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"Orangeburg, SC"

Rev. Leon Howard Sullivan's Resume

This resume details Rev. Leon Howard Sullivan's degrees, affiliations, awards, works and accomplishments. SCLC's Operation Breadbasket was modeled after the Selective Patronage program that Rev. Sullivan developed.

SCLC Affiliates

Tuesday, October 17, 1967

Tom O. writes Mrs. King attaching an example of a brochure which entails a description SCLC's affiliate program. Tom O. also insures Mrs. King that the color in which the brochure is printed is not final.

Religion

Dr. King's focuses on religious beliefs and their relation to intellectual concepts.

The Irish Echo: Ann Daly's Corner

Saturday, June 15, 1963

Ann Daly, a writer for the Irish Echo newspaper, reviews Dr. King's "Strength to Love" and recommends that her readers get a copy of it. She notes that the Irish community should be sympathetic to the plight of Negroes in Alabama because their Irish ancestors also endured oppression. She also gives her opinion on a Gaelic society publication, a book for teenage boys, and recent Irish cultural events.

Letter from Burke Marshall to MLK

Friday, March 29, 1963

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice, informs Dr. King that his department is inquiring into events in Greenwood, Mississippi that Dr. King brought to his attention. He assures Dr. King that the Justice Department will take appropriate action with respect to any violations of federal law.

Letter from Jitsuo Morikawa to MLK

Tuesday, February 25, 1964

Jitsuo Morikawa, Secretary for Evangelism at the American Baptist Jubilee Advance, asks Dr. King to address the organization's Evangelism Luncheon in Atlantic City, New Jersey.

Letter from University of Saskatchewan's Student Union to MLK

Tuesday, December 21, 1965

A representative of the Student Union at the University of Saskatoon writes Dr. King inviting him to speak about the Civil Rights Movement. The representative asserts "the problems which you face are a matter for attention of the entire world."

Letter from Benjamin Mays to MLK

Friday, May 7, 1965

Dr. Mays, President of Morehouse College, writes each of the members of the board to seek an honorary degree of Doctor of Humane Letters for Dr. J. Curtis Nixon. Nixon was a lawyer and famous labor mediator.

"In a Word-Now" by MLK

Sunday, September 29, 1963

In the attainment of civil rights, Dr. King stresses the importance and urgency of "NOW". He further expounds on the immediate and effective actions that should be exercised by the Federal government to better the society.

Religious Index - MLK Notes

This document illustrates how to put together a sermon for religious services and contains notes from Dr. King.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Katherine McBride

Tuesday, February 22, 1966

Dora McDonald responds to the President of Bryn Mawr College expressing that Dr. King has committed to being the key note speaker for the upcoming graduation. Following the letter is the official commencement invitation.

Schleiermacher (Dogmas & Creeds)

Dr. King references Friedrich Schleiermacher's notions of dogmas and creeds, stating that they are mere descriptions of feeling.

Letter from W. David Angus to MLK

Friday, September 20, 1963

W. David Angus, Secretary of the Canadian Club of Montreal, extends an invitation to Dr. King to speak at an upcoming luncheon. He concludes by offering to cover any expenses that Dr. King may accumulate if he were to accept the invitation.

The Civil Rights Struggle in the United States Today

Saturday, May 1, 1965

This pamphlet, published by the Association of the Bar of the City of New York, is a transcript of an address delivered by Dr. King titled "The Civil Rights Struggle in the United States Today." In his first speech before the organization, Dr. King recounts the history of the global civil rights movement.

Pathos and Hope

Dr. King writes about his trip to the Mississippi Delta. He reflects on the resolve and spirit of the people, who despite all odds are fighting for social justice and change.

Letter from Dora McDonald to William K. Du Val

Tuesday, June 4, 1963

Dora McDonald responds to William K. Du Val of the Commission on Ecumenical Mission and Relations on behalf of Dr. King.

Anonymous Letter to John B. Oakes

Friday, August 26, 1966

This letter to the Editorial Page Editor of "The New York Times" features an unidentified writer presenting a rebuttal to a previous article on violence and "young Negroes." The writer identifies himself as a "dark-skin, non white" and cites examples of racial violence in other areas of the world.

Letter to MLK from Alan Westin

Friday, April 8, 1966

Alan F. Westin invites Dr. King to serve on the Board of Governors of the Center for Research and Education in American Liberties of Columbia Univeristy and Teachers College. Westin describes the mission of the Center and asks Dr. King to join in their efforts of developing civil rights teaching techniques to be used in all levels of public education.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to MLK

Tuesday, September 28, 1965

In this letter Ms. Daves writes to Dr. King to thank him for sending her the commission check from the "Saturday Review" SELMA piece. Daves goes on to say that Dr. King's article on the Watts riots was not published in several publications due to "scheduling problems", but will run in the "Saturday Review".

I HAVE A DREAM

Text of Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech delivered August 28, 1963 at the Lincoln Memorial, Washington, D. C.

Telegram from Norwegian Student Association to MLK

The Norwegian Student Association inquires if Dr. King will be available to give a lecture on Human Freedoms.

Letter from John H. Telfer to MLK

Saturday, March 13, 1965

Mr. Telfer, a 6th grade teacher, offers his sincerest gratitude for Dr. King and his efforts to eradicate injustice. He includes an additional thanks to Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth, a fellow civil rights leader.

Letter to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

This handwritten letter was written the day after Dr. King's assassination and is addressed to Mrs. King.

Letter from L. M. McCoy to MLK

Thursday, February 23, 1967

The Board of Missions of the Methodist Church, on behalf of the Methodist Church of Brazil, invites Dr. King to speak at the centennial celebration of Methodist missionary work in Rio De Janeiro, Brazil. McCoy also provides a brief history of the Methodist Church of Brazil.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. White

Dr. King informs Mrs. White that she should seek financial assistance from her local welfare office because the SCLC will not be able to provide that service.

Letter from Curtis Cosby to MLK

Monday, May 17, 1965

Curtis Cosby, writing on behalf of the Esquires Club, encourages Dr. King to support attorney Donald Hollowell as the replacement for judge Boyd Sloan in order to place a Negro in a high level federal position.

Letter from H. D. Bollinger to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, October 28, 1964

H.D. Bollinger is honored to have Dr. King as a speaker for their Eighth Quadrennial Methodist Student Movement Conference at the Municipal Auditorium. Mr. Bollinger communicates with Dora McDonald the details of Dr. King's trip. He also informs her that they will cover the travel expenses for Dr. King's assistant and have received the items he requested. In an additional letter a month later, the director of the conference notifies Miss McDonald that they are in need of five additional photographs and the address of Dr. King.

Letter from Members of a French Church to Dr. King

Monday, January 22, 1968

Members of the Paul - Gerhardt Church in Cologne, France send Dr. King birthday greetings.

The Ultimate Doom of Evil

Dr. King outlines a sermon entitled "The Ultimate Doom of Evil." The text is derived from a Biblical text, which states that one should not fret over evil doers because God is our vindicator.

Wave of Violence Against Blacks

This pamphlet produced by the NAACP, New York Branch, begins with the discussion of a controversial statement made by Senator James Eastland and its adverse affect of increased violence among blacks. Eastland attacked the Supreme Court's desegregation edict by stating, "You are not required to obey any court which passes out such a ruling. In fact, you are obligated to defy it." Newspaper clippings are shown with headlines that illustrate the violence, murder, bombings, and attacks blacks faced.