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Memorandum from Dorothy Cotton to SCLC Staff

Mississippi (MS), Jackson, MS

Dorothy Cotton provides the SCLC staff with instructions for and information about the Tenth Annual Convention, including suggested procedures, details about transportation and expenses, and staff work assignments.

Some Things We Can Do

In this series of note cards entitled "Some Things We Can Do," Dr. King provides several suggestions pertaining to the African American community.

"University Plans 'Liberties' Program"

Monday, February 21, 1966
New York (NY), New York, NY

Experts at Columbia University plan to adopt a program that will make the meaning of American liberties more relatable to students.

Letter from Mrs. Aaron Oliver to MLK

Monday, June 29, 1964
California (CA), Atlanta, GA

Dr. King extends his heart-felt appreciation to Mr. and Mrs. Aaron Oliver for their hospitality during his visit to San Diego.

Letter from MLK to Verna L. Halll

Tuesday, January 29, 1963
Los Angeles, CA, California (CA)

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Hall and the rest of the Mississippi Club for their donation. He assures her that "good will contributions" are necessary for the work of the SCLC to continue.

People In Action: The Complete Life

Saturday, April 27, 1963
Birmingham, AL, New York (NY)

Dr. King was in jail in Birmingham and unable to contribute his regular column to the New York Amsterdam News. The editors published these excerpts from a sermon he had recently given at Riverside Church on "The Dimensions of a Complete Life."

Patripassianism

Dr. King gives a definition of patripassianism.

Ossie Davis Defines Blackness and Whiteness

In this document,Ossie Davis uses Roget's Thesaurus and defines the words "whiteness" and "blackness" only to find many positive outcomes for whiteness and an abundance of negative synonyms for blackness.

Invitation from C.W. De Kiewiet to MLK

Thursday, July 15, 1965
SOUTH AFRICA

Cornell William De Kieweit invites Dr. King to speak as the T.B. Davie Memorial Lecturer at the University of Cape Town in South Africa. Mr. De Kieweit explains the civil rights struggle in South Africa and explains that Dr. King's appearance would be of great help.

Letter from Lady Bird Johnson To Mrs. Arthur Stengel

Monday, June 29, 1964
Washington, D.C., New York (NY)

Lady Bird Johnson writes Mrs. Arthur Stengel expressing amazement at her likeness of the President. Sally Stengel was a sculptress whose likeness of Eleanor Roosevelt is permanently placed at the White House. Joseph Mermel contracted Dr. King to inquire whether he wished a similar bust of himself.

Statement on Nobel and Catholic Interracial Council Awards

Saturday, October 17, 1964
Chicago, IL

John A. McDermott, Executive Director of the Catholic Interracial Council, lauds Dr. King's receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize and announces that the Council is awarding King its John F. Kennedy Award.

Dr. King's Involvement with the Second Emancipation Proclamation

Saturday, March 24, 1962
CANADA

This article states, Dr. King recently announced President Kennedy has request he submit for his signature a second Emancipation Proclamation.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald about Dr. King's "Three Lives for Mississippi" Preface

Friday, May 7, 1965

In this letter to Dora McDonald, Dr. King's assistant, Joan Daves writes that she has received Dr. King's preface for the foreign editions of "Three Lives For Mississippi."

Letter from Frank McRedmond to MLK

Wednesday, February 7, 1968
New Mexico (NM), Atlanta, GA

Frank McRedmond suggests that Dr. King consider using the term "the economic defenseless" rather than "the poor," in order to gain support from the white community.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to Mr. August Schou

Friday, November 20, 1964
New York, NY

In this letter Ms. Daves addresses Mr. Schou's request to have copyright assignment to the speech which Dr King delivered at the University of Oslo, after receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. She stipulates to Mr. Schou's "first call" but stresses the importance of copyright protocol "after Oslo."

Letter from Fr. John McNamara to MLK

Monday, July 26, 1965
Louisiana (LA), Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL, St. Augustine, FL

Fr. McNamara, Catholic Chaplain at the Louisiana State Prison at Angola, writes Dr. King to extend congratulations on being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Bernard LaFayette, Jr. to MLK

Friday, March 24, 1967
Chicago, IL, New York (NY), VIETNAM, Atlanta, GA

Before Mr. LaFayette leaves for New York to join the Spring Mobilization to end the war in Vietnam, he offer suggestions towards the housing problems that have occurred in Chicago. He states that there should be an urban renewal project that could possibly help low-income citizens afford respectable housing.

Letter from Hosea Williams to SCLC Field Staff

Tuesday, March 5, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), Baltimore, MD, Chicago, IL

Hosea L. Williams writes project leaders and field staff focused on mobilizing field operatives for the Poor People's March on Washington 1968. Williams sets the procedures and guidelines for all fundraising activity.

Letter from MLK to Herbert Lamont

Wednesday, August 23, 1967
California (CA)

This document contains a small series of responses between Dr. King and Herbert Lamont. Dr. King expresses gratitude for Mr. Lamont's moral support, while Lamont affirms Dr. King's sentiments on peace and justice.

Letter from Ram Bagai to MLK

Thursday, March 18, 1965
Los Angeles, CA, California (CA), New York, NY, INDIA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Ram Bagai, President of Films of India, writes Dr. King to support him and his affiliation with the Civil Rights Movement. He also seeks to become a financial donor to assist Dr. King. Bagai discusses a film entitled "Two Eyes, Twelve Hands," which is set to premiere in New York, and offers the proceeds to Dr. King to assist in his endeavors.

Letter from MLK to J. Howard Edmondson

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King writes Oklahoma Senator James Howard Edmondson to express appreciation for his support of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from MLK to James Farmer

Thursday, April 30, 1964
New York, NY

Dr. King sends James Farmer a complimentary copy of a journal on the works of the SCLC.

Letter from J. Stanley Purnell to Rev. MLK, Sr.

Monday, February 26, 1968
Pennsylvania (PA)

The Chairman of the United Health Foundations, J. Stanley Purnell, sends out an gratitude of thanks to Daddy King.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Yankowski to MLK

Monday, July 4, 1966
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

Mr. and Mrs. Yankowski of New York inform Dr. King of their plan to open a museum for junior high students featuring Americans of great importance. They request a collection Dr. King's past articles and photographs to be highlighted in the museum.

Freedom

Here, Dr. King defines freedom.

Letter from Betty Morton to MLK

Sunday, October 8, 1967
Selma, AL

Betty Morton of Selma, Alabama writes to solicit help from Dr. King. She also informs him of her hardships with school and her family.

Adverse Postcard to MLK

Boston, MA, Atlanta, GA, Tennessee (TN)

American Opinion illustrates a propaganda postcard of Dr. King that accuses him of being a communist. The photo on the postcard was taken at the Highlander School in 1957 which trained leaders in nonviolent passive resistance.

Where Do We Go From Here (Chapter V Draft)

Alabama (AL), Atlanta, GA, Birmingham, AL, Georgia (GA), New York (NY), Selma, AL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This draft of Where Are We Going?, Chapter 5 of Dr. King's book Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community? was significantly edited before publication but the central ideas are here. The government's failure to develop economic justice programs cannot be blamed on the Civil Rights Movement's lack of ideas, as often claimed. Building the political will for change is more important for the movement. The rights of Negroes to economic well-being are well aligned with goals and tactics of the labor movement. Negro leadership needs to be developed from within the community.

Letter from Muriel N. Bishop to MLK

Saturday, November 2, 1963
CANADA

Muriel N. Bishop, President of the Manitoba branch of Voice of Women, invites Dr. King to "address a public meeting" in Winnipeg at his earliest convenience. She expresses their interest in learning about his philosophy and efforts in the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Arthur L. Kinsolving to MLK

Tuesday, September 19, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY

Arthur Kingsolving sends his thanks to Dr. King for remembering him and sending a copy of "Where Do We Go From Here?"