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The Prayer Pilgrimage for Freedom

This photograph encourages individuals to join the Prayer Pilgrimage for Freedom to Washington, D.C in an attempt to arouse the conscience of the nation.

Letter from MLK to the Bulstrode School Children

Friday, July 9, 1965

Dr. King thanks the school children of Bulstrode in England for their SCLC contribution by means of their daffodil sales. Outlining the current work of the SCLC, he educates the young supporters on the measures being taken to secure voting rights via "Operation Breadbasket" and "Operation Dialogue."

Letter from Raphael Gould to Dora McDonald Re Thich Nhat Hanh

Friday, January 27, 1967

Raphael Gould, of The Fellowship of Reconciliation, writes to Miss McDonald requesting a letter from Dr. King nominating Thich Nhat Hanh for the Nobel Peace Prize. Mr. Gould calls attention to the approaching deadline and the extensive documentation that must accompany the letter.

Letter from Martin Shepard to MLK with Citizens For Kennedy/Fulbright Pamphflet

Thursday, April 27, 1967

Dr. Martin Shepard, co-chairman of Citizens for Kennedy/Fullbright 1968, wrote this letter to Dr. King after reading the Dr. King felt Robert F. Kennedy would be the best Democratic Presidential nominee in 1968. Dr. Shepard writes that they "share the same feelings about President Johnsons and his insane war in Vietnam" and encourages Dr. King to read the enclosed pamphlet and join their efforts.

Letter to Hubert M. Humphrey from MLK

Friday, January 24, 1964

Dr. King writes Hubert M. Humphrey to praise his "matchless, exhaustive and courageous leadership" in guiding the Civil Rights Act of 1964. For his effort, Dr. King tells Congressman Humphrey that he has earned the "sincere gratitude" of the international community.

Aristotle

Dr. King outlines some principles regarding Aristotelian philosophy.

SCLC Newsletter: March 1963

This is the SCLC's 1963 Spring Newsletter. Articles include: "The 22 Billion Dollar Giant" and "Solid Wall of Segregation Cracks at Albany."

Messianic Age

Dr. King reviews a bible verse that discusses the rule of the Messiah.

Guide for Churchmen in Interracial Conflict Situations

Wednesday, March 29, 1967

In this document, the Southern Field Service encourages church leaders to aid in African American social justice mobilization.

Letter from Dan Aldridge to MLK

Monday, December 23, 1963

Dan A. Aldridge, President of the Foundation Life Insurance Company, recalls a previous visit to Dr. King's home. Aldridge requests an appointment with Dr. King to discuss several important business matters.

Telegram from MLK to Senator Robert Kennedy

Monday, March 18, 1963

Dr. King requests that Senator Robert Kennedy initiate an investigation into complaints about the actions of police during demonstrations in Petersburg, Virginia.

MLK Speech at Nobel Peace Prize Recognition Dinner

Wednesday, January 27, 1965

Dr. King delivers this address after returning from his trip to Oslo, Norway. A recognition dinner is held in his hometown of Atlanta, Georgia as an honor for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. King thanks supporters, family, and friends, however, accepts the award on behalf of the many people struggling for justice and civil rights. He states that oppressed people can only stay oppressed for so long because "the yearning for freedom eventually manifests itself."

MLK's Final Exam for Social Philosophy

Monday, May 28, 1962

Dr. King's final exam for the Seminar in Social Philosophy class he taught at Morehouse College from 1961-1962.

Notification of Grant Award to SCLC

This document is a notification of a grant award from the Department of Health, Education and Welfare to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

A Tough Mind and A Tender Heart

Sunday, August 30, 1959

An early foreshadowing of his nonviolent philosophy, Dr. King advises Negroes of a particular course of action they should adhere to in order to properly equip themselves to combat racial injustice. Seeking to avoid both complacency and hostility, he challenges those who desire self-satisfaction, as well as those who seek to pacify their oppressors, by proposing the idea of one having both a tough mind and a tender heart.

Letter from Frank Sullivan to MLK

Friday, March 24, 1967

In this letter, the president of the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers, Mr. Sullivan, informs Dr. King that the organization will look to donate to the S.C.L.C.

Washington State University Students Invite MLK to Speak

Tuesday, December 22, 1964

Timothy D. Bradbury writes Dr. King on behalf of the students of Washington State University inviting him to speak about civil rights on their campus.

Voting Rights and Terrorism in the South

The author places the success of the Voting Rights Bill of 1965 in the hands of the Federal Government. It is stated that the only way the Negros will truly feel the effects of the bill is if the government does its part to enforce it.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mrs. Bill Green

Friday, August 2, 1963

Dora McDonald informs Mrs. Bill Green that Dr. King is on an extended lecture tour at the moment. She ensures Mrs. Green that the letter and poem sent will receive his attention upon his return.

Royalty Statement from Harper & Row Publishers

Here Harper and Row Publishers itemize the royalties from Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom" for a total of $689.44.

Post Card from Archie Brest to MLK

A supporter of the Vietnam War expresses his conflicting views regarding the struggle for democracy in Southeast Asia. In order to combat the brutality of North Vietnamese forces, he insists that American military presence will ultimately prove that "terror cannot succeed as a weapon in Vietnam, we shall discourage it's use anywhere."

Religion

Dr. King writes about the role of religion as an ideal and as a unifying force.

MLK Announces a New SCLC March in Washington, DC

Monday, December 4, 1967

Dr. King announces the SCLC's decision to lead a non-violent march on Washington protesting the government's lack of support in providing jobs and income for impoverished Americans.

MLK Question Response on Ministry and Segregation

This document features Dr. King's listed "Question: How far is the fact that you are a minister involved in your action?" and its subsequent answer. Citing the "church...[as]...the chief moral guardian of the nation," Dr. King uses the example of the Southern Baptist Convention's hypocrisy regarding segregation.

Essay - MLK Entitled "The Bravest Man I Ever Met"

Dr. King's essay, entitled "The Bravest Man I Ever Met," profiles Norman Thomas, a prominent Socialist.

Telegram from Roy Wilkins to MLK

Thursday, January 5, 1967

Roy Wilkins, the chairman of the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights, urges Dr. King to attend a special meeting in Washington, D.C. to plan a course of action on pending civil rights legislation.

Letter from Mrs. Ernest Erber to MLK

Wednesday, July 14, 1965

Mrs. Erber tells Dr. King that she is sending the newspaper clipping featuring her daughter Elena. Elena raised eighty cents to fight the injustices of racism.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dwight Campbell

Monday, September 28, 1964

Miss McDonald regretfully informs Mr. Campbell that Dr. King is unable to attend the October 7th Methodist Youth Fellowship engagement.

Handwritten Notes on Science and Religion

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines his views on science and religion. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definition, and bible verses.

Letter from R. Lennox to MLK

Wednesday, November 25, 1964

Dr. King is invited to deliver the main address for The Presbyterian College of Montreal's Annual Convocation in April of 1965. The institution will be preparing to celebrate its 100th Anniversary.