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Letter from Reverend William D.F. Morris to MLK

Sunday, December 20, 1964
CANADA, Atlanta, GA

Rev. William D. F. Morris, of Centennial United Church in Toronto, invites Dr. King to visit his church during Lent.

Letter from Clair M. Cook to MLK

Wednesday, July 1, 1964
Washington, D.C., Indiana (IN), Ohio (OH)

Mr. Cook, legislative assisant to Senator Hartke of Indiana, thanks Dr. King for his recent letter lauding Senator Hartke for supporting the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Cook also recalls his and Dr. King's experience at Boston University.

Letter from W. Maxfield Garrott

Friday, October 16, 1964
Tennessee (TN), JAPAN, Virginia (VA), Atlanta, GA, Richmond, VA

W. Maxfield Garrott, president of the Seinen Jo Gakuin Baptist School in Japan, invites Dr. King to make an appearance if he ever visits Japan. Garrot also congratulates Dr. King on being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from MLK to High School Students

Dr. King writes some high school students to inform them of his inability to attend their graduation. He also offers some words of encouragement.

Telegram from Charles Pincjard to MLK

Tuesday, April 2, 1968
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Charles Pincjard writes Dr. King to confirm the date for a the WMPP Awards Brunch.

Telegram from ABC Network to Ralph David Abernathy

Monday, April 22, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

A correspondent from the American Broadcasting Company Network in Washington D.C. contacts Reverend Ralph Abernathy attempting to continue an interview previously scheduled with Dr. King before his death.

Letter from MLK to Paul Andrews

Wednesday, December 4, 1963
Massachusetts (MA)

Dr. King acknowledges Mr. Andrews' commitment to racial justice and expresses gratitude for his encouraging letter. Dr. King states that the most important contribution to justice anyone can make is a "thorough examination" of one's own behavior.

Letter from Mrs. King to Ms. Dixie Lee Kisor Regarding Home Helper Position

Saturday, June 22, 1963
Ohio (OH), Georgia (GA)

In this letter dated 6/22/63, Mrs. King informs Ms. Kisor of her decision not to employ her as a home-helper. She and Dr. King believe it would be in the best interest of the children to have someone who would be available on a permanent basis.

Notecard Written by MLK Regarding the topic "Paint"

This notecard, entitled "Paint", expresses Dr.King's ideals and philosophical viewpoint on the purpose of mankind.

Race Problems in Albany

Wednesday, December 13, 1961
Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C.

In the midst of some very disturbing events taking place in Albany, GA, Edward P. Morgan of the American Broadcasting Company writes this captivating broadcast message reflecting his personal view of the Negro's increasing self-awareness and recognition of its place in society.

Letter from James A. Dombrowski Regarding S.C.E.F. Contribution

New Orleans, LA, Louisiana (LA)

In this document, James A. Dombrowski, the Executive Director of the Southern Conference Educational Fund, Inc. requests a $10.00 contribution.

Plea for the Poor to MLK

Thursday, March 28, 1968
Georgia (GA)

Signing as "A Poor Person," this author urges Dr. King to remember that poverty transcends race. The author requests that Dr. King help the poor of all races, with an emphasis on promoting voter registration for all poor people.

Progress

Dr. King writes that progress has to do with value in human life.

Letter from Philip E. Jones to MLK

Thursday, October 6, 1966
Mississippi (MS), Pennsylvania (PA), Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), INDIA

Philip E. Jones, a SCOPE volunteer, recollects a "terrible night at Canton, Mississippi" where he met Dr. King and was assigned the duty to find Rev. Young. Jones invites Dr. King to speak about civil rights issues at Juniata College where he is enrolled.

Thank You Letter from MLK to Lilace Reid Barnes

Monday, May 23, 1966
Illinois (IL)

Dr. King expresses his deep appreciation for the contribution made by Lilace Barnnes to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Dr. King states that without the contributions from supporters the initiatives of the SCLC would not be possible.

Lette from Alta Yount to MLK

Tuesday, April 11, 1967
Arizona (AZ), Atlanta, GA, Los Angeles, CA, California (CA)

Alta Yount expresses her approval of a speech that Dr. King delivered. She also requests some copies of it.

Adverse Advertisement Regarding MLK

This flyer questions prominent leaders Dr. King and Robert Kennedy.

Letter from Frank Jones to MLK

Tuesday, August 14, 1962
Atlanta, GA, Albany, GA

Reverend Frank Jones sends Dr. King a letter expressing his concern about the recent occurrences in Albany, Georgia.

Letter from MLK to Joel Crittenden

Dr. King responds to Joel Crittenden's concern about white hatred toward Negroes by making two points: 1) some whites have given their lives in the freedom struggle, and 2) hatred and violence must be met with love and nonviolence.

Letter from John Lewis to Rev. Ralph Abernathy

Tuesday, August 31, 1965
Atlanta, GA

John Lewis thanks the Southern Christian Leadership Conference Board of Directors for their five thousand dollar contribution to the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee.

Letter to Dr. Neil V. Sullivan from Robert L. Green

Thursday, April 27, 1967
Michigan (MI), Berkeley, CA

Robert Green expresses his appreciation for Dr. Neil Sullivan's chapter contribution in the book, "Education and the Urban Poor." Mr. Green is pleased when he discovers Dr. Sullivan has contributed a portion of the book profits to Dr. King and the SCLC. The book will be in demand for college level courses focusing on education, psychology and sociology.

Letter from John H. Herriford to MLK

Friday, November 11, 1960
Minnesota (MN)

John Herriford, a student at the University of Minnesota, offers Dr. King advice on how to improve sit-in demonstrations.

A. N. Whitehead

Dr. King quotes Alfred North Whitehead's view of the philosophy of science in The Concept of Nature.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Arvella Gray

Monday, June 3, 1963
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

Dora McDonald acknowledges receipt of items sent by Arvella Gray. She ensures Mr. Gray that Dr. King will be made aware of the gifts upon his return from Birmingham.

Letter from George Richard to MLK

North Carolina (NC)

George Richard asks Dr. King for books on demonstrations, and he also asks Dr. King to visit his town.

Justification (Ritschl)

Dr. King quotes Albert Ritschl's "The Christian Doctrine of Justification and Reconciliation."

Letter from Constance Beitzell to MLK

Sunday, April 14, 1963
California (CA), Atlanta, GA, Birmingham, AL, Los Angeles, CA

In the aftermath of Dr. King's arrest in Birmingham, Constance Beitzell expresses her dissatisfaction with federal officials not putting an end to the intimidation against Negroes in Birmingham. Beitzell is perplexed at the fact that the United States promotes freedom but does not allow freedom for many of its citizens who happen to be Negro. According to Beitzell, "What man in a Christian nation can trample on the rights of a citizen because of his race?"

Letter from Stephen J. M. Robbins to MLK

Wednesday, March 24, 1965
Philadelphia, PA, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL

Stephen Robbins thanks Dr. King for inviting the United States National Student Association to participate in the demonstrations in Selma and Montgomery, Alabama. Robbins states that the organization has directed its focus to equal opportunity for all and protection for demonstrators. Robbins also invites Dr. King to address the 18th National Student Congress at the University of Wisconsin at Madison.

Letter from MLK to Ivan Allen Jr.

Thursday, May 31, 1962
Atlanta, GA

Dr. King writes Mayor Allen regarding a seemingly unfair price quota for the Atlanta Municipal Auditorium that the SCLC plans to use for the Harry Belafonte concert.

Letter from MLK to Otis Warren

Thursday, July 22, 1965
Baltimore, MD, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Florida (FL)

Dr. King acknowledges the contribution made by Otis Warren of Baltimore, Maryland to the SCLC. He highlights new initiatives that the SCLC will undertake to boost Negro political participation in Southern states and a project to tackle the ghettos of Northern cities. Dr. King humbly notes that these projects could not move forward without the generosity of individuals like Warren.