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"SOUTH KOREA"

Flight Schedule for Coretta Scott King and Party

Tuesday, December 1, 1964

The Henderson Travel Service provides a detailed schedule of suggested flights for Coretta Scott King and others traveling to witness Dr. King receive the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Geiser

Dr. King offers praise and support to Mrs. Geiser for her efforts to teach her children tolerance in the face of bigotry and racial hatred.

Telegram from LD Reddick to MLK

Saturday, October 22, 1960

In this letter, LD Reddick tells Dr. King that he is a magnificent example to other leaders. Reddick then tells Dr. King to ask the presidential candidates to state their views more specifically.

Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to Miss Dora McDonald

Monday, June 5, 1967

In this document, President of Morehouse College, Benjamin E. Mays writes to Dora McDonald regarding receipt of a check. Mays also discusses the role he played in bringing McDonald to Atlanta.

Greeks

Dr. King shares his personal insight on Greek and African "ability," relative to African-Americans.

Letter from Troy J. Horton to MLK

Thursday, October 22, 1964

Troy J. Horton, a teacher at Wilson High School, inquires if Dr. King is interested in speaking to the student body of the school on topics such as racism, prejudice and segregation.

Freedom (Of Choice)

Dr. King quotes Thomas Huxley's "Collected Essays" on the freedom to do right and to do wrong.

Telegram from Sylvester Nichols to Mrs. King

Friday, May 3, 1968

Mrs. King received many telegrams, following the assassination of Dr. King. This telegram, in particular, came from Sylvester Nichols and the members of the Brooklyn branch of the National Association of Negro Musicians. The association wanted to extend sympathy to the King family and to inform Mrs. King that they would continue to live out Dr. King's principles.

Reader's Digest: Martin Luther King's March on Washington

Monday, April 1, 1968

This April 1968 article by William Schulz warns that the Poor People's March on Washington and the planned disruption of the nation's capital pose an enormous challenge to security forces and may humiliate the country internationally.

Letter from MLK to Reverend Cornell E. Talley

Wednesday, April 25, 1962

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Reverend Cornell E. Talley for the contribution from New Light Baptist Church in Detroit, Michigan. Dr. King expresses an interest in speaking at a mid week prayer service at New Light Baptist Church.

Letter from Bill Bennett to MLK

Wednesday, January 5, 1966

William Bennett offers the suggestion that the phrase "dark skinned" be used to describe people of color. Bennett encountered the phrase while on a trip in Bermuda, and realized he should enforce the idea that skin color does not determine American citizenship.

Letter from Ray Fritsch to MLK

Thursday, March 28, 1968

Ray Fritsch of Illinois Wesleyan University writes Dr. King to inform him that the university is "participating in Time Magazine's Choice 68' primary election" and requests campaign material.

A Tough Mind and A Tender Heart

Sunday, August 30, 1959

An early foreshadowing of his nonviolent philosophy, Dr. King advises Negroes of a particular course of action they should adhere to in order to properly equip themselves to combat racial injustice. Seeking to avoid both complacency and hostility, he challenges those who desire self-satisfaction, as well as those who seek to pacify their oppressors, by proposing the idea of one having both a tough mind and a tender heart.

Program for Ecumenical Service in Storkyrkan

The following document is a program for an ecumenical service held at Storkyrkan in Stockholm, Sweden. Dr. King provided the sermon for the service that was translated in the Swedish native language.

Newspaper Article Concerning Race Riot at Northwestern University

The author of this article gives an account of a race riot that occurred during a basketball game at Northwestern University.

American Nurses' Association Names Judges for Integration Award

Friday, September 1, 1967

The American Nurses' Association announces its panel of judges for the 1968 Mary Mahoney Award, which honors progress in integration and nursing.

Telegram From MLK to Dr. L. Frances Griffin and Dr. Milton Reid

Dr. King offers this inspirational message to Drs. Griffin and Reid for their outstanding leadership in the advancement of public education.

Letter from Lessie Robinson to MLK Regarding Segregation

Mrs. Robinson informs Dr. King of the difficulty in finding a good job in segregated Graceville, FL.

Telegram from Congressman Charles E. Bennett to MLK

Friday, July 9, 1965

Florida Democratic Congressman Charles Bennett informs Dr. King that the Celler Bill does not apply to all states, though he feels that it should. The Celler Bill, introduced by New York Democratic Congressman Emmanuel Celler, would prohibit the purchase of rifles, shotguns and handguns by direct mail.

Memorandum from Pacem In Terris II to All Participants

This memorandum from the Pacem In Terris II Secretariat issues detailed arrival and departure instructions to all participants of the Pacem In Terris Convocation. General conference information is also included. Translated as "Peace on Earth," the event was held in Geneva, Switzerland and accommodated participants from around the world. Dr. King attended the conference and delivered an address.

Who Are We?

Saturday, February 5, 1966

In this sermon Dr. King contemplates "who are we?" and "what is man?". He differentiates between the pessimistic attitudes of the materialistic understandings of man and the optimistic attitudes of humanistic definitions of man. King also states that man is neither all good nor all bad, but a combination. Man is both an everlasting miracle and mystery.

Telegram from C. Dolores Tucker to MLK and Others

Friday, November 3, 1967

C. Dolores Tucker offers some words of encouragement to Dr. King and Rev. Wyatt Walker during their incarceration in the Birmingham City Jail.

Letter from Randolph T. Blackwell to MLK Requesting a Leave of Absence from the S.C.L.C.

Monday, June 13, 1966

Randolph T. Blackwell requests a one-year leave of absence from the Southern Christian Leadership Conference to work with Citizens Crusade Against Poverty. Blackwell will assist the S.C.L.C. sister organization with its emerging Southern Rural Development Project.

Letter from John M. Thornton to MLK

Wednesday, October 16, 1963

John M. Thorton invites Dr. King to speak at the Citizenship Award Banquet hosted by the National Capital Voters Association, in order to encourage the 425,000 Negro citizens of Washington, DC to vote in the upcoming presidential election.

Letter from MLK to Louis Simon

Tuesday, January 16, 1962

Dr. King thanks Louis Simon of the Amalgamated Laundry Workers Joint Board for his thoughts about Dr. King's speech in Miami and the financial contribution to the SCLC. Dr. King explains that the holiday season is one of the hardest times of the year for the SCLC.

Letter from Wyatt T. Walker to S. I. Hayakawa

Tuesday, July 30, 1963

Wyatt Tee Walker writes S. I. Hayakawa, academic and political figure of Japanese ancestry, informing him that the SCLC is not a tax-exempt organization. Walker says that because it is not tax exempt they are free to do as they please, and he directs Hayakawa on where to send future contributions.

First Congregational Church Program

Dr. King is listed to speak at an evening church service entitled, "The Immorality of Racial Segregation."

Letter from Jean Ward Wolff to MLK

Thursday, February 9, 1967

Jean Ward Wolff expresses her concern about Dr. King turning his back on truth and justice in the form of supporting Adam Clayton Powell.

Letter from Mount Olivet Tabernacle Baptist Church to MLK

Wednesday, November 1, 1967

Pastor Marshall L. Shepard invites Dr. King to the Dedication Service for the Mount Olivet Village Corporation in Philadelphia.

MLK Press Conference and Speech Notes

Dr. King stresses that his appearance to Cleveland is not in the interest of the candidates but to urge the people to exercise their political and moral responsibility.