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Letter from a Concerned Christian to MLK

Wednesday, January 22, 1958
Baltimore, MD, ISRAEL

This letter penned by "Concerned Christian" informs Dr. King of a change in the course of the Civil Rights Movement. The "Concerned Christian" makes note of the increased amount of violence in the city of Baltimore and reprimands Dr. King's "reduced faith in God."

Strength to Love

Sunday, August 11, 1963
New York, NY, New York (NY), London, England, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This is the printer?s proof of Strength to Love, Dr. King?s book of sermons that was published in 1963. He drafted three of the sermons while serving a fifteen-day jail term in Albany, Georgia. Although his editors lauded the first draft, they later deleted strong phrases about segregation, colonialism and capitalism and many of his statements against war. The collection includes some of Dr. King's most popular sermons, including: Loving Your Enemies, Paul?s Letter to American Christians, A Knock at Midnight, A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart, and Three Dimensions of a Complete Life.

Letter from MLK to High School Students

Dr. King writes some high school students to inform them of his inability to attend their graduation. He also offers some words of encouragement.

Mastering Our Fears

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR

Dr. King discusses fear, the healthy and unhealthy fears humanity has, the need to overcome fear, and steps in mastering fear.

Letter from M. G. Greens to MLK

Saturday, November 23, 1963
New York (NY)

Miss M. G. Green, member of the Church of the Open Door, informs Dr. King of her concern with the Civil Rights Movement and her desire to offer her services as contribution to the cause. She encloses two letters addressed to Reverend Andrew Young, who never responded to her request.

Letter from Peter White to Dora McDonald Regarding MLK Invitation

Monday, August 23, 1965
CANADA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Peter White, President of the University of Western Ontario Student Council, sends Dora McDonald an invitation for Dr. King to come speak at their institution. He explains that another institution is planning to invite Dr. King to their facility and it would be financially "attractive" and convenient for Dr. King to accept both invitations.

Dorothy Cotton's Notes

Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI), DENMARK

Dorothy Cotton's compilation of notes includes topics such as the advantages of urbanization, diversity, automation, the "purpose of human effort," Denmark, community mobilization, the democratic method, the behavior of a responsible citizen and the "greatest prize" for mankind. Dorothy Cotton was the SCLC's Education Director and one of the organization's highest ranking female members at the time.

Letter from MLK to Joseph White

Monday, January 30, 1967
New Jersey (NJ)

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Dr. White's contribution to the SCLC and apologizes for the delay of response that was due to a high volume of other calls and letters.

Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to MLK

Thursday, May 7, 1964
Atlanta, GA

Morehouse College President Benjamin E. Mays writes Dr. King to ask him to consider donating his papers to the Atlanta University Center Library as an alternative to Boston University.

MLK Statement Regarding Desegregation

Thursday, May 24, 1962
SOUTH AFRICA

Dr. King discusses the end of the Old South and segregation. He lists urbanization, federal intervention and the unrest of Negroes as key ingredients in breaking down the old system.

Nonviolence: The Only Road to Freedom

Los Angeles, CA, California (CA), New York (NY), New York, NY, GHANA, ZAMBIA, ZIMBABWE, SOUTH AFRICA, TANZANIA, NIGERIA, ANGOLA, Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, INDIA, Georgia (GA)

In this article, Dr. King argues that the American Negro's salvation will be reached by "rejecting the racism, materialism and violence that has characterized Western civilization" and working instead toward a world of brotherhood and cooperation. The civil rights leader denounces recent violent uprisings in urban ghettos, as they only contribute to the growing frustrations and issues perpetuating America's racial divide.

SCLC Executive Staff Meeting Agenda

Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Los Angeles, CA, New York, NY, New York (NY), Washington, D.C., Los Angeles, CA

This executive staff meeting agenda for the S.C.L.C. provides a list of topics to be discussed as well as some organizational strategies for the organization.

Letter from MLK to David Dubinsky of the International Ladies Garment Workers Union

Tuesday, June 16, 1964
New York, NY

Dr. King thanks David Dubinsky of the International Ladies Garment Workers Union for their thoughtful donation to SCLC. The contribution will be used to assist the SCLC in voter registration, direct action and other methods to combat racial injustice.

Resolution for the Democratic Caucus of the House of Representatives

Washington, D.C.

This document is a resolution that explains the rules for current and incoming members of the Democratic Caucus of the House of Representatives.

New Housing Developments - West

Ohio (OH)

This outline entails the location, prices, floor plans and descriptions of new homes for Negro families.

L. A. Dotson Attempts to Speak with MLK

Saturday, August 19, 1967
Atlanta, GA

L. A. Dotson has made several attempts to speak with Dr. King on a personal matter. Unfortunately, Dr. King has not responded. L. A. Dotson forwards contact information to Dr. King and has taken residence at the Regency Hyatt room 226.

Letter from M. L. Banner to MLK

Friday, September 13, 1963
Atlanta, GA, Pennsylvania (PA)

The board of directors of the Booker T. Washington Center, Inc. requests Dr. King to serve as the guest speaker for their annual banquet. The Booker T. Washington Center is the only predominately Negro Welfare Agency in the community.

God

Dr. King uses a verse from the Book of Nehemiah to illustrate God's faithfulness.

Letter from MLK to Mr. & Mrs. Charles Digioia

Monday, October 24, 1966
Michigan (MI)

Dr. King expresses his sincere gratitude for the sculpture of John Henry that was created and sent to him by Mr. & Mrs. Digioia. As intended by the artist, the art work embodies the magnificence of strength and courage held with in the oppressed. Honored to accept it, Dr. King sees John Henry as an inspirational symbol of will and spirit.

Letter from Edna Hedrick to MLK

Sunday, November 8, 1964
Michigan (MI)

Edna Hedrick, writing on behalf of the Ypsilanti, MI, branch of the NAACP, congratulates Dr. King for being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa Memorandum

Wednesday, May 17, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, NIGERIA, Washington, D.C., UNITED KINGDOM, SOUTH AFRICA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, MALAWI, ZIMBABWE, NAMIBIA

Theodore Brown, Executive Director of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa, provides a progress report on ANLCA's work on Nigeria, Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe) and Southwest Africa (now Namibia). He mentions that the group offered to help the Nigerian federal government and the four regions mediate the conflict that resulted in the Nigeria-Biafra Civil War (1967-1970).

News from SCEF Regarding Police Raids

Wednesday, October 16, 1963
New Orleans, LA, Washington, D.C., Louisville, KY, Atlanta, GA, Louisiana (LA)

As a result of a police raid on the offices of the SCEF and its officers, two of their top officers were arrested and their records and papers were seized. The White Citizens Council praised the Louisiana Joint Legislative Committee on Un-American Activities for instigating the raids, while numerous other committees strongly denounced the raids.

Letter from MLK to Reverend Leon H. Sullivan

Wednesday, October 31, 1962
Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA

Dr. King thanks Rev. Leon Sullivan for visiting Atlanta and delivering a powerful message. Dr. King had asked Rev. Sullivan to come to Atlanta and meet with local ministers to discuss the selective patronage program Sullivan developed in Philadelphia. This program became the model for SCLC's Operation Breadbasket.

Letter from Lorraine Hughes to MLK Regarding the March on Washington

Washington, D.C.

Mrs. Hughes requests that Dr. King does not proceed with the march in Washington D.C., due to the inability of poor people to conduct a peaceful movement.

Letter from Rev. E. C. Smith to MLK

Monday, November 26, 1962
Washington, D.C.

Rev. Smith informs Dr. King that the Testimonial Committee has made the assumption that Dr. King is unable to accept their previous invitation, so they have made other arrangements.

Miracle

Dr. King references the Old Testament Biblical Book of Numbers regarding the topic of miracles.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Elizabeth T. Babcock

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Babcock for her substantial contribution and lets her know that her continued generosity and abiding faith in the cause have served to sustain and renew the strength of the SCLC.

Marx

Dr. King references German philosopher Karl Marx regarding his teachings. King states, "Marx teaching resolves into three principal elements: a philosophy of history, and economic theory, and a practical program for the realization of a new social order."

Women's Response to the Rising Tide of Violence

Monday, February 21, 1966
Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

Women's Response to the Rising Tide of Violence was a two day day conference in Philadelphia. The women who gathered agreed that violence was not a spontaneous action, but something that grows out of the environment. The way to combat such violence it enforce positive action with long-term solutions through social, economic, and political programs.

National Student Christian Federation Bulletin

Monday, February 29, 1960
New York, NY, Nashville, TN, Ohio (OH), New York (NY)

The National Student Christian Federation released several bulletins and informational letters regarding the student demonstrations in the 1960s. Herluf Jensen, General Secretary of the NSCF, provides readers with the progress of different trials related to the movement, arrest statistics and institutions involved. Obtaining strong civil rights legislation through Congress is discussed as well.