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Letter from Monica Wilson to Dora McDonald

Friday, March 11, 1966
SOUTH AFRICA, Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Monica Wilson, from the School of African studies at the University of Cape Town, writes Dora McDonald expressing joy and excitement that Dr. King accepted the invitation to deliver the Davie Memorial Lecture. Wilson states that while King's accommodations are taken care of, the school cannot possibly pay for his aide.

Letter from Stephen Goodyear to MLK

Friday, July 14, 1967
New York, Connecticut (CT), Chicago, IL

Stephen Goodyear expresses appreciation for an inscribed copy of "Where Do We Go From Here?", as well as his enthusiasm regarding Dr. King's attendance at the National Conference for New Politics.

Immortality

Dr. King cites the Old Testament Book of Isaiah regarding the topic of immorality.

Colloque Sur un Projet de Plan Mondial de Resorption du Sous-Developpement

FRANCE

This is a draft of the conference in Paris regarding a global plan to help underdeveloped countries with technical and democratic issues.

Repentance

Dr. King clarifies the meaning of repentance according to the Old Testament.

Letter from MLK to E. H. Lehman

Pennsylvania (PA), Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King expresses concern regarding the illegal seating of elected representatives from Mississippi.

Letter from Harry A. Blachman to MLK

Tuesday, June 20, 1967
Cleveland, OH, VIETNAM

Harry Blachman writes Dr. King supporting his stance on Vietnam. He also requests a meeting with Dr. King to discuss the possibility of creating low-cost housing for low-income groups.

Lucky to Be an American

An anonymous person tells Dr. King that he has lost his place as the most liked American. The author infers that Dr. King should not look for everything free and work for his success.

Dr. King-Notecard

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines Brown's views on religion. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Tuesday, June 9, 1964
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Joan Daves writes to Dr. King to thank him for making a visit, in reference to his book. Ms. Daves mentions the positive reactions from the audience and how she believes that their positive feedback will make for a good start of the book.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Francis Smiley

Mr. Francis Smiley expresses his admiration to Dr. King for his leadership in what he describes as a potential end of civilization with the continued course of the Vietnam war. Francis encloses a check as an expression of heartfelt gratitude to the Reverend for his insight, humaneness, courage, and truthfulness.

Letter from Lady Bird Johnson to Sally Stengel

Sunday, October 4, 1964
Washington, D.C., New York (NY), New York, NY

Lady Bird Johnson thanks Mrs. Stengel for the sculpture of Eleanor Roosevelt.

Letter from John Askins to MLK

Wednesday, October 11, 1967
Detroit, MI

John Askins requests that Dr. King correct the transcription of an earlier interview for publishing purposes.

Letter from MLK to Raymond Beard

Friday, November 26, 1965
Cleveland, OH, New York (NY)

Dr. King thanks Raymond Beard for his statement on peace and Christianity. He believes that the Fellowship of Reconciliation can distribute Beard's message to fellow clergyman around the country. In Dr. King's view, "...we must embark upon positive programs of international aid and amity to strenghten the bonds of world community and to eliminate the conditions which historically have led nations to start wars."

Letter from Carl Albert to MLK

Friday, October 20, 1967
Oklahoma (OK), Washington, D.C.

In this letter, U.S. Congressman Carl Albert offers his gratitude to Dr. King regarding a letter he sent to him about problems in the country.

Letter from Mrs. Raphael Demos to Mrs. Coretta Scott King

Monday, February 10, 1958
Massachusetts (MA), Alabama (AL), Boston, MA, Montgomery, AL

Mrs. Demos thanks Mrs. King for her Christmas card and expresses congratulations on the birth of Martin Luther III. Mrs. Demos goes on to provide Coretta with various updates occurring in her own life.

Draft of Statement to TIME Magazine from MLK

Friday, January 12, 1962

In this statement, Dr. King is pleased to know that the President is calling for new civil rights legislation. Unfortunately, the President did not express anything new nor directly address the issue. Dr. King emphasizes the urgent need for the President to demand vigorous civil rights legislation in order to expedite school integration and the right to vote.

Letter from Irving Frank to MLK

New York (NY)

Irving Frank urges Dr. King to continue speaking out against the Vietnam War. Frank also encloses a check in support of Dr. King.

How Do You View Progress in School Desegregation?

Alabama (AL), Philadelphia, PA, Mississippi (MS)

In this rough draft of an article written by Gene Roberts of the New York Times, Roberts expresses his optimistic and realistic views of the progress being made in integrating schools.

Newsletter from Rev. Ellis Vanderbilt

Wednesday, May 1, 1968
South Carolina (SC)

On April 14, 1968, a group of Black and White Christians met to form the first integrated Baptist Church in South Carolina. The congregation bought an abandoned church, however, the church members needed additional financial assistance, so the Reverend Vanderbilt solicited contributions of at least $100.00.

Letter From Paul Brest to Members of the SCLC

Monday, November 14, 1966
Mississippi (MS), Memphis, TN, Jackson, MS

Paul Brest, on behalf of Marian E. Wright, alerts Dr. King and other SCLC staff members about legal initiatives to desegregate schools in Mississippi and other southern states.

Letter from Gaye Breitel to MLK

New York (NY), New York, NY

Gaye Breitel, a ten year old from New York, writes Dr. King to request an autographed photo or book with a recent picture.

Letter from MLK to Senator Everett McKinley Dirksen

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King thanks Senate Minority leader Senator Everett McKinley Dirksen (R-Illinois) for his role in helping to pass the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Dirksen was one of a handful of Republican Senators that helped break a southern Democratic filibuster designed to prevent the passing of this legislation.

Christology

Dr. King outlines a quote from Ritschl regarding "Christology."

Letter from Dora McDonald to MLK

Los Angeles, CA, Philadelphia, PA, New York (NY), New York, NY, Washington, D.C., Cleveland, OH, Atlanta, GA

Dora McDonald updates Dr. King regarding the numerous letters, invitations, phone calls and other pending business matters while he has been away from the office. During this period of absence, Dr. King had been imprisoned and was now recovering at home.

U.S. News & World Report: Negro Leaders Tell Their Plans for '64

Monday, February 24, 1964
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York (NY), New York, NY, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, MEXICO, CUBA, Georgia (GA), Kentucky (KY), Michigan (MI), Louisiana (LA), Atlanta, GA, Minnesota (MN), Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA, Missouri (MO), Massachusetts (MA), Boston, MA, Louisville, KY, North Carolina (NC), Mississippi (MS), Jackson, MS, Texas (TX), INDIA, Florida (FL), Tallahassee, FL, Detroit, MI, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, San Francisco, CA, Pittsburgh, PA, Washington, D.C., Birmingham, AL, Virginia (VA), Montgomery, AL

Past, present and future efforts in the area of civil rights are discussed in interviews of five organizational leaders in the civil rights movement. These leaders are: Whitney M. Young, Jr. of the National Urban League, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. of the SCLC, Roy Wilkins of the NAACP, James L. Farmer of CORE, and James Forman of SNCC.

Letter From Irene M. Kohlmeyer of WBJC to MLK

Thursday, December 1, 1966
Baltimore, MD

Irene M. Kohlmeyer, Program Director of WBJC radio at Baltimore Junior College, asks Dr. King for his permission to rebroadcast the transcription of a Phi Beta Kappa address he gave at Johns Hopkins University.

Anonymous Letter to Charles C. Diggs Jr.

Alabama (AL), New Orleans, LA, Louisiana (LA), Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), JAPAN

This anonymous letter to Congressman Charles Diggs, Jr. of Michigan details the grievances suffered by Negro and Caucasian females in the U.S. Army. The authors assert that they routinely are subjected to segregation in public accommodations and are denied equal opportunity for promotion and reenlistment.

Letter from Mrs. G. Wayne

VIETNAM, Philadelphia, PA

Mrs. G. Wayne, a white American mother, expresses support for Cassius Clay and everyone who denounces the Vietnam War.

Let's Be Human

Wednesday, March 1, 1967
New York, NY, CHINA, Colorado (CO), GERMANY, Maryland (MD), New Jersey (NJ), Ohio (OH), Atlanta, GA

Long time civil rights agitator Harry Fleischman wrote this syndicated column for the American Jewish Committee's National Labor Service. Articles within the column took a humorous and often irreverent view of social and civil rights issues around the globe. Fleischman was also the national secretary of the Socialist Party USA from 1942-50.