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"SOUTH AFRICA"

It's Hard to Be a Christian

Dr. King outlines his sermon entitled "It's Hard to Be a Christian." King asserts that in order for one to be a fully committed Christian he or she must subordinate their ego and prioritize their concern for God's kingdom.

Excerpts from The Negro and the American Dream

Sunday, September 25, 1960
North Carolina (NC), South Africa, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, UNITED KINGDOM

In this address to the Charlotte, North Carolina branch of the NAACP, Dr. King outlines five actions that Negroes must address in order to ensure their own first-class citizenship.

Letter from Kate Krauthemier to MLK about a St. Louis Appearance

Monday, August 17, 1964
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Missouri (MO)

In this letter, Kate Krautheimer of the Artists and Speakers Bureau,urgently requests an appearance from Dr. King to St. Louis University.

Notecard- Sin

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines Augustine's view on sin.

Letter from Henry Gonzalez to MLK

Tuesday, June 28, 1966
Washington, D.C.

Representative Henry Gonzalez, a democratic politician representing Texas, responds to a request letter for donations from the SCLC. While he encloses a check, he criticizes the fact that the NAACP was excluded from the Mississippi March.

Letter from Evert Svensson to MLK

Wednesday, June 7, 1967
Stockholm, Sweden, VIETNAM, Atlanta, GA

Evert Svensson invites Dr. King to speak before the Christian Social Democrats Movement in Gotesborg, Sweden.

Term Paper Notes

EGYPT, ETHIOPIA

During Dr. King's matriculation through Crozer Theological Seminary, he writes a term paper that contains results of a historical study on Mesopotamia and Egypt.

Letter from Abraham Lincoln High School to MLK

Wednesday, June 28, 1967
California (CA), Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL

Earl Saunders, an art teacher at Abraham Lincoln High School, writes to Dr. King regarding awards of merit for Dr. King's contribution to the Civil Rights Movement. Dr. King and Mr. Saunders are both alumni of Boston University's School of Theology.

Sin I and Sin II

Dr. King cites scripture in examining concepts of sin.

Letter from the Knox's Church to MLK

Friday, January 24, 1964
CANADA, Atlanta, GA

The Knox's Church of Canada expresses their excitement to see Dr. King's image in Time Magazine for 'Man of the Year.' The author asserts that after all John F. Kennedy may have not died "in vain." Robert A. Jackson expounds on the societal issues in Canada and how they experience some aspects of segregation in cities. Mr. Jackson invites Dr. King to the Knox church upon his availability.

Letter from Rev. Robert Hoggard of Grace Cathedral to Dora McDonald

Thursday, February 18, 1965
San Francisco, CA, Atlanta, GA

Reverend Robert Hoggard, of Grace Cathderal in San Francisco, contacts Dora McDonald with the hope that Dr. King will be able to preach for their congregation on March 28, 1965.

Letter from Martha Johnson to MLK

Thursday, May 3, 1962
Philadelphia, PA, New York (NY), Brooklyn, NY, Atlanta, GA

Martha Johnson invites Dr. King to be a member of the John Brown Memorial Association, which is dedicated to the memory of its first freedom rider.

Telegram from MLK to President Eisenhower

Thursday, August 13, 1959
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY, Washington, D.C.

This is the text of a telegram Dr. King sent to President Eisenhower regarding the contemporaneous events of the opening of desegregated schools and the arrival of Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev.

Letter of Gratitude and Concern from Eulah M. Eubank to Charles R. Baker of IAD

Sunday, February 18, 1968
Washington, D.C., Virginia (VA)

In this letter Eulah Eubank points to an urgent situation. Hence, Eubank writes with the intention of receiving resources to continue the fight against injustice. Finally, she communicates her sustained commitment to volunteering with the Anti Defamation League and Open for Opinion via radio monitoring.

Memo from Joan Daves to MLK

Thursday, May 28, 1964
New York, NY

In this memo, Joan Daves informs Dr. King, along with others, that the Detroit News will run installments for "Why We Cant Wait." They are also told that the copyright will be in Dr. King's name and that credit will be given to Harper and NAL.

Letter from Jerome S. Ozer to MLK

Thursday, May 18, 1967
New York, NY

Mr. Ozer informs Dr. King that his organization will be publishing "Eyewitness: The Negro in American History" by William Loren Katz, which covers the Negro in every aspect of American life. He then requests that Dr. King write an introduction for the book.

Letter from Robert J. McCraken to MLK

Friday, October 25, 1963
New York, NY

Reverend McCracken extends an invitation to Dr. King to preach at The Riverside Church in New York.

Letter from William A. Rutherford to Mr. T. M. Alexander, Jr.

Tuesday, March 5, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), South Africa

Mr. Rutherford writes Mr. Alexander explaining that members of the SCLC were not aware of the purchase of stock made on behalf of the organization. He explains to Mr. Alexander that the organization is in complaint of and will protest Mr. Alexander's actions.

MLK Upon Landing at New York City

Wednesday, March 18, 1959
New York (NY), New York, NY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, INDIA

Dr. King expresses his enjoyment upon his return from India. He also gives his opinion on a few issues in India such as India's struggling economy. He first advises that Western nations should aid India in improving their economy. Then he compares the caste system to the race problem in America.

Letter from Peter Seeger to MLK

New York (NY), Tokyo, Japan

American folk singer, songwriter and activist Peter Seeger shares with Dr. King a previous experience appearing on a television program in Tokyo. Seeger recommends the program as an excellent means to communicate with the Japanese people.

Facing the Challenge of a New Life

EGYPT, GREECE, CHINA, FRANCE, INDIA, PAKISTAN, Montgomery, AL

Dr. King uses Greek Philosophy, the Christian conception of agape love, and the need for nonviolent resistance as a guideline of "Facing the Challenge of a New Life" in America. Throughout the sermon, he encourages African Americans to remain committed to the nonviolent principles of the Montgomery Bus Boycott and the precepts of Christian living to facilitate the birth of a new way of life in an America dealing with violent conflicts over social conditions.

MLK Remarks at The World March Toward Human Rights Luncheon

Thursday, May 28, 1964
Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), Virginia (VA), Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King addresses the 25th anniversary of the NAACP Legal Defense and Education Fund. Dr. King delivers remarks honoring the work of the Fund in combating the system of racial segregation and striving for human rights. He advocates the need for current civil rights legislation, but finds congressional hesitation frustrating and problematic. Referencing the 1964 Civil Right's Act, King is convinced that if the bill is not passed, the "nation will drift toward its moral and political doom."

Letter from Burke Marshall of the Department of Justice to MLK Regarding Paul Chapman

Wednesday, May 6, 1964
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice, writes Dr. King in reference to a previous telgram correspondence concerning an assault on Reverend Paul Chapman. Burke writes that his department can take no action due to a lack of evidence indicating a crime.

New Attack on Highlander Folk School

Tuesday, July 16, 1963
Tennessee (TN), New Orleans, LA

The Southern Conference Educational Fund distributed this "Action Memo" to generate support for Highlander High School in a fight against the State of Tennessee.

MLK Statement on Book by Salk

Monday, February 21, 1966

Dr. King writes a statement on a book by Jonas Salk and discusses the significance of his contribution. Dr. King expresses that Mr. Salk's book highlights one of the most damaging consequences of slavery in the eradication of the meaning, history, and identity of the Negro.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Gates to MLK

Sunday, June 30, 1963
Missouri (MO), Chicago, IL

Bob and Betty Gates write Dr. King enclosing a contribution toward his work for freedom and better opportunities for African Americans. The Gates also ask Dr. King's opinion regarding the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund.

Letter from MLK to Naomi Thomas

Monday, January 8, 1968
South Africa, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York (NY), Los Angeles, CA, South Africa

Dr. King explains to Naomi Thomas his reasons for supporting athletes who plan to boycott the Olympics.

Letter from Congressman Lionel Van Deerlin to MLK

Monday, August 30, 1965
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C., California (CA), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Congressman Lionel Van Deerlin, the 37th district Representative from California, thanks Dr. King for the telegram urging him to sign the discharge petition for the home rule bill for the District of Columbia, and he lets Dr. King know he has already signed it.

Letter from Ian Robertson to MLK

Wednesday, January 26, 1966
SOUTH AFRICA

Ian Robertson, President of the National Union of South African Students, writes Dr. King on behalf of the organization. He addresses the lack of acknowledgement to their previous letter and requests a copy and recording of Dr. King's speech.

Letter from Ira Sandperl to MLK with Concerns of Supporting SCLC

Saturday, December 10, 1966
California (CA), Chicago, IL, South Carolina (SC)

Sandperl pleas with Dr. King to review and respond to his four point proposal, proclaiming that only then will he and Joan Baez continue to support SCLC. Sandperl criticizes SCLC for not being honest with it's coworkers, being unorganized, and self defeating. Sandperl wants Dr. King to convince him otherwise, but does not view the SCLC as being able to achieve social change from what he experienced at the retreat in South Carolina. Sandperl promises support if his proposal is adopted by the SCLC.