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"SOUTH KOREA"

Telegram from Sylvester Nichols to Mrs. King

Friday, May 3, 1968

Mrs. King received many telegrams, following the assassination of Dr. King. This telegram, in particular, came from Sylvester Nichols and the members of the Brooklyn branch of the National Association of Negro Musicians. The association wanted to extend sympathy to the King family and to inform Mrs. King that they would continue to live out Dr. King's principles.

Letter from MLK to Murray Thomson

Friday, February 11, 1966

Dr. King regretfully informs Murray Thomson that he cannot accept his invitation to Toronto due to his prior commitments for the month of June.

Letter from US Ambassador Findley Burns, Jr. to MLK

Monday, January 23, 1967

United States Ambassador Findley Burns writes Dr. King expressing his joy regarding King's upcoming pilgrimage to the Holy Land. Despite warnings due to Middle East conflict, Burns hopes that Dr. King will not cancel the trip. He sees the visit as an opportunity to strengthen the bonds between the US and Jordan.

Letter from MLK to Boldwen Collins

Monday, October 21, 1963

Dr. King responds to a previous letter sent to him from Miss Boldwen Collins. He clarifies various points that were unclear to Miss Collins pertaining to the overall purpose of the civil rights movement and its effect on the nation. Dr. King explains that Negroes in the North and South want the same things as other human beings: freedom.

Letter from Barry Diamond to MLK

Wednesday, March 27, 1968

Barry Diamond, Chairman of Choice 68 at the University of Florida, informs Dr. King that his name will be on the ballot and invites him to speak at the University. Diamond explains that Choice 68 is "a national collegiate presidential primary sponsored by Time Magazine."

Brotherhood

Dr. King cites a quote that exemplifies the necessity of understanding human connection. Emphasizing brotherhood, he notes man's inherent dependence on others.

Letter from Mildred Lynch to MLK

Saturday, November 25, 1967

Secretary of the Canadian Anti-Apartheid Committee Mrs. Mildred Lynch inquires about Dr. King's availability to join group members for an upcoming 1968 public meeting to be held in Toronto.

Origen

Dr. King records biographical information about Origen.

Letter from Fred Becker to MLK in Regard to Speaking Engagements

Monday, January 14, 1963

Mr. Fred C. Becker writes to Dr. King about his speaking engagement, lectures, and attendance at special meetings. He requested that Dr. King would send a list of speaking engagements in as advance as possible. The publishers wanted the opportunity to allow the public to be aware of his speaking schedule, so they may be able to purchase his books.

Letter from Edward Boland to MLK

Tuesday, August 24, 1965

Representative Edward P. Boland informs Dr. King of his signing of the Discharge Petition for Home Rule in the District of Columbia.

The Free Southern Theater

The Free Southern Theater was co-founded by members of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. They toured throughout the South, performing free of charge in Negro communities that had no theater, as a cultural and education extension of the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Lucks Regarding Assistant Pastor

In this letter, Dr. King advises Rev. Lucks on choosing an assistant pastor.

Apologist

Dr. King cites information regarding the historical background of the Apologists and their role in defending Christianity.

Letter from MLK to John Lee Tilley

Tuesday, October 21, 1958

Dr. King commends Reverend Tilley on writing the preamble of an unnamed document and offers a few minor suggestions for his consideration.

Telegram From Edwin Berry to MLK

Wednesday, October 14, 1964

Edwin Berry congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Helen E. Saum to MLK

Wednesday, March 20, 1968

Helen E. Saum writes Dr. King concerning the issue of drop-outs and its affect on riots and demonstrations.

Do the Following to Keep National Attention Focused on Selma

Dr. King composes a list of activities that will keep national attention focused on Selma. Written on Waldorf Astoria Hotel stationary, the list includes measures such as contacting top level government officials like President Johnson, organizing a march, and enlisting the help of celebrities. Dr. King concludes the list by emphasizing "We must insist that voting is the issue and here Selma has dirty hands."

Letter from Earl Smith to MLK about Portugeese Translation of "Strength to Love"

Wednesday, November 16, 1966

Earl M. Smith writes to Dr. King requesting permission to translate and publish the book "Strength to Love" in Portuguese. Mr. Smith states that a Fellowship of Reconciliation representative can be responsible for translating.

Letter from MLK to Ray Stewart

Dr. King thanks Ray Stewart for a song written in tribute to the Freedom Movement, but states that neither he nor the SCLC can underwrite the requested fee for use of the song.

Letter from Leland Stewart to MLK

Thursday, May 11, 1967

Leland Stewart, of the Conference on Science and Religion, writes to Dr. King to offer support in the movement to end the war in Vietnam.

Letter from Harley Lappin to MLK

Wednesday, January 3, 1968

The Public Affairs Committee of Winters College at York University in Ontario invites Dr. King to participate in a discussion to raise student awareness of current political issues.

Letter from S. Scott to MLK

Tuesday, August 1, 1967

S. Scott states how he objects to Dr. King's leadership because he believes that Dr. King's influence has resulted in lawless riots. Mr. Scott suggests alternatives for those who live in the "slums" and identifies education as a means of advancement. Furthermore, Mr. Scott assures results from the Civil Rights Bill in time.

Congressional Record Regarding Antipoverty Funding

Wednesday, December 6, 1967

This Congressional Record documents a statement regarding the antipoverty bill. The statement, made to the public by the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights, urged Congress to support funding towards eradicating poverty for both black and white citizens.

Spencer

Dr. King records a quote from Herbert Spencer’s “First Principles.”

Letter from MLK to Katherine Gunning

Thursday, July 13, 1967

Dr. King thanks Katharine Gunning for sending him a copy of the letter she sent to President Johnson. He urges that "those of us who seek peaece through non-violence make our consciences and numbers known to the men who run our government."

Telegram from Harold Willens to Dora McDonald

Friday, May 10, 1968

Mr. Willens forwards a telegram to Dora McDonald that he had previously sent to Andrew Young. Willens invited Ralph D. Abernathy to be a guest on "Issues and Answers." Abernathy initially declined the invitation only later to accept, which lead Willens to inform him of the potential "impact and consequences."

Letter from Henderson Travel Service, Inc. to Dora McDonald

Monday, November 30, 1964

Freddye Henderson of Henderson Travel Service, Inc. informs Miss McDonald of the total cost for the group's trip to Oslo, Norway.

SCLC Mail Log: March 4, 1968

Monday, March 4, 1968

This mail log lists the names of people and organizations sending correspondences to several SCLC staff members.

Letter from Thelma Berlack Boozer to MLK

Tuesday, May 24, 1966

Thelma Berlack Boozer, President of Les Seize Club, Inc. writes Dr. King expressing that her club "continues to believe in the aims of the SCLC," and encloses a monetary contribution.

Civil Rights Photographic Series

These fifteen photographs chronicle several historical moments in the Civil Rights Movement.