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"RUSSIAN FEDERATION"

Telegram from Congressman Don Edwards to MLK

Friday, April 14, 1967

California Democratic Congressman Don Edwards congratulates Dr. King on his April 4th, 1967 speech "Beyond Vietnam," and commends his courage in speaking "so clearly on this vital question."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Peggy Duff

Thursday, May 4, 1967

Dr. King's secretary Dora McDonald communicates with Peggy Duff of London. Miss McDonald informs Miss Duff of Dr. King's travels outside of Atlanta. The particular matter, unkown and referenced in this letter, will be conveyed to him once he arrives back to SCLC.

Telegram from MLK to Elijah Muhammed

Monday, August 14, 1967

Dr. King commends Muhammad Ali's conscientious objection to the Vietnam War. He encourages Elijah Muhammed to convince Ali to speak at the upcoming Tenth Annual Convention of SCLC.

Letter from Dinkar Sakrikar to MLK

Friday, September 23, 1966

D.Sakrikar writes to solidify the plans for the donation of a bronze statue of Mahatma Gandhi.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Peter White

Friday, September 10, 1965

Dora McDonald notifies Peter White, of the University of Western Ontario, that Dr. King is unable to accept any additional speaking engagements for the "next seven or eight months."

Telegram from Johnnie McKinney to MLK

Monday, April 5, 1965

Johnnie McKinney telegrams Dr. King to invite him to a fundraising event that is set to occur in Wyoming. McKinney states, "Wyoming needs you to make Reverend Reebs home state a real fortress of equality."

Invitation from Douglas Davis to MLK

Thursday, November 7, 1963

Douglas A. C. Davis invites Dr. King to speak at the University of Western Ontario's School of Business Administration. He explains that Dr. King's visit will be one of great pleasure and honor.

Mrs.Herr of the Yakima Chapter to MLK

Friday, April 2, 1965

Mrs. Herr, on behalf of the Yakima Chapter of United Nations Association invites Dr. King to speak October 24, in honor of United Nations Week. The organization offers to pay his fee for speaking to their organization.

War

Dr. King quotes Napoleon, Gen. Dwight Eisenhower, Gen. Douglas MacArthur, and Gen. Omar Bradley on war as impractical.

Letter from Tom Cochran to MLK

Mr. Cochran highlights the need for more responsible leadership within the Civil Rights Movement and also more involvement from middle-class Americans.

Letter from Wallis E. Wood to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967

Mr. Wood requests an interview with Dr. King to discuss Operation Breadbasket.

Letter from Senator Edward V. Long to MLK

Thursday, July 2, 1964

Senator Edward V. Long (D-Missouri) writes Dr. King to thank him for his letter concerning Long's support of the civil rights bill.

Letter from MLK to Heinz Ehrlick

Thursday, August 15, 1963

Dr. King thanks Mr. Ehrlick for his encouraging letter and suggestions.

Faith In The Heart

Dr. King uses the steadfast faith of biblical figures Abraham and Paul to express his desire to part from the traditionalism of religion and make it applicable to all aspects of a person's life. King also iterates this position by using excerpts from various philosophers such as Edgar Brightman and Ralph Waldo Emerson.

Angeology

Dr. King cites the reference in Isaiah 6:2 to a seraphim, likely "a winged human figure."

The Modern Negro Activist

Dr. King profiles the emergent young Negro civil rights activist who is college-educated, creative, brave and committed to the discipline of non-violence. He attributes the activist's diligence to a keen awareness that they inhabit a world on the cusp of positive social change and that they will have the privilege to direct that change. They are no longer to be an imitator of his white counterpart, but rather an initiator and leader in this new age.

Letter from MLK to Dr. Rubio

In this letter, Dr. King attempts to guide Dr. Rubio to resources that will be helpful in his new endeavors.

Statement from the Commission on Civil Rights

Wednesday, March 27, 1968

Clarence H. Hunter issued this statement to share the news that the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights would be holding a public hearing in Montgomery, Alabama to collect information regarding the condition of African Americans in Alabama. Hunter states the purpose of the Commission's investigation and names the notable members of the investigation.

Correspondence Letter to Mrs. King from Paul Torres

Friday, April 5, 1968

This letter from a middle school student expresses condolences to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King’s assassination.

Letter from Bishop K. Chengalvaroya Pillai to MLK

Saturday, August 27, 1966

Bishop K. Chengalvaroya Pillai writes Dr. King asking if he can read his recently published book entitled "Light Through an Eastern Window" and write a book review. His book "acquaints the people of the Western World with the thought and ways of life of the Eastern world in relation to the Bible."

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, September 11, 1967

In this letter, Joan Daves informed Dr. King that “Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" would not be able to be converted into a paperback book. Joan Daves is Dr. King’s literary agent.

Current Magazine

Thursday, August 1, 1963

This Current Magazine issue on racism in the U.S. features an article "Is Direct Action Necessary" by Dr. King, as well as pieces by James Meredith, James Reston, and others.

Letter from Philip M. Weightman to MLK

Friday, January 3, 1964

Philip Weightman invites Dr. King to attend the AFL-CIO Committee on Political Education's conference at the Dinkler Plaza Hotel in Atlanta, Georgia. Weightman also briefly explains what will be discussed at the conference.

Senator Mark Hatfield Address on Vietnam

Thursday, March 16, 1967

In this address to the Harvard Young Republicans Club about the Vietnam War, Senator Mark O. Hatfield provides historical background on the conflict, defines the driving force of Ho Chi Minh as nationalism not Communism, and recounts the numerous times the U.S. has spurned overtures to negotiate a settlement. He proposes a political settlement after a suspension of bombing and de-escalation of the war. Hatfield first publicly opposed the Vietnam War as Governor of Oregon; he was the first prominent Republican to express opposition.

Partial Transcript: Speech at Guardian Association

Dr. King discusses the events in Montgomery, Alabama as a catalyst in what will become a new world. He stresses that the honor he receives from the Garden Association is not just for him, but for the fifty thousand supporters of the Montgomery Bus Boycott.

MLK's Statement in Regards to Adlai Stevenson

Wednesday, July 14, 1965

Dr. King makes a statement following the death of Adlai Stevenson.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Gwen B. Geiges about Moral Support

In this letter, Dr. King writes to Mrs. Geiges to thank her for her letter expressing support of his work in the movement.

What's Your Brotherhood Quotient?

National Comics Publications, Inc. publishes this questionnaire as a public service to gauge the attitudes of readers while also enlightening readers about their own xenophobic perceptions. The writer asserts that it is okay to dislike vegetables or insects, but to dislike people is to "hurt them and cheat yourself."

Program: The Call To Worship

Sunday, July 11, 1965

This program outlines the order of service at Friendship Baptist Church in Pasadena, California. Dr. King is highlighted as the guest speaker at the Sunday morning service.

Letter from MLK to W. M. Jones

Monday, September 9, 1963

Dr. King writes Bishop W. M. Jones of Israel of God's Church expressing his gratitude for their generous contribution to the SCLC.