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Letter from John Saunders to MLK

Sunday, February 11, 1968

A supporter from D.C. writes Dr. King to ask if he can work for him in the "coming campaign".

Letter from Representative Charles Longstreet Weltner to MLK

Monday, January 4, 1965

Representative Weltner disagrees with Dr. King's assessment that Weltner's decision to seat the regular Mississippi delegation "was a vote for organized violence, murder, and oppression." Weltner also reminds Dr. King that he voted for the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Thank You Letter from MLK

Tuesday, January 9, 1968

MLK wrote this thank you note to a supporter, Mrs. C.C. White, at a time when some former supporters were worried about a lack of racial unity or SCLC's position against the Vietnam War.

Judaism

Dr. King highlights a quote regarding the distinction between Reform, Orthodox and Conservative Judaism.

Letter from Eunice Johnson to Coretta Scott King

Monday, October 12, 1959

Eunice Johnson, an African woman born in America but now living in Nigeria, writes Mrs. King in hopes of being able to meet her during her visit to America. She hopes that they can discuss Dr. King's nonviolent campaign.

MLK Lauds Roy Wilkins for His Work with the NAACP

Wednesday, January 3, 1962

Dr. King honors Roy Wilkins for not only his efforts in the NAACP, but also his efforts in the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Benjamin Spock to MLK

Monday, February 21, 1966

Dr. Spock, pediatrician and Vietnam anti-war activist, writes Dr. King to enlist his support for an anti-war effort by joining in a "statement of common concern" with other "key spokesman for major American interests and institutions." He proposes that the group hold a press conference to release the statement with the intention of encouraging collective action against the Vietnam War. Dr. Spock indicates that he would like to hold the press conference on March 7, 1966. Dr. Spock hopes the group can get an audience with President Johnson to discuss their concerns.

Letter from Elisabeth T. Babcock to Dora McDonald

Thursday, February 25, 1965

Elisabeth T. Babcock writes Dora McDonald regarding Dr. King's schedule around May 8, 1965. Babcock desires Dr. King to address high school students "in support of Long Island." Babcock states that maybe Dr. King can help the children display their courage.

Is Nonviolence Effective

Rev. P. R. Regamey writes a paper that discusses whether or not nonviolence is effective. He uses Gandhi's methods as a basis for the paper. Rev. Regamey also addresses the broader theory and practice of nonviolence.

Newark Evening News: King's Standing Grows

Wednesday, August 24, 1966

This 1966 Newark Evening News article outlines the history and progression of Dr. King's leadership during an SCLC initiative addressing discriminatory living practices in Chicago.

Erasmus

Dr. King writes about Erasmus, a Dutch scholar, who lived during the Reformation period.

Colloque Sur un Projet de Plan Mondial de Resorption du Sous-Developpement

This is a draft of the conference in Paris regarding a global plan to help underdeveloped countries with technical and democratic issues.

Letter from Viva O. Sloam to CORE Members

Tuesday, June 19, 1962

Viva O. Sloam, sends a letter to members of the Congress for Racial Equality regarding integration in a Kentucky neighborhood.

Letter from Katherine Camp to Dora McDonald

Friday, September 10, 1965

Katherine L. Camp, Chairman for the Fiftieth Anniverdary of the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom, writes Dora McDonald regarding plans for Dr. King's address at the banquet. Mrs. Coretta Scott King is listed as one of the sponsors for the event.

Letter from MLK to Robert F. Kennedy

Monday, October 14, 1963

Dr. King informs Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy that if the proposed Civil Rights Bill of 1964 is "weakened at any point" that civil disobedience will follow and it will be the fault of those that "watered down the bill."

The New York Times: New Way Sought to Teach Rights

Sunday, February 20, 1966

Columbia University and its Teachers College plan to begin a nationwide initiative to improve the teaching of civil rights. The plan will not only apply to elementary and secondary schools but also to college, universities and adult education forums. Instead of using textbooks, teachers will utilize case studies and films to keep information up to date.

Letter from Mark Cohen to MLK

Saturday, September 25, 1965

Mark Cohen, of the Political Union of Central High School, requests for Dr. King to speak at the school regarding peace and civil rights on the same day he's addressing the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom in Philadelphia.

Excerpts from The Negro and the American Dream

Sunday, September 25, 1960

In this address to the Charlotte, North Carolina branch of the NAACP, Dr. King outlines five actions that Negroes must address in order to ensure their own first-class citizenship.

God

Dr. King writes about God, according to Isaiah 6:1.

Letter from Harry Wachtel to Owen Hungerford Regarding Finances

Monday, December 12, 1966

Harry Wachtel informs Owen Hungerford that Dr. King has approved the enclosed financial statement. Relative tax exemption material is also forwarded.

Letter from Doug Dodge to MLK

Wednesday, February 28, 1968

Mr. Doug Dodge writes Dr. King to request his help in identifying an appropriate role in the Civil Rights Movement for a young white male who is seeking to get involved.

Letter from MLK to David Dubinsky of the International Ladies Garment Workers Union

Tuesday, June 16, 1964

Dr. King thanks David Dubinsky of the International Ladies Garment Workers Union for their thoughtful donation to SCLC. The contribution will be used to assist the SCLC in voter registration, direct action and other methods to combat racial injustice.

Letter from Amelia P. Boynton to the SCLC

Wednesday, June 2, 1965

Amelia Boynton writes the members of the SCLC seeking financial assistance to help purchase a particular piece of land to help start a new sewing machine factory and other projects in Selma, Alabama. Boynton provides details of the history of the struggle of people of color in Selma, and stresses that the land would be used to help teach the underprivileged in the area to help themselves.

Diary in Jail

Thursday, August 23, 1962

Dr. King wrote a personal diary of his day-to-day experiences while in an Albany, Georgia jail for attempting to pray in front of City Hall. He pledged to return to jail, if necessary, if the City Commission refused to negotiate with Negro leaders on demands for immediate desegregation of all public facilities.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dr. Richard C. Gilman

Wednesday, October 19, 1966

Dora McDonald informs Dr. Gilman that Dr. King will be able to speak at Occidental College on November 17, 1966.

Library Book Due Date Card

This document is a ledger that contains a due date for an over night loan.

Letter from Phyllis E. Ames to MLK

Sunday, October 25, 1964

Phyllis E. Ames, on behalf of the National Association of Negro Business and Professional Women's Young Adults of the New York Club, congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Sin

Dr. King writes about sin, according to Jeremiah 31: 29, 30.

Ebenezer Baptist Church. Dr. King with Daughter Bernice (Bonnie). Atlanta, 1967

This photo comes from the Benedict J. Fernandez "Countdown to Eternity" portfolio.
(Copyright: Benedict J. Fernandez)

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mr. S.C. Njonjo

Tuesday, December 1, 1964

Dora McDonald responds to Mr. Njonjo's invitation for Dr. King to attend Kenya's Independence Celebration. Ms. McDonald informs Mr. Njonjo that Dr. King is happy to accept the invitation.