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Revelation Baptist Church Program for "A Knock at Midnight"

Sunday, September 27, 1964

This program outlines the Revelation Baptist Church Sunday Worship Service on September 27, 1964. The booklet lists Reverend Fred L. Shuttlesworth, co-founder of the SCLC, as the church's presiding minister. On this occasion, Dr. King addressed the congregation from the pulpit with the sermon "A Knock at Midnight," which had been published the year before. Dr. King's handwritten notes seem to outline another talk on the back cover.

Letter from MLK to Agnes Mack

Saturday, December 10, 0196

Dr. King sends Agnes Mack a form to complete so that she may receive a copy of the "I have a Dream" speech.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Harry Wachtel

Wednesday, November 18, 1964

Ms. McDonald sends Mr. Wachtel Dr. King's schedules for visiting Oslo, Norway. Dr. King is traveling to Norway to receive his Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Dolly Davis to MLK

Tuesday, February 19, 1963

Dolly Davis, Publicity Director of the John Day Company publishers, writes Dr. King to request his reaction to Harold Isaac's book, "The New World of Negro Americans." Davis asks permission to quote his comments and sends him the advance galleys.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK Regarding "Why We Can't Wait"

Wednesday, June 3, 1964

In this letter dated June 3, 1964, Joan Daves sends Dr. King two copies of his contract for for his book entitled "Why We Can't Wait". The terms for the German edition of "Why We Can't Wait" have already been cleared.

Letter from James W. Thetford to MLK

Friday, April 21, 1967

A 75-year old man expresses his discontent with the Vietnam War and his belief that America's economic and social problems are inextricably linked to the ongoing military occupation in Vietnam.

Letter from Birt Waite to MLK

Sunday, November 6, 1966

Mr. Waite writes to Dr. King explaining the difficulties that have arisen with trying to give the SCLC his 1958 Rambler.

Letter from Queen N. Lewis to Coretta Scott King

Monday, April 16, 1956

Queen N. Lewis reaches out to Mrs. King to inquire about an upcoming trip to Detroit, Michigan. She mentions that she is a member of a church congregation that donated $1000 to the cause and informs Coretta that there is more she would like to discuss with her at a later date.

Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty

The following document lists the members of the Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty.

Letter from MLK to Dr. Eisendrath

Friday, September 29, 1967

In this letter, Dr. King writes to Dr. Eisendrath to clarify SCLC's view on anti-Semitism. Dr. King explains that neither he nor his organization support any resolution calling for black separatism or the condemnation of Israel. He identifies oil as the primary issue in the region and maintains the only way to relieve the tensions between the Middle East and the United States is through peaceful solutions.

I Have A Dream

In the most famous of his speeches, given from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial at the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, Dr. King drew on themes from previous sermons and speeches, including an address he called The American Dream. Citing Lincoln and the Emancipation Proclamation, the US Constitution, and the Declaration of Independence, King calls upon the nation to fulfill its promise of freedom and justice for all of its citizens. Although he began by reading from a manuscript, he later abandoned it and spoke directly to the crowd of more than 200,000.

Letter from James McDaniel to MLK

Monday, October 31, 1966

This appreciation letter from James A McDaniel, thanks Dr. King for his willingness to serve as a member on the Executive Committee of the National Citizens Committee for the Child Development Program in Mississippi.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Richard Russell

Monday, December 4, 1967

Dr. King conveys his well wishes to Mr. Russell for a speedy recovery.

Letter from Hazel Olivier to MLK

Tuesday, February 1, 1966

Hazel H. Olivier of Chicago, in a letter dated February 1, 1966, asks Dr. King to help her retain an apartment building on Yale Avenue that she purchased in 1957. She lived there 5 years before being told there were serious violations. Three years after spending substantial funds and being informed by the inspector that everything was in compliance, she was cited with additional violations and told there were no reports of her earlier remedial actions. She wonders how the previous white owner was permitted to sell if there were violations. Mrs.

Error

This set of note cards written by Dr. King explores the causation of error. King quotes Alfred North Whitehead's "The Concept of Nature" noting several reasons as to the rise of error.

Letter from MLK to Charles A. Melton

Monday, April 25, 1966

Dr. King declines an invitation to visit Westchester, Pennsylvania due to the time he must devote to the Chicago campaign and helping political candidates in Alabama.

War

Dr. King records a quote regarding war from General Omar Bradley in 1950.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Alan J. Rankin

Tuesday, April 25, 1967

Dora McDonald writes Alan Rankin on behalf of Dr. King regarding a possible visit to McMaster University.

Letter from MLK to Rev. W.C. Dobbins

Monday, October 21, 1963

Dr. King informs Rev. Dobbins that he is unable to meet with him in the next few months, but possibly will be able to in the coming spring.

Nobel Foundation's Invitation to Dr. and Mrs. King

The Consul General of Sweden requests the presence of both Dr. and Mrs. King. The Kings are offered an invitation to meet the director of the Nobel Foundation and attend a reception in New York.

Letter From DuPree Jordan to MLK

Tuesday, July 11, 1967

DuPree Jordan, of the Office of Economic Opportunity, hopes to meet with Dr. King and hear his suggestions and ideas to improve any of the OEO's programs.

Letter from Alfred Martin of the Jefferson Democratic Association to MLK

Thursday, December 28, 1961

Alfred Martin, representing the Jefferson Democratic Association, offers his support to Dr. King and the struggle for equality in the south. He forwards two documents to Dr. King pertaining to his potential run for Congress and his ideas to assist Negroes in being able to vote. Martin also encloses a donation and apologizes for his inability to send more.

Invitation to President Kennedy's Inauguration Reception

The Distinguished Hospitality Committee of the Inaugural Committee invite Dr. and Mrs. King to attend a reception preceding the inauguration of President-elect John F. Kennedy and Vice President-elect Lyndon B. Johnson.

Telegram from Charles Hayes to to MLK

Charles Hayes, an official of the AFL-CIO, sends Dr. King best wishes for a "speedy recovery." He also thanks Dr. King for sending Ralph Abernathy to speak at a banquet held for the organization.

Letter from Bonnie Scott to MLK

Bonnie Scott, a student at Lake Forest College, sends Dr. King a letter asking him for his bibliography as well as information about nonviolence for their senior thesis.

Letter from Harold Eggers to MLK

Thursday, December 29, 1966

In this letter Harold Eggers, a White supremacist, criticizes the African American race, for what Eggers perceives as an inability to recognize "real leadership ability." However, he does this while commending Dr. King for possessing "real leadership ability."

Letter from Clarence Portericker to Mrs. King

Clarence Portericker, a student in New York, wrote this letter of condolence to Mrs. King hoping that Dr. King's dream will come true.

Thank You Letter from Dr. King to Eartha Kitt

Tuesday, December 18, 1962

In this letter, Dr. King is expressing his deep apprecitation to Eartha Kitt for her contribution to the Southern Chrisitan Leadership Conference.

Death

Dr. King recalls a quote from British prime minister Winston Churchill and his tribute to King George VI.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. William Machesney

Tuesday, January 9, 1962

Dr. King communicates with Mrs. William Machesney of Compton, California regarding her letter about children who need help. Dr. King recommends that Machesney pursue her initiative and encourages her to solicit the support of the State of California.