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Telegram from Rev T R Albert to MLK

Rev. T.R. Albert, Pastor of Weslay Methodist Church, in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, sent Dr. King words of encouragment while he recovered in the Harlem hospital.

Letter from Audrey Mingo to MLK

Tuesday, May 16, 1967

Mrs. Mingo asks for detailed information regarding Dr. King's trips to the Holy Land and Africa.

Letter from Shirley Leonard to MLK

Sunday, December 31, 1961

Shirley Leonard encloses a check for ten dollars to help Dr. King further integration.

Letter from Lymell Carter to MLK

Thursday, January 17, 1963

Reverend Lymell Carter, Minister of Wesley Chapel C.M.E. Church, informs Dr. King that the Clarksville community is in need of his appearance. Reverend Carter details the racial demographics of the Tennessee town and the minimal voting capacity of the African American population. He notes the urgency of Dr. King's appearance to assist with the issues of integration and necessary political influence of the black community.

Letter from John Lazenby to MLK

Wednesday, May 10, 1967

John Lazenby, Professor Emeritus at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, encloses a donation to Dr. King. He further stresses that nonviolence is the prime method to solve problems around the world. Lazenby requests copies of Dr. King's anti-war speech delivered at New York's Riverside Church on April 4, 1967 to distribute to his friends.

Letter from Manley Brudvig to MLK about an Autograph

Wednesday, July 6, 1966

In this letter Manley Brudvig asks Dr. King for his autograph on the enclosed Newsweek cover.

Nature

Dr. King writes notes regarding the topic of nature.

Letter from the Frink Family to MLK

Monday, December 25, 1967

Father and husband John Frink, sends a $200 donation to Dr. King and the SCLC. The donation was made possible by not getting anyone any Christmas gifts. The author writes of a future intent to contribute physical aid to the organization in their hometown of Florida. In closing, Frink requests information regarding sponsorship of a needy family for the purpose of teaching his children how to be of service to others.

Draft Statement of Reverend Dr. MLK Jr.

This statement, not written in Dr. King's hand, responds to Joseph Alsop's syndicated column in the New York Herald Tribune. Dr. King clarifies that SCLC has no affiliation with the Communist Party. He also states the SCLC has not continued a relationship with Jack O'Dell since he was relieved of his responsibilities.

Letter from Ann Gallagher to Dr. King, January 31, 1967

Tuesday, January 31, 1967

In this correspondence to Dr. King, Ann Gallagher of the Catholic School Div. of Holt, Rinehart and Winston, Inc, was requesting the copyrights for "Letter from a Birmingham Jail," which would be featured in Father Joseph Novak's, "Christianity Today: A Book of Reading."

Letter from Pastor G. Murray Branch to MLK

Wednesday, June 7, 1967

In this letter, Pastor Branch invites Dr. King to be the speaker on the 90th Anniversary of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church.

Telegram from MLK to Robert Kennedy

Monday, June 4, 1962

Dr. King issues an urgent request for Robert Kennedy's immediate involvement in the prosecution of four students who were arrested while engaged in a peaceful demonstration in Jackson, Mississippi. Dr. King has also received information of gross violations of the students' constitutional rights.

Immortality

Dr. King discusses the relationship between the physical and spiritual elements of man. He notes four theories that describe the nature of soul and body.

Newsmakers Interview with MLK

Saturday, July 10, 1965

Los Angeles' Channel 2 interviews Dr. King for its Newsmakers program. Topics include King's call for a negotiated settlement in Vietnam and the resulting criticism by other civil rights leaders, plans for mass demonstrations in Los Angeles on the poverty bill, King's position on the armed group called the Deacons and his commitment to nonviolence, and how he responds to the personal threats on his life.

Letter from Carey B. Joynt to Rev. Carroll D. Payne

Tuesday, June 20, 1967

In this letter, dated June 20, 1967, Carey Joynt asks Rev. Carroll Payne to review her rough draft regarding the Vietnam War and Ramsey's ideas. She has simplified the arguments to the best of her abilities and hopes that Payne can offer suggestions for her draft.

Problem of Evil Notecard

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines his views on the problem of evil. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verse.

Work Summary of Rachel Davis DuBoise

This document is a brief work summary for Rachel Davis DuBoise as a member of the Dialogue Department of SCLC covering the periods from November 1965 to October 1966.

Letter from New York City Mayor to MLK

Tuesday, March 28, 1967

The Mayor of New York, John V. Lindsay, invites Dr. King to a conference entitled "Puerto Ricans Confront the Problems of the Complex Urban Society: A Design for Change." Panel meetings will expound on twelve subjects ranging from "Education" to the "Administration of Justice."

Suffering

Dr. King notes that Deuteronomy 8:3 suggests that the purpose of suffering is to teach higher spiritual truths.

Letter from Kate Krauthemier to MLK about a St. Louis Appearance

Monday, August 17, 1964

In this letter, Kate Krautheimer of the Artists and Speakers Bureau,urgently requests an appearance from Dr. King to St. Louis University.

Letter from Sture Stiernlof to MLK

Tuesday, September 19, 1967

Arbetet magazine's foreign editor, Sture Stiernlof, requests an interview with Dr. King for a "series of articles about the negro movement" that will be published in Sweden's most popular magazine, "Vi," as well as in Arbetet. Additionally, Stiernlof will use the materials for a book.

Response from MLK to Paul Yeiter

Monday, January 8, 1968

Dr. King responds to Yeiter's questioning of his support of plans to boycott the 1968 Olympic games. Dr. King argues that Negro athletes have presented specific and reasonable demands to the Olympic Committee, which reflects a valid concern for the social welfare and progress of the whole nation. He commends these athletes for their determination and courageous stand against racism and injustice.

Letter from T.Y. Rogers to MLK

Friday, January 6, 1967

T. Y. Rogers, an assistant to Dr. King at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery writes the Reverend expressing his interest in traveling to Israel to tour the country with him. In addition, Rogers offers to assist with funds if necessary.

March on Washington to End the War in Vietnam

Saturday, April 17, 1965

Thousands of students from across the nation collectively organized a March on Washington to end the war in Vietnam. The students were attempting to voice their disapproval of the war and asked that conscientious individuals join them.

Telegram from Teamsters Vice President Harold Gibbons to MLK

International Brotherhood of Teamsters Vice President Harold Gibbons conveys his support to Dr. King for a statewide Mississippi boycott. Gibbons congratulates Dr. King on being the recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize.

The Blame in Birmingham

The article, "The Blame in Birmingham", discusses the situation in Birmingham where four little girls were killed during a Sunday school class when a bomb was detonated. Governor Wallace's reaction and the consequences of the actions are mentioned in the article.

Telegram from Tuskegee Students and Teachers to the SCLC

Wednesday, April 12, 1967

Teachers and students from Tuskegee write members of the SCLC to express their support for the upcoming mobilization and Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War.

Telegram from St. James Baptist Church to MLK

Tuesday, September 23, 1958

Rev. W.C. Barnett, pastor of St. James Baptist Church, sent this telegram expressing well wishes, from his congregation, towards Dr. King.

Letter from Danny Cupit to MLK

In this letter, Danny Cupit writes to Dr. King and expresses his joy in reading one of Dr. King's books. He also acknowledges the pleasure of meeting Dr. and Mrs. King after a speech, given by Senator Kennedy.

Crusade For Citizenship

"Crusade For Citizenship," an initiative of the SCLC, illustrates the importance of Negro voters in the South. The brochure incorporates important facts to implement emphasis on how imperative the cause is.