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Beyond the Los Angeles Riots

Saturday, November 13, 1965
Los Angeles, CA, Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA

Dr. King discusses the legacy of the Los Angeles riots in nonviolent protest. A decade after the Montgomery Civil Rights demonstrations, Dr. King speaks to the improvement of Southern African Americans' lives and the degradation of Northern African Americans' situations.

Letter from Johan Mulert to MLK

Wednesday, May 24, 1967
BELGIUM

Mr. Mulert requests for Dr. King to send him an autograph and a photo.

Telegram from MLK to President Kennedy

Mississippi (MS), Greenwood, MS, Washington, D.C.

In order to protect citizens involved in voter registration from attacks and harassment by police, Dr. King requests that President Kennedy intervene the situation in Greenwood, Mississippi.

Letter from Peggy Duff to MLK

Wednesday, September 13, 1967
GERMANY, London, England, San Francisco, CA

Peggy Duff writes Dr. King on behalf of The Campaign for Disarmament in West Germany to request a meeting with him while he is London. Ms. Duff references an earlier meeting with Dr. King in which he mentioned a projected trip to Europe in order to receive an Honorary Degree at Newcastle University. She informs him that the organization is interested in having him speak at a meeting on the war in Vietnam.

MLK Letter re Harvey Cox Book

Dr. King drafts a response to a request for permission to be quoted in Rev. Cox's book, God's Revolution and Man's Responsibility.

Sixth Grade Wisconsin Achievement Test Responses

Wisconsin (WI), Iowa (IA)

This is a collection of responses from sixth graders of average ability in a Wisconsin school. Although the instructions are not provided, it seems evident that the students were tasked to paraphrase the passage or, simply tell what the passage meant to them.

The Sword That Heals

Montgomery, AL, Birmingham, AL, Mississippi (MS), INDIA, Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), New York, NY

Dr. King, in this article adapted from his book "Why We Can't Wait," evaluates the intimidation the Negro faces as a result of securing freedom. He uses the campaigns in Birmingham, Albany, and Montgomery as backdrops to depict how the use of nonviolent direct action causes unrelenting sacrifice in the face of grave danger. This article was published in this quarterly summer 1964 issue of "The Critic."

Letter from Jeriann Kelsey to MLK

Sunday, May 21, 1967
Massachusetts (MA), Mississippi (MS), VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, UNITED KINGDOM, FRANCE, EGYPT, SOUTH AFRICA, Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA)

Jeriann Kelsey writes Dr. King to contrast and compare her experiences raising her son in Mississippi to the Civil Rights Movement and the war in Vietnam. She includes a photo of her son to show that a son "I have seen and touched and loved" is more important to her than "a war I've merely heard about."

Letter from MLK to E. H. Lehman

Pennsylvania (PA), Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King expresses concern regarding the illegal seating of elected representatives from Mississippi.

Evil

Dr. King outlines Quintus Septimius Florens Tertullianus' insights on the question of evil.

Letter to Senator Robert Kennedy from MLK

Wednesday, March 2, 1966
Washington, D.C., Chicago, IL

Dr. King applauds Senator Robert Kennedy for his statement on Vietnam. Both Robert Kennedy and former President John F.Kennedy contributed to the overall political philosophy and concept of a world of diversity. In addition, Dr. King mentions several political entities of progression due to the intellect and partnership with Senator Kennedy.

Letter from Mrs. Ted Gustafson to MLK

Sunday, December 10, 1967
New York, NY, Minnesota (MN)

Mrs. Ted Gustafson writes Dr. King to express her dismay with pastors and the pulpit, providing her belief that a Saint is long overdue.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

Monday, July 31, 1967
MALAYSIA, Atlanta, GA, SINGAPORE

This letter, signed "A Malaysian Citizen," expresses the author's hatred of African Americans. In addition to urging for their genocide, the author states that African Americans ought to be grateful that they are no longer enslaved. The author tasks the recipients of this letter, including Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, and President Johnson, to circulate it widely in order to express what he claims are the Malaysian views of the 20th century.

Letter from Sylvester Webb to MLK

Thursday, December 23, 1965
Philadelphia, PA

Sylvester Webb, Sponsor of the Sixth Grade Graduating Class Gift for Edward Gideon Public School in Philidelphia, informs Dr. King that an oil portrait of him was commissioned by sixth grade class. Webb request King's appearance or one of his advisers for the ceremony to place the portrait in the school lobby. Dr. King would later send Reverend Walter Fauntroy of the SCLC's Washington bureau to represent him.

Letter from Robert L. Green to MLK

Friday, December 15, 1967
Michigan (MI), Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Washington, D.C.

Michigan State University Associate Professor Robert Green sends Dr. King the final report of the Chicago Adult Education Project funded by the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare.

Letter from Keith G. Allen to MLK

Monday, February 26, 1968
Los Angeles, CA, Los Angeles, CA

In this letter, Mr. Allen requests an allocation from the sum of money that was granted to the SCLC from the Ford Foundation.

Letter from James H. Ridgely to MLK

Thursday, December 21, 1967
Baltimore, MD, Maryland (MD), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Attorney Ridgely requests that Dr. King sends his social security number in order for Addison H. Flournoy's federal estate tax return to be filed.

White House Invitation to Signing of Voting Rights Act

Thursday, August 5, 1965
Washington, D.C.

This telegram from The White House invites Dr. King to the U.S. Capitol for the signing of the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

Index Card with Dr. King's Handwritten Theology Notes

This notecard seems to elucidate some of Dr. King's personal insights on the relationship between Christianity and society.This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses. Topics covered include theology, philosophy, and history. Some material from these reference notes would later emerge in his speeches and sermons.

Letter from Roy M. Green to MLK

Monday, September 18, 1967

In this letter, Mr. Green wants Dr. King to read and give an opinion on the three views of the "Black Ghetto" in the October issue of the Atlantic Monthly. Mr. Green states to Dr. King, "Our editors would be most interested in your opinions and comments".

Letter from A. Philip Randolph to MLK

Thursday, July 30, 1964
Montgomery, AL, New York, NY

A. Philip Randolph asks Dr. King to make a tribute for Norman Thomas' eightieth birthday celebration.

Numbers

Dr. King records class notes from the biblical Book of Numbers regarding ethics, knowledge, and sin.

Telegram from MLK to William Dawson

Monday, March 21, 1966
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King informs William Dawson that the SCLC approves the plan to "transfer the Community Relations Service to the Department of Justice."

A Background Paper for the Delaware Conference on Equal Opportunity in Housing

Friday, December 2, 1966
Delaware (DE), Washington, D.C.

This paper is intended to catalyze discussion at the Delaware Conference on Equal Opportunity in Housing. By providing facts and analysis pertaining to Wilmington and surrounding areas, the paper is written to help familiarize attendees of the housing situation in Delaware. A key goal is to educate on the racial disparity and deterioration of urban areas. "The national housing objective is to provide decent, safe, and sanitary housing to all people" and this document encourages the execution of developed solutions.

Statement on the Indictment of MLK

Thursday, March 3, 1960
Alabama (AL), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York, NY, New York (NY), Montgomery, AL, New Orleans, LA, Mississippi (MS), Louisiana (LA), Orangeburg, SC, Birmingham, AL, Nashville, TN, Tallahassee, FL, Little Rock, AR

The "Committee to Defend Martin Luther King, Jr." issued this statement, accusing the state of Alabama of falsely distorting Dr. King's 1958 income tax return in an attempt to indict him.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rev. William Lawson

Wednesday, May 6, 1964
Texas (TX)

Dora McDonald writes in response to a request from Reverend William Lawson of Texas Southern University. McDonald encloses a biographical sketch and photograph of Dr. King, then relays a message from the Reverend to exclude a reception for him on May 17.

Song of Songs

Dr. King writes a brief summary of the book Song of Songs.

Letter from George T. Raymond to MLK

Monday, February 4, 1963
Chester, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

George Raymond, Rebecca Taylor and Rosa Ballard follow up with Dr. King about his availability to speak to the NAACP in Chester, Pennsylvania.

"Attorney's Arrest is Protested"

Thursday, August 18, 1966
Washington, D.C., Texas (TX), New York (NY), San Francisco, CA

This Washington Post article, entitled "Attorney's Arrest is Protested", talks about Arthur Kinoy's arrest and the complications that aroused as a result of it.

Letter from Edward W. Brooke to MLK

Monday, April 1, 1968
Washington, D.C.

In this letter, Senator Edward W. Brooke offers his gratitude to Dr. King, for his support of the current civil rights bill.