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"RUSSIAN FEDERATION"

Letter from Jerry Russell to Mrs. King

Thursday, April 11, 1968

Jerry Russell offers his sympathy to Coretta Scott King following the death of Dr. King. He describes Dr. King as an individual of greatest integrity.

Letter from Wilma Hopkins to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967

Mrs. Hopkins sends prayers and Bible scriptures to Dr. King to emotionally support him during his jail sentence in Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter from Gregory Williams to MLK

Thursday, February 29, 1968

Eleven-year-old Gregory Williams expresses his admiration and support for Dr. King's leadership in the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to MLK Regarding Morehouse Anniversary

Friday, January 13, 1967

In this letter, President Mays invites Dr. King to Morehouse's 100th Anniversary celebration.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Jack E. Wood, Jr.

Tuesday, December 13, 1966

Dr. King extended his appreciation to Mr. Jack E. Wood, Jr. for the letter and copy of Mr. Wood's speech given on the Demonstration Cities Program.

MLK on Brown versus Board of Education

Dr. King writes notations regarding the Supreme Court's decision in 1954 of Brown versus Board of Education, listing the various positive and negative aspects of that decision. The Reverend closes by stating, "Let us go and unite and be inspired once more..."

Letter from Pastor G. Murray Branch to MLK

Wednesday, June 7, 1967

In this letter, Pastor Branch invites Dr. King to be the speaker on the 90th Anniversary of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding The Critic in Chicago

Friday, April 7, 1967

In this letter, Joan Daves informs Dr. King about the only magazine commitment to-date with The Critic in Chicago.

Letter from Cleonia and Frank to MLK

Tuesday, February 23, 1960

Cleonia and Frank, of Montgomery, Alabama, convey their support to Dr. King and the civil rights movement.

3000 Jackson Negros Flay Headstart Cutoff

This article discusses the protest of African Americans to the ending of the Headstart nursey program, and the reallocation of those funds to other state programs.

MLK Comments on Jack O'Dell's Alleged Communist Ties

Dr. King attempts to correct the erroneous impressions created by various newspapers alleging Jack O'Dell's connection to "Communist" activities. While Dr. King maintains Mr. O'Dell's strong work performance, the Detroit native will relinquish his role "in order to avoid embarrassment to SCLC."

Letter from MLK to Mother F. McMullen

Wednesday, October 23, 1963

Dr. King thanks Mother F. McMullen for her kind letter. Dr. King explains their goals and commitment to nonviolence in seeking brotherhood in America. He encloses a copy of his "Letter from Birmingham Jail" and expresses his appreciation for her support.

Letter from Jesse L. Jackson to MLK

Tuesday, January 31, 1967

Jesse Jackson writes Dr. King in reference to the efforts of Operation Breadbasket and its fundraising successes. He also expresses to Dr. King the importance of the Support A Worker (SAW) program and encloses information regarding its development.

Those Attending Breakfast with MLK

List of attendees for a breakfast meeting at Cornell University in Ithaca (NY) when Dr. King was on campus to deliver his sermon, "Three Dimensions of a Complete Life."

Letter from Joseph A. Scahill to Mrs. King

Wednesday, April 10, 1968

Following Dr. King's assassination, Minister Joseph Scahill sent this letter of sympathy to Mrs. King. Minister Scahill mentioned, briefly, his participation in the 1965 Selma campaign with Dr. King and vowed to continue such work.

True Democracy

Reverend O. J. P. Wetklo explains his ideas of true democracy, which he gives a Christian foundation and compares to the natural world. He calls true democracy "a perfect brotherhood of man," and he argues that each individual member of society must take responsibility for the whole.

Letter from John Barber to Mrs. A.W. Boone

Monday, November 8, 1965

John Barber, Executive Assistant to Dr. King, thanks Mrs. Boone of Atlanta's Booker T. Washington High School for agreeing to find a "Negro youngster" to become the pen pal of "a young French correspondent." The pen pal request resulted from communication between Dr. King and Dominique Pire, a Nobel Peace Prize recipient and Belgian priest.

Hosea Williams' SCLC Voter Registration Department Report

Tuesday, February 6, 1968

Hosea Williams' Bi-Annual Report from the Department on Voter Registration and Political Education gives an overview of the department's work; lists the field secretaries, project leaders and field organizers; and summarizes SCLC's eight state programs.

Letter from Representative Thomas G. Morris to MLK

Tuesday, September 21, 1965

New Mexico Congressman Thomas Morris writes Dr. King to acknowledge the receipt of a telegram requesting Morris' opposition to House Bill 585, which would dismiss five recently elected members. Morris does not indicate his position in the matter.

Letter from Mrs. Bill Green to MLK

Monday, May 27, 1963

Mrs. Bill Green, an uneducated white woman, informs Dr. King on the spiriutal words she has recieved from God. Mrs. Green asserts that she recieved this insight after she envisioned the struggle Dr. king has endured. She lists four ideas surrounding the lack of collectivity amongst the races and the acknowledgment of the power of prayer.

The Dimensions of a Complete Life

Dr. King begins this sermon with the story of John's first sight of the holy city of Jerusalem. He uses the story to emphasize "an eternal truth which we must forever recognize, and that is that life at its best and life as it should be is the life that is complete on all sides." This famous sermon had been drafted several times and also takes up the name "Three Dimensions of A Complete Life."

Letter from Joan Daves to Pierre Servais

Friday, November 20, 1964

Joan Daves writes to Pierre Servais in Belgium, thanking him for requesting the presence of Dr. King at the launching of a new edition of Strength to Love. She informs Mr. Servais that Dr. King's itinerary has not yet been set and that he will receive more information at a later date.

Carbon Copy of Letter from Melvin Arnold to Joan Daves

Monday, September 16, 1963

In this letter, Melvin Arnold, a representative of Harper & Row Publishing, clarifies and corrects sales and advertising figures related to Dr. King's book, "Strength of Love". The letter refers to a telephone conversation between Arnold and Joan Daves, a literary representative of Dr. King, in which advertising and promotion figures were discussed. Arnold uses the letter to justify the disappointing 18% sales outlay decided on by Dr. King's publisher.

Letter from Burke Marshall to MLK

Thursday, April 9, 1964

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General, writes Dr. King acknowledging his previous telegram about racism in St. Augustine, Florida. In addition, Marshall refers a copy of the telegram to the attention of George B. Hartzog, Jr.

Letter from T. W. Cole Sr. to MLK

Monday, August 12, 1963

The General President of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity sends Dr. King a contribution to aid the SCLC in the quest for "human dignity." Dr. King was inducted into Alpha Phi Alpha at Boston University in 1952.

Letter from Maude to MLK

Thursday, September 25, 1958

Maude extends her wishes for the rapid recovery of Dr. King, following a stabbing in New York. She assures him that she is holding down the fort and provides him with a breakdown of correspondences that he has received.

Letter From MLK

Tuesday, July 26, 1966

Dr. King regrets to inform some of the SCLC staff that they will have to cut back to their "normal capacity", while thanking them for their contribution to the organization.

Trent, Canons and Decrees of the Council of

Dr. King records some thoughts on the Decrees of the Council of Trent regarding the Catholic Church's response to the Protestant Reformation.

Letter from MLK to Reverend W.E. Gardner

Wednesday, February 28, 1962

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for a gift given to the SCLC on behalf of the First Baptist Church in Long Island, New York.

MLK Interview: The Negro Protest

Kenneth B. Clark conducts a televised interview with Dr. King, James Baldwin, and Malcolm X. Clark discusses with Dr. King his personal history, the relationship between the love ethic and nonviolent direct action, Malcolm X's claim that nonviolence is perceived by white leaders as weakness, and Baldwin's concern that Negroes will not remain nonviolent if met with brutal responses.