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Letter from Welton B. Smith to MLK

Wednesday, March 23, 1966

The 376 and 400 National Veterans Association request Dr. King as a speaker for their Sixth National Reunion Convention in an effort to become an active organization in the struggle for equal rights. The convention chairman, Welton M. Smith, informs Dr. King that a $300 donation would be distributed upon the acceptance of this speaking engagement.

Washington State University Students Invite MLK to Speak

Tuesday, December 22, 1964

Timothy D. Bradbury writes Dr. King on behalf of the students of Washington State University inviting him to speak about civil rights on their campus.

Financial Statement Regarding "Stride Toward Freedom"

Sunday, December 31, 1961

In this document, the number of books that were sold during the six month period to December 1961 are shown.

Letter from MLK to C. B. King

Tuesday, October 10, 1967

Dr. King thanks C. B. King for a recent contribution and tells him that the widespread, articulate opposition to the war in Vietnam is unprecedented in American history.

The Boston Sunday Globe: The Road to Loyalty

Sunday, August 28, 1966

Justice Felix Frankfurter is quoted by the Boston Sunday Globe to discuss the lack of liberty in history due to repulsive individuals. The American Civil Liberties Union is accused of being communist as well as Jefferey Gordon, a member of the pro-Peking Progressive Labor Party. The article expounds on various organizations and quotes surrounding their political perspective.

A Memo from the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE)

Thursday, April 6, 1967

This memorandum written by Lincoln Lynch, Associate Director of the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE), outlines proposed travel arrangements, speakers, workshop topics and entertainment for the upcoming National Convention.

Telegram from Andrew Young to Rev. George W. Gunn

Friday, August 6, 1965

Reverend Andrew Young informs Reverend George Gunn of the Presbyterian University Center that he will not be in attendance at the Campus Ministry Association meeting due to an emergency situation in Americus, Georgia that requires his special attention.

Letter from David Brandyberry to MLK

Thursday, June 20, 1963

David Brandberry, a student 16 years of age, informs Dr. King that he desires to voice his opinion about the racial issues in the south. Mr. Brandberry cannot comprehend the logical reasoning of racism and the motives of the "ignorant whites." Furthermore, the student discusses the issues of immigration and the political concept of communism. Mr. Brandberry states that he "wish he had been born a Negro" to he could be of more assistance in the movement.

Letter from E. Paul Weaver to MLK

Tuesday, January 9, 1962

E. Paul Weaver writes to Dr. King enclosing a small contribution for the work of the SCLC. Weaver also requests that the Dr. King visit Camp Mack as a guest speaker. The Executive Secretary of Church of the Brethren, one of three historic peace churches in the U. S., informs Dr. King of the Brethren's strong stand against slavery long before the Civil War.

Letter from MLK to Paul Andrews

Wednesday, December 4, 1963

Dr. King acknowledges Mr. Andrews' commitment to racial justice and expresses gratitude for his encouraging letter. Dr. King states that the most important contribution to justice anyone can make is a "thorough examination" of one's own behavior.

Letter from Edinburgh University Debate Club to MLK

Thursday, May 20, 1965

James Douglas-Hamilton, the President of Debate Club at Edinburgh University, sends an invitation to Dr. King to speak at a debate against the motion "That Legislation cannot bring about Integration."

Letter of Support to MLK

Saturday, November 12, 1966

In this letter, a supporter of Dr. King writes to let him know of how good of a job that they feel he his doing.

Transcript of Tape Recording of Mr. Hanna Nazzal

Wednesday, June 21, 1967

This document is a transcript of a tape recording of the President of Terra Santa Tourist Company, Mr. Hanna Nazzal, that was sent to Dr. King and Rev. Andrew Young.

MLK Press Statement Regarding Riots in Los Angeles

Friday, August 20, 1965

In this statement to the press, Dr. King comments on the Watts Riots that took place in Los Angeles, California. He further discusses the economic, social and racial inequalities that he feels were the cause of the violence.

Immortality

Dr. King references Thomas Carlyle regarding the topic of immortality.

Letter from Peter White to Dora McDonald Regarding MLK Invitation

Monday, August 23, 1965

Peter White, President of the University of Western Ontario Student Council, sends Dora McDonald an invitation for Dr. King to come speak at their institution. He explains that another institution is planning to invite Dr. King to their facility and it would be financially "attractive" and convenient for Dr. King to accept both invitations.

Letter from Luther Hodges to MLK Regarding the Civil Rights Act of 1964

Tuesday, June 30, 1964

The U.S. Secretary of Commerce, Luther Hodges, sent this letter to Dr. King on the eve of the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. He writes that he, King, and President Johnson share enthusiasm over the bill and are positive for the future of America. Hodges asks for Dr. King's continued aid in leading the nation to comply with the bill and, in the words of President Johnson, "eliminate the final strongholds of intolerance and hatred."

Letter from Robert Gabor to MLK

Thursday, June 27, 1963

Robert Gabor writes Dr. King inviting him to Oslo, Norway to speak at the 7th International Congress of the International Union of Socialist Youth. Gabor expresses to Dr. King that their organization supports "the present struggle of the American Negro."

My Dream: The Violence of Poverty

In this draft of an article that appeared in the New York Amsterdam News January 1, 1966, Dr. King points out that although the Negro in America is freer, he is “an impoverished alien in an affluent society.” He cautions that the Administration will fail in its War on Poverty if it substitutes welfare programs for the creation of new jobs. He says the Negro’s nonviolent movement directed at the violence of poverty as well as the violence of segregation.

Letter from MLK to Roberta Evans

Thursday, August 23, 1962

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Evans for her kind gesture in sending a letter enclosed with a book by Will Campbell. Dr. King believes his views on race will be a benefit to him.

Letter from Robert Stark to President Johnson

Wednesday, October 18, 1967

Mr. Stark sends the President his views on Liberty and Justice for All, calling programs designed to benefit Negroes a "farce," denouncing Negro lack of responsibility and claiming that it is civil rights not the Vietnam War that is expensive. He is upset that there is so much media focus on blacks and believes it is time to insist upon white rights.

Letter from MLK to Billy Fleming

Tuesday, April 24, 1962

Dr. King writes Mr. Billy Fleming expressing how lovely his visit was to the Fleming-Delaine Funeral Home. Dr. King also expresses how loving the people of Clarendon County were, which he will remember forever.

Letter from Elijah Muhammad to MLK

Wednesday, July 6, 1966

In this letter, Elijah Muhammad expresses the importance of black unity in the efforts for equality. Elijah Muhammad requests the presence of Dr. King and other prominent civil rights leaders at a meeting to discuss solutions to the ongoing struggle against injustice.

It's Hard to Be a Christian

Dr. King outlines his sermon entitled "It's Hard to Be a Christian." King asserts that in order for one to be a fully committed Christian he or she must subordinate their ego and prioritize their concern for God's kingdom.

Conditions for Entering the Kingdom

Dr. King opens these sermon notes by discussing a child's behavior and actions. According to King, "a child has the inexhaustible capacity to forgive" and is inquisitive, honest, and open-minded. These are characteristics that adults should possess, which would help them gain entry into the Kingdom.

Draft of Speech to the National Press Club

Thursday, July 19, 1962

Dr. King's speech to the National Press Club in Washington D.C. was delivered a week after he was incarcerated in Albany, Georgia. This draft shows Dr. King's notes on his address about the Civil Rights Movement.

Social Ethics

This biblical scripture, deriving from the book of Deuteronomy, suggests that people who assist the poor will be blessed.

Fear

Dr. King quotes John Watson's "Behaviorism" on the two things that incite fear.

Letter from MLK to Reverend Earl C. Scott

Thursday, September 13, 1962

Dr. King writes Reverend Earl C. Scott expressing appreciation for his words of encouragement and providing Reverend Scott with information regarding his current work towards social justice.

Report of A Participant

This report illustrates the authors concern and outlook on the Vietnam war.