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"SOUTH AFRICA"

Letter from Alex Pascal to MLK

California (CA), VIETNAM

Mr. Pascal states that the American people are ignorant to the facts of Vietnam. He praises a recent speech by Dr. King on the subject, and he requests a copy of it.

Letter from Abraham Lincoln High School to MLK

Wednesday, June 28, 1967
California (CA), Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL

Earl Saunders, an art teacher at Abraham Lincoln High School, writes to Dr. King regarding awards of merit for Dr. King's contribution to the Civil Rights Movement. Dr. King and Mr. Saunders are both alumni of Boston University's School of Theology.

Letter from Episcopal Churchmen for South Africa to MLK

Tuesday, May 26, 1959
Johannesburg, South Africa, South Africa, New York, NY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This fundraising letter and accompanying bulletin describes the plight of South African non-whites brought on by apartheid and economic disparities. The Episcopal Churchmen for South Africa requests donations and support for the work of the Diocese of Johannesburg.

Letter from Paul Madsen to MLK

Tuesday, November 5, 1963
Pennsylvania (PA)

Paul Madsen, Associate Executive Secretary of the American Baptist Home Mission Societies, offers Dr. King a consulting position with the organization. The organization needs someone to provide guidance on critical decisions, appear at a limited number of speaking engagements, and to make suggestions to the organization as needed. He mentions that the consulting arrangement could be used to help Ebenezer Baptist Church's budget.

Letter from Anna Hedgeman to MLK

Wednesday, October 26, 1966
New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. Hedgeman writes Dr. King to express her support for Dr. King's quality service that he has given America. He then targets Dr. King on a letter he received on the representation of the slogan "Black Power." Dr. Hedgeman feels the slogan relates strongly towards extremists and black supremacy. Lastly, she encloses a small contribution and two letters.

Letter from Bonnie Scott to MLK

Illinois (IL), Atlanta, GA

Bonnie Scott, a student at Lake Forest College, sends Dr. King a letter asking him for his bibliography as well as information about nonviolence for their senior thesis.

Spring Mobilization Background Material

New York, NY, San Francisco, CA, VIETNAM, Atlanta, GA, Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Chicago, IL

The Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam announces Dr. King as its speaker for their April 15 march. In addition, this document offers background information on the conflict in Vietnam.

Telegram from Richard J. Daley to MLK

Friday, July 16, 1965
Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA, Detroit, MI

Mayor Richard J. Daley discusses the issue of human rights in Chicago and the initiation of new programs. The mayor suggests a visit with Dr. King to acquire his intellect on this progressive plan. In addition, Mayor Daley informs Dr. King that he will be attending the National League of Cities Conference.

Letter from Carolyn Martinelli to Ralph Abernathy After the Death of MLK

Saturday, April 13, 1968
California (CA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Mrs. Martinelli writes Rev. Abernathy in the month following Dr. King's death, encouraging him to continue promoting a philosophy of love and equality. Martinelli identifies herself as a white housewife, teacher and mother of two, who has only known three Negroes in her whole life. . Although she has never known poverty, her desire is for all Americans to know the truth and work to resolve these problems in society.

Letter to MLK from N.P. Feinsinger

Friday, April 28, 1967
Wisconsin (WI)

In this letter, Feinsinger is consulting Dr. King about the Russell Bull Scholarship and hoping that he can proceed with the selection process.

MLK Notes for Speech to the Chicago Headline Club

Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Georgia (GA), Selma, AL, Alabama (AL)

This is a draft of a speech Dr. King delivered to the Chicago Headline Club. The speech encompasses information regarding the difficulty the media may have covering the SCLC and the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from John E. Farrow to MLK

Monday, November 18, 1963

John Farrow writes Dr. King to suggest he tread softly as he continues the fight for social justice. Farrow states that whites will fight back with brute force against desegregation and civil rights for all. Farrow urges Dr. King to offer knowledge but not seek to antagonize whites during the March on Washington and his future efforts for the civil rights movement.

Letter from Coretta Scott King to Francis Robinson

Wednesday, May 25, 1966
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

Mrs. King expresses her appreciation for the opera tickets that Mr. Robinson gave to her and Dr. King.

Telegram from MLK to Senator Robert Kennedy

Monday, March 18, 1963
Washington, D.C., Virginia (VA)

Dr. King requests that Senator Robert Kennedy initiate an investigation into complaints about the actions of police during demonstrations in Petersburg, Virginia.

Invitation to the 20th Anniversary World Conference Against Atom and Hydrogen Bombs

Saturday, June 26, 1965
JAPAN, Tokyo, Japan, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, VIETNAM

Ichiro Mortaki, of the Japan Congress Against Atom & Hyrdrogen Bombs, invites Dr. King to their conference taking place 20 years after two atomic bombs were dropping on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan, in World War II. This leading Japanese disarmament organization was founded the same year they extended this invitation to Dr. King.

Telegram from Nathaniel Tillman Jr. to MLK

Thursday, February 28, 1963
Washington, D.C.

The Washington, D.C. chapter of Morehouse College Alumni invites Dr. King to speak at its first annual Public Affairs Forum. The organization suggests a topic of "The Negro 100 Years After Emancipation."

Letter from Mrs. Everett L. Brantley to the SCLC

Friday, June 11, 1965
New Jersey (NJ)

Mrs. Brantley asks that the SCLC forward an enclosed check for Mrs. Reeb, funded by money raised at a citizens meeting in New Jersey.

Letter from Ruthe T. Sheffey to MLK

Thursday, November 9, 1967
Baltimore, MD

In this letter, Ms. Sheffey asks Dr. King's permission to use his "I Have a Dream" speech in her upcoming textbook, "Impressions in Asphalt." Ms. Sheffey is a faculty member at Morgan State College, who is working on a textbook of poetry and prose with coworker, Eugenia Collier.

Notes for U.F.T. Address

On March 14, 1964, Dr. King was presented with the John Dewey Award by the United Teachers Federation. The address he delivered that day is outlined in this type-written draft along with his handwritten notes. In the draft, Dr. King emphasizes the importance of education, especially as a tool for African American advancement. He cites how the deprivation of education has been used as a way to systematically oppress African Americans and he asserts that this inequality is a reality that must be confronted. Dr.

Tillich's Philosophy of Religion

Dr. King quotes Paul Tillich's "The Protestant Era."

The State of SANE

Tuesday, November 28, 1967
Washington, D.C., Chicago, IL, New York (NY), VIETNAM, Detroit, MI, New Jersey (NJ), New York, NY

H. Stuart Hughes, Chairman of the National Committee for a SANE Nuclear Policy, writes this report to the board, sponsors and chapters of the organization. Hughes notifies his readers that SANE's policy making body is being renewed due to newly elected regional and national members. Also, the Board adopted a detailed statement of a strategy, which places top priority on promoting an alternative to President Johnson and his Vietnam War policy. Other events include the update of a successful Labor Leadership Assembly for Peace and guest speaker Norman Thomas.

Letter from Edwin Fenton to MLK about permission to use Marchi on Washington speech

Tuesday, June 13, 1967
Pennsylvania (PA)

Edward Fenton, Co-Director, Social Studies Curriculum Development Center at Carnegie Institute of Technology writes to request permission to duplicate some excerpts from Dr.King's speech in Washington during the summer of 1963 without fee. Operating under a grant from the United States Office of Education, the Center is developing new courses of study and writing materials to teach social studies inductively to able students in grades nine through twelve.

Telegram from Carole Hoover to MLK

Thursday, November 2, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Birmingham, AL, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL)

Carole Hoover offers encouragement to Dr.King while he is incarcerated in Birmingham.

Letter from Jean Tisdale to MLK

Friday, March 30, 1962
Atlanta, GA, California (CA), Montgomery, AL

Jean Tisdale, a student at Mills College in Oakland, California, writes Dr. King and requests an account of his personal experiences concerning problems in the South and the Negro's stride toward equality.

Letter from MLK to Theodore W. Kheel

Tuesday, September 8, 1964
New York, NY, Berlin, Germany

Dr. King graciously declines attorney and noted labor mediator Theodore Kheel's invitation to sit on the Dais at the International Longshoremen's 50th Anniversary Dinner due to a previous commitment in Berlin, Germany.

Letter from Annie L. Cook to MLK

Thursday, December 17, 1964
West Virginia (WV), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Annie Cook asks Dr. King to make a speech at a program sponsored by the Greenbrier County branch of the NAACP. She predicts that the program will be informative and improve communication between Negros and whites.

Letter from MLK to Willard T. Carter

Friday, December 27, 1963
Connecticut (CT), Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Dr. King thanks Mr. and Mrs. Willard Carter for their monetary contribution to the SCLC. King states that because of friends like them he can help end racial discrimination and segregation in the South.

Program of the Chicago Freedom Movement

Chicago, IL

The SCLC and the Coordinating Council of Community Organizations (CCCO) issues a program addressing the goals of the Chicago Freedom Movement. The Chicago Freedom Movement is composed of a coalition of organizations who have decided to eradicate slums, ghettos and racism from the city.

Letter from William W. Boyer to MLK

Friday, February 2, 1968
Kansas (KS)

This Letter from William W. Boyer, Chairman of the Convocations Committee, to Dr. King informs Dr. King the transcription of his "Future of Integration" speech to the Kansas State University academic community has arrived. A copy of the transcription will be published in Issues 1968.
This enclosed transcription of his speech addresses many varied issues affecting American society.

Letter from Edward Kennedy to MLK

Thursday, August 18, 1966
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Edward Kennedy thanks Dr. and Mrs. King for their hospitality during the Annual Convention of the SCLC.