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Thank You Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to MLK

Wednesday, February 26, 1964

In this letter, Benjamin E. Mays former president of Morehouse College thanks Dr. King for his Founders' Day contribution.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Julia Smith

Tuesday, January 16, 1962

Dora McDonald responds to Julia Smith's letter on behalf of Dr. King and informs Smith that they hope she accomplishes her dream of becoming a nurse. Miss McDonald also tells Smith that they will remember her in their prayers.

Letter from Philip Isely to MLK

Thursday, April 6, 1967

Philip Isely, Secretary General for the World Constitutional Convention, asks Dr. King to publicly declare himself as an election candidate as delegate to the Peoples World Parliament and World Constitutional Convention. He states that Dr. King endorsed the idea in the past and encourages him to pursue the candidacy.

Preaching

Dr. King quotes Samuel Arthur Devan's "Ascent to Zion."

Letter from John D. Silvera to MLK

Thursday, March 15, 1962

John D. Silvera proposes several mass media initiatives to Dr. King. Attached to this letter is a memorandum with additional information.

Letter from Burke Marshall of the US Department of Justice to MLK

Thursday, July 26, 1962

Civil Rights Division Assistant Attorney General Burke Marshall responds to a telegram from Dr. King requesting an investigation regarding conditions at the Mitchell County, Georgia Jail. Marshall points out that his department has no juridiction in the absence of any federal violations, but he assures the Reverend that he will examine any information sent by Dr. King.

Letter from John Reevs Calloway III to the SCLC

Friday, April 5, 1968

Mr. Galloway sends his condolences to the SCLC for the untimely death of Dr. King.

Birthday Card from Margarite Foley

This birthday, wishing the recipient "increasing joy," was sent by Margarite Foley.

Condolences to the Wife of Theodore Trammell

Tuesday, March 20, 1962

Dr. King and Rev. Wyatt Walker send condolences to Mrs. Theodore Trammell. They make a promise to rededicate themselves to the fight for human rights, just as her husband had done.

Cable from J. Campe to MLK Regarding Payment

Monday, January 29, 1968

This cable from J. Campe to Dr. King references payment by Editora Senzala Ltd. for the Portuguese-language rights to "Why We Can't Wait."

Telegram from W. L. Bentley to MLK

W. L. Bentley expresses to Dr. King that his ill health prevents him from being present. He also requests to enroll and would like to be forwarded the cost.

Letter from Tony Edwards to MLK

Thursday, December 24, 1964

Fourteen-year-old Tony Edwards writes Dr. King to ask for an autograph to add to his collection. He also thanks Dr. King "for making the Civil Rights Bill possible."

Letter from Phyllis E. Ames to MLK

Sunday, October 25, 1964

Phyllis E. Ames, on behalf of the National Association of Negro Business and Professional Women's Young Adults of the New York Club, congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Thank You Letter from MLK

Tuesday, January 9, 1968

MLK wrote this thank you note to a supporter, Mrs. C.C. White, at a time when some former supporters were worried about a lack of racial unity or SCLC's position against the Vietnam War.

Tampa Tribune: MLK – A Religious Prophet

Saturday, November 7, 1964

In a letter to the editor, Rev. Gordon Christensen responds to The Tribune’s editorial “Peace Prize Puzzle,” saying the problem can be solved from both the secular and religious perspectives. King’s nonviolent resistance to segregation supports national law as laid out in the Constitution, the Bill of Rights, and Supreme Court decisions. The effort to gain freedom for Negroes through nonviolence offers the world an alternative to Communism as a means of ending colonialism.

Letter from the University of Newcastle to MLK

Thursday, February 23, 1967

E. M. Bettenson, the registrar of the University of Newcastle, sends Dr. King a follow up letter inquiring his availability to accept an honorary degree.

The U.S. Negro, 1953

Monday, May 11, 1953

This Time Magazine article discusses socioeconomic components for the Negro in 1953. Topics range from the Mason-Dixon Line and Cadillacs, to the difference between Southern and Northern Negroes.

Letter from MLK to Wesley A. Hotchkiss

Tuesday, March 1, 1966

Dr. King thanks Dr. Wesley A. Hotchkiss from the United Church of Christ for his generous contribution of $11,000 to the SCLC. King includes a list of how they money will be spent to assist with voter registration.

MLK Flyer - The Rising Tide of Racial Consciousness

Tuesday, September 6, 1960

This flyer promotes Dr. King's address on "The Rising Tide of Racial Consciousness." The event was held at Community Church for the 50th Anniversary of the Urban League of America.

Around The World Pilgrimage Proposal

Tuesday, December 31, 1963

Mr. W Emerson Smith appoints Dr. King and Mr. Abernathy as leaders of a proposed pilgrimage around the world. Mr. Smith outlines the estimated costs and planned itinerary along with profits for the SCLC.

Letter from John Sayre to MLK

Thursday, July 20, 1967

Mr. Sayre of the International Fellowship of Reconciliation thanks Dr. King for the autographed copy of "Where Do We Go From Here?"

Letter from Maurice A. Dawkins to MLK concerning VISTA volunteer training

Tuesday, November 23, 1965

Maurice A. Dawkins, of the Office of Economic Opportunity, requests leadership training from the SCLC for the VISTA volunteers who were expected to work in the rural South.

An Order For the Baptism of Adults

Dr. King outlines the order of the baptism service, including specific phrases for the minister to use.

Statistics on Birmingham, Alabama

This sheet shows Negro vs. White Populations in Birmingham, Alabama in regards to voting. It also shows the working wages of the Negro Population according to an article in the Saturday Evening Post.

Letter from MLK to Helga Gulbrandsen

Thursday, March 12, 1964

Dr. King responds to an invitation to visit Oslo, Norway under the auspices of the Norwegian Fellowship in the fall of 1964. He informs Ms. Gulbrandsen that he cannot commit to accepting the invitation due to his uncertain schedule, but assures her that he will keep her invitation on file. However, Dr. King's handwritten notes found on the letter indicate that he was unable to accept the invitation.

We are Still Walking

Saturday, December 1, 1956

Dr. King describes how African Americans reacted to the Klan's plan to intimidate them after the decision of the Supreme Court. Although deeply involved in the bus protest, Dr. King stated that there were other goals to achieve such as establishing a bank and credit union in Montgomery for African Americans.

Letter from Wallace Terry to MLK

Wednesday, April 11, 1962

Wallace Terry extends his appreciation for Dr. King's visit to Washington, D. C. and sends best wishes from Jack Eisen to Mrs. King.

Fight for Open City

Sunday, August 21, 1966

Included in The United Council Sentinel, is an excerpt featuring an initiative of Dr. King and various others: Operation Breadbasket. The author explores the details of this specific movement.

Vietnam and Beyond

This program for the Ecumenical and Community Conference held at the Thornfield Conference Center in Cazenovia, New York, highlights leaders from across the globe invited to attend the conference. These leaders were invited to support the efforts in Vietnam and assess policies regarding the country.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mamie Reese

Monday, January 22, 1968

Dr. King's assistant writes Mamie Reese to applaud Eartha Kitt's courage in speaking up about what she believes is the cause of “restlessness” and crime in the streets. Kitt spoke out against the Vietnam War at a White House luncheon hosted by Lady Bird Johnson, the First Lady.