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"SOUTH AFRICA"

Mrs.Herr of the Yakima Chapter to MLK

Friday, April 2, 1965

Mrs. Herr, on behalf of the Yakima Chapter of United Nations Association invites Dr. King to speak October 24, in honor of United Nations Week. The organization offers to pay his fee for speaking to their organization.

Letter from Maurice A. Dawkins to MLK

Saturday, June 5, 1965

In this letter, Mr. Dawkins informs Dr. King that the Summer Community Organization and Political Education, S.C.O.P.E., stands to benefit from the involvement of the VISTA organization.

Letter from Jan Jansen to MLK

Thursday, February 20, 1964

Jan Helgo Jansen sends a letter on the behalf of the student organizations in Norway, Denmark and Sweden, inviting Dr. King to speak in Scandinavia.

The Atlanta Constitution: Dr. King Warns Against the Riots

Tuesday, June 27, 1967

Eugene Patterson describes Dr. King's position against violent race riots and the consequences of these movements on the Black and White community.

Apostles' Creed

Dr. King outlines the history of the Apostles' Creed and states the creed in its Roman form.

MLK Announces a New SCLC March in Washington, DC

Monday, December 4, 1967

Dr. King announces the SCLC's decision to lead a non-violent march on Washington protesting the government's lack of support in providing jobs and income for impoverished Americans.

Letter from Frances Pauley to MLK

Friday, May 8, 1964

Mrs. Pauley, Executive Director of the Georgia Council on Human Relations, thanks Dr. King for his contribution to her organization.

Invitation from Hermon Dilmore to MLK

Wednesday, March 1, 1967

Representing the American Baptist Men, Director, Hermon C. Dilmore makes acquaintance with Dr. King via mutual friend, J.C. Herrin, Assistant General Secretary of the American Baptist Convention. Mr. Dilmore invites Dr. King to stop by the American Baptist Men's booth at the Convention in Pittsburgh. Furthermore, he invites attendance of at least one family from Dr. King's church to the 24th Annual National Conference at the American Baptist Assembly in Green Lake, Wisconsin.

Letter from Carey B. Joynt to Rev. Carroll D. Payne

Tuesday, June 20, 1967

In this letter, dated June 20, 1967, Carey Joynt asks Rev. Carroll Payne to review her rough draft regarding the Vietnam War and Ramsey's ideas. She has simplified the arguments to the best of her abilities and hopes that Payne can offer suggestions for her draft.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rev. William Lawson

Wednesday, May 6, 1964

Dora McDonald writes in response to a request from Reverend William Lawson of Texas Southern University. McDonald encloses a biographical sketch and photograph of Dr. King, then relays a message from the Reverend to exclude a reception for him on May 17.

Newspaper Submissions on Race from U.S. Soldiers

This newspaper clipping features two submissions from U.S. Soldiers, both concerning racial issues.

Letter from MLK and Others to President Dwight D. Eisenhower

Friday, January 11, 1957

A group of Southern religious leaders write to President Eisenhower concerning the extreme violence directed towards Negro people throughout the South. They request his immediate action to address the nation's moral and legal framework sustained by the presiding racial climate.

Letter from Charles McC. Mathias, Jr. to MLK

Monday, March 8, 1965

Maryland Congressman Charles M. Mathias thanks Dr. King for his letter regarding the Representative's recent trip to Selma, Alabama. As a result of his visit, Congressman Mathias informs Dr. King that he prepared and introduced civil rights legislation to the latest House of Representatives session.

Letter from Mrs. David Bowen to MLK

Mrs. David Bowen suggests that SCLC start a poor people's campaign. She says that they should focus on a specific group of people instead if just problems in general. She also says that she and others will be willing to help when they know how to find the people who truly need it.

MLK Postcard - American Negro Emancipation Centennial

Wednesday, January 1, 1964

The American Negro Emancipation Centennial issued this 1964 postcard containing Dr. King's brief biography. The postcard was designed to be used as a study guide in Negro history.

"Lost Sheep" or "The God of the Lost"

Sunday, September 18, 1966

Dr. King delivers a sermon about the parable of the lost sheep from the book of Luke. In this sermon, Dr. King poses the question that has pondered mankind for ages, "What is God Like?" He declares, "God is like a good shepherd" caring for his sheep. Dr. King commends the good done in America, but compares the nation to "a lost sheep" for failing to maintain equality for all men. He summarizes by describing good as a process, that everyone is significant and God is seeking to find the lost.

Letter from Verinal Harris to MLK

Monday, January 8, 1968

Mrs. Verinal Harris pleads for the help of Dr. King regarding the brutal actions of the police against children in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Letter From Ambassador Avraham Harman to MLK

Friday, January 27, 1967

Ambassador Harman congratulates Dr. King for his aspirations concerning an "American Negro Pilgrimage" to Israel. He praises Dr. King for his receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize, and discusses the importance of his leadership in this proposed project for peace.

The Negro Heritage Library

The Negro Heritage Library sought to make the Negro community aware of the cultural "black-out" that was due to the inadequacies within the nations history books.The president of the library, Noel N. Marder, focused the energies and resources from the Educational Heritage. As the most respected spokesman for the Negro of his time, there is a section focused solely on Dr. King's work.

Letter from MLK to Rev. James Endicott

Monday, December 18, 1967

Dr. King acknowledges the receipt of Rev. Endicott's telegram inviting him to speak at a rally in Toronto. He regretfully declines the invitation due to the volume of work with his organization.

I Sat Where They Sat Sermon Outline

This sermon draft of Dr. King's was never delivered, but focuses on the Christian themes of empathy and understanding. Dr. King claims that "if the white man was closer to the Negro he would... ...understand them" better.

Letter from Charles T. Dubin to MLK

Sunday, February 11, 1968

Attorney at Law, Charles T. Dubin writes Dr. King to express his approval of the nonviolent practices of the SCLC, and assures Dr. King of the legal effect on the American judicial system. Dubin closes by imploring that Dr. King does not place himself in jeopardy and danger of life and limb.

Thank You Letter from Mary Keller to MLK

Tuesday, March 19, 1968

This letter from Mary Keller to Dr. King thanks him for his speech given at Grosse Pointe High School on March 14, 1968. Keller apologizes for the behavior of some "troublemakers" during the event.

Aquinas, Thomas

Dr. King notes biographical information about Thomas Aquinas.

The Sound of Freedom

Wednesday, October 7, 1964

The Greater Philadelphia Citizens Committee presents The Sound of Freedom to "demonstrate Philadelphia unity" where Dr. King is the guest speaker.

Letter from Martha Roberts to MLK

Tuesday, April 25, 1967

Martha Roberts, of Scranton, Pennsylvania, chastises Dr. King for leading marches and speaking against the war in Vietnam. She expresses to Dr. King that his focus should be on teaching "your people" to learn trades, enhance education and accept gradual change.

Letter from Johann R. Goelz to MLK

Tuesday, May 7, 1963

Johann R. Goelz highlights the spiritual irony that Dr. King's has the same name of the historical Martin Luther. Mr. Goelz served as a former Lutheran pastor in Germany and expounds on the religious realities of Jesus Christ.

SCLC Board Meeting

Tuesday, September 29, 1964

This is the agenda for a board meeting of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in Savannah, Georgia.

Letter to Coretta Scott King from Diana Melendez

Friday, April 5, 1968

Diana Melendez, a student at New York City's M.E.S. 146, wrote this letter to Coretta Scott King following a school assembly that announced the death of Dr. King. Melendez offers her condolences and writes that Mrs. King was truly lucky, as she "married a brave man."

Letter from Robert Needles to MLK

Thursday, June 17, 1965

A critic writes to Dr. King to explain why he will not support his program. He insists that Dr. King's activity only contributes to the "deterioration of the colored people in America."