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Jeremiah

Dr. King records several scriptures from the biblical Book of Jeremiah.

Day of the Lord

Dr. King writes about the "Day of the Lord," as mentioned in the Old Testament book, Zephaniah.

Letter from Irene Harper to Dora McDonald

Monday, July 22, 1963

Irene Harper inquires of Dr. King's secretary if it would be possible to meet with the King family.

Volunteers Serving Program

This report highlights the voluntary efforts of programs serving for social justice along with numerous SCLC contributions.

Advertisement for "Why We Can't Wait"

Monday, May 25, 1964

Under the Additional Listings section of this magazine is a review about Dr. King's "Why We Can't Wait."

Immortality

Dr. King highlights a quote from Harry Emerson Fosdick's book "Assurance of Immortality."

Telegram from Robert Mangum to MLK

Tuesday, October 31, 1961

Mr. Mangum sends his support to Dr. King as he serves his time in Jefferson county jail.

Statement on Warnings Issued by U Thant

Sunday, May 21, 1967

On behalf of Secretary General of the United Nations U Thant, this letter serves as a call to action for every government, organization, and organ of world opinion to take a firm stance against American military escalation in the Vietnam conflict.

Draft of Speech to the National Press Club

Thursday, July 19, 1962

Dr. King's speech to the National Press Club in Washington D.C. was delivered a week after he was incarcerated in Albany, Georgia. This draft shows Dr. King's notes on his address about the Civil Rights Movement.

Statement from the Commission on Civil Rights

Wednesday, March 27, 1968

Clarence H. Hunter issued this statement to share the news that the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights would be holding a public hearing in Montgomery, Alabama to collect information regarding the condition of African Americans in Alabama. Hunter states the purpose of the Commission's investigation and names the notable members of the investigation.

Insight Broward: Bullets, Backflips & Baby-Talk

Moreland Smith forwarded a copy of Insight Broward Magazine for Dr. King to view. In this collection of articles, Jim Corvell expresses his disapproval of Alcee Hastings, a local NAACP lawyer, who was a candidate for the House of Representatives. Coryell heatedly describes his efforts to thwart what he called "the [N]egro racist's political plans.

Fellowship of Reconciliation Campaign Proposal

Thursday, October 27, 1966

The Fellowship of Reconciliation announces its "Thanksgiving-To-Tet" campaign and includes details of the types of aid that will be given to the people of Vietnam.

Letter from Robert Harris to SCLC

Thursday, June 17, 1965

Mr. Harris offers the SCLC assistance from the Michigan Chapter of the Law Students Civil Rights Research Council to research civil rights problems.

Letter from Wilbur C. Davis to MLK

Tuesday, February 8, 1966

Wilbur C. Davis writes Dr. King seeking prayer for him and his family. Davis also includes a poem that he wrote regarding Dr. King's life and involvement in the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Peter Seeger

Wednesday, December 6, 1967

Ms. McDonald informs American folk singer,Peter Seeger, that Dr. King will be unable to accept the invitation to appear on a Japan television program in January or February of the coming year. Dr. King asks that Mr. Seeger informs the program host that sometime during the summer would be more favorable for his schedule.

Telegram from Thomas Penna to MLK

Monday, November 6, 1967

Thomas A. Penna, the president of the Interracial Council of Buffalo, lists his concerns related to a poverty bill that will be debated the next day. Penna points out that the bill will harm impoverished Negroes, who are already being denied their right to vote. Penna urges Dr. King to address these issues during his upcoming speech in Buffalo, New York.

Telegram from Rodney Clurman to MLK

Rodney Clurman writes to Dr. King concerning recent updates with regard to political and social agendas. He concludes by requesting a wire transfer to his current location in New York City.

Letter from Wendell P. Whalum to Fellow Morehouse Alumnus

Thursday, January 11, 1968

Wendell P. Whalum informs the alumni of Morehouse College about the events that will place during inaugural week.

Hungry Club Speech

Wednesday, May 10, 1967

This document is a draft copy of Dr. King's Hungry Club Speech, in which he speaks on the subject "America's Chief Moral Dilemma." He states that the dilemma is "the means by which we live have out distanced the ends for which we live." Dr. King thoroughly discusses the three major evils that contribute to this dilemma: the evil of racism, the evil poverty, and the evil of war. He also discusses the progress of the Civil Rights Movement as it enters a new phase of fighting for "genuine equality."

Letter to Men of Morehouse from Morehouse President Benjamin E. Mays

Morehouse President Benjamin E. Mays discusses the events during Centennial Founders Week at Morehouse College for those who were not in attendance. He also informs the Men of Morehouse of the upcoming commencement ceremony.

Letter from the University of Capetown to MLK

Friday, February 18, 1966

Monica Wilson asks if Dr. King can deliver the T. B. Davie Memorial Lecture at the University of Cape Town.

Moral Progress

Dr. King describes moral progress as endless struggle toward "an infinite goal," which will lead to "happiness."

Letter from MLK to Paralee Fields

Friday, November 13, 1964

Dr. King writes Paralee Fields to decline an invitation to speak at the commencement for Phenix High School. Dr. King explains that he is very busy with the Civil Rights Movement and has limited time for speaking engagements.

Flyer for SCLC Mass Meeting

This flyer advertises a 1958 Norfolk, VA SCLC mass meeting.

Letter from the Poor People's Committee in Grenada, Mississippi

Friday, January 19, 1968

The Poor People's Committee of the Grenada Freedom Movement writes to Dr. King requesting help in securing jobs and adequate education.

Letter from Sargent Shriver to MLK

Monday, August 2, 1965

Sargent Shriver, Director for the Office of Economic Opportunity, regretfully informs Dr. King that he will not be able to meet with SCLC's delegates in Birmingham for their convention.

Telegram from Dorothy Height to MLK

Saturday, December 5, 1964

Dorothy Height, President of the National Council of Negro Women, sends Dr. King well wishes.

Letter from James R. McDowell to Mrs. King

Monday, February 25, 1963

Rev. James McDowell, Headmaster of The Lovett School in Atlanta, informs Mrs. King that the application for Martin Luther King III has been rejected. Mrs. King's application represented the first formal Negro application in the history of The Lovett School, thus the Headmaster had consulted the Board of Trustees. Upon receiving the rejection from the Trustees, McDowell returns Mrs. King's check and apologizes for any inconvenience. Attached to this set of documents is Coretta's statement regarding why she wanted her son to attend The Lovett School.

Out of the Long Night of Segregation

Friday, February 28, 1958

In this article, "Out of the Long Night of Segregation", Dr. King discusses the result of Negroes waiting to be treated as equals to no avail. He also presents several actions that should take place to provoke change.

Letter from Gordon Allott to MLK

Thursday, July 9, 1964

Gordon Alliot, a member of the United States Senate, sends his appreciation to Dr. King for his endorsement for a position on the "historic civil rights bill."