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Letter from C. I. C. Bosanquet to MLK

Wednesday, November 22, 1967
SPAIN

Vice Chancellor Bosanquet of the University of Newcastle Upon Tyne provides Dr. King with the photographs from the honorary degree service. In addition, he expresses gratitude for Dr. King's visit in the mist of his "strenuous" and "eventful" life.

Introduction to the Demands of the Freedom Movement

Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

This document discusses the injustices and inequalities that Negroes are facing in Chicago's urban communities. The author outlines the struggles blacks endure in a variety of different arenas such as racism, discrimination, poverty, unemployment and segregation.

Letter from Gunter Kohlhaw to MLK

Friday, October 14, 1966
Atlanta, GA, Indiana (IN), GERMANY

Dr. Gunter B. Kohlhaw shares the memorable experience of hearing Dr. King deliver a sermon while attending Sunday service at Ebenezer Baptist Church. Kohlhaw also requests copies of Dr. King's collection of sermons.

Letter from Chester Bowles to MLK

Tuesday, December 31, 1957
Connecticut (CT), Montgomery, AL, INDIA

Chester Bowels writes Dr. King requesting the use of his quotes to submit to the Saturday Evening Post. Mr. Bowels also regrets to inform Dr. King that he cannot join the national committee to raise funds to fight for Negros voting rights in the Southern states.

The Many Faces of Black Power

CHINA, CUBA, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR

The author identifies several approaches to the notion of Black Power. The author concludes that Black Power is "a programmatic concept capable of objective definition", "it presents many difficulties", and that the negatives have outweighed the positives.

Man, a Being of Becoming

Dr. King documents ideas regarding the philosophy of man. Using the metaphor of a "flowing stream," he addresses man's experience from infancy through adulthood.

Institute on Nonviolent Resistance to Segregation

Tuesday, August 11, 1959

The SCLC publishes this manifesto declaring that all eyes are focused on the South as it confronts the controversial issues of freedom and equality for Negroes. In the quest for equality, the southern Negros' plan of defense is Christian love and non-violent resistance. The document not only reveals tragic conditions in the South, but also affirms five principles by which equality can be achieved for Negro citizens.

God

Dr. King quotes Donald M. Baillie's "God Was in Christ."

Letter from Linda Gillies to MLK

Sunday, March 17, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Indiana (IN), VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Chairman of the Choice '68 Steering Committee, Linda Gillies asks Dr. King about his stance on referendum issues. Topics that Dr. King was asked to respond to included King's opinion on what military action the U.S. should have in Vietnam, the course of action the US should pursue regarding bombing North Vietnam and governmental spending.

Letter from Jan Helge Jansen to MLK

Friday, November 29, 1963
NORWAY, DENMARK, SWEDEN, Oslo, Norway

The Norwegian Student Association invites Dr. King to speak at one of their meetings and suggest the topic of his lecture be human rights and freedom.

Letter from Jerry Russell to Mrs. King

Thursday, April 11, 1968
Georgia (GA)

Jerry Russell offers his sympathy to Coretta Scott King following the death of Dr. King. He describes Dr. King as an individual of greatest integrity.

Letter from John Whyte to MLK

Friday, July 1, 1966
New York (NY)

John Whyte, an eighth grader, describes his class's fundraising efforts for the SCLC.

Dr. King's Notes on Ministry

Dr. King explains his perspective on the path of ministry as a career. In this brief paragraph, he notes that ministry is a very noble career but it is also difficult.

Toynbee

Dr. King highlights a quote from Arnold J. Toynbee's twelve-volume analysis of the rise and fall of civilizations, "A Study of History."

Humanism

Dr. King quotes Algernon Charles Swinburne's "Hymn of Man" and William Ernest Henley's "Invictus" as representative of humanist thought.

Letter from MLK to Laura Graves

Monday, October 21, 1963
Chicago, IL

Dr. King thanks Laura Graves for her recent letter which presented suggestions and advice regarding the prejudice in the American community. King states, "with persons of good will increasingly speaking on behalf of racial injustice, the day will arrive more quickly."

Appeal from the Circuit Court of Cook County

Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Kansas (KS), Wisconsin (WI), Louisiana (LA), New Hampshire (NH)

Defendant-Appelant Frank Ditto filed for an appeal against the City of Chicago after feeling he was unconstitutionally denied a trial by jury. Ditto, Dr. King, and others were on trial previously for their demonstrations in the Chicago, Illinois.

Letter from Robert L. Green to MLK

Wednesday, July 5, 1967

Robert L. Green writes to Dr. King concerning "Education and the Negro Revolution."

Telegram from Icabod Flewellen to MLK

Wednesday, April 26, 1967
Cleveland, OH, Ohio (OH)

Icabod Flewellen welcomes Dr. King to Cleveland, Ohio.

Royalty Statement from Joan Daves to MLK

Wednesday, June 14, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY

This document is a royalty statement from Joan Daves to Martin Luther King Jr. for his text "Stride Toward Freedom". June 14, 1967

Jesus: Humanity and Ethical Character

Dr. King lists verses from the New Testament on Jesus as an ethical character and man as sinner.

Telegram from MLK to Dr. Clinton Warner

Thursday, May 20, 1965
Atlanta, GA

In this telegram, Dr. King informs Dr. Clinton Warner of Sammy Davis Jr.'s performance at a freedom benefit concert being sponsored by the SCLC. Dr. King then requests that Dr. Warner serve as one of the honorary chairman of the event.

The Power of Silence

Dr. King provides an account of several passages from the Bible, outlining his notes and interpretation.

Letter to Miss Dora McDonald

Wednesday, February 24, 1965
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA, New York, NY

This letter includes a $500 check from Mr. Sidney Emerman and a copy of two letters between the author and Emerman. Additionally, the author encloses two checks totaling $435 from Mr. Clifford Joseph who donated proceeds from Christmas cards that he designed and printed.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Harris to MLK

Monday, March 25, 1968
Memphis, TN

Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Harris write Dr. King expressing their appreciation for his role as a Civil Rights leader. They were moved to write to him after hearing him speak at the Masonic Temple in Memphis, Tennessee and request to meet with him the next time he visits.

Letter from Leon Hall to William Rutherford

Sunday, March 17, 1968
Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C.

Leon Hall writes William Rutherford requesting additional per diem fees for SCLC's Mississippi field staff.

"University Plans 'Liberties' Program"

Monday, February 21, 1966
New York (NY), New York, NY

Experts at Columbia University plan to adopt a program that will make the meaning of American liberties more relatable to students.

Letter from Theodore E. Brown to Conference Participants

Friday, November 25, 1966
New York, NY, Washington, D.C., ZAMBIA

In this letter, Director Theodore E. Brown notifies the conference participants of the rescheduling for the Third National Biennial Leadership.

Minutes of the Council of United Civil Rights Leadership Meeting

Wednesday, March 23, 1966
New York, NY, Washington, D.C., VIETNAM

These minutes from the meeting of the Council of United Civil Rights Leadership give a description of the topics discussed. Topics included: meeting with President Johnson, Office of Economic Opportunity memoranda, Inter-organizational conflict and fundraising.

Economic and Social Bill of Rights

Tuesday, February 6, 1968
VIETNAM

The SCLC calls for an economic and social bill of rights to demand the inalienable rights to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness for African Americans. It would include the right of every employable citizen to a decent job, the right of every citizen to a minimum income, the right to a decent house in a neighborhood of choice, the right to an adequate education, the right to health care, and the right to full participation in decision-making.