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"SOUTH AFRICA"

Hosea

Dr. King writes notes regarding the prophet Hosea and his views of God.

Address Given by Vice President Nixon in Asheville, North Carolina

Wednesday, June 5, 1957

This is the text of an address given by Vice President Richard Nixon before the sixty-sixth annual convention of the General Federation of Women's Club. He discusses the differences in countries dealing with Communism and America being a democracy.

SCLC Fall Conference Agenda

Friday, September 30, 1960

This is a tentative program for the SCLC's General Fall Conference to be held October 11th through the 13th in 1960. The program included such keynote speakers as Kelley Miller Smith, Joseph E. Lowery, and a freedom rally led by Dr. King, Ralph Abernathy and Fred Shuttlesworth.

MLK Makes Request About Bill Stein

Monday, November 21, 1966

Dr. King requests that the Protestant Episcopal Church of New York allow Bill Stein to continue his work with SCLC programs.

MLK's Own Ticket to the SCLC Banquet

Friday, October 25, 1963

Sometimes you buy your own ticket to your own show!

Letter from Leon Levy to MLK

Tuesday, December 26, 1961

Leon Levy congratulates Dr. King on his leadership and the efforts of the SCLC. Mr. Levy contributes to the organization and states that he follows Dr. King's work with interest.

Washington State University Students Invite MLK to Speak

Tuesday, December 22, 1964

Timothy D. Bradbury writes Dr. King on behalf of the students of Washington State University inviting him to speak about civil rights on their campus.

Why We Chose Jail Rather than Bail

Dr. King cites seven reasons for choosing jail not bail. Among them is that ?the highest expression of nonviolence is self suffering.?

Letter from Harry Wachtel to David Hunter

Wednesday, November 2, 1966

Mr. Wachtel expresses gratitude for a grant awarded by the Stern Family Fund to the American Foundation on Nonviolence and the SCLC.

Letter from Rachel Davis DuBois to MLK

Monday, August 29, 1966

Ms. Dubois writes to Dr. King regarding the strategy of the Commission on Religion and Race of the National Council of Churches. She believes that a change in attitude of whites, so that they desire to work with "Americans of darker complexion" should be a part of this strategy.

Letter from Clarence D. Coleman to MLK

Wednesday, November 11, 1964

Director of the Southern Region of the National Urban League, Clarence D. Coleman, congratulates Dr. King for receiving the 1964 Nobel Piece Prize. Coleman extends his very best wishes to Dr. King and the SCLC on behalf of the staff of the Southern Regional Office of the National Urban League and the officers and members of the Atlanta Summit Leadership Conference.

Letter from Amos O. Holmes to MLK

Wednesday, September 20, 1967

Amos Holmes, Georgia Field Director of the NAACP, appeals to Dr. King to reject the invitation to take leadership within the Atlanta community. He feels that the city can solve its own problems without the aid of SCLC or Dr. King.

God

Dr. King writes about God, according to Isaiah 40: 12-31.

Secrets of a Happy Marriage

Dr. King expounds upon the secrets of a happy marriage. His first point is that the husband and wife must comprehend the nature of sexes. He describes the dichotomy of a man and woman's perception of contentment. The second point Dr. King makes is that the married couple must have an understanding of the nature of marriage itself. He further asserts that a successful marriage must be built on a mutual compromise. The final contention by Dr. King is each individual must instill the sacredness of marriage.

Foreward by MLK: Famous Negro American Series

Dr. King discusses the contributions of Negro Americans to American society, past and present, in this foreward for the publication: Famous Negro American Series.

Letter from Rev. Milton Reid to MLK

Tuesday, January 28, 1964

Rev. Milton Reid invites Dr. King to Petersburg, Virginia to be the speaker at the 190th Anniversary of the First Baptist Church. Rev. Reid mentions to Dr. King that the church holds historical significance because meetings about abolishing slavery were held at the church by Nat Turner and John Brown. Reid asks Dr. King to suggest another speaker if he is unable to accept the invitation.

Letter from the Spring Mobilization Coordinating Center to MLK

Monday, February 27, 1967

A.L. Everett conveys pleasure in knowing Dr. and Mrs. King are sponsors of the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam, and that Dr. King will be speaking at an upcoming rally in San Francisco on April 15th. Everett requests that any further press releases concerning the planned demonstrations in both San Francisco and New York also include statements from both Dr. and Mrs. King.

Letter from MLK to Herbert Lamont

Wednesday, August 23, 1967

This document contains a small series of responses between Dr. King and Herbert Lamont. Dr. King expresses gratitude for Mr. Lamont's moral support, while Lamont affirms Dr. King's sentiments on peace and justice.

The Danger of A Little Progress

Saturday, February 15, 1964

In Dr. King's article, The Danger of a Little Progress, he discusses the work of the SCLC and SNCC in correlation to statistics regarding integrated housing and schools, as well as discrimination in employment. Dr. King concludes that there has been little progress among blacks in Atlanta statistically.

Final Plans for the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

This final organizing manual for the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom details all logistics of the march, including the purpose of the march and accommodations for arriving in Washington, D.C.

Letter from Eugene Cook to Wyatt Tee Walker

Thursday, August 15, 1963

Georgia Attorney General Eugene Cook regrets that Dr. King has refused to reveal the names of individuals affiliated with Communist activities throughout the United States. Mr. Cook states that he will continue to investigate the file on his own accord.

Letter from Dorothy Height to Dr. and Mrs. King

Thursday, December 8, 1966

Noted civil rights leader and women's activist Dorothy Height invites Dr. and Mrs. King to be special guests at the National Council of Negro Women's Life Membership Dinner. The event is also set to honor union leaders A. Philip Randolph, Walter Reuther and Mrs. Arthur Goldberg. Singer Lena Horne serves as a co-host to the dinner.

Letter from Mrs. William P. Camp to MLK

Thursday, October 28, 1965

Mrs. Camp expresses her gratitude for Dr. King's participation in the Fiftieth Anniversary Celebration ceremonies for the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom. Mrs. Camp requests permission to reproduce excerpts from his speech for use in publication of the organization.

Estimated Budget

This document drafts out SCLC's estimated budget for the 1964-1965 fiscal year.

SCLC Citizenship Workbook

This workbook is an extension of the SCLC Conference Citizenship program "designed to acquaint citizens with the way in which our government is run and to help them meet voting requirements." This resource tool features a number of vocabulary-building, arithmetic, reading comprehension, and spelling exercises to better equip voters with the knowledge to "fight against prejudice and loss of human rights in education."

Letter from Thomas Johnson to MLK

Monday, November 20, 1967

Thomas Johnson, a reporter for the New York Times, writes to Dr. King requesting his participation in a symposium to be published in Playboy, regarding the civil rights movement.

Reason

Dr. King quotes a passage from Karl Barth's "Word of God and the Word of Man," regarding reason.

Letter from Dr. King to W. Daniels

Tuesday, March 12, 1968

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. responds to W. Daniels letter regarding a speaking invitation, March 12, 1968. Dr. King regrettably informs him that his intensive schedule restricts his ability to accept speaking engagements, for the next eight or nine months.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Henry R. Luce

Friday, February 15, 1963

Dora McDonald writes to Henry Luce, of Time & Life, in response to his prior correspondence to Dr. King.

SCLC Newsletter, July-August 1964

Wednesday, July 15, 1964

This 1964 SCLC newsletter addresses nearly all if not all topics related to the Civil Rights Movement of the era.