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Dogmatics

Dr. King records a note on the function of dogmatic theology and a quote from Karl Barth's "Church Dogmatics: The Doctrine of the Word of God."

Letter from Robert L. Green to Dora McDonald

Friday, November 3, 1967

Mr. Green encloses a foreword to Dr. Neal Sullivan's book by Dr. King.

Letter from Margo Belden to MLK

Thursday, March 21, 1968

Margo Belden inquires about materials from Dr. King for Choice '68, the national collegiate presidential primary.

Telegram from Roy Wilkins to MLK

Wednesday, October 11, 1967

Mr. Wilkins invites Dr. King to attend a meeting with Dr. K. O. Mbadiwe, former Nigerian Minister, and other Negro leaders in the United States to discuss the increasing conflict in Nigeria.

Letter from M. Rogers to MLK

Friday, August 18, 1967

M. Rogers objects to Dr. King's teachings and infers he should study the New Testament of the Bible. Mr. Rogers perceives that what Dr. King preaches causes "more resentment between the different races." He further elaborates on how he envisions the affects of "non-violence" and "civil disobedience."

Letter from MLK to Mr. Arthur Flemming

Monday, January 30, 1967

Dr. King is writing to express his deep appreciation for Mr. Flemming's contribution to the SCLC. He states that because of the contributors continuing support, the initiatives of the SCLC can persist forward.

MLK Speaker's Contract

Monday, April 3, 1967

This Speakers Bureau Contract states that Dr. King has a speaking engagement on May 12, 1967 at the University of Wisconsin.

Letter from Gregory Williams to MLK

Thursday, February 29, 1968

Eleven-year-old Gregory Williams expresses his admiration and support for Dr. King's leadership in the Civil Rights Movement.

Christian Social Philosophy

Dr. King focuses on the interrelatedness of Christian social philosophy, Christian ethics and theology. He argues for the rejection of theology that has no social ethics and also contends that ethics must be dynamic.

Manifesto of the Meredith Mississippi March

Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, and Floyd McKissick sign the Manifesto of the Meredith Mississippi March, which represents a "public indictment and protest of the failure of American society." In solidarity, they demand courses of actions to deal with voting fraud, strengthened civil rights legislation, and impartial application of the law.

Rep. Powell Unseating to Stick?

Tuesday, March 7, 1967

This article discusses public opinion surrounding former U.S. House Representative Adam Clayton Powell's ethics investigation, and subsequent ousting from office.

Legal Petition Made by Karl Von Key Against Selective Service System

Wednesday, June 15, 1966

Karl Von Key petitions the United States District Court of California about his draft into the armed forces. He contends that, as a person of color, he is a colonial subject, not a citizen of the United States. As a colonial subject, he should not be forced to serve in the military. He also writes that he is a conscientious objector and that he believes he was targeted by the local induction station because of his social and political views.

Letter from Mayor El-Khatib of Jerusalem to MLK

Tuesday, January 24, 1967

Rouhi El-Khatib, the Mayor of Jerusalem, Jordan, welcomes Dr. King to the city in advance of a pilgrimage planned for November 1967. At the time of this letter, East Jerusalem was part of Jordan and West Jerusalem was Israeli territory. During the 1967 Six-Day War, Israeli occupied and annexed East Jerusalem, but that annexation is not recognized by the international community.

List of Persons Invited to the Advisory Board for World Government

Tuesday, December 12, 1967

This document lists seven international figures who were invited to take a seat on the Advisory Board for World Government.

Dr. King Sermon Outline

Dr. King prepares notes for the sermon "Three Levels of Fellowship" deriving from 1st Corinthians 1:2, 9.

Index card written by MLK regarding Faith

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines another thinker's insights on the subject of faith. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for quick reference to quotations, ideas, and bible verses, among other things. Material covered on these index cards includes topics such as theology, philosophy, and history. Some material from these reference notes would later emerge in his speeches and sermons.

Robert L. Cope

Dr. King references Robert L. Cope’s article “Nature and/or Grace.”

Wall Street Journal: Letter to Editor from J. Chico Ramos

Monday, July 22, 1963

Mexican- American J. Chico Ramos gives his opinion to the Editor of The Wall Street Journal on racial issues in America. He objects to the claims that the Civil Rights Movement is going to help all minorities, because while they may benefit negroes, he doesn't feel they have ever benefitted anyone of his own nationality.

Materialism

Dr. King references author Emil Carl Wilm's publication, "The Problem of Religion."

Letter from Marvin Caplan of Leadership Conference on Civil Rights

Wednesday, December 6, 1967

In a letter to the heads of various organizations, Marvin Caplan encloses information regarding the Crime Control Bill that was sent to all members of the State Judiciary Committee. The enclosure is entitled "A New Threat to School Desegregation."

Letter from Reverend Roland de Corneille to Wyatt Walker

Friday, December 6, 1963

Reverend Roland de Corneille writes to Wyatt T. Walker regarding a fundraiser for the SCLC. Reverend de Corneille would like for Dr. King and a notable celebrity, such as Harry Belafonte or Nat King Cole, to come to Toronto, Canada for a benefit show.

Letter from Nancy Keppy to MLK

Wednesday, January 31, 1962

Nancy Keppy, a high school student from Alabama, asks Dr. King to share his thoughts on integration and segregation.

University of West Indies News Release

Thursday, May 27, 1965

The University of West Indies releases a statement announcing Dr. King's acceptance to preach the University's Valedictory Sermon.

Letter from William H. Chester to Rev. A. D. King

Thursday, May 16, 1963

William Chester, Regional Director of the International Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union, writes Rev. A. D. King as a follow-up to their earlier telephone conversation regarding the transports unions supporting the Negro community in Alabama. Chester provides suggestions for how the SCLC should try to secure the participation of the large unions, such as the Teamsters and the National Maritime Union. Chester also addresses a copy of the letter to Dr. King, Rev. Abernathy and Rev. Shuttlesworth.

Immortality

"Immortality" is the title of this handwritten note card by Dr. King, who documents a story of Socrates and the harp as an analogy to man.

Telegram from Harold Stassen to MLK

Thursday, October 15, 1964

Harold Stassen, President of the American Baptist Convention and former Minnesota Governor, congratulates Dr. King on being the recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize. He states that Dr. King is the most deserving because he tackles the race crisis through non-violent means.

Letter from Anderson Davis to MLK

Thursday, October 3, 1963

Mr. Davis invites Dr. King to speak at West Virginia's Emancipation Proclamation centennial celebration. Mr. Davis informs Dr. King that the event is an opportunity to collect contributions for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart

Dr. King uses Matthew 10:16 as the text for this sermon delivered August 30, 1959 at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery. Soft mindedness, he asserts, makes men gullible, superstitious, and fearful of change and fosters the belief that science and religion are in conflict. It contributes to racial prejudice and is capitalized upon by dictators. But tough mindedness, King says, must be tempered by a compassionate heart. The nonviolent struggle for freedom and justice must combine tough mindedness and tenderness of heart.

MLK's Recommendation Letter for Alan Wachtel

This original letter was handwritten and initialed by Dr. King for Alan Wachtel, who he was recommending for law school.

Christianity (History Of)

Dr. King quotes Harkness on the history of Christianity. Likely this is American theologian Georgia Harkness.