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Letter from Mary Bull to MLK

Monday, January 29, 1968

Mary Bull writes Dr. King expressing her sentiments towards the concept of racial separatism, and how it causes detriment to the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter of Thanks From MLK To Reverend Taylor

Tuesday, May 9, 1967

Dr. King writes to Reverend Gardner C. Taylor, the pastor of the Concord Baptist Church of Christ, to thank him for his support of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Dora McDonald to MLK about CORE National Convention

Thursday, June 11, 1964

This response letter dated June 11, 1964, was sent from Ms. McDonald, secretary of Dr. King to Mr. James Farmer. She states that while Dr. King will not be able to attend the CORE National Convention, he will send a representative from the SCLC to the meeting.

Letter from Dr. Herzl Ragins to MLK

Wednesday, March 1, 1967

Dr. Herzl Ragins writes to Dr. King, denouncing him because of his support for Adam Clayton Powell.

Letter from Leslie A. Strikes to MLK

Wednesday, December 27, 1967

Leslie Strike, Canadian Vice President of the English-Speaking Union of the Commonwealth, invites Dr. King to speak on the US Civil Rights Movement.

Telegram from Roy Wilkins to MLK

Friday, March 20, 1964

Roy Wilkins invites Dr. King to attend an urgent meeting of the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights to discuss civil rights developments in the Senate. The 1964 Civil Rights Act was under debate at the time in the United States House of Representatives and Senate.

Science Surpasses the Social Order

Dr. King wrote this essay during his career at Crozer Theological Seminary in 1951. In the paper, he discusses the disproportionate growth of science and technology compared with that of the social order. Referencing the sociological term, Dr. King refers to this predicament as "cultural lag." He attributes this problem to the "lack of world brotherhood" and asserts that the survival of civilization depends on global unity. Drawing on Republican politician Wendall Wilkie and Prime Minister Clement Attlee, Dr.

Letter from MLK to Richmond M. Rudden

Thursday, January 26, 1967

Dr. King writes Richmond M. Rudden to decline an invitation to speak at Lafayette College due to upcoming non-violence workshops, voter registration drives and SCLC fundraising activities.

SCLC 10th Anniversary Flyer

Wednesday, August 16, 1967

The flyer highlights the 10th anniversary of the SCLC and outlines the speakers and events which will take place.

Letter from Joseph McKinney to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965

Reverend Lee Wright invites Dr. King to speak at the Annual Spring Membership Campaign for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, Wheeling Branch in West Virginia.

Letter From MLK to Ben Ari

Friday, September 22, 1967

This letter from Dr. King declines a request to go on a religious pilgrimage to the Holy Land due to turmoil in the Middle East.

Statement for "Stride Toward Freedom"

This is a financial statement for Dr. King's book "Stride Towards Freedom".

Spirit of Law[s]

Dr. King summarizes “The Spirit of the Laws,” written by Montesquieu, a political philosopher of the Enlightenment period.

Letter from MLK to Robert Wagner

Tuesday, March 3, 1964

Dr. King sends condolences to Mayor Robert Wagner consequent to his wife's death.

Letter from Reverend Robert Jacoby to MLK

Monday, June 17, 1963

Reverend Robert Jacoby informs Dr. King that his Letter From Birmingham Jail was used in the Sunday worship service sermon.

Letter from Harry Wachtel to Abram Heschel

Friday, March 29, 1968

Harry Wachtel, legal counsel to Dr. King, expresses his gratitude to leading Jewish theologian Rabbi Heschel for his great works.

Letter from Richard C. Gilman to MLK

Tuesday, July 5, 1966

Richard C. Gilman, President of Occidental College, invites Dr. King to speak to the students at their opening convocation.

Letter from Charles S. Spivey, Jr. to the Racial Justice Committee

Wednesday, March 6, 1968

Charles S. Spivey, Jr. outlines the events to take place during the SCLC Poor Peoples Campaign under the leadership of Dr. King. The main events all transpired after Dr. King's assassination on April 4th, 1968.

MLK Remarks at the NAACP's Civil Rights Rally

Sunday, July 10, 1960

Dr. King addresses the NAACP in regards to the equality of the school systems for Negro students. He urges the crowd to "employ only the highest weapons of dignity and discipline" while continuing to fight against segregation.

Letter from MLK to Winifred Menehart

Monday, January 8, 1968

In this document, Dr. King is truly appreciative of the encouraging letter he received from Mrs. Winfred Menehart, a native of Minnesota. Dr. King emphasizes on the positivity that rests within her letter, as a facet of hope, amid the contrasting assaults and criticisms he receives daily.

Letter of Resignation Rachel Davis DuBois to MLK

Wednesday, November 2, 1966

Rachel Davis DuBois resigns from the staff of SCLC to help the organization during a time of financial difficulties. Dr. DuBois offers her services in the future whenever needed without compensation.

Senator Mark Hatfield Address on Vietnam

Thursday, March 16, 1967

In this address to the Harvard Young Republicans Club about the Vietnam War, Senator Mark O. Hatfield provides historical background on the conflict, defines the driving force of Ho Chi Minh as nationalism not Communism, and recounts the numerous times the U.S. has spurned overtures to negotiate a settlement. He proposes a political settlement after a suspension of bombing and de-escalation of the war. Hatfield first publicly opposed the Vietnam War as Governor of Oregon; he was the first prominent Republican to express opposition.

Letter from Mr. Harry W. Allison, Ph.D. to MLK

Thursday, June 30, 1966

Mr. Allison, a white clinical psychologist, expresses his support of Dr. King's leadership in the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Sharon Drebert to MLK

Monday, March 18, 1968

Sharon Drebert communicates with Dr. King about submitting information for the 'Choice 68' campaign. She asks that Dr. King submit any campaign literature before April 23, 1968. Dr. King would be assassinated on April 4, 1968.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Jack Delano

Tuesday, July 6, 1965

Dr. King accepts Mr. Delano's invitation to appear for an hour on WIPR-TV during his visit to Puerto Rico.

Letter from Charles T. Dubin to MLK

Sunday, February 11, 1968

Attorney at Law, Charles T. Dubin writes Dr. King to express his approval of the nonviolent practices of the SCLC, and assures Dr. King of the legal effect on the American judicial system. Dubin closes by imploring that Dr. King does not place himself in jeopardy and danger of life and limb.

Letter from the Faculty of the Tuskegee Institute to President Kennedy

Thursday, May 16, 1963

Members of the faculty and staff of Tuskegee Institute issue a plea to President John F. Kennedy to intervene in the Birmingham crisis of 1963. They request that the President use an upcoming speech to discuss Constitutional rights, send the FBI to Alabama to investigate "charges of police brutality," and revoke federal funds that support segregation and persuade business leaders to desegregate public facilities.

Letter from Richard L. Doerschuk to MLK

Thursday, October 22, 1964

Deputy director of the United States Information Agency, Richard Doerschuk requests that Dr. King participate in a television program to be broadcast in Africa on the topic of civil rights.

Letter from J. P. Brookshire to MLK

Saturday, February 3, 1968

Mr. Brookshire explains to Dr. King the application of the U.S. Constitution to underprivileged groups and urges him to avoid matters of war and peace.

MLK on Danville and the Problem of Violence

Friday, July 12, 1963

Dr. King discusses his perception of the nonviolent movement, and how the leadership maintains control even though minimal violent outbreaks may occur.