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1965 Pacem In Terris Peace and Freedom Award

Iowa (IA), Illinois (IL)

This program details the events surrounding the Davenport Catholic Interracial Council's 1965 Pacem In Terris Peace and Freedom Award. Dr. King received the award that year for exemplifying principles of peace and freedom.

Draft Statement of Reverend Dr. MLK Jr.


This statement, not written in Dr. King's hand, responds to Joseph Alsop's syndicated column in the New York Herald Tribune. Dr. King clarifies that SCLC has no affiliation with the Communist Party. He also states the SCLC has not continued a relationship with Jack O'Dell since he was relieved of his responsibilities.

Letter from J. Ross Flanagan to MLK

Tuesday, May 4, 1965
Washington, D.C., New York (NY), VIETNAM

Dr. King is invited by the Interreligious Committee on Vietnam to speak at a mass meeting in Washington, DC. A handwritten notation indicates that Dr. King cannot accept the invitation.

Letter from MLK to Joyce Armstrong

Thursday, November 7, 1963
Detroit, MI

Dr. King responds to Joyce Armstrong, a student at Central High School, regarding her concerns on equality. Dr. King expresses his deep appreciation and states, "it is gratifying to us to know that so many young people are dedicated to the cause of Freedom."

Letter from student Sue Moranian to MLK

Wednesday, February 22, 1967
New Jersey (NJ)

Sue Moranian, a fourteen year old white girl, writes Dr. King and encloses a $2.00 contribution to assist in endeavors to help blacks reach racial equality.

Pledge of Support from Thelma Rutherford

Wednesday, March 15, 1967
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Thelma Rutherford, Missions Representative for the Church of the Savior in Washington D. C., pledges the churches support for Dr. King and the work of the SCLC. She encloses a check for $500.00 with this letter.

Letter from The Canadian Council of Christians and Jews to MLK

Tuesday, November 22, 1966

National Executive Director Richard Jones invites Dr. King to speak in Toronto during the celebration of Canada's centennial birthday. Jones describes current racial relations and acknowledges that the centennial events could be used to spur "advances toward complete equality."

Schleiermacher's Distinction

Dr. King documents German philosopher Friedrich Schleiermacher's view on one of the distinctions between Protestantism and Catholicism.

Letter from Alice Sargent to MLK

Wednesday, November 13, 1963
Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA), Cincinnati, OH, Ohio (OH)

Alice Sargent, the Assistant Director of Student Activities at Temple University, inquires what role the students can play in the Civil Rights Movement and sends a sample of one of the students' editorials.

Letter from John Conyers to MLK

Monday, December 28, 1964
Washington, D.C., Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI), Atlanta, GA

John Conyers, Congressman-Elect for the first district of Michigan, writes Dr. King seeking advice and endorsement for his campaign.


Dr. King quotes John Hodgdon Bradley from an article in the December 1932 Atlantic Monthly, “Letter from a Scientist to a Priest.”


Dr. King expounds on "the eternality of God" by using the Book of Psalms.

Highlander Folk School 25th Anniversary Seminar

Tennessee (TN)

The Highlander Folk School in Monteagle, Tennessee, hosts the 25th Anniversary Seminar entitled "The South Thinking Ahead." At the program, Dr. King is scheduled to deliver the keynote address and activities have been set up to entertain the children that may be in attendance.

Letter from Theodore Brown to MLK and Others

Sunday, February 11, 1968

This is a memorandum from Theodore E. Brown concerning his trip to Nigeria. Brown attaches a newspaper article referencing the turmoil in Nigeria.


Dr. King quotes German philosopher Dr. Oswald Spengler regarding his ideology of immortality. According to Spengler, history holds no permanent value. King states "If such a philosophy of history is right there would be no reason to desire continued existence...immortality would have no meaning."

Letter from MLK to Dr. James Costar at Michigan State University

Wednesday, February 9, 1966
Michigan (MI)

In this letter to the Chairman of the Department of Counseling and Guidance at Michigan State, Dr. King gives a stellar review of the work of Dr. Robert Green. Dr. King commends Dr. Green's performance in stabilizing the SCLC Citizenship Education Program and expresses appreciation to the university for sharing his expertise.

Letter from LeRoy Allen to MLK

Tuesday, August 15, 1967
Pennsylvania (PA), Atlanta, GA

LeRoy Allen, President of Cheyney State College, invites Dr. King to be the keynote speaker for their Founder's Day Convocation in November of 1967. Allen emphasizes the goal of the college to aid Negroes living in urban communities.


Dr. King explains the relationship between punishment and sin by referencing the biblical verse, I Chronicles 21:17.

Letter from J. B. Hamilton to MLK

Tuesday, March 26, 1963
Virginia (VA), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL)

J. B. Hamilton expresses gratitude for Dr. King's visit to the Mount Zion Baptist Church in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Telegram from Rev. Andrew J. Young to Mrs. Rosa M. Mcghee

Monday, August 9, 1965
Birmingham, AL, Tennessee (TN)

Rev. Andrew Young sends this telegram to Mrs. Rosa Mcghee apologizing on behalf of the SCLC for neglecting to invite the officials and members of the American Federation of Teachers.

Schedule of Buses for Pacem in Terris Participants and their Guests

Geneva, Switzerland

This schedule of bus routes is intended for Pacem in Terris participants and their guests. Trips include travel to Convocation sessions and a concert held at Victoria Hall.

Letter from Bill Daniels to Dora McDonald

Monday, October 2, 1967
Atlanta, GA

Bill Daniels, the editorial cartoonist for WSB Radio and Television, responded to a letter he received from Ms. Dora McDonald concerning a cartoon. He suggested that she have her television adjusted, as the cartoon is "by no means a negro."

Letter from Dora McDonald to James Pike

Tuesday, April 7, 1964
San Francisco, CA

Dora McDonald informs Dr. James A. Pike that Dr. King will be able to preach for Grace Cathedral's Consecration celebration. She suggests that Dr. Pike lists five possible dates for Dr. King to fulfill this commitment in San Francisco.

Letter from Frederick B. Hewitt to MLK

Wednesday, February 26, 1964
CANADA, Atlanta, GA

Rev. Frederick Hewitt of Grace United Church writes Dr. King inviting him to visit the Thousand Islands for a combination of preaching with summer vacation.

Letter From Heather Burke to the SCLC

Sunday, August 14, 1966
Mississippi (MS), Atlanta, GA, California (CA), Nashville, TN

Heather Burke informs the SCLC of her upcoming attendance as a student at Vanderbilt University. She wishes to volunteer with the organization.

Darien Seeking Negro Teachers

Thursday, November 26, 1964
Connecticut (CT), New York (NY)

This article discusses the teacher exchange program between New York City Public Schools and Darien, Connecticut. The program calls for African American teachers to teach students in the predominately white town. The superintendent states the purpose of the project is to show the students that African Americans, if given the same opportunity, are just as intelligent as their white counterparts.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rev. Oliver W. Holmes

Friday, January 24, 1964
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Miss McDonald informs Rev. Holmes that Dr. King is out of the country, but that a tentative date has been set for Dr. King to meet with Mrs. Faber, a student who would like to speak with Dr. King regarding her dissertation.

Delegation of 11 from Local 237 Walk in Mourning March


This article explains the march that took place after Dr. King's assassination. Many people took part in the mourning march led by Coretta Scott King and Reverend Ralph Abernathy.

Letter from Lorraine Hughes to MLK Regarding the March on Washington

Washington, D.C.

Mrs. Hughes requests that Dr. King does not proceed with the march in Washington D.C., due to the inability of poor people to conduct a peaceful movement.

Leibnitz's Doctrine of Evil

Dr. King cites Albert C. Knudson's "Doctrine of Redemption."