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"SOUTH KOREA"

Letter from Warrington Allsop to MLK

Monday, October 6, 1958
New York (NY), Washington, D.C.

During the fall of 1958, Dr. King was stabbed by an African American woman during a book signing in Harlem, an event that nearly cost him his life. Following this event, Warrington Allsop sends his support and well-wishes for Dr. King's immediate recovery.

What is Man?

Sunday, January 12, 1958
Montgomery, AL

Citing views from historical and contemporary figures, Dr. King asserts that the definition of "man" lies somewhere between God and an animal. Dr. King contends that, although man is limited by time and space, humans are not animals, because they have the capacity for rational thought. However, the central theme that Dr. King argues is that humanity is inherently evil and must constantly strive for high moral standards.

MLK Addresses the Atlanta Press Club

Wednesday, November 10, 1965
Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL

Dr. King discusses the struggle for racial justice and the concept of goodwill with the Atlanta Press Club. He stresses that any opposition in the fight for equality will inevitably fail in the face of a unified effort across America.

Letter from Marie L. Jones Regarding Reverend Ashton Jones

Wednesday, September 25, 1963
Cleveland, OH, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, New York (NY), Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Mary L. Jones sent out this letter reporting on the plight of her husband, Reverend Ashton Jones, who was arrested in July of 1963 for attempting to lead an interracial student group into a service at the segregated First Baptist Church of Atlanta. Reverend Jones was sentenced to a year in the Georgia state prison and six months of hard labor for the crime of "disturbing a worship service." Mrs. Jones encourages readers of her letter to heed the advice of British social critic Bertrand Russell, by writing an "avalanche of letters" to those responsible.

The Atlanta Board of Education

Friday, September 15, 1967
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

The Atlanta Board of Education neglects to solve educational issues in the Negro community. There are protests and demonstrations from those who object to the disdain of action. Julian Bond purposes a course of action designed to educate, convince, and force action from the board.

J.H. Emms to MLK

Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, New York (NY), New York, NY

J.H. Emms offers his approval and support to Dr. King regarding his position on Civil Rights and the Vietnam problem, which were expressed at speeches in Los Angeles and New York.

Telegram from MLK to Andrew Heiskell and A. Philip Randolph

Washington, D.C.

Dr. King informs Mr. Heiskell and Mr. Randolph that he will not be able to attend the emergency convocation. He also notes why this convocation is needed.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Harry Stern Shanis

Tuesday, March 19, 1968
Pennsylvania (PA)

Dora McDonald acknowledges Harry Shanis' earlier letter. She sends a photograph of Dr. King along with a biographical sketch.

Letter from Carey Preston to Dora McDonald

Thursday, October 11, 2012
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA

Mrs. Preston acknowledges receipt of letter from Dora McDonald regarding the possibility of Dr. King speaking at the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Convention. Due to the Sorority's intense desire to have Dr. King as the speaker, Ms. Preston is willing to wait for the confirmation.

Telegram from Anne Farnsworth and Marty Peretz to MLK

Friday, April 14, 1967
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Anne Farnsworth and Marty Peretz offer their encouragement to Dr. King.

Revolution in the Delta: Farm Hands Go on Strike

Mississippi (MS)

David R. Underhill discusses the strike of farm laborers in various Mississippi Delta cities. Underhill highlights strike procedures, methods, and locations.

Letter from Ruth H. Bunche to MLK

Saturday, September 9, 1967
New York, NY

Mrs. Ruth H. Bunche appeals to Dr. King for his financial support for Inwood House, a support system for unmarried mothers. Enclosed is a brochure describing the program and its services.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dr. Richard C. Gilman

Wednesday, October 19, 1966
Los Angeles, CA

Dora McDonald informs Dr. Gilman that Dr. King will be able to speak at Occidental College on November 17, 1966.

People to People

Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Cleveland, OH, Ohio (OH), Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA), Washington, D.C., Albany, GA, Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL, Florida (FL), St. Augustine, FL, Georgia (GA), Virginia (VA)

Dr. King announces the SCLC's launching of a People to People tour of four northern cities. The SCLC launched this tour in the north to display a concern for the "moral welfare of Northern Negroes."

Crusade For The Ballot

GEORGIA, Virginia (VA), North Carolina (NC), South Carolina (SC), Mississippi (MS), Louisiana (LA), Texas (TX), Atlanta, GA

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference issues a pamphlet addressing the need for increased registration of Negro voters in the southern states of America.

Man, a Being of Becoming

Dr. King documents ideas regarding the philosophy of man. Using the metaphor of a "flowing stream," he addresses man's experience from infancy through adulthood.

Killing Won't Frighten Negroes

Monday, May 24, 1965
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Montgomery, AL

Regarding the violence in Alabama, Dr. King decries the lack of justice for the ten murdered civil rights demonstrators under Governor Wallace's administration. He continues by saying that "eyes should have been on God" the Sunday morning the four girls were killed in Birmingham. King declares that the killings will not frighten the activists into submission.

Letter from MLK to Robert Maloney

Monday, March 4, 1963
Virginia (VA), Atlanta, GA

Robert Maloney encloses a picture to Dr. King that he took of a young Virginia Boy Scout troop. Maloney was surprised that all the boys in the troop were African American.

Schleiermacher

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher's "Speeches on Religion" on temporal things so filling people's minds that they don't have room for the eternal. He contrasts this with pantheism. The full title of this work is "On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers."

Letter from Curtis Cosby to MLK

Monday, May 17, 1965
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Curtis Cosby, writing on behalf of the Esquires Club, encourages Dr. King to support attorney Donald Hollowell as the replacement for judge Boyd Sloan in order to place a Negro in a high level federal position.

University of Mississippi at Oxford Crisis

Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King discusses the Mississippi crisis after the admittance of James Meredith into the local University.

Fellowship of Reconciliation Campaign Proposal

Thursday, October 27, 1966
New York (NY), VIETNAM, CANADA, Washington, D.C., UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

The Fellowship of Reconciliation announces its "Thanksgiving-To-Tet" campaign and includes details of the types of aid that will be given to the people of Vietnam.

Letter from Otto Emil Geppert to MLK

Wednesday, May 3, 1967
New York (NY), Illinois (IL), Memphis, TN

In this letter, Otto Emil Geppert expresses his opposition to the Vietnam War and encloses a monetary contribution to Dr. King, in support of his nonviolent approach.

Letter from MLK to Norman Baugher

Thursday, August 15, 1963
Illinois (IL)

Dr. King conveys his support to Norman Baugher for the Church of the Brethren's past correspondence regarding publicizing the philosophy of nonviolence.

Prayer Pilgrimage

Montgomery, AL, New York, NY, Alabama (AL), New York (NY), Nashville, TN, Tennessee (TN)

Various quotes are cited surrounding Dr. King's perception on love, nonviolence, spirituality, Montgomery, and more. Dr. King elaborates on the history of Montgomery and its direct relation to slavery. Ebony Magazine releases the exclusive eight-point "Plan for Freedom" for Montgomery, calling Negros to mobilize for an all-out assault on segregation."The Death of Evil' is also cited which correlates such evil with details from the book of Exodus.

Telegram from MLK to Muhammad Ali

Nevada (NV)

Dr. King sends a supportive telegram to Muhammad Ali. test

Letter from Carolyn B. Russell to MLK

Sunday, May 29, 1966
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Carolyn B. Russell is a high school student in support of Dr. King and informs him about different aspects of her life. As a result of living in her single mother's household, Carolyn desires employment and to continue her education.

Letter from Student Suzi Breece to MLK

Missouri (MO)

Cuba, Missouri High School freshman Suzi Breece asks Dr. King to send a letter about why civil rights are important to everyone. She hopes to use his statement as part of a class project.

War

Dr. King quotes the views of Italian politician Benito Mussolini, English public intellectual John Ruskin, and Nazi politician Dr. Robert Ley on war and its relationship to masculinity.

Thoughts on Nobel Prize

Birmingham, AL, New York (NY), California (CA), Florida (FL), Philadelphia, PA, Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL)

This draft of Dr. King's Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech lends recognition to the nonviolent practices of those engaged in the fight for equality and civil rights.