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Telegram from Emory R. Searcy to MLK and Others

Dr. Searcy advises Dr. King and Dr. Abernathy to consider relinquishing their involvement with the Albany Movement. The sender suggests that this action may help to dispel contention resulting from "the presence of outsiders" and the process of negotiations.

Telegram from MLK to John F. Kennedy

Tuesday, November 20, 1962

Dr. King expresses his approval of an executive order outlawing discrimination in federally assisted housing. He states that this is a courageous action that is a giant leap towards freedom and democracy.

Letter from Anonymous Writer to MLK

Wednesday, May 31, 1967

The author of this letter copies an article "Communists Meet the Church," published by the San Francisco Examiner and Chronicle, to support his accusations of cooperation between the Catholic Church and Communists.

Letter from Dr. King's Secretary, Maude L. Ballou

In this standard response letter, Dr. King's personal secretary highlighted the progress made in his recovery from a nearly fatal stabbing in Harlem. It also notes that Dr. King would respond to his many "well wishes", once he had been cleared by his physicians.

Letter from Professor St. Clair Drake to MLK Regarding the Economic State of Negro People

In this letter, Standford University Professor of Sociology, St. Clair Drake, discusses his interest in launching a co-operative movement to aid the Negro people. Professor St. Clair Drake also mentions an enclosed newspaper.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Marilyn Coulter

Thursday, November 7, 1963

Dora McDonald encloses an informational packet from Dr. King to Marilyn Coulter. Dr. King's only request for Coulter is that when she uses the information she cites the source from which it derives.

Letter from MLK to Ruth Huston

Wednesday, July 17, 1963

Dr. King sends a copy of "Strength to Love" and "Letter from Birmingham City Jail" to his friend Ruth Huston of New York City. Jokingly, Dr. King characterizes what Huston's reaction might be to "Strength to Love," due to Huston's own personal beliefs about religion. He emphasized that she may be disinterested in reading the book of sermons, but "on the other hand they may give you some religion."

Harry Belafonte - American Committee on Africa

Harry Belafonte sends a request for support in South Africa bringing awareness to apartheid and the injustices it entails. Belafonte implores the reader to send immediate help to the country in financial contributions, as an effort to fight racism and government corruption.

Letter from MLK to Ambassador and Madam J. Graham Parsons

Monday, December 28, 1964

Dr. King expresses his appreciation to Ambassador and Madam J. Graham Parsons for the reception and their hospitality during Dr. King's visit to Sweden.

MLK Supports New York City Teachers

Wednesday, September 13, 1967

Dr. King sends telegram of support to the United Federation of Teachers backing them in their efforts to create better conditions to work and educate students.

Letter to Mrs. King from Maria Stimma

Friday, April 5, 1968

Maria Stimma wrote this letter to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King's assassination.

Letter from Griffin R. Simmons to MLK

Thursday, October 4, 1962

Griffin R. Simmons, President of The Consolidate Association, responds to Dr. King's letter of recent date stating that he was chosen to be honored by the Consolidate Association. Simmons hopes that Dr. King can make an appearance at the Fall Affair, and requests him to make a statement which will appear in their journal.

Letter to Men of Morehouse from Morehouse President Benjamin E. Mays

Morehouse President Benjamin E. Mays discusses the events during Centennial Founders Week at Morehouse College for those who were not in attendance. He also informs the Men of Morehouse of the upcoming commencement ceremony.

What is The OIC Institute?

The Opportunities Industrialization Center (OIC) Institute was founded in 1964 by Reverend Leon H. Sullivan in response to public demand for a centralized resource for economic and social progress. This brochure outlines the program's history, principles, and current executive leaders.

Royalty Statement from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, August 23, 1965

This statement from Dr. King?s literary agent reflects monies earned from the German pocketbook edition of "Why We Can't Wait."

Letter from Massachusetts Mental Health Center to MLK

Tuesday, January 16, 1962

Drs. Myron Sharaf and Milton Greenblatt invite Dr. King to speak at the Commonwealth of Massachusetts' Department of Mental Health where the staff and researchers share an interest in ending "hate in social life."

Getting Caught in the Negative

Dr. King references the Book of Acts regarding his sermon "Getting Caught in the Negative." King asserts, "Don't get bogged down in the negative. Christianity must forever offer to the world a dynamic positive."

Letter to MLK Requesting Aid

Saturday, September 9, 1967

In this plea to Dr. King, Mrs. Venis Whitten asks for assistance with obtaining adequate medical care and welfare, which would tremendously improve the livelihood of herself and her two grandchildren.

Letter from Leonard Manning to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Leonard Manning offers condolences to Mrs. King following Dr. King's death.

Minutes of National Action Council Meeting

Sunday, July 1, 1962

The National Action Council, a sector of the Congress of Racial Equality, hosts a regional meeting in Miami, Florida where they will vote on council member positions, as well as regional and national NAC meeting logistics.

Letter from R. Lennox to MLK

Tuesday, January 5, 1965

R. Lennox writes a follow-up letter to Dr. King regarding an invitation to speak at the annual convocation celebrating the one hundredth anniversary of The Presbyterian College.

Letter from Floyd Henderson to MLK

Saturday, February 3, 1968

Floyd B. Henderson informs Dr. King that he supports African Americans as a whole. He proceeds to ask him to help elect Richard Nixon for President.

The Negro Speaks

Several prominent African Americans describe the issues that plague the black community. Some of these issues include poverty, segregation, civil rights and race relations.

Letter from Miles W. Jackson to MLK

Saturday, November 11, 1967

The Board of Christian Social Concerns of the Pacific Northwest Conference invites Dr. King to speak at the 1968 conference dinner. The conference will be held at the Methodist Church and will present civil rights spokesman Bishop Everett W. Palmer.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Carey B. Preston

Wednesday, July 1, 1964

Dora McDonald sends a reply to the Mrs. Carey B. Preston accepting an invitation on behalf of Dr. King.

Poor People's Campaign 1968

This pamphlet produced by the Southern Christian Leadership Council promotes the Poor People's Campaign in Washington, D. C. for the spring of 1968.

Telegram from MLK to Judy Silver & Gordon Geller

Dr. King salutes the Cincinnati Committee of Concern for Soviet Jewry for their efforts to end discrimination against the Jewish people of the U.S.S.R.

Letter from Joan Daves to Hoki Ishihara

Monday, August 24, 1964

Joan Daves encloses a copy of a manuscript of the proposed speech to be given in Berlin by Dr. King. Daves also indicates the fifty-dollar fee for the one-time publication of Dr. King's comments about the late President Kennedy.

Letter from MLK to Ms. Yvonne Hairston

Thursday, July 20, 1967

In this letter, Dr. King addresses Ms. Hairston's concerns about his opposition to the war in Vietnam.

Citizens Crusade Against Poverty Project Summary

Citizens Crusade Against Poverty summarizes a nationwide project focused on eradicating poverty, providing funding for education, and creating more effective ways to utilize welfare spending.