The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Rhode Island (RI)"

Handwritten Notecard about Peace

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines J Maritain's views on Peace, from the book Christianity and Democracy.

Letter from Edwina C. Johnson to MLK

Edwina C. Johnson claims that the racial problems in the United States are the result of "what is recorded as 'The American Heritage'" and its debasement of African Americans in media, particularly textbooks. Johnson suggests emphasizing the role that African Americans have played in American history. Johnson also provides a list of freedoms that should not be denied to African Americans.

An Open Letter to Congress from John H. Murphy III

Thursday, November 9, 1967

John H. Murphy III, president of the National Newspaper Publishers Association, urges Congress to pass the Anti-poverty Bill, because voting down the bill would be "cruel and inhumane."

Support Negro Businesses

Tuesday, November 1, 1966

From November 1966 newspaper ad: "Support Negro Business" advertisement from the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Promotional Ad in Publisher's Weekly for "Why We Can't Wait"

Sunday, March 8, 1964

This ad, published in Publisher's Weekly, serves to promote Dr.King's book "Why We Can't Wait".

Public Meeting Program Agenda

Wednesday, September 26, 1962

This document outlines the participants of a two-day public meeting beginning on September 26, 1962. Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth presides over the meeting in which the "Rosa Parks Freedom Award" is presented by Rosa Parks and Adam Clayton Powell.

Barth, Karl

Dr. King comments on Karl Barth's view that Christ assumed fallen human nature.

Letter from Paul Good to MLK

In this letter, Paul Good repeats his first attempt to volunteer as a "press liaison" for the SCLC, and presents Dr. King with his support for the Poor Peoples Campaign.

Schleiermacher, Friedrich

Dr. King records a note on Friedrich Schleiermacher's "Speeches on Religion."

A New South A-Coming

This pamphlet discusses the courageous stand of African American high school students against racial discrimination in the South. The efforts demonstrated by these young people to bring about change of many undemocratic practices were significantly noted in Negro history.

MLK's Statement in Regards to Adlai Stevenson

Wednesday, July 14, 1965

Dr. King makes a statement following the death of Adlai Stevenson.

Where Do We Go From Here (Chapter V Draft)

This draft of Where Are We Going?, Chapter 5 of Dr. King's book Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community? was significantly edited before publication but the central ideas are here. The government's failure to develop economic justice programs cannot be blamed on the Civil Rights Movement's lack of ideas, as often claimed. Building the political will for change is more important for the movement. The rights of Negroes to economic well-being are well aligned with goals and tactics of the labor movement. Negro leadership needs to be developed from within the community.

Letter from Senator Robert F. Kennedy to MLK

Thursday, March 31, 1966

Senator Robert Kennedy thanks Dr. King for a previous correspondence and expresses his aligned views regarding nonviolent reconciliation. Senator Kennedy believes in the preservation of dignity and freedom internationally without imposing "incessant military conflict" upon those with unaligned views. He references Dr. King's statement regarding the precedence of progress in America to that of other countries. He also wishes to hear Dr. King's reaction to a series of his speeches on "A Program for the Urban Crisis" that he has attached.

Note Cards on God

Dr. King's writes on the possibility of finding God from the First Book of Chronicles.

Letter from John Isaacson to MLK

Wednesday, June 7, 1967

John Isaacson, on behalf of the Student Steering Committee for the Senior Symposia at Dartmouth College, invites Dr. King to come speak on the topic "The Critic and Government Policy."

God (Evil)

Dr. King quotes Anicius Severinus Manlius Boethius, from "De Consolatione Philosophiae" (Consolation of Philosophy).

Letter from Thomas Hejzlar to MLK

Friday, December 1, 1967

Student Thomas Hejzlar of Czechoslovakia writes to Dr. King requesting an autograph. He includes a postcard for Dr. King to sign and return.

Letter from Gerhard Ruoff to MLK

Thursday, May 4, 1967

Gerhard Ruoff inquires about Dr. King and his nonviolent philosophy. Ruoff desires to know how King will respond if violence faces him.

The Second Annual Bishop Lichtenberger Human Rights Award Dinner

The Chicago Chapter of The Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity invites Dr. King to the Second Annual Bishop Lichtenberger Human Rights Award Dinner. This award is being accepted by Mrs. Philip B. Daniels on behalf of her late son, Jonathan Myrick Daniels.


Dr. King quotes Blaise Pascal's "Pensees."


Dr. King provides a definition of worship.

SCLC Flyer: Going Out of Business

The Fort Worth chapter of the SCLC issued this flyer advising its fellow Negro residents to boycott Bill Sodd's Meat Store because of discrimination.


Dr. King quotes an excerpt from Fosdick's "Modern Use of the Bible."

Memo from Theodore Brown

Monday, January 22, 1968

Mr. Brown informs several African American leaders, including Dr. King, of his attempts to raise funds for the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa.

Letter from MLK to Mr. and Mrs. Charles Evans

Tuesday, March 26, 1968

In this letter Dr. King offers his gratitude to Mr. and Mrs. Evans for their monetary contribution of $200. Dr. King references the work of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and explains how the Evans' contribution supports the efforts of the organization.

Letter to Participants in Team Ministry to Southern Cities from Jack Sisson and Oscar McCloud

Friday, May 12, 1967

Subsequent to the collective participation in the Team Ministry to Southern Cities, the members formed a consensus that a mandatory urgent meeting was necessary. The meeting will entail the regrouping of Team Ministry, community conflict, Project Equality, and the follow-up plans in three southern locations.

Anonymous Letter to Charles C. Diggs Jr.

This anonymous letter to Congressman Charles Diggs, Jr. of Michigan details the grievances suffered by Negro and Caucasian females in the U.S. Army. The authors assert that they routinely are subjected to segregation in public accommodations and are denied equal opportunity for promotion and reenlistment.

Letter from Lyndon B. Johnson to MLK

Monday, May 18, 1964

President Lyndon B. Johnson writes Dr. King, thanking him for sending him an advance copy of "Why We Can't Wait."

Sunday with Martin Luther King, Jr. Radio Sermon on WAAF-AM Chicago, IL

Sunday, April 10, 1966

This copy of Dr. King's segment on WAAF-AM radio, entitled "Sunday with Martin Luther King," explains the plight of the "Negro" in the South as similar to the oppression experienced by the Israelites in the book of Exodus.

Letter to the SCLC from The United Church Board for World Ministries

Wednesday, April 10, 1968

In this document, is a note to request acknowledgement of a $50 dollar contribution, from Andrew C. Mills of New Delhi, India.