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Statement from American Jewish Congress Regarding the Bundy School-Decentralization Plan

Wednesday, February 28, 1968

Murray A. Gordon, a New York lawyer and national vice president of the American Jewish Congress, endorses the Bundy School-Decentralization plan. Mr. Gordon believes that the reform is essential to good education and assures teachers that the plan will not violate their rights.

Augustine (Concept of Evil)

Dr. King quotes theologian St. Augustine's "Confessions."

Letter from Gordon Allott to MLK

Thursday, July 9, 1964

Gordon Alliot, a member of the United States Senate, sends his appreciation to Dr. King for his endorsement for a position on the "historic civil rights bill."

Letter from Thomas Wilkins to MLK

Monday, April 5, 1965

Thomas Wilkins suggests that Dr. King consider pursuing an initiative against taxation in Alabama. He proposes that any Negro who is refused voter registration should not pay any taxes in the state.

Telegram from MLK to Senator Robert Kennedy

Monday, March 18, 1963

Dr. King requests that Senator Robert Kennedy initiate an investigation into complaints about the actions of police during demonstrations in Petersburg, Virginia.

Letter from Jack Thayer to Mrs. King

Friday, January 19, 1968

Jack Thayer, of KLAC Radio, writes to Mrs. King thanking her for a recent guest appearance on "Two-Way Radio," in Southern California.

Pledge Card: Get Rid of Wallace

This adverse advertisement published by the SCLC encourages Negro residents of Alabama not to vote for Governor George Wallace.

Letter from E.B. Putnam to MLK

Mrs. E.B. Putnam writes Dr. King regarding her concerns with the Communist Party's presence in America. She believes they are using race issues to gain power. The author also tells Dr. King that he should focus on leading people to Christ and not on race relations.

Statement Before The Credentials Committee

Saturday, August 22, 1964

Dr. King makes a statement to the Democratic National Committee in an effort to persuade the the organization to recognize the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party as a sitting, and voting, entity of the Democratic Party. Dr. King emphasizes that not only is the fabric of the Democratic National Party at stake, but representative government as it is known throughout the world.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rev. Otis Moss

Wednesday, January 9, 1963

Dora McDonald informs Rev. Otis Moss, Dr. King's former co-pastor at Ebenezer Baptist Church, that Dr. King will not be able to accept his invitation to speak at Mt. Zion Baptist Church for Men's Day due to his travels.

Letter from Ms. Dorothy Clark to Rev. Abernathy

Wednesday, April 10, 1968

In this letter accompanying a contribution, Ms. Clark expresses her condolences after Dr. King's assassination and pledges her personal support in continuing his mission.

Letter from Peter Seeger to MLK

American folk singer, songwriter and activist Peter Seeger shares with Dr. King a previous experience appearing on a television program in Tokyo. Seeger recommends the program as an excellent means to communicate with the Japanese people.

Why We Can't Wait Book Cover

This draft of Why We Can't Wait contains sketches of a cover, table of contents and edits of the brief description.

Wisdom

Dr. King quotes and comments on Proverbs 2:6, saying that wisdom is a supreme virtue for the author of Proverbs and involves moral character and knowledge.

Telegram from Rev. Harold Carlson to MLK

Thursday, September 19, 1963

Reverend Harold E. Carlson sends words of encouragement to Dr. King. Carlson prays for continued strength and courage for King's "holy cause."

Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty Southern Rural Action Project Progress Report

Wednesday, August 24, 1966

This document contains the Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty Southern Rural Action Project Progress Report. Randolph T. Blackwell, former program director of the SCLC is now director of the Southern Rural Action Project.

Letter from the US Civil Service Commission to Helyn M. Brooks

Friday, March 26, 1965

The United States Civil Service Commission informs Mrs. Helyn M. Brooks of her prospects for consideration for appointment in a civil service position.Mrs. Brooks' prospects section estimate is listed as poor.

Telegram from Roy Wilkins to MLK

Thursday, November 28, 1963

SCLC Chairman Roy Wilkins invites Dr. King to join other civil rights leaders in honoring President John F. Kennedy, as the they seek to promote the idea of civil rights.

Letter from Annie Mae Williams to MLK

Sunday, May 2, 1965

Annie Mae Williams and her family make a contribution of $25 to Dr. King.

Love

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr's "The Nature and Destiny of Man."

MLK's Reply to an Invitation

Thursday, December 21, 1967

Dr. King regrets to inform Robin Skuce of his inability to accept her invitation to speak at a seminar for a Canadian high school under the auspice of the United Nations Association in Canada. Dr. King informs Miss Skuce that he must decline her offer due to preparation of several SCLC programs scheduled for the following year.

Letter From Rabbi Robert E. Goldburg to MLK

Tuesday, March 6, 1962

Mr. Goldburg congratulates Dr. King on a recent article about civil rights that Dr. King wrote for "The Nation."

Advertisement for Mrs. King's Upcoming Appearance

This flyer serves as an advertisement for Mrs. Coretta Scott King's upcoming public appearance at the First African Baptist Church. Mrs. King wishes to honor every Freedom Fighter who was imprisoned during a civil rights demonstration.

Letter from Jefferson Poland to MLK

Following the death of his grandfather, Jefferson Poland corresponds with Dr. King to share his belief in man's divinity. After a life of discrimination, Poland's grandfather, Ross Mullin, wrote a poem to Dr. King which criticized prejudice. This transformation after sixty years of hatred represents man's continuous growth.

Black Power and the American Christ

The Christian Century published this article by historian and civil rights activist Vincent Harding in its June 4, 1967 issue. In the essay, Harding, friend, associate, and speech writer for Dr. King, claims that Eurocentric Christianity antagonized the Black Power Movement.

Letter from MLK to Thomas Harten

Monday, July 15, 1963

Dr. King writes to Rev. Harten of the Holy Trinity Baptist Church to thank him and his organization for the donation of one thousand dollars. He explains how the money will be used throughout the SCLC and the importance of having support from organizations who help contribute to the Civil Rights Movement.

Hegel

Dr. King references German philosopher, George Hegal, in this handwritten notecard.

Letter from B. J. Mason to President Johnson

Friday, February 9, 1968

B. J. Mason deplores how justice is not yet color-blind, at least in Alabama. Mason states that Mr. Boykin's right to "due process of law" is being violated. Edward Boykin admitted guilt to a crime and was sentenced to death, but the trial judge had not ensured that the defendant understood the plea. The U.S. Supreme Court overturned the conviction in Boykin vs. Alabama (1968), citing the Fifth and Fourteenth Amendments.

Pride

Dr. King quotes Bertrand Russell’s “Power: A New Social Analysis.”

Chicago Freedom Movement Tent-In

Thursday, June 22, 1967

This flyer outlines the platform for the Chicago Freedom Movement's Tent-In. This organization, based out of Warrenville, Illinois, sought for equality in housing and was an initiative of the SCLC and Al Raby's Council of Federated Organizations.