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Letter from Clarence E. Pickett to MLK

Monday, September 9, 1963

The American Friends Service Committee is a peace and service organization that seeks to promote social justice in the United States and around the world. Mr. Pickett, a current representative, invites Dr. King to be a part of a lecture series that will be presented in all major U.S. cities. In addition, he offers Dr. King monetary compensation for travel and hospitality accommodations.

Press Release - MLK Mass Meeting

Sunday, August 21, 1960

This document is a 1960 press release detailing a voter's rally at the Jefferson County Armory in Kentucky where Dr. King will be the principle speaker.

Emergency Rally--Walk with Dr. Spock for Peace in Vietnam

The following document is promoting a rally for peace in Vietnam. Dr. Benjamin Spock, among others, is scheduled to speak at the rally.

Unity

These notes, prepared by Dr. King, were for a sermon entitled "Unity." This sermon, believed to be composed during the time of 1948-1954, was never delivered.

Letter of Invite from M. J. Jones to MLK

Tuesday, February 20, 1968

In this letter, M. J. Jones invites Dr. King and Mrs. King to be his guest at a dinner with Dr. L. Harold DeWolf. DeWolf is delivering three lectures over the course of two days, to which Dr. and Mrs. King are also invited.

Note to MLK from Mrs. Ed Brooke

This note from Mrs. Ed Brooke is extremely negative towards Dr. King, accusing him of inciting riots and calling him names.

A Tribute to the MLK

Monday, November 30, 1964

Several organizations in Stamford, Connecticut sponsor a tribute in honor of Dr. King. This document outlines the program participants, and lists Dr. King as providing the keynote address.

Letter from Mrs. William P. Camp to MLK

Thursday, October 28, 1965

Mrs. Camp expresses her gratitude for Dr. King's participation in the Fiftieth Anniversary Celebration ceremonies for the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom. Mrs. Camp requests permission to reproduce excerpts from his speech for use in publication of the organization.

Forgiveness

Dr. King provides several definitions of the word forgiveness according to several outside references.

Letter from Nils K. Stahle to Joan Daves

Wednesday, December 2, 1964

The Director of the Nobel Foundation, Niles K. Stahle, explains the copyright of Dr. King's Nobel Lecture. Stahle states that the Lecture belongs to the Nobel Foundation and that measures will be taken to preserve its integrity.

Letter from Joan Daves to Hoki Ishihara

Monday, August 24, 1964

Joan Daves encloses a copy of a manuscript of the proposed speech to be given in Berlin by Dr. King. Daves also indicates the fifty-dollar fee for the one-time publication of Dr. King's comments about the late President Kennedy.

Letter from Jacob Hoffman to MLK

Monday, June 7, 1965

Jacob Hoffman, principal of M. Hall Stanton Public School, requests that Dr. King record on a tape a few inspirational words for the graduating sixth grade class. Mr. Hoffman, also, mentions a new project called the, "New Dimensions Project," which is to inspire students to achieve higher standards.

Letter from James R. Smith to MLK

James R. Smith, the director of the Youth Christian Education Department of Athens Community, inquires if Dr. King can support his program by giving a donation.

Mysticism

Dr. King cites Psalms 17:15, surmising that the vision of God is a mystical union with God.

Letter from Ann Lincoln to MLK

Thursday, June 24, 1965

The writer, who identifies herself as a "collateral descendent of Abraham Lincoln," relates a story involving a young colored girl to Dr. King. Ms. Lincoln explains that the incident disturbed her greatly and she feels it is time to educate Negros on white acceptance.

Speech in Jackson, Mississippi

Wednesday, March 20, 1968

Dr. King addresses supporters in Jackson, Mississippi during his statewide tour for the 1968 Poor People's Campaign. He speaks of his excitement about the number of blacks in Mississippi that participated in the last congressional election. He emphasizes that the Poor People's Campaign cannot be successful without a strong coalition of organizations that see the need to combat poverty. King would be assassinated in Memphis two weeks after making this speech.

War

Dr. King quotes the views of Italian politician Benito Mussolini, English public intellectual John Ruskin, and Nazi politician Dr. Robert Ley on war and its relationship to masculinity.

Right & Wrong

Dr. King quotes James Martineau’s “Types of Ethical Theory, Volume II.”

Letter from Tom Offenburger to MLK

Wednesday, October 18, 1967

Tom Offenburger and Stan Levison plan to do a story on the Cleveland project and justify the expenses involved as necessary in the process of field research.

Fred M. Holt, Jr. Asks MLK to Suggest A Member of the Senior Citizens Commitee

Monday, May 27, 1963

Fred H. Holt, Jr., Chairman of the Annual Meeting Committee for the Houston Council on Human Relations, writes Dr. King asking him to recommend someone on the Senior Citizens Committee to serve as the speaker for a banquet.

Letter from MLK and Others to H. Brownell

Wednesday, January 11, 1956

Dr. King and other prominent clergymen "urgently request" a conference with U.S. Attorney General Brownell to discuss discrimination against bus passengers.

Letter from E. J. Moorer to Dr. King

Wednesday, July 21, 1965

E. J. Moorer of the Alabama Young Democratic Congress asks Dr. King to speak at one of their events.

Letter from Earl W. Hall to MLK

Saturday, May 13, 1967

The National Observer publishes an article entitled "Prophet or Propagandist" to critique Dr. King's political stance on the Vietnam War. Earl Hall objects to these perceptions deliberated in this article and contacts the National Observer to express his concerns. To support his argument, Mr. Hall references biblical prophets from the Old Testament. Mr. Hall communicates this information with Dr. King and informs him of their correlating views on the Vietnam War.

Letter from Edwin Tuller to MLK

Wednesday, June 22, 1966

Edwin Tuller, General Secretary of the American Baptist Convention, discusses an invitation for Dr. King to speak for the Buffalo Baptist Association. He suggests that Dr. King consider accepting the invitation because the association has good attendance from both Negroes and whites.

Sin

Dr. King paraphrases a scripture from the book of Leviticus that pertains to sin.

Jesus

Dr. King outlines some thoughts on the effect Jesus' life had on his followers.

Letter from MLK to Marion Jordan

Friday, May 4, 1956

Dr. King apologizes to Mrs. Marion Jordon and the Pittsburgh branch of the NAACP for the lack of acknowledgment for their contribution to the Montgomery Improvement Association. He expresses appreciation for their support and provides a report of their total contributions.

Letter from Nancy Davison to MLK

Thursday, May 18, 1967

Nancy Davison writes Dr. King to thank him for his words published in Ramparts. She writes that she finds it thrilling to be able read his own words instead of quotations used by others out of context. She thanks him for the stance he has taken on Vietnam, for fighting injustice, and for "having the courage to reveal what is in your heart."

Epitaph for a First Lady: Eleanor Roosevelt

Upon the death of First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt, Dr. King wrote this epitaph, calling her "a symbol of world citizenship." In addition, Dr. King commends Mrs. Roosevelt for her commitment to humanity.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, March 31, 1967

Joan Daves informs Dr. King about her Italian associates, Santi Ando & Figli's, invitation to Italy. She also notes the publisher's request for a surplus of photographs.