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"SOUTH KOREA"

Letter from SCLC to Lizzie Williams

Tuesday, August 17, 1965

A representative of the Citizenship Education Program, an initiative of the SCLC, informs Mrs. Willis of recent travel plans to Dorchester, GA. Dorchester academy played a vital role in the struggle for voting and civil rights.

Letter from MLK to Miss Ethel Klemm

Wednesday, October 23, 1963

Dr. King takes time to write Miss Ethel Klemm and explain the reasons for the purpose of the Freedom Movement. He clears up the misconception that Negroes are just hastily trying to get their way by stating that Negroes have been patient for too long. According to Dr. King, "This is not a matter of gradualism in its most commonly accepted term, but it is a matter of morality."

Letter from Leon Hall to William Rutherford

Sunday, March 17, 1968

Leon Hall writes William Rutherford requesting additional per diem fees for SCLC's Mississippi field staff.

Letter From Bessie Burrett to MLK

Bessie Burrett, a NAACP member, writes Dr. King asking for help and explaining the multiple incidences of racial injustice she and her husband have personally witnessed. Burrett describes her husband's injuries, which he obtained as a result of police brutality, and their struggles with unfair treatment in the court system. As a result, her husband is unable to work and they have mounting hospital and court fees to pay, creating a financial hardship for their family.

Letter to MLK from John Yeck

Tuesday, August 8, 1967

Yeck asks Dr. King to think about the connotations of the words "black" and "Negro." He feels that the word "black" contains a separating connotation, and the word "Negro" a unifying one.

Letter from Randall Elias to MLK

Thursday, May 27, 1965

Randall Elias offers the support of himself and the North Shore Chapter of Americans for Democratic Action for the civil rights march from Chicago to Springfield.

Letter from Benjamin F. Smith to the Editor of Detroit Free Press

Friday, March 31, 1967

In a letter to the editor of the Detroit Free Press, Benjamin Smith criticizes US involvement in Vietnam. He advocates ending the war as 80% of South Vietnamese people want peace, while 67% of Americans "favor a rough war."

The Task of Christian Leadership Training for Education in the Local Community

This undated manuscript was used as the basis for a speech Dr. King gave at the National Sunday School and Baptist Training Union Congress in Atlantic City, New Jersey in 1944. Dr. King defines community, lists three current problems within the community and explains the role of Christian leaders and education in a community. Dr. King identifies the most pressing problems as the economy, divisions within Christianity and race relations.

Science Surpasses the Social Order

Dr. King wrote this essay during his career at Crozer Theological Seminary in 1951. In the paper, he discusses the disproportionate growth of science and technology compared with that of the social order. Referencing the sociological term, Dr. King refers to this predicament as "cultural lag." He attributes this problem to the "lack of world brotherhood" and asserts that the survival of civilization depends on global unity. Drawing on Republican politician Wendall Wilkie and Prime Minister Clement Attlee, Dr.

"DuBois State Memorial Proposed; Would Be in Great Barrington"

Monday, February 12, 1968

William F. Bell writes an article concerning a proposed W. E. Dubois State Memorial in Great Barrington.

Letter from Sharon J. Brown to MLK

Friday, March 22, 1968

Sharon Brown, a fifth grader at Our Lady of Perpetual Help School, asks Dr. King how his congregation worships. She explains that this question is for a class project.

God

Dr. King quotes Jeremiah 29:13-14, noting that man can find God if he searches with all his heart.

Letter from University of King's College to MLK

Monday, February 3, 1964

The University of King's College sends a follow up letter to Dr. King inquiring if he will accept their offer to receive an Honorary Doctorate of Civil Law.

Notecard- Sin

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines Augustine's view on sin.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, September 11, 1967

Joan Daves informs Dr. King that Harper and Row is having difficulty publishing a paperback edition of "Where Do We Go From Here? "

Letter from E. Thomas Williams Jr. to MLK

Friday, April 23, 1965

On behalf of the Peace Corps Staff in Washington D. C., E. Thomas Williams, Jr. sends Dr. King a contribution to aid in the work of the SCLC. Williams also explains that many of the donors have made more than financial contributions to the civil rights movement.

Jeremiah

Dr. King records several scriptures from the biblical Book of Jeremiah.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Paul Kurtz

Friday, January 5, 1968

Dora McDonald grants Kurtz permission to print Dr. King's unedited speech "as is," as long as Kurtz indicates on the speech that is taken from a tape and is un-edited.

Letter of Invitation from Jay Goodlette-Bass to Mrs. Corretta Scott King to the Pageantry of the Peace Prize Award

Monday, October 19, 1964

The Fariyah Agency acknowledges Mrs. King commitment to the movement via her commitment to Dr. King. Additionally, the author requests Mrs. King presence to attend the pageantry of the Peace Prize award.

Letter from Coretta Scott King to the Women's Strike for Peace

Saturday, June 22, 1963

Mrs. King writes to the Women's Strike for Peace to extend her appreciation for their support in the area of civil rights.

Statement on Nonviolence in the South

Thursday, January 10, 1957

This document is a statement addressing the need to combat the growing violence between southern Caucasian Americans and African Americans.

Poster: Victory Baptist Church Banquet

This poster announces Victory Baptist Church's 24th anniversary banquet, with Dr. King as guest speaker. Dr. King spoke at this Los Angeles church on June 25, 1967.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, August 7, 1964

Ms. Daves writes Dr. King concerning an invitation to speak from the University Settlement.

Letter from J. G. Anoma to MLK

Tuesday, November 30, 1965

J. G. Anoma writes Dr. King to contribute to the movement of advancement of human dignity in the U. S. In addition, Anoma encloses a poem he wrote in Africa in honor of Dr. King and his accomplishments.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Tuesday, August 4, 1964

Joan Daves requests confirmation of a possible press conference, subsequent luncheon, and speaking engagement made by Dr. King. This letter includes Dora McDonald's holograph shorthand in red ink.

Telegram from Richard Daley to Dr. King Requesting Meeting

Chicago Mayor Richard Daley invites Dr. King to meet with him and other religious leaders to discuss programs that will improve the quality of life in Chicago.

How My Mind has Changed in the Last Decade

Dr. King writes notes on how his mind has changed in recent years. King states that while his main focus was on theology and philosophy, he also focused on social ethics. According to Dr. King, segregation is a tool that exploits the Negro and poor whites. He saw similarities with the liberation of India's people from Britain and asserts that his trip to India cultivated his ideologies on nonviolence.

Newspaper Clippings from New York and New Jersey

These newspaper clippings represent the views of several individuals who are critical of the Black Power Movement, the work ethics of African Americans and the government's policies.

New York Times: US Judge Forbids A House Inquiry; Panel is Defiant

Tuesday, August 16, 1966

This article discusses the decision of a federal judge, ordering the House Committes of Un-American Activities to not hold a hearing on a bill that would make it illegal for Americans to aid the Vietcong.

Note to MLK from Mrs. Ed Brooke

This note from Mrs. Ed Brooke is extremely negative towards Dr. King, accusing him of inciting riots and calling him names.