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Letter from Ira Edmond Gillet to MLK

Friday, October 25, 1963

Mr. Gillet, a member of the Fellowship of Reconciliation and former missionary in South Africa, sends Dr. King his thoughts on a recent petition circulated by the American Committee on Africa. He explains that the actions called for in the petition would "do more harm than good." Gillet encloses a copy of the petition, highlighted with his own comments, which implores President Kennedy to impose sanctions on South Africa.

Invitation from the United Federation of Teachers to MLK

Saturday, February 10, 1968

The United Federation of Teachers invite Dr. King to their annual Spring Conference Luncheon. At this particular event, civil rights activist Bayard Rustin will be honored with the John Dewey Award.

Marx, Karl

Dr. King quotes Karl Marx from J.W. Scott's "Syndicalism and Philosophic Realism."

Letter from Edward Gulick to MLK

Monday, March 12, 1962

Edward Gulick of Wellesley College writes Dr. King, expressing his appreciation and admiration for the work Dr. King has done in Massachusetts and elsewhere.

Telegram from the Faculty of Howard University School of Law to MLK

The faculty of Howard University's Law School offers to assist Dr. King in the fight against social injustice in Alabama.

Letter from Gregory Williams to MLK

Thursday, February 29, 1968

Eleven-year-old Gregory Williams expresses his admiration and support for Dr. King's leadership in the Civil Rights Movement.

Schleiermacher (The Original Righteousness of Man)

Dr. King writes about Friedrich Schleiermacher’s view that original perfection is part of human nature.

Invoice-"Where Do We Go From Here?"

Friday, June 16, 1967

Harper & Row, Publishers issued this invoice to Dr. King, for the shipment of six copies of Dr. King's book, "Where Do We Go From Here?"

Letter from Jeanne Whitaker to MLK

Jeanne Whitaker does not oppose the slogan "Black Power", however she identifies the distinction between power and violence. Mrs. Whitaker elaborates on the influence of non-violence that was rooted from Mahatma Gandhi's methodology and practice.

Letter from Jeremiah Rome to MLK

Wednesday, August 2, 1967

Mr. Rome writes to Dr. King to state that African-Americans need good white people, to create job opportunities for the black race.

Letter from James E. Baine to MLK about Commentary

Wednesday, October 4, 1967

In this letter James Baine asks Dr. King about segregation and integrated for reference to be used in a college class.

Martin Luther King Does It Again

Sunday, April 23, 1967

Ralph C. Bailey, a marcher in the New York City demonstration against the War in Vietnam, describes the demonstration as an "impressive spectacle" of people of all ages and races. He praises Dr. King for combining revolution with nonviolence in hopes of a peaceful demonstration.

News Article about MLK's Church and Atlanta Housing Project

In this article, the author highlights Dr. King's involvement with a recent urban housing redevelopment project. The author states that the Ebenezer Baptist Church will commit full sponsorship; he later discusses the various plans in more detail and the purpose to community it will serve.

Letter from MLK to Rev. S. J. Wickliffe

Saturday, March 31, 1962

Dr. King thanks Rev. S.J. Wickliffe for his financial contribution. Dr. King also stresses that, despite his schedule, he will have his secretary type out Rev. Wickliffe's manuscript and then review it to figure out why it has not been published.

Brutality in Mississippi

This document contains two articles that reference CORE worker Scott B. Smith. Disclosing accounts of Smith's experiences in Mississippi, the articles emphasize racially charged brutality as a common occurrence.

Certificate Honoring MLK

Friday, March 31, 1967

This certificate serves to honor MLK for his contributions "in the field of racial relations."

Letter from MLK to David Sutton

Thursday, December 16, 1965

Dr. King regretfully informs Mr. Sutton of his inability to speak at Drexel Institute for the 1965-1966 calendar year. At the time of writing, Dr. King was engaged in non-violent grass roots efforts throughout the South to end racial discrimination. His commitment to community issues would oftentimes force him to refuse public speaking engagements, among other requests.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

An anonymous author instructs Dr. King on how he should prepare his people for the end of the world.

Letter from Thomas K. Gilhool to MLK

Wednesday, July 12, 1967

The Fellowship House in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania invites Dr. King to be a speaker at a dinner honoring Marjorie Penney for her 35 years of service as Director.

Letter from Kenneth Ives to MLK

Monday, August 28, 1967

Kenneth Ives writes a letter and encloses his research that could be beneficial to Dr. King. Ives studied the effects of various social policy efforts on individuals and on society in general.

Letter from Edward J. Warren to Senator Jacob K Javits

Friday, March 16, 1962

Mr. Warren writes to Senator Javits to confirm receipt of a previous correspondence. He expresses gratitude for Javits position on Human Rights.

Royalty Statement for Japanese Edition of Stride Toward Freedom

Friday, May 19, 1967

Joan Daves details royalty earnings for the Japanese edition of Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom," including the number of copies sold in 1966.

Letter from "A Southerner" to MLK

This letter, signed by, "A Southerner", suggests that Dr. King persuade Black people to return to Africa.


Dr. King quotes Alfred North Whitehead's "Adventures of Ideas."

Letter from W. Maxfield Garrott

Friday, October 16, 1964

W. Maxfield Garrott, president of the Seinen Jo Gakuin Baptist School in Japan, invites Dr. King to make an appearance if he ever visits Japan. Garrot also congratulates Dr. King on being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Introduction to the Demands of the Freedom Movement

This document discusses the injustices and inequalities that Negroes are facing in Chicago's urban communities. The author outlines the struggles blacks endure in a variety of different arenas such as racism, discrimination, poverty, unemployment and segregation.

Letter from MLK to Takarekpenztar

Dr. King offers his gratitude to the workers of the Country Savings Bank XIII in Budapest for naming their socialist labor brigade after Dr. King. Unable to understand any of the names from the initial letter, Dr. King addresses this letter to "Takarekpenztar" or "savings bank" in Hungarian.

Plans for Progress: Atlanta Survey

The Southern Regional Council releases a special report regarding Atlanta's "Plans for Progress," a program that gives the President's Committee on Equal Employment Opportunity power to require contractors to eliminate discrimination in the workplace. According to a study, only three of the twenty-four firms appeared to be interested in abiding by the "Plans for Progress." These were Lockheed, Western Electric Company, and Goodyear.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Carey Preston

Friday, June 12, 1964

Ms. McDonald informs Mrs. Preston that two of Dr. King's friends have encouraged him to reconsider accepting an invitation to speak at her sorority's convention. Hopefully, rearrangement of Dr. King's schedule will permit his acceptance.

Letter from Senator Charles H. Percy to MLK

Tuesday, November 28, 1967

United States Senator, Charles H. Percy informs Dr. King that he would like him to read the enclosed speech, "Toward Responsible Freedom", given before the Community Renewal Society of Chicago. The senator also provides an update on the housing proposal and gives Dr.King a copy of the committee report.