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Critical Postcard to MLK

The author of this document questions whether Dr. King is worthy of the Nobel Peace Prize Honor.

Revelation

Dr. King quotes Emil Brunner's "The Mediator."

SCLC News Release: The State of Negro Education in the South

This SCLC news release discusses the terrible educational conditions endured by African American students in the South. It also highlights effective solutions to exposing "negro youngsters" to better teachers and a better quality of learning.

Statement Adapted from MLK Nobel Peace Prize Acceptance Speech

Sunday, July 30, 1967

Tom Offenbburger requests Dr. King's permission to forward this adaptation of his Nobel Prize acceptance speech for publication in the French newspaper, "Ouest France."

Dr. King Sermon Rough Draft - "Man Incurably Religious"

The document, shown here, is a rough draft of sermon notes, prepared by Dr. King, under the title "Man Incurably Religious." The exact timeframe, of this sermon draft, is unknown. Dr. King, in this draft, puts the spotlight on examples such as a baby's attachment to a mother, a flower's direction toward the sun and the flight pattern of a pigeon. He used a quotation of St. Augustine that said, "We come forth from God and we shall be homesick until we return to him."

Letter from Mark Raphael to MLK

Mark Raphael, the President of the All-Square Student Congress Speaker's Bureau at New York University, invites Dr. King to talk about his priorities in America and plans for Washington.

Letter from Helen Marrow to MLK

Thursday, April 6, 1967

Mrs. Marrow thanks Dr. King for his leadership and position on the Vietnam War. She also encloses a special composition dedicated to Dr. King for his commitment to peace.

Letter from MLK to Senator Hiram L. Fong

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King thanks Hawaii Republican Senator Hiram Fong for his role in the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Fong was the first Asian American and Chinese American to become a US Senator.

Letter from the US Civil Service Commission to Helyn M. Brooks

Friday, March 26, 1965

The United States Civil Service Commission informs Mrs. Helyn M. Brooks of her prospects for consideration for appointment in a civil service position.Mrs. Brooks' prospects section estimate is listed as poor.

Letter from John Bolt Culbertson to MLK

Attorney John Bolt Culbertson writes Dr. King to inform him of the upcoming "Negro Spiritual Singing Convention" in Greenville, South Carolina. Mr. Culbertson explains that the previous occasion was so successful that he has decided to sponsor a similar event with the aspiration that it will be bigger than the last. He requests Dr. King's help in advertising for the Convention and indicates in postscript that he would appreciate it if Dr. King could send a representative as he did before.

Newspaper Submissions on Race from U.S. Soldiers

This newspaper clipping features two submissions from U.S. Soldiers, both concerning racial issues.

MLK's Public Statement Regarding Julian Bond

Tuesday, January 12, 1965

Dr. King expresses his indignation for the State Legislatures refusal to seat Representative-Elect Julian Bond. Dr. King asserts that there are obvious racial overtones in the State Legislatures decisions since Mr. Bond received 82 percent of the votes in his district. Dr. King will commence direct action due to the state of urgency.

Telegram from A. Philip Randolph to MLK

Friday, October 14, 1966

A. Philip Randolph expresses his discontent with the release of a manifesto from civil rights leaders without Dr. King's signature.

Letter from Martin Paryer to MLK

Tuesday, August 9, 1966

Martin Paryer wrote Dr. King this letter to respond to his July form letter, stating that he finds Black Power and the violence associated with it to be detrimental to the nonviolent Civil Rights campaign. He further states that poverty is not only a Negro problem, but also a problem of all races.

Negroes Suffer From Riots, King Writes In New Book

Sunday, June 25, 1967

The Oregonian newspaper published this brief review of Dr. King's last publication, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?". The article highlights Dr. King's perspective on the negative impact of riots. According to Dr. King, riots were menacing for both black and white communities.

Letter from Clair Callan to MLK

Thursday, January 7, 1965

Representative Callan of Nebraska writes Dr. King to thank him for his recent telegram regarding the Mississippi Congressional Delegation. After giving serious consideration to Dr. King's recommendation to vote against seating the Mississippi Congressman, Callan states that he came to the conclusion that "a refusal to seat the Delegation in question would not further the cause of the Negro in that state," and consequently voted for the seating.

Telegram from Dora McDonald to E. M. Bettenson

Monday, September 11, 1967

Dora McDonald informs Mr. E. M. Bettenson from the University of Newcastle Upon Tyne of a date that Dr. King will be available to receive an Honorary Degree.

Letter from Assistant Deputy Attorney General William A. Geoghegan to MLK

Wednesday, March 10, 1965

William Geoghegan, Assistant Deputy Attorney General, thanks Dr. King for his telegram recommending L. N. D. Wells, Jr. to the Fifth Circuit of the United States Court of Appeals.

Letter from Henry H. Arrington to Paul Whelehon about P. Ballantine & Sons Employment of Negroes

Thursday, January 12, 1967

The letter references letters between Arrington and John Farrell, regarding the employment of a Negro representative. Mr. Kiah Sayles, a representative of P. Ballantine & Sons, explained that P. Ballantine & Sons was the first company to hire Negro models which elevated Negroes in executive positions. Sayles went on to explain the liberal hiring policy of Coyle Beverage, a distributor of P. Ballantine and Sons.

Letter from Wayne Williams to Virgil Jones

Wednesday, August 23, 1967

Wayne Williams writes to follow up with Virgil Dwight Jones on his recently filed charge with the Chicago Fair Employment Practices Commision Office.

Social Ethics

Dr. King cites the Old Testament biblical book of Exodus regarding social ethics.

Letter from C.A. Echols to MLK

Thursday, July 1, 1965

C.A. Echols requests a copy of Dr. King's publication "The Time for Freedom Has Come" to be included in his upcoming thesis "Thoreau and Civil Disobedience."

Don B. Pratt's Position Statement

Friday, January 26, 1968

Don Pratt expresses concerns about his induction into the US Army during the Vietnam War. Mr. Pratt questions the morality of this "aggressive" war, which would enable him to inflict violence against his "neighbors" of Vietnam.

Letter from Rosa A. King to MLK

Rosa King invites Dr. King to be a speaker at Central Baptist Church's 14th Annual Friends Day in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Correspondence - Aftermath of Dr. King's Assassination, 4/5/68

Friday, April 5, 1968

This letter, originating from Chattanooga, TN on the day immediately following Dr. King's assassination, is a personal note of condolence and lament. In it the writer identifies Dr. King as "truly America's outstanding citizen of our time". The writer and addressee are unidentified.

Memorandum on direct Action in Alabama Cities

Dr. King writes a Direct Action plan for the Alabama cities of Birmingham, Danville and Montgomery. He believes that these cities need to focus on the emergence of violence and recommends the integration of Negroes into the police force.

Royalty Statement for MLK's "Why We Can't Wait"

Thursday, June 30, 1966

This royalty statement from Harper and Row, Publishers Incorporated, details royalty earnings for Dr. King's "Why We Can't Wait" for the six month period ending June 30, 1966.

MLK Advocates Registering to Vote

Dr. King urges individuals to join the "march to Freedom" by becoming a registered voter. Dr. King asserts that voting will help educate children, obtain a minimum wage law, and create the opportunity for better medical care.

Letter from MLK to Louis Simon

Tuesday, January 16, 1962

Dr. King thanks Louis Simon of the Amalgamated Laundry Workers Joint Board for his thoughts about Dr. King's speech in Miami and the financial contribution to the SCLC. Dr. King explains that the holiday season is one of the hardest times of the year for the SCLC.

Letter from J. L. Roberts to MLK

Tuesday, September 19, 1967

Minister Roberts writes to Dr. King expressing his support of the Civil Rights Movement along with making a donation to the SCLC.