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Biographical Sketch of James Bevel

Nashville, TN, Tennessee (TN), Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Jackson, MS, McComb, MS, Greenwood, MS, Mississippi (MS), Albany, GA, Selma, AL, Chicago, IL

This one page biography summarizes the achievements of James Bevel, one of the founding members of SNCC. The biography highlights Bevel's involvement with civil rights drives in Georgia, Alabama and Mississippi, including the Freedom Rides and numerous SCLC action programs.

The Ultimate Doom of Evil

These sermon notes outline the inevitable fall of evil. Dr. King uses the work of influential American historian, Charles A. Beard to prove this claim. "A graphic example of this truth" is found in ancient proverbs that Dr. King aims to examine in detail.

Letter from Beth Arnold to MLK

Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), New York, NY

Ms. Arnold writes to inform Dr. King that she is head of his campaign committee for a campus movement for the upcoming election. She asks for any campaign material Dr. King can provide.

SCLC Constituent to Rev. Abernathy

Thursday, May 2, 1968
New York, NY

This letter, originating from New York City in the aftermath of Dr. King's assassination, is from a supporter who is inquiring about the purchase of items relating to Dr. King's correspondence.

Letter from Rosalind Rhines to MLK

Thursday, March 28, 1968
New Jersey (NJ), Atlanta, GA

Ms. Rhines, a student at Drake College of Business, requests Dr. King's opinion regarding the Civil Rights Bill proposed to Congress, and which candidate in the coming election has the best understanding of the American Negro struggle.

Letter from Norue Crickson to MLK

Tuesday, March 9, 1965
Michigan (MI)

Twelve-year-old Norue Crickson commends Dr. King for his civil rights efforts. He expresses that from now on he will offer his "prayers for this cause."

Does MLK Have the Right? the Qualifications? the Duty? to Speak Out on Peace

VIETNAM, New York (NY), New York, NY, Rhode Island (RI), FRANCE, CAMBODIA, LAO PEOPLE'S DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC, THAILAND, New Jersey (NJ), California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, PHILIPPINES, DOMINICAN REPUBLIC, HAITI, NICARAGUA

SCLC National Executive Director Andrew Young addresses recent articles criticizing Dr. King's expressions on peace. Young argues that these attacks are largely based on misconceptions of Dr. King's views. He states that the media is quick to attack Dr. King, but whenever critics retract their statements, nothing is reported. To combat this, Young includes a sampling of accurate articles on Dr. King to "redress the imbalance."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Student Jacquelyn Gravely

Wednesday, March 18, 1964
North Carolina (NC)

Dora McDonald refers Allen High School student Jacquelyn Gravely to read "Stride Toward Freedom" and "Crusader Without Violence" for her school assignment. She conveys Dr. King's good wishes towards Gravely's academic career.

Letter from Jesse L. Jackson to MLK

Tuesday, January 31, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C., New York (NY), Cleveland, OH

Jesse Jackson writes Dr. King in reference to the efforts of Operation Breadbasket and its fundraising successes. He also expresses to Dr. King the importance of the Support A Worker (SAW) program and encloses information regarding its development.

Letter from MLK to Berl Bernhard

Monday, August 20, 1962
Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA)

Dr. King writes Berl Bernhard, Staff Director of the Commission on Civil Rights, to introduce him to Mrs. Walter Lee Mengledorff. Mrs. Mengledorff is a resident of Savannah, Georgia, and "has concrete evidence on voting irregularities in Chatham County, Georgia. She is interested in bringing the whole matter to the attention of the Commission on Civil Rights.

Quotes on Love

The document, seen here, displays special quotations that focus on the theme of "love." Prominent individuals and philosophers such as: Carlyle, Suard, the Pope and Washington Irving are just a few of the quotes chosen by Dr. King.

Newspaper Article "Negro Nation Ratified"

Detroit, MI, New York (NY), Los Angeles, CA

This article discusses a group of black nationalists who ratified a declaration of independence for a separate Negro nation. The new nation was named the "Republic of New Africa."

Telegram from L. V. Booth and Otis Moss to MLK

Cincinnati, OH, Ohio (OH)

Dr. L. V. Booth and Reverend Otis Moss thank Dr. King and the SCLC for their efforts during the last ten years.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Watts

Monday, January 15, 1968
Louisville, KY, Kentucky (KY), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King thanks Mr. Watts for taking the time to express his support for King's efforts.

Letter from James H. Duckrey to MLK

Wednesday, March 11, 1964
Pennsylvania (PA)

James H. Duckrey, President of Cheyney State College, writes Dr. King asking him to serve as the Commencement Speaker. He briefly discusses the history of the college and informs Dr. King of the Honorarium.

Letter from Nancy Parr to MLK

Tuesday, December 10, 1968
San Francisco, CA

In this letter, Nancy Parr offers help to Dr. King in trying to "avert riots in 1968" to prevent the "right-wing" from taking over the nation.

An Evaluation of the Racial Problems of Chicago

Chicago, IL, Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL

The writer of this document examines the intended efforts of Dr. King and the SCLC in addressing the issues of poor urban conditions, unemployment, unequal education and lack of Negro political involvement in the City of Chicago.

Letter from W. J. Murphy to Deton Brooks

Monday, July 11, 1966
Los Angeles, CA, Chicago, IL

Congressman W. J. Murphy writes this letter to Dr. Deton Brooks, Executive Director of the Commission on Urban Opportunity. After listening to a radio show, of which Dr. Brooks and Dr. King posed commentary, Murphy was prompted with a response towards solving America's racial issues. Murphy states he initially opposed the executively ordered Fair Employment Practices Commission for the reason that brotherly love could not be legislated. FEPC requires that companies in governmental contract could not discriminate on the basis of race or religion.

Letter from Jim Morton to Members of the UTC Board of Directors

Wednesday, June 28, 1967
Chicago, IL, New York (NY), New York, NY

Jim Morton communicates the results of the executive committee conference call in preparation for a board member conference call at a later date. The Urban Training Center for Christian Mission is dedicated to community action and supports additional organizations. The training center is attempting to input a new training program and have appointed three staff positions.

Sin

Dr. King notes that Genesis 5:24, 6:9 and 6:22 make it clear that sin is not universal.

War

Dr. King quotes the views of Italian politician Benito Mussolini, English public intellectual John Ruskin, and Nazi politician Dr. Robert Ley on war and its relationship to masculinity.

Letter from Phyllis Light to the NAACP

Monday, June 17, 1963

Mrs. Light argues that the goals of the NAACP are too low. She compares the efforts of the movement to those of Hitler, Mussolini, Napoleon, and Caesar. Because of these comparisons, Mrs. Light promotes segregation amongst the races and accuses educated African Americans of abandoning their culture.

Letter from Paul Yelter to MLK

Monday, December 11, 1967
Oregon (OR), Los Angeles, CA, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), California (CA)

Signed by twenty-one supporters, this letter requests that Dr. King make a public statement about his disapproval of the 1968 Olympic Boycott by American Negro athletes. The authors argue that the boycott will ruin a chance for Negro athletes to prove their equality to white athletes.

Science

New York, NY

Dr. King records a definition of "science", quoted from John F. X. Pyne's "The Mind."

Letter from Reverend Robert Jacoby to MLK

Monday, June 17, 1963
New Jersey (NJ)

Reverend Robert Jacoby informs Dr. King that his Letter From Birmingham Jail was used in the Sunday worship service sermon.

Invoice for The 1961 American Peoples Encyclopedia Yearbook

Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

This invoice was sent to Dr.King is from the 1961 American Peoples Encyclopedia, which gives an account of the events during the year 1960.

Monarchianism

Dr. King defines the doctrine monarchianism as "a doctrine stressing the unity of the Godhead as against the ultimately prevailing tendency to affirm personal distinctions within the Godhead."

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Ruth W. Carr

Friday, May 19, 1967
Massachusetts (MA)

Dr. King sends Mrs. Carr his condolences for the death of her husband and thanks her for her contribution to the SCLC.

Telegram from Sen. Edward Kennedy to MLK

Saturday, October 17, 1964
Boston, MA

Senator and Mrs. Edward M. Kennedy congratulate Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

School Desegregation 10 Years Later

Thursday, May 7, 1964
Atlanta, GA, Mississippi (MS), Indiana (IN)

This statement was released by Dr. King ten years after the Supreme Court's decision, Brown versus Board of Education, which made segregation in public schools unconstitutional. The Reverend states, "The naive might believe great strides have been made in school desegregation over the past decade, but this is not at all true."