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Immortality

Dr. King references Thomas Carlyle regarding the topic of immortality.

Sermon on Conformity Thought "Nonconformist - J. Bond"

Sunday, January 16, 1966

Dr. King in this sermon at Ebenezer Baptist Church speaks to his congregation on the topic of disent. He expresses in detail about how we essentially must not conform to standards set by society.

Publication on Civil Disobedience

Saturday, January 1, 1966

This document on civil disobedience is an occasional paper that includes articles from the legal, philosophical, historical and political science perspective. Throughout the paper there are pieces on Gandhi, Thoreau and Martin Buber; all of whom influenced Dr. King.

Letter from V.R. Hardy to MLK

V.R. Hardy lectures Dr. King regarding his methods of obtaining equality. He asserts that such methods will only result in a race of people wallowing in self-pity. Hardy cites the long-term oppression of Jews as a case in point of how to overcome the tragedies of the past.

Exodus

Dr. King wrote these note cards, marked "Class Notes," on Exodus. He focuses on the topics of knowledge, the doctrine of God, sin, ethics, social ethics, and the covenant.

Newspaper Article - South May Hold Best Hope for Martin King

This newspaper article describes efforts of Dr. King in seeking aid for Negroes in Northern cities slum areas and the formation of a third political party to run in the 1968 Presidential Elections.

Program for SCLC Annual Freedom Banquet

Monday, August 8, 1966

This program from SCLC's Tenth Annual Freedom Banquet features Senator Edward M. Kennedy as guest speaker.

Worship Must Have Three Things

Dr. King states that "worship" must have three things: unity, movement, and rhythm.

Non-Violent Procedures to Inter-Racial Harmony

Tuesday, October 16, 1956

In this early speech to a NY Universalists' convention, Dr. King lays out his nonviolence method, based on Gandhi's. He outlines five of the six principles he will use later. They are: active, courageous resistance; winning the moral conversion of the opponent, not defeating him; attacking the forces of evil, rather than the persons doing evil; using love to avoid "internal violence of the spirit"; and faith in the inclination of the universe towards justice.

Letter To Mr. Kennady From Miss D. McDonald

Thursday, January 4, 1968

In this letter to Mr. Kennady, Miss Dora McDonald informs him that Dr. King is happy to grant permission to mimeograph copies of his article entitled " A New King Of Power".

Letter from Sandy F. Ray Regarding "Holy Land Pilgrimage"

Monday, July 17, 1967

Sandy F. Ray, president of Concreta Tours writes a letter sharing the details concerning Dr. King's Holy Land Pilgrimage. She explains that an office representative recently returned from the Middle East "with first hand information regarding tour conditions there." This document includes a report on hotels, roads, inhabitants, and basic information permitting travel to Israel and the West Bank of Jordan.

Outline of Sincerity Is Not Enough

This partial sermon outline in Dr. King's handwriting focuses on the subject "Sincerity Is Not Enough", based on the text Romans 10:2.

Answer to a Perplexing Question

Sunday, March 3, 1963

Dr. King preaches about faith, based on Matthew 17:14-20, and applies it to the Civil Rights Movement. He defines faith as cooperating with God by surrendering to God's will so that His strength may act freely through us. He asserts that faith, intellect, and work must blend together.

Rousseau

Dr. King writes a quote from Genevan philosopher, Jean-Jacques Rousseau.

Letter to Martin Luther King Jr. from Clement Alexandre 1957

Friday, October 4, 1957

Dr. King received this letter from Doubleday & Company, regarding offering Dr. King royalties to write his first book. The owner/publisher of Doubleday, Clement Alexandre, tried to persuade Dr. King to work with them on a book that would expand his base of influence. The book would relate to issues of civil and political issues.

Letter from MLK to Don Blaine

Friday, November 26, 1965

Dr. King shows delight in Mr. Don Blaine's idea of promoting a "peace caravan" to travel around the United States. He requests that Blaine further develop the idea and contact heads of various peace organizations to assist in the endeavor. Dr. King also displays his willingness to participate in the caravan.

Letter from Melvin D. Kennedy to MLK

Thursday, February 28, 1963

Melvin D. Kennedy, Editor at Morehouse College, writes Dr. King about the book, "Perspectives in Freedom and Progress, 1863-1963: An appraisal of the Negro's First Hundred Years of Freedom." He explains that the book is a non-profit venture that will add to the Negro narrative and highlight Negro accomplishments. He goes on to request that Dr. King contribute a chapter about the Negro's fight for freedom.

Letter from Mrs. W. J. Givan to MLK about Unsavory Association

Wednesday, November 1, 1967

In this letter Mrs. Givan expresses her dissatisfaction with Dr. King on how "prominent Negroes" are often photographed with "unsavory whites."

Telegram from Dr. L. K. Jackson to President John F. Kennedy

Dr. L. K. Jackson of St. Paul Baptist Church writes to President Kennedy regarding "barbaric" demonstrations against Negroes in the South.

John Coleman Bennett

John Coleman Bennett's work is used to flesh out an outline on the issues that plague society. The issues are broken up into five sections: the fact of evil, four problems of social gospel, economic, state and the church, and Communism. Bennett was a Christian theologian, author, and president of the Union Theological Seminary in New York.

Letter from Eric Malling to MLK

Tuesday, December 21, 1965

Letter of Invite from M. J. Jones to MLK

Tuesday, February 20, 1968

In this letter, M. J. Jones invites Dr. King and Mrs. King to be his guest at a dinner with Dr. L. Harold DeWolf. DeWolf is delivering three lectures over the course of two days, to which Dr. and Mrs. King are also invited.

Telegram from Senator Phil Hart to MLK

Friday, June 21, 1963

Senator Phil Hart of Michigan sends this telegram to Dr. King expressing his optimism about the eradication of segregation in America.

Letter from John Shirley to MLK

Thursday, January 18, 1968

John Shirley, of the Oxford University Cherwell Newspaper, poses a list of questions to Dr. King concerning Civil Rights, the Vietnam War, and the emergence of Black Power groups. Shirley assures the Reverend of his gratitude for any feedback he may provide, and informs him of the circulation of the literature at being well over 10,000 within the University.

Letter from MLK to S. P. Belcher

Tuesday, April 5, 1966

Dr. King express gratitude for the receipt of financial support during an event at the Palasis des Sports. In addition, Dr. King highlights the importance of the demonstration for international concerns of the French and American communities in Paris.

Letter from Stephen Sargent to Ralph David Abernathy

Monday, April 8, 1968

Stephen Sargent, a young student, writes to Rev. Ralph Abernathy on the day of Dr. King's funeral service. Stephen's letter mentions his enclosure of a check to the SCLC to assist in the cause for freedom.

1965 Annual Board Meeting for SCLC

Thursday, April 1, 1965

This document details the agenda at the Annual Board Meeting for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from James K. Mbuguah from MLK

Wednesday, January 17, 1962

James Mbuguah is a young boy from Kenya who has been accepted into John Hopkins University. James is contacting Dr. King because he does not have the finances to attend the school and would like to receive assistance.

Letter from MLK to Tore Staav

Monday, April 25, 1966

Dr. King expresses his sincerest gratitude to Mr. Tore Staav, the editor of Vi Magazine, for his unwavering support and sponsorship during the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to MLK Regarding Monroe Defense Committee

Thursday, December 14, 1961

In this letter, Benjamin E. Mays, the president of Morehouse College, inquires what Dr. King may know about the Monroe Defense Committee.