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Letter from Mrs. Ted Gustafson to MLK

Sunday, December 10, 1967

Mrs. Ted Gustafson writes Dr. King to express her dismay with pastors and the pulpit, providing her belief that a Saint is long overdue.

1965 Human Rights Day Flyer

This flyer advertises a rally to benefit South African victims of apartheid.

Letter from Rabbi Joel S. Goor to MLK

Tuesday, July 28, 1964

Rabbi Joel Goor extends his appreciation to Dr. King for being able to participate in SCLC's 1964 desegregation campaign in St. Augustine, Florida. He feels that his involvement in the civil rights movement spirtitually enhances his role as an active religious leader. Rabbi Goor encloses a donation to the SCLC for assisting with his bail while being jailed in St. Augustine and a copy of "Why We Can't Wait" for Dr. King to autograph.

Spurrier, William A.

Dr. King cites William Spurrier's "Guide to the Christian Faith."

Letter to MLK from A Friend of Justice and Democracy

Tuesday, February 14, 1967

An anonymous individual writes Dr. King to declare that the Jewish people are responsible for the oppression of Negroes.

Letter from MLK to Dr. L. K. Jackson

Tuesday, February 5, 1963

Dr. King regretfully informs Dr. L. K. Jackson that the Sunday he wants to preach at Ebenezer is one of the three Sundays that he is obliged to preach. Dr. King states the he knows Pastor Jackson understands his schedule and he would love to have him speak at his church in the future. Dr. King connects Pastor Jackson to Reverend Abernathy so that he can preach at his church.

Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty Southern Rural Action Project Progress Report

Wednesday, August 24, 1966

This document contains the Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty Southern Rural Action Project Progress Report. Randolph T. Blackwell, former program director of the SCLC is now director of the Southern Rural Action Project.


Dr. King cites several scriptures from the Bible regarding reason.

Letter from Barbara Patterson to MLK

Friday, March 15, 1968

Barbara Patterson writes Dr. King thanking him for the lecture at Grosse Pointe High School in Michigan. She also encloses a letter that was sent to the Michigan Chronicle. The letter pointed out how great of a lecture Dr. King gave which ended in a standing ovation and how it inspired those that listened.

MLK Addresses the National Association of Radio Announcers

Friday, August 11, 1967

After returning from a Real Estate Brokers convention in San Francisco, Dr. King addresses the body of the National Association of Radio Announcers during their annual convention. The Reverend expresses appreciation for the influence radio has had in an unrepresented community of uneducated listeners who may otherwise be denied information and economic opportunity.

Letter from William Reynolds to MLK

Thursday, April 20, 1967

Mr. Reynolds writes Dr. King requesting to use quotations from his April 5th speech to encourage a higher attendance at future vigils in the Bay Area.

Letter from Theodore Brown to MLK and Others

Sunday, February 11, 1968

This is a memorandum from Theodore E. Brown concerning his trip to Nigeria. Brown attaches a newspaper article referencing the turmoil in Nigeria.

Draft Letter from MLK to Mr. Hasselvander

Dr. King writes Mr. Hasselvander hoping to resolve some issues from recent events of injustice and inequality that occurred in Hasselvander's life.

Hall Syndicate: LBJ Unveils New Education Plan

Howard U. sends this article to Dr. King with a note asking him to have the students protest its contents, and soon. The article, by Robert S. Allen and Paul Scott, discusses President Lyndon B. Johnson's proposed plan to allow students to borrow from the federal government to finance their college education, repaying the loans through extra income taxes during their working years.

Letter from C. Kenzie Steele to MLK

Tuesday, March 6, 1962

C. Kenzie Steele writes Dr. King to thank him for his "expression of encouragement" for the celebration of his Tenth Anniversary as pastor of Bethel Baptist Church.

Tribute to Jimmy Lee Jackson

Friday, February 26, 1965

Dr. King edits a draft of a eulogy he wrote in the wake of four girls killed in a bombing at the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama. Dr. King applauded these martyrs, for their brief yet powerful appearance on this Earth and their contribution to the "holy crusade for freedom and human dignity." Reiterating these sentiments, Dr. King edits the eulogy to fit the life story of Jimmy Lee Jackson.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK encluding copy of British magazine SLANT

Wednesday, November 8, 1967

Joan Daves informs Dr. King that she has enclosed a copy of the British magazine SLANT that has a shortened version of his Riverside Church address inside.

Letter from Grandison Cherry-El to MLK

Thursday, October 21, 1965

Grandison Cherry-El, Minister with The Moorish Science Temple of America, contacts US Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbak in reference to discrimination in citizenship in American public schools.


Dr. King quotes Ernst Haeckel's "The Riddle of the Universe."

Letter from J.H. Wheeler to MLK

Wednesday, October 12, 1966

J.H. Wheeler requests Dr. King's attendance at the Morehouse College Board of Trustees meeting in New York City.

Letter from Beresford Hayward to MLK

Thursday, October 14, 1965

Mr. Hayward sends Dr. King a brief note on what has been keeping him so busy and hopes that while Dr. King is in Pars, they will be able to meet.

Fiscal Facts about SCLC

This brochure outlines financial disclosure information regarding SCLC as a non-profit organization.

Letter from Benjamin Mays to Editors of the New York Times

Monday, August 20, 1962

In this letter, Mays addresses the editors of the New York Times about an article on equal employment opportunity. Mays states that he was not consulted by the article's author. As a result, he was misquoted. Mays uses the remainder of the article to clarify his position on equal employment programs.

MLK's Reply to an Invitation

Thursday, December 21, 1967

Dr. King regrets to inform Robin Skuce of his inability to accept her invitation to speak at a seminar for a Canadian high school under the auspice of the United Nations Association in Canada. Dr. King informs Miss Skuce that he must decline her offer due to preparation of several SCLC programs scheduled for the following year.

What Is Man?

This is one of several documents where Dr. King explores the nature of "man." He considers the question "what is man?" to be a timeless concept that "confronts any generation." Dr. King's analysis incorporates Biblical and Shakespearean texts, among other notable references.

Telegram from Phil Stovin to MLK

Thursday, August 17, 1967

Mr. Stovin praises Dr. King for his nonviolent approach towards achieving peace.

Letter from MLK to Senator Everett McKinley Dirksen

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King thanks Senate Minority leader Senator Everett McKinley Dirksen (R-Illinois) for his role in helping to pass the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Dirksen was one of a handful of Republican Senators that helped break a southern Democratic filibuster designed to prevent the passing of this legislation.

Letter from MLK to W. D. Mason

Tuesday, January 16, 1962

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak in support of the Mercer County Branch of the NAACP in Farrell, Pennsylvania. He expresses his appreciation for the invitation but explains that he has accepted his maximum number of speaking engagements for the spring.

Telegram from Dr. Roland Smith to MLK

Friday, June 2, 1967

Dr. Roland Smith congratulates Dr. King on being honored with a Doctor of Divinity Degree from Morehouse College.

MLK Writes to Mrs. King from Jail

Tuesday, October 25, 1960

Dr. King writes this letter to Coretta Scott King after recently being transferred to a state prison in Reidsville, Georgia. He expresses understanding of how the present circumstances are difficult for his family, particularly given Coretta's pregnancy with their third child, Dexter Scott King. King goes on to encourage Coretta to maintain strength and says that their excessive suffering will serve the greater purpose of freedom. He asks her to come visit him and requests that she bring several books, a collection of sermons and a radio.