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"Orangeburg, SC"

Royalty Statement from J. Campe to MLK Regarding Harper and Row

Monday, April 10, 1967
New York (NY)

J. Campe informs Dr. King of the deductions for his royalty check from Harper and Row.

Letter from MLK to Alyce Bledsoe

Monday, July 12, 1965
California (CA)

Dr. King thanks the Women's Auxiliary to the Charles R. Drew Medical Society for its contribution to the SCLC. The contribution will be used to send California students to assist in voter registration projects.

Letter From MLK to Mr. Berkowitz

Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL

Dr. King responds to a request for information regarding demonstrations in Montgomery.

Articles Regarding Operation Breadbasket

Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA

These two articles from the Chicago Daily News and The Washington Post, discuss the economic improvement of Negroes in Chicago, IL.

Letter from MLK to Rev. John A. Clark

Tuesday, July 11, 1967
Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI)

Dr. King expresses his agreement with Reverend Clark regarding the church's lax position on "racial justice and brotherhood among men." Although he cannot participate in Reverend Clark's suggested campaign, Dr. King encourages the minister to move forward with his plans of establishing a revival campaign to preach "the message of Our Lord at every opportunity."

"Are We Ready"

This column by Joseph D. Bibb makes the argument that not only is "the colored American" ready for his civil rights, but also it is hypocritical to deny him those rights given the ignorance and savagery of many of his white counterparts.

Statement from MLK Regarding the Death of Malcolm X

Sunday, February 21, 1965

Dr. King comments on the assassination of civil rights activist Malcolm X.

Letter from MLK to Senator Daniel Brewster

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King commends Senator Daniel Brewster for his support of the 1964 Civil Rights Act.

SCLC Strategy North/South

This document addresses indifference of the Northern and Southern movement contributions. The direct-action techniques that are exercised in the South do not exist in the North. The SCLC is in need of a fundamental and effective political action in the North. The primary focus is to lay political foundations for the basic social and economic reforms throughout the nation.

Seasons Greetings from Roy Hamilton to MLK

Saturday, December 14, 1963
New York (NY), New York, NY

Roy Hamilton writes Dr. King to send Seasons Greetings to him and his family.

Letter from Max Hess to MLK

Monday, May 14, 1962
California (CA)

Mr. Hess expresses his sincere admiration for Dr. King stating, "you have done more than stood fast in the liberty wherewith Christ hath made us free."

Telegram from MLK to Robert Kennedy

Washington, D.C.

Dr. King requests a meeting with Attorney General Robert Kennedy regarding voter registration.

Letter from Charles Sellers to MLK

Saturday, April 29, 1967
Berkeley, CA, New York (NY), Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL, VIETNAM, Washington, D.C., Geneva, Switzerland

Charles Sellers, a Professor of History at the University of California at Berkeley, writes this letter to Dr. King promoting the Washington Convocation On The National Crisis. He encloses the proposal that he and Cecil Thomas discussed with Mrs. King over the phone. The proposal details the organized effort to marshal public sentiment against current US policy in Vietnam. Five hundred prominent Americans will be invited to the convocation, to be held in Washington, DC.

Letter from Mary T. Clark to MLK

Wednesday, November 11, 1964
New York (NY)

This letter from the Social Action Secretariat, National Federation of Catholic College Students references an enclosed letter which was issued to all member colleges. The enclosed letter supports student activity in the 1964 Freedom Fast.

Agenda for the SCLC State and Local Leaders

Friday, February 2, 1962
Atlanta, GA

This agenda outlines several topics discussed for the Southwide Meeting of State and Local Leaders. Dr. King, the President of the SCLC, spoke on SCLC's 'People to People' Program.

Recommendations Made to Executive Board of Montgomery Improvement Association

Thursday, May 24, 1956
Robinson, Jo Ann Gibson, Montgomery, AL

Dr. King makes recommendations to the Executive Board of Montgomery Improvement Association. He suggests developing a monthly newspaper to inform friends of the movement activity and scheduling weekly mass meetings.

Optimism

Dr. King quotes F. S. Marvin's "The Living Past."

Letter from Alice Mary Hilton and Kathryn Anne Hilton Hayward to MLK

Wednesday, April 12, 1967
VIETNAM, New York, NY

Kathryn, a young American girl, writes a letter to Dr. King expressing her sympathy for a girl in the Vietnam War. Kathryn sends twelve cents to help the girl in the war smile. Kathryn's mother also expresses her concern about the war.

Letter from MLK to the SCLC Executive Staff

Tuesday, June 6, 1967
Cleveland, OH, Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA

Dr. King informs the SCLC's Executive Board of a special meeting that will take place at Beamon's Restaurant. Outlined are the staff members who are expected to be in attendance and the topics they will review.

Outline of MLK's 1962 Address to NAACP

Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA

In Dr. King's handwriting, this outline is from a speech he later addressed to the NAACP, at its 53rd Annual Convention in Atlanta, GA.

Letter from Charles Williams to MLK

Thursday, February 1, 1968
Cincinnati, OH, New York, NY

Charles Williams thanks Dr. King for sending him an autograph.

New Politics Convention. Chicago, 1967

Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

This photo comes from the Benedict J. Fernandez "Countdown to Eternity" portfolio.
(Copyright: Benedict J. Fernandez)

Letter from Leslie A. Strikes to MLK

Wednesday, December 27, 1967
CANADA, Montgomery, AL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Leslie Strike, Canadian Vice President of the English-Speaking Union of the Commonwealth, invites Dr. King to speak on the US Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Matthew Schechter to MLK Regarding NAACP

Wednesday, May 17, 1967
Connecticut (CT), New York, NY

Mr. Schechter encloses correspondences between hm and the NAACP regarding Dr. King's comments on the Vietnam War and the civil rights movements. Mr. Schechter is returning his membership card due to the NAACP's "uncalled for commentary" concerning Dr. King. Mr. Morsell, Assistant Executive Director of the NAACP, informs Mr. Schechter that the NAACP took a position on the issue because of numerous requests they received from local members and leaders.

Food and Population Crisis Committee

Tuesday, April 4, 1967
New York, NY, INDIA, New Delhi, India, ISRAEL

Dr. David Lubbock and Dr. Jo Alter describe the economic conditions in New Delhi, India. The document lists the operations, communications, medical assistance, food and other things needed to provide relief to the population involved in the crisis.

Fundamentalism

Dr. King discusses the concept of religious fundamentalism as it relates to the Christian faith.

Schedule for Oslo Visit

NORWAY, Oslo, Norway, Atlanta, GA, London, England, FRANCE, Stockholm, Sweden, SWEDEN, KENYA

This document outlines Dr. King's twelve-day travel schedule to Oslo, Norway to receive the Nobel Peace Award. The itinerary includes various banquets, speaking engagements and meetings with individuals including the leaders of the British Council of Churches and the mayor of Oslo.

Lace Laird Affirms his Support for MLK

Sunday, February 11, 1968
Detroit, MI

Lace Laird wrote to Dr. King acknowledging that he stood with Dr. King at multiple marches in Detroit. He further rendered his services to Dr. King for SCLC's 1968 Poor Peoples March on Washington.

Descartes

Dr. King references a theological concept by the French philosopher Rene Descartes.

MLK's Statement on Church Destruction in Leesburg, Georgia

Thursday, August 16, 1962
Georgia (GA)

In this statement following the destruction of a church in Leesburg, Georgia, Dr. King argues that it was the action of somebody with the "strange illusion" that it would somehow stop African-Americans from seeking freedom and justice.