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The Dilemma of Negro Americans

In this draft of a chapter for his book Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community?, Dr. King offers an in-depth description of the plight of African Americans over the past few hundred years and how it will never be fully understood by their white counterparts. He recounts the issues associated with American slavery – the dehumanization of slaves and the destruction of the family unit. He ties what happened in the past to what is occurring in the present, explaining that because of these layers of oppression African Americans have to play catch up to be seen as equals in America.

Telegram from Memphis Sanitation Workers' to MLK

Sunday, October 1, 1967

Members of the Memphis Sanitation Workers' Strike express an urgent need for Dr. King to travel to Memphis in order to aid them in their crusade.

Photograph of Hammond Sound Truck Advertising Freedom Concert

This photograph shows the Hammond Sound Truck advertising a Freedom Concert , which will feature Harry Belafonte, Aretha Franklin, Joan Baez and Dr. King.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Spicher

Dr. King informs Mrs. Spicher that he is unable to assist her with the issues from her previous letter due to limited resources.

Invitation to Ghana's Independence Celebration

Dr. and Mrs. King were the recipients of a series of invitations to attend celebratory ceremonies to celebrate the independence of Ghana.

Letter from Marc Pilisuk to MLK

Thursday, June 22, 1967

Marc Pilisuk, Associate Professor of Administrative Science and Psychology at Purdue University, requests Dr. King's permission to reprint the book "The Triple Revolution."

Boston University Graduation Exercises

Sunday, June 5, 1955

Boston University awards an honorary PhD of Laws to John F. Kennedy.

Schleiermacher (Definition of Theology)

Dr. King quotes and interprets Friedrich Schleiermacher's definition of dogmatic theology in "The Christian Faith."

MLK Postcard - American Negro Emancipation Centennial

Wednesday, January 1, 1964

The American Negro Emancipation Centennial issued this 1964 postcard containing Dr. King's brief biography. The postcard was designed to be used as a study guide in Negro history.

Letter to MLK from Violet Calvert

Thursday, July 1, 1965

Violet Calvert expresses to Dr. King that she has little money but she uses letters to fight for equality. She shows Dr. King a copy of one of her published letters.

Letter from MLK to Victoria Gist

Dr. King apologizes for a belated reply and says he hopes the State Youth Congress meeting was successful. King was invited to be banquet speaker.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Theodore A. Dilday

Wednesday, June 1, 1966

Dr. King writes Mrs. Dilday of Riverside Baptist Church to express his appreciation for her two contributions to the SCLC. He explains the current works of the SCLC in Chicago and Alabama and stresses the importance of supporters like her.

Letter from Marilyn Sauer to MLK

Wednesday, May 31, 1967

Marilyn Sauer, Administrative Assistant to Dr. L. M. McCoy, provides Dr. King with the address of the Archbishop of Recife. Sauer also informs Dr. King of the proper way to address the Archbishop.

Social Ethics in Psalms

Dr. King writes about social ethics as discussed in Psalms 72.

Address by MLK to Southern Association of Political Scientist

Friday, November 13, 1964

Dr. King addresses the issues of poverty, unemployment, education, health, and housing disparities within the nation. Granted, many strides have been made but there is still more work to be done. Equality has still not come full circle in regards to these social issues. Dr. King urges the people to continue the fight of social justice in all aspects of inequality.

Introduction to the Demands of the Freedom Movement

This document discusses the injustices and inequalities that Negroes are facing in Chicago's urban communities. The author outlines the struggles blacks endure in a variety of different arenas such as racism, discrimination, poverty, unemployment and segregation.

The Role of the Church in the Nation's Chief Moral Dilemma

This handwritten draft represents the first part of Dr. King's address entitled, "The Role of the Church in Facing the Nation's Chief Moral Dilemma," delivered at the Conference on Christian Faith and Human Relations in 1957. Dr. King begins his address by discussing the scientific and technological advances that have taken place in America and how this progress has influenced economic growth. He asserts that this is the nation is dealing with a "chief moral dilemma."

Letter from E. Thomas Williams Jr. to MLK

Friday, April 23, 1965

On behalf of the Peace Corps Staff in Washington D. C., E. Thomas Williams, Jr. sends Dr. King a contribution to aid in the work of the SCLC. Williams also explains that many of the donors have made more than financial contributions to the civil rights movement.

Telegram from Dr. King to Senator Ernest Gruening

In this telegram to Senator Ernest Gruening, Dr. King expressed his happiness to serve as sponsor of a peace concert of the Arts that was held at Lincoln Center, January 21, 1968.

Letter from Don Blaine to MLK

Thursday, August 26, 1965

Don Blaine seeks advice from Dr. King concerning the idea of organizing a peace caravan that would travel throughout the United States. Blaine views this suggestion as a way to garner international support for peace.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Harry Walker

Tuesday, September 19, 1967

Ms. McDonald writes to Mr. Walker and states that Dr. King will accept the invitation to speak at Fairleigh Dickinson University in Rutherford, New Jersey on 10/25/67.

Homoionsios

Dr. King gives a definition of the Greek term "homoionsios."

Telegram from Ike Knight to MLK

Ike Knight notifies Dr. King about civil rights issues concerning steel workers going on strike.

Funeral Service for Mrs. Sharon Joann Moss

Saturday, October 10, 1964

Sharon Joann Moss, wife of Otis Moss Jr., passes at an early age and is given a funeral service which includes numerous members from the civil rights movement. Dr. King delivered the eulogy for the service and many other prominent members operated as pall bearers.

Optimism

Dr. King quotes F. S. Marvin's "The Living Past."

Telegram from Congressman Don Edwards to MLK

Friday, April 14, 1967

California Democratic Congressman Don Edwards congratulates Dr. King on his April 4th, 1967 speech "Beyond Vietnam," and commends his courage in speaking "so clearly on this vital question."

Letter from Charley Brown to MLK about Wallace Administration

Tuesday, November 1, 1966

In this letter Charley Brown suggests to Dr. King the idea of endorsing Mrs. Wallace for governor of Alabama, arguing that this would actually lose Mr. Wallace a number of votes.

Chapter II - The Methodologies of Tillich and Wieman

This is the third chapter of Dr. King's dissertation "A Comparison of the Conception of God in the Thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman."

Song of Solomon

Dr. King discusses the biblical book Song of Solomon and asserts that it contains minimal significance and little, if any, religious value.

Soap, Brush Help

Addressing Chicago slums, the focal point of Dr. King's Chicago crusade, the writer of the article calls for all tenants, regardless of race, creed or color, to assume some responsibility for the upkeep of their buildings instead of expecting Dr. King and the landlords of the buildings to solve the issue for them.