Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"RUSSIAN FEDERATION"

Southern Christian Leadership Rally Souvenir Program

Friday, October 18, 1963
Atlanta, GA, Boston, MA, Indiana (IN)

This is the 1963 Souvenir Program for the Southern Christian Leadership Rally, an initiative of the citizens civic planning committee. Dr. King is honored as an audacious leader.

Letter from Richard U. Smith to MLK

Tuesday, March 14, 1967
Maryland (MD), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Rev. Richard Smith expresses his political views on the possible re-election of Adam Clayton Powell. Smith explains to Dr. King and other leaders that to rally for Mr. Powell is to ignore the moral character of man.

Request from The Wooster Afro-American Students Organization

Tuesday, March 19, 1968
Ohio (OH)

The Wooster Afro-American Students Organization inquires if Dr. King would be available to speak to the institute about the concept of Black Power.

Telegram from Sargent Shriver to Coretta King

Tuesday, November 14, 1967
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Sargent Shriver, American statesmen, activist, founder of Job Corps and Peace Crops, expresses gratitude for Mrs. King's public endorsement of the war against poverty.

Support Letter from

Tuesday, March 9, 1965
Wisconsin (WI)

Donna Breiter conveys her support of Dr. King's work within the Civil Rights Movement. Due to her finances she cannot physically attend marches, but she inquirers of other ways to support the efforts.

Truth

Dr. King quotes Robert Browning's "Paracelsus."

Letter from Burton Cain to MLK

Thursday, September 7, 1967
Pennsylvania (PA), Chicago, IL

Burton Caine informs Dr. King of the dilemma with the American Jewish liberal's continuation in the Civil Rights Movement. Caine recounts repeated instances of Negroes singling out Jews in verbal attacks. He emphasizes this irony given that Jews have been active supporters of the Civil Rights Movement. Unsure if Dr. King stands in solidarity with anti-Semitic views, Caine asks Dr. King to issue a statement to clarify his beliefs.

Letter from Cleonia and Frank to MLK

Tuesday, February 23, 1960
Montgomery, AL

Cleonia and Frank, of Montgomery, Alabama, convey their support to Dr. King and the civil rights movement.

King Family Christmas Card

Thursday, December 1, 1966

The King family sends out holiday greetings with their family Christmas card. The card displays a portrait of the King family along with a holiday message.

Telegram from Dr. F. Earl McLendon to MLK

Tuesday, March 9, 1965
Selma, AL, Alabama (AL)

Dr. McLendon, President of the Atlanta Medical Association, offers aid to Dr. King and the people of Selma, Alabama after incidents of police brutality.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Tuesday, June 9, 1964
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Joan Daves writes to Dr. King to thank him for making a visit, in reference to his book. Ms. Daves mentions the positive reactions from the audience and how she believes that their positive feedback will make for a good start of the book.

Telegram from Dora McDonald to E. M. Bettenson

Monday, September 11, 1967
London, England

Dora McDonald informs Mr. E. M. Bettenson from the University of Newcastle Upon Tyne of a date that Dr. King will be available to receive an Honorary Degree.

Sin

Dr. King cites a scripture from the Old Testament biblical Book of Leviticus regarding the transformation of sin.

Letter from MLK to Vera Jones

Thursday, December 2, 1965
New Jersey (NJ)

In this letter, Dr. King thanks Vera Jones for her support of the Freedom Movement and the SCLC.

Letter to Eugene Exman from MLK

Monday, December 4, 1961
New York, NY

Dr. King responds to a previous correspondence from Mr. Eugene Exman of Harper and Brothers Publishing. The content of the letter references Dr. King's discussion with Mr. Mel Arnold, regarding his sermons being transcribed into a manuscript. The sermons would eventually be compiled into what would be Dr. King's second book, "Strength to Love."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Henry R. Luce

Friday, February 15, 1963
New York (NY), New York, NY

Dora McDonald writes to Henry Luce, of Time & Life, in response to his prior correspondence to Dr. King.

Letter from Beatrice Smith to MLK

Thursday, April 29, 1965
Chicago, IL, Alabama (AL)

Beatrice Smith encloses a contribution to Dr. King and explains the interest and sympathy in Dr. King's work. She also expresses concern for the boycott of Alabama product stating that it might result in "more enemies than friends."

Press Statement by MLK About President Johnson's Address on Selma

Tuesday, March 16, 1965
Selma, AL, Alabama (AL)

Dr. King lauds President Johnson's speech to a joint session of Congress, which he describes as an eloquent, unequivocal and passionate plea for human rights. This statement and the President's address occurred during the height of the Selma voting rights campaign.

104:3 General Correspondence 1967 (T)

Friday, April 21, 1967
Ohio (OH), Atlanta, GA, Oklahoma (OK), Cleveland, OH, VIETNAM

Richard Tennent Jr. requests that Dr. King consider applying his efforts of non-violence to Cleveland, Ohio "...to help prevent the violence that seems inevitable." Tennent states that he cannot support the Reverend's stance on the Vietnam War, either financially or intellectually.

Letter from Sharon Judith Bresler to SCLC

California (CA), Los Angeles, CA

Sharon Bresler encloses a check to the SCLC and requests that they write Rabbi Sanford Shopero from the Congregation of Temple Emmanuel to inform him that the gift was made in his honor.

Letter from Dennis Crawford to MLK

Monday, May 25, 1964
Oregon (OR), Atlanta, GA

Dennis Crawford, Executive Secretary of the YMCA-YWCA, invites Dr. King to the first Northwest Collegiate Civil Rights Conference. In addition, Crawford makes mention of their contributions to the movement in the form of students, money, books and community leadership.

Letter from Milton A. Reid to Senator Leroy Johnson

Thursday, October 10, 1963
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Virginia (VA)

Milton A. Reid, a candidate for State Senate, invites Georgia Senator Leroy Johnson to a banquet at Virginia State College. The event will benefit the campaign expenses and feature guest speaker Wyatt Tee Walker, Dr. King's assistant.

Love

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr's "The Nature and Destiny of Man."

Telegram from MLK to Mrs. H. H. Hubbard

Friday, September 15, 1967
Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL

Dr. King sends his condolences to Mrs. H. H. Hubbard following the death of her husband. Dr. King also mentions the importance of Dr. Hubbard's contributions to the Montgomery bus boycott.

Draft of I Have a Dream

Wednesday, August 28, 1963
Washington, D.C.

This version of Dr. King's famous "I Have a Dream" speech reveals important changes to ideas and phrases that Dr. King chose either to alter or omit completely the day he addressed the throng gathered before the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. Dr. King's argument against the "normalcy" of bigotry remained a key message on the day he took the podium.

How 700 Ibos were Killed by Mistake

Sunday, January 21, 1968
NIGERIA, RUSSIAN FEDERATION, EGYPT

This article reports on the massacre of 700 Ibos by federal troops in the Ibo town of Asaba, Nigeria.

Worship

Dr. King references William Ernest Hocking and James Bissett Pratt regarding religious worship.

Advice for Living

Georgia (GA), New York (NY), Tennessee (TN), Chicago, IL

Advice for Living is a column Dr. King uses to help people with moral dilemmas. In this issue, he receives questions from an 18-year old about his mother's drinking issues, a 24-year old with relationship issues, and others.

Letter from Mrs. Willie Mae White to SCLC

Tuesday, December 5, 1967
Georgia (GA)

Mrs. Willie Mae White requests help from SCLC. She explains that she has fifteen children and would like to provide Christmas dinner and gifts, but does not have the financial means to do so. As a poor family in Scottsdale, Georgia, her family struggles, living without many basic necessities. Mrs. White also appeals to the members of SCLC, imploring them to send any available household ware, such as curtains, sheets, clothes, and kitchen utensils.

Chicago Tribune: Man's Struggle for Freedom

Sunday, June 25, 1967
Illinois (IL)

Clarence Seidenspinner writes this review for the Chicago Tribune regarding Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" His evaluation centers around Dr. King's progression from using nonviolence as strategy in Montgomery, to his focus on international affairs. He further explains Dr. King's first uneasy experience with the Black Power slogan and its effects.