The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:

Correspondence - Aftermath of Dr. King's Assassination, 4/5/68

Friday, April 5, 1968

This letter, originating from Chattanooga, TN on the day immediately following Dr. King's assassination, is a personal note of condolence and lament. In it the writer identifies Dr. King as "truly America's outstanding citizen of our time". The writer and addressee are unidentified.

Letter from Omer Allison to MLK

Saturday, August 19, 1967

Mr. Allison expresses dissatisfaction with Dr. King's representation of the Negro race, the church and the Kingdom of God.

Letter from Irma Monsky to Mary McHugh

Tuesday, November 14, 1967

In this letter, Irma Monsky informs Mary McHugh that their panel of judges selected "Christians and Jews: The Tragic Past and the Hopeful Future" and Dr. King's "Where Do We Go from Here", as winners for their National Mass Media Brotherhood Award Program.

Darien Integration

Friday, April 17, 1964

This article is a summary of the integration of the Negro population into high-income residential suburbs. The Superintendent of schools and the Darien Board of Education has created a program to exchange schoolteachers and encourage students to attend schools with integrated classes.

Letter from MLK to Fellowship Baptist Church

Friday, May 5, 1967

In this letter Dr. King offers his gratitude for the contribution made by the Fellowship Baptist Church in Chicago, Illinois to the SCLC while explaining what the contribution is envisioned to accomplish and what the SCLC has already accomplished.

Scholarship Essay

Kathleen Lyons, an artist and student from St. Norbert College in Wisconsin, writes this scholarship essay to solicit funds to attend school in Chicago. In the paper, she recounts her experience with art centered civil rights work in Chicago and Wisconsin in various schools, a Native American reservation and a state reformatory. Additionally, Lyons explains that in the summer of 1966 while doing volunteer work in Chicago, she became involved with "Martin Luther King's freedom movement."

Telegram from President Kennedy to MLK

President John F. Kennedy applauds the work of Dr. King and the SCLC on the occasion of the organization’s Sixth Annual Convention.

Address by MLK at SCLC Ministers Conference

Wednesday, September 23, 1959

Dr. King addresses those in attendance at the Southern Christian Ministers Conference. He brings words of encouragement to those working diligently for social change in Mississippi. He speaks words of promise that things will change since the Supreme Court has ruled segregation unconstitutional and he gives examples of how things are slowly changing. However, he acknowledges that there is still much work to be done, especially in the South. Dr. King lists actions that must be at the top of everyone's list to be taken care of.


Dr. King references the religious philosopher William Ernest Hocking regarding the topic of evil.

Telegram from President Johnson to Bernard Lee

Sunday, May 29, 1966

Dr. King's special assistant, Bernard Lee, was the recipient of this telegram requesting his presence at a White House conference called by President Johnson. The theme of the conference was "To Fulfill These Rights."

Letter from Fitzhugh Mullan to MLK

Wednesday, August 17, 1966

Fitzhugh Mullan, the Chairman of the Student Health Organization of Chicago, asks Dr. King to be an advisor to the organization. Nationwide, the student health movement has worked in the ghettos of Los Angeles, with California migrant farmworkers, and in three Southern states.

MLK Interview on NBC's Meet the Press

Sunday, March 28, 1965

This edition of NBC's Meet the Press featured Dr. King for a discussion concerning the Civil Rights Movement and its demonstrations. The interview was moderated by Ned Brooks and the panel featured John Chancellor, James J. Kilpatrick, Tom Wicker and Lawrence E. Spivak.

Letter from Norma Lineberger to MLK

Tuesday, December 17, 1963

Mrs. Lineberger encloses a financial contribution for Dr. King to use for his personal well-being. She states that the gift is in memory of the late President Kennedy with hopes that his death will result in a unified stride "toward the good life."

American Foundation on Nonviolence

Friday, October 1, 1965

As Honorary Chairman of the American Foundation on Nonviolence, Dr. King presents a draft letter in which he calls for individuals to tackle the issues of voter registration, non-violence training, and protection of civil rights leaders by joining the organization and serving on its Board of Directors. Dr. King himself pledges $25,000 of his Nobel Peace Prize funds to the American Foundation on Nonviolence.

Letter from the Brotherhood Activities Committee to MLK

Thursday, October 31, 1963

The Brotherhood Activities Committee regrets that Dr. King will be unable to attend their speaking engagement. The committee requests that Dr. King provide them with a possible spokesman to speak in his absence. Fred Shuttlesworth and Morgan Collins serve as two primary options to serve the Ohio-West Virginia community.

Unitarian Universalist Statement of Consensus on Racial Injustice

Friday, May 20, 1966

The Fifth General Assembly of the Unitarian Universalist Association listed several laws adopted by the association. Some of the laws incorporate civil rights, demonstrations, voting rights, equality, civil disobedience, and discrimination in employment and housing.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Tullberg to MLK

Tuesday, April 18, 1967

The Tullberg family from New Hampshire conveys their support to Dr. King for his stance against the Vietnam War. They believe that the war is a violation of the basic principles of human rights.

Letter from Juniata College to MLK

Thursday, June 4, 1964

Robert E. Faus of Juniata College address Dora McDonald concerning the possibility of securing Dr. King for their religious convocation. Mr. Faus inquires about the status of Dr. King's schedule for the school year.

Letter from Peggy Duff to MLK

Wednesday, May 31, 1967

Peggy Duff writes Dr. King inviting him to attend a conference in Stockholm, Sweden surrounding the issue of peace and the Vietnam War. Duff is an official with the International Confederation for Disarmament and Peace. She thanks Dr. King for meeting with her in San Francisco, California and urges him to attend the conference in Stockholm.

Letter from Judy Palmer to MLK

Saturday, January 6, 1968

Judy Palmer agrees with Dr. King concerning the traffic jam in Washington D.C, and asks if Dr. King can befriend the White House.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Sandra Durlauf

Thursday, October 29, 1964

Dora McDonald encloses Dr. King's biographical information to help aid Sandra Durlauf in her studies. She also refers Mrs. Durlauf to read Dr. King's books "Stride Toward Freedom," "Crusader Without Violence," and "Strength to Love."

Letter from Ann Gallagher to Dr. King, January 31, 1967

Tuesday, January 31, 1967

In this correspondence to Dr. King, Ann Gallagher of the Catholic School Div. of Holt, Rinehart and Winston, Inc, was requesting the copyrights for "Letter from a Birmingham Jail," which would be featured in Father Joseph Novak's, "Christianity Today: A Book of Reading."

Letter from MLK to Laura R. Daly

Tuesday, April 19, 1966

Dr. King apologizes to Laura Daly for his delayed response and expresses his appreciation for her financial contribution. He states that the "new democracy" that has emerged in the south would not be possible without the moral and financial support from contributors such as Miss Daly. He discusses how there is still work to accomplish and the SCLC will continue their efforts in the freedom struggle.

God (His Love)

Dr. King writes notes regarding God and his love for humanity. King states, "God is a God who takes initiative... [He] seeks His creatures before they seek him."

Letter from Paul Good to MLK

In this letter, Paul Good repeats his first attempt to volunteer as a "press liaison" for the SCLC, and presents Dr. King with his support for the Poor Peoples Campaign.

Letter from George Field to Ms. McDonald

Tuesday, November 12, 1963

Mr. Fields requests advance text of remarks Dr. King is to give at the Twenty-second Freedom House Anniversary Dinner. The Freedom House Dinner receives major attention from the media and boasts a guest list of influential opinion makers.

Letter from Pastor F. Peter Sabey to MLK

Monday, April 26, 1965

Pastor F. Peter Sabey of the Lafayette College Church invites Dr. King to give a sermon at the church. Sabey states that he will cover the expenses for Dr. King and give an honorarium if he accepts.

Letter from MLK to Thomas K. Gilhool

Wednesday, September 6, 1967

Dr. King apologizes for his tardy response to a previous letter from Thomas Gilhool. He also expresses regret for his inability to speak at a dinner honoring Marjorie Penney.

Immortality (By Tennyson)

Abstract: Dr. King quotes Alfred, Lord Tennyson's "The Ancient Sage."

Letter from Helen Harrington to MLK with Poems

Thursday, February 8, 1968

Helen Harrington writes to Dr. King to offer him the use of her poems in his writing and speeches. The poems, attached, are entitled 'Color Book,' 'Viet Nam,' and 'Two Prisons.' In a post script, Harrington urges Dr. King to run for president on an independent ticket, provided a peace candidate is not nominated by the Republican or Democratic parties, adding that she wants no more of President Johnson.