also encloses a contribution to the SCLC as a Christmas present.

Letter from Matthew Killian to MLK

Tuesday, February 6, 1968

Matthew Killian shares his outrage with the unjustified suffering that violence creates. Mr. Killian continues by providing support to Dr. King in an interpretation of a scripture concerning Peter and the woman at the foot of the cross. In closing, Killian wishes blessings upon the Reverend for his efforts to complete his work.

Adverse Letter to MLK

In this letter, opposition is asserted as the author places into question Dr. King's decency and religion.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Charles E. Boddie

Friday, February 17, 1961

Dora McDonald informs Charles Boddie that Dr. King cannot accept any speaking engagements for his desired date because he has previously committed to having lunch with some students and faculty.

Letter from Rev. Robert Hoggard of Grace Cathedral to Dora McDonald

Thursday, February 18, 1965

Reverend Robert Hoggard, of Grace Cathderal in San Francisco, contacts Dora McDonald with the hope that Dr. King will be able to preach for their congregation on March 28, 1965.

High School Seniors in Chicago Request Conversation with MLK

Friday, January 28, 1966

Edward Foreman, on behalf of the senior class at J.H. Bowen High School in Chicago, Illinois, invites Dr. King to lead a discussion regarding the issues that brought about Dr. King's adventure to Chicago.

List of SCLC Board Members

This document is a list of all board members of the SCLC.

MLK Addresses the National Association of Radio Announcers

Friday, August 11, 1967

After returning from a Real Estate Brokers convention in San Francisco, Dr. King addresses the body of the National Association of Radio Announcers during their annual convention. The Reverend expresses appreciation for the influence radio has had in an unrepresented community of uneducated listeners who may otherwise be denied information and economic opportunity.

Letter from Stuart E. Atkinson to the SCLC

Stuart E. Atkinson sends a donation to the SCLC and requests the address to which he should send donated clothing and toys.

Letter from MLK to Otis Warren

Thursday, July 22, 1965

Dr. King acknowledges the contribution made by Otis Warren of Baltimore, Maryland to the SCLC. He highlights new initiatives that the SCLC will undertake to boost Negro political participation in Southern states and a project to tackle the ghettos of Northern cities. Dr. King humbly notes that these projects could not move forward without the generosity of individuals like Warren.

Operation Freedom Helps In Selma

This document provides details about three specific individuals from Selma who were fired from their jobs after their employers learned of their participation in the Civil Rights Movement. Unemployed and on the verge of disaster, Operation Freedom stepped in and provided financial aid to the three individuals, to cover the cost of food, housing, transportation and medical care.

Jesse Jackson and the Civil Rights Movement

This article details Jesse Jackson's involvement with the Civil Rights Movement.

Telegram to MLK from H. Rap Brown

Tuesday, June 13, 1967

Police brutality in the black communities of Prattville, Alabama prompts this request sent to Dr. King, which seeks immediate federal investigation and protection of black prisoners.

Letter from Bayard Rustin to MLK

Monday, May 15, 1967

In this letter, Mr. Rustin requests that Dr. King assents to being a member of the "Institute's Board of Advisory Directors".

Schleiermacher (Where Religion Is to Be Found)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “Speeches on Religion.” The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”"

Telegram from Rev and Mrs A C L Arbouin to MLK

Friday, November 3, 1967

Reverend and Mrs A.C.L Arbouin offer Dr. King spiritual encouragement during his time in Birmingham Jail.

Letter from MLK to Donna Mitchell

Thursday, November 7, 1963

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for a previous letter sent by Donna Mitchell. He shares the gratification of knowing that young people are aware of "the changing world in which we live." King concludes by stating that correspondence from youth is always welcomed.

Letter from Unknown to MLK

This letter from an unknown author advises Dr. King to conduct the largest voter registration drive in an effort to elimate poverty. According to the author, "Politicians understand the ballot."

Press Release - MLK Mass Meeting

Sunday, August 21, 1960

This document is a 1960 press release detailing a voter's rally at the Jefferson County Armory in Kentucky where Dr. King will be the principle speaker.

Letter from Mrs. R.B. Hassell to MLK

Tuesday, April 11, 1967

Writing from Memphis, Tennessee, Mrs. Hassell expresses her love for America and her concern regarding the cruel treatment many have experienced throughout the world. She offers encouragement to Dr. King and other preachers who are advocates for peace.

Gray Power

Tuesday, August 1, 1967

This sketch was originally sent to Dr. King from John McClellan along with a letter that titled the sketch, "Gray Power."

Letter from Carl Shipley to MLK

Friday, July 20, 1962

Carl Shipley, Head of the Republican State Committee for the District of Columbia, thanks Dr. King for his address at the National Press Club. Shipley expresses that despite the reservations of many individuals regarding Dr. King's emphasis on civil disobedience, the overall support of his speech was highly satisfactory.

Letter to Reverend Ralph D. Abernathy

Monday, April 29, 1968

In this letter, the author suggests that the marchers of the Poor Peoples March should make a surprise visit to the estates of Senator Robert and Edward Kennedy during the historic event.

Letter from Ann Pooney to MLK

Ann Pooney expresses her sentiments regarding Dr. King's teachings and the state of African Americans. Pooney feels that most blacks have not proven to be good Christians or citizens of the US.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Gwen B. Geiges about Moral Support

In this letter, Dr. King writes to Mrs. Geiges to thank her for her letter expressing support of his work in the movement.