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"SOUTH KOREA"

Letter from Carolyn Martinelli to Ralph Abernathy After the Death of MLK

Saturday, April 13, 1968
California (CA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Mrs. Martinelli writes Rev. Abernathy in the month following Dr. King's death, encouraging him to continue promoting a philosophy of love and equality. Martinelli identifies herself as a white housewife, teacher and mother of two, who has only known three Negroes in her whole life. . Although she has never known poverty, her desire is for all Americans to know the truth and work to resolve these problems in society.

K.O. Mbadiwe Contacts MLK

Friday, February 16, 1968
London, England, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Kingsley Ozuomba Mbadiwe, Nigerian nationalist and politician, informs Dr. King of his travels to the United States. Mbadiwe ensures that he will contact King upon arrival. Dr. King and Mbadiwe were working on a proposal for a solution to the Nigerian-Biafran civil war. A peace mission to Nigeria was planned for April 1968.

Letter from Rev. E. C. Smith to MLK

Monday, November 26, 1962
Washington, D.C.

Rev. Smith informs Dr. King that the Testimonial Committee has made the assumption that Dr. King is unable to accept their previous invitation, so they have made other arrangements.

Essay on Walter Rauschenbusch

This essay exams Walter Rauschenbushch views on the relationship between the Church and Society.

Operation Breadbasket of the SCLC

How to Win Jobs And Influence Businessmen; a speech given by the SCLC'S Operation Breadbasket, discusses job discrimination and the stimulation of Negro businessmen.

Statement Before The Credentials Committee

Saturday, August 22, 1964
Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), SOUTH AFRICA, CUBA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King makes a statement to the Democratic National Committee in an effort to persuade the the organization to recognize the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party as a sitting, and voting, entity of the Democratic Party. Dr. King emphasizes that not only is the fabric of the Democratic National Party at stake, but representative government as it is known throughout the world.

Letter From Paul Brest to Members of the SCLC

Monday, November 14, 1966
Mississippi (MS), Memphis, TN, Jackson, MS

Paul Brest, on behalf of Marian E. Wright, alerts Dr. King and other SCLC staff members about legal initiatives to desegregate schools in Mississippi and other southern states.

MLK Statement about the New York Riots

Monday, July 27, 1964
Mississippi (MS), New York (NY), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. Kind addresses the press' claim that civil rights leaders are involved in the outbreak of riots in New York. He says that violence creates more social problems than it solves. He says that government officials need to take responsibility and help all American citizens gain justice and equality.

Letter from Wyatt Tee Walker to Hugh Morrow

Monday, June 25, 1962
New York, NY

Wyatt Tee Walker writes to Hugh Morrow expressing his grievance for the attack of Governor Rockefeller.

Letter from Nathan Green to Ralph David Abernathy

Sunday, April 28, 1968
Los Angeles, CA, California (CA)

Here, Nathan Green requests to meet with Rev. Abernathy to discuss a plan that Green believes will be of "tremendous value" to their cause.

Letter from William Mallory to MLK

Friday, July 2, 1965
Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Mr. Mallory writes to Dr. King proposing a national day to be observed by all Negroes. The three purposes of this day are to instill racial pride, demonstrate the contributions of Negroes and to preserve the heritage of American Negroes.

Leibniz

GERMANY

This twenty card series gives a biographical sketch of the German mathematician and philosopher Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz. It also intricately details many aspects of Leibnizean philosophy under multiple subject titles including "Notion of Force," "Idealism," "Monads," "Leibniz as Compared with Predecessors," "The Mind-Body Problem," "Panpsychism," "Theory of Knowledge," and "Arguments for the Existence of God."

Letter from John Lewis to MLK

Thursday, July 22, 1965
Hawaii (HI), Atlanta, GA

In this letter, John Lewis requests a loan for the amount of $10,000 from the Southern Christian Leadership Conference so that the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee can meet their payroll and cover pressing bills. He then speaks on the importance of continuous dialogue between the SCLC and SNCC.

Letter From Irving Neiman to MLK

Monday, October 18, 1965
Connecticut (CT), GERMANY

Irving Neiman offers his legal services to the SCLC for their work in the civil rights movement.

Telegram from A. Philip Randolph to MLK

Friday, October 14, 1966
Chicago, IL

A. Philip Randolph expresses his discontent with the release of a manifesto from civil rights leaders without Dr. King's signature.

Letter from Clifford L. Alexander to MLK

Monday, January 29, 1968
Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), New York, NY, Alabama (AL), Ohio (OH), Cleveland, OH, UNITED KINGDOM, Indiana (IN), New Jersey (NJ)

Clifford L. Alexander, Chairman for the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, wrote to Dr. King to encloses some clippings from the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission News Digest, the New York Times, Los Angeles Times, and the Washington Post regarding the EEOC's hearings on white collar discrimination in New York.

Letter from James L. Davis to MLK

Saturday, November 11, 1967
Texas (TX), New York (NY)

Here a retired minister offers support and good wishes to Dr. King while pleading with him to reconsider his stance on Vietnam.

Notecard Written by MLK Regarding "Race Prejudice"

Here in this notecard, Dr. King expresses his ideals and philosophical viewpoints on Race Prejudice and the "evil" it entails.

Nature and Perception

Dr. King discusses his philosophical perspective on perception and nature.

Homoionsios

Dr. King gives a definition of the Greek term "homoionsios."

Spring Mobilization Committee Information Sheets

New York (NY)

These information sheets concern the Spring Mobilization Committee's rally taking place within the United Nations. Topics discussed include meals, housing, and child safety.

Letter to Mrs. King from Lillian Tynec

Saturday, October 10, 1959
Chicago, IL

Lillian Tynec writes Mrs. King to request the travel details related to a Women's Day program.

Letter from Pat Carter to MLK

Saturday, November 30, 1963
Missouri (MO), Atlanta, GA

Dr. King receives a letter from Miss Pat Carter, the public relations director at Katz Radio, thanking him for his address regarding the assassination of President John F. Kennedy.

Telegram from James Endicott to MLK

Tuesday, December 12, 1967
VIETNAM, CANADA, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

James Endicott writes to Dr. King inviting him to address the mass rally in Toronto with the theme being Vietnam, civil rights and world peace.

Letter from Stephen J. M. Robbins to MLK

Wednesday, March 24, 1965
Philadelphia, PA, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL

Stephen Robbins thanks Dr. King for inviting the United States National Student Association to participate in the demonstrations in Selma and Montgomery, Alabama. Robbins states that the organization has directed its focus to equal opportunity for all and protection for demonstrators. Robbins also invites Dr. King to address the 18th National Student Congress at the University of Wisconsin at Madison.

Letter from Congressman James Roosevelt to MLK

Tuesday, February 25, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Representative James Roosevelt thanks Dr. King for his words regarding Roosevelt's contribution to the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Psychology

This series of note cards addresses psychology through the means of human unity. The concept of human unity is indicated by the presence of the body and the soul working in conjunction to inform the human experience. Dr. King references the views of St. Augustine and St. Thomas as it pertains to "the close union between body and soul."

Letter from Polly M. Williams to Whom it May Concern

Sunday, January 29, 1967
Georgia (GA), Florida (FL)

Polly Williams, a former counselor of the Neighborhood Youth Corps, requests a full investigation of its director, Mr. Pace. Mrs. Williams requested a sick leave while undergoing surgery, yet later discovered that her request had counted as vacation time. She discusses numerous orders she received from Mr. Pace that negatively impacted her health and her recovery from surgery. She believes that she is a victim of racial discrimination in the workplace.

A Statement by Dr. King

Sunday, July 17, 1966
Chicago, IL

In a statement made in Chicago, Dr. King asks for the economic and social betterment of the individuals living in the "slums" of the city.

Letter from MLK to Quentin N. Burdick

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Quentin Burdick, a United States Senator from North Dakota, for supporting the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.