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Letter from Mrs. Eva Claytor to MLK

Wednesday, December 14, 1966
New York (NY)

In this letter Mrs. Claytor of New York, NY, identifies herself as an "admirer" and is writing to inform Dr. King that his proposed book title "Where Do We Go From Here [sic]" conflicts with a previously published and copyrighted work of the same title in England.


Dr. King records a definition of the word "doctrine."

Telegram from MLK to Katie B. Whickham

Thursday, July 27, 1967
Atlanta, GA

Dr. King welcomes Mrs. Whickham and the National Beauty Culturist League to Atlanta. He also thanks Mrs. Whickham for the support that her organizations has given to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Hazel Gregory to MLK

Friday, July 19, 1963
Montgomery, AL, Washington, D.C., Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Hazel Gregory, on behalf of the Montgomery Improvement Association, asks Dr. King about transportation to the March on Washington. She also commends him on his recent article published in "Ebony." Dr. King was president of the Montgomery Improvement Association from 1955 to 1960. The organization was founded after the arrest of Rosa Parks, which sparked the Montgomery Bus Boycott.

Letter from Johann R. Goelz to MLK

Tuesday, May 7, 1963
Milwaukee, WI, GERMANY

Johann R. Goelz highlights the spiritual irony that Dr. King's has the same name of the historical Martin Luther. Mr. Goelz served as a former Lutheran pastor in Germany and expounds on the religious realities of Jesus Christ.

Letter from MLK to Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King writes Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy to commend him for his courage and work in directing the Civil Rights Act of 1964 through Congress.

MLK Interview on NBC's Meet the Press

Sunday, March 28, 1965
Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL

This edition of NBC's Meet the Press featured Dr. King for a discussion concerning the Civil Rights Movement and its demonstrations. The interview was moderated by Ned Brooks and the panel featured John Chancellor, James J. Kilpatrick, Tom Wicker and Lawrence E. Spivak.


Dr. King cites the Old Testament book of Deuteronomy regarding the topic of monotheism.

Support from Lawyer Grenville Clark to Attorney General Nicholas Kstzenbech

Thursday, July 28, 1966
New Hampshire (NH), Washington, D.C., New York (NY), New York, NY

In this letter to U.S. Attorney General Nicholas Kstzenbech, Grenville Clark requests a reply to Dr. King's "devastating" public statement in the New York Times about proper enforcement of the 1965 voting rights law.

Request Letter from Marchen- und Fabelbuch Gesellschaft

Saturday, December 30, 1967

In this Marchen- und Fabelbuch Gessellschaft is requesting that Dr. King contribute to an International Fairy-Tale and Fable-book. The book is a charitbale action to benifit UNICEF.

What the Reformation Took Out

This note card lists the effects of the Reformation on Christian worship. Summarizing the consequences, Dr. King notes, "the intellectual element was overemphasized."

Telegram from Lee C. White to MLK

Wednesday, September 18, 1963
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Birmingham, AL, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL)

Lee C. White, Assistant Special Counsel to the President, confirms a meeting with President Kennedy and Dr. King to discuss the Birmingham bombing incident.

MLK - Justice Without Violence

Wednesday, April 3, 1957
Massachusetts (MA)

Dr. King gave this 1957 address to the Institute of Adult Education at Brandeis University in Boston, Massachusetts.

Schleiermacher (The Church)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher's "The Christian Faith."

Anonymous Letter of Support for Reverend Ralph Abernathy

Saturday, April 27, 1968

An unknown author warns Rev. Abernathy to protect himself from those who might try to harm him and other Negro civil rights leaders.

MLK Speech at SCLC Staff Retreat

Monday, November 14, 1966
Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, SWEDEN, INDIA, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, VIETNAM, South Carolina (SC)

Dr. King addresses the staff of the SCLC at a retreat in Frogmore, South Carolina. He divides his speech into three parts: "whence we have come, where we have come, and where do we go from here." Dr. King thoroughly discusses his thoughts on Communism, the practice of nonviolence, the belief that racism is an "ontological affirmation,"and the weaknesses of Black Power.

Letter from Burke Marshall of the US Department of Justice to MLK

Thursday, July 26, 1962
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA)

Civil Rights Division Assistant Attorney General Burke Marshall responds to a telegram from Dr. King requesting an investigation regarding conditions at the Mitchell County, Georgia Jail. Marshall points out that his department has no juridiction in the absence of any federal violations, but he assures the Reverend that he will examine any information sent by Dr. King.

Executive Orders

Dr. King drafts numerous directives pertaining to the 1964 expenses of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.


Dr. King highlights a quote regarding time. [This quote is attributed to Henry Austin Dobson.]

Agenda for the SCLC State and Local Leaders

Friday, February 2, 1962
Atlanta, GA

This agenda outlines several topics discussed for the Southwide Meeting of State and Local Leaders. Dr. King, the President of the SCLC, spoke on SCLC's 'People to People' Program.

Letter from N. M. Nel to MLK

Thursday, March 17, 1966
SOUTH AFRICA, New Orleans, LA, Atlanta, GA

N. M. Nel writes to inform Dr. King that his visa application for South Africa has been denied.

Letter from Pamela Schnida to MLK

Thursday, October 10, 1067
Wisconsin (WI)

Pamela Schnida writes to Dr. King requesting information on the riots that occurred in 1967.

Letter from MLK to Evert Svensson

Friday, May 29, 1964

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for the Nobel Peace Prize Award nomination, but informs Evert Svensson that there are some roadblocks affecting his acceptance. The race problem in America requires his time, energy and presence in order to prevent the offset of violence. Dr. King inquires if the proposed date for the event could be altered.

Letter from MLK to Richard V. Grulich

Thursday, July 13, 1967
New York (NY)

Dr. King expresses his agreement with Mr. Grulich regarding U.S. foreign policy, asserting that the federal government needs to develop the "moral courage" to admit past mistakes.

Telegram from Mr. Robert Lieberman to MLK about Denver Teachers Union

Chicago, IL, Philadelphia, PA, Denver, CO

In this telegram, Mr. Lieberman writes to Dr. King requesting his support for an upcoming unionization vote by Denver public school teachers.

Poor People's Campaign

Sunday, March 17, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., Los Angeles, CA, Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL)

Dr. King is touring the nation to meet poor people in an effort to expose their living conditions. He also wants them to join the campaign to fight for better housing and jobs.

Letter from Richard Clemence to MLK

Thursday, January 27, 1966
Florida (FL), Atlanta, GA

Richard Clemence, a white Air Force officer, thanks Dr. King for his service to the nation in bringing people together. Clemence wrtes that "your steady guiding hand and spirit have led many to see the light of moral right."

Draft of Dedication Page for "Why We Can't Wait"

This document is a rough draft of the dedication page of Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait;" the draft reveals Dr. King's wish for his children.

Letter from Fred Roesti to MLK

Wednesday, December 21, 1966
Illinois (IL), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Fred Roesti writes Dr. King to arrange a meeting between him and five pre-theological students, to get his perspective on "the contemporary social situation and the 'relevance' of the church."

Coretta's Personal Story

Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA, Oslo, Norway, Boston, MA, Alabama (AL)

This telegram, dictated to Charles L. Sanders on the way back from the Nobel Peace Prize Award ceremony, contains Mrs. Coretta Scott King's sentimental narrative of her acclaimed relationship with Dr. King. Revealing details that range from their meeting in 1951 through twelve years of marriage, Mrs. King admits she was immediately smitten by Dr.