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"Orangeburg, SC"

Sermon Text (Habakkuk)

Dr. King examines Habakkuk chapter 1, verses 2 through 4 to discuss whether the inequalities of life are justification to question God.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Martin Peretz

Wednesday, October 11, 1967

In this letter, Ms. McDonald informs Dr. Peretz that Dr. King will be able to have lunch with him and that he will be accompanied by Reverend Andrew Young, Reverend Bernard Lee and herself.

Letter from Ernest Dale to MLK

Monday, January 8, 1968

In this letter, Professor Dale asks to reschedule an appointment with Dr.King. He had been unable to keep the original appointment because he was not in Atlanta.

Excerpts of Letters Written About Vietnam War

This document includes excerpts from letters written by Mary Agnes Blonien, sister of an American nurse at the Minh Quy Hospital at Kontum, South Vietnam. Moved to the point of tears, the nurse shares her thoughts and gives a vivid account of the war conditions in Vietnam, and expresses empathy for both Americans and Vietnamese.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dean Rhoda Dorsey of Goucher College

Friday, June 26, 1964

Dora McDonald conveys Dr. King's delight in knowing that Dean Rhoda Dorsey of Coucher College will include "Letter from Birmingham Jail" on their school's reading list. She urges Dean Dorsey to purchase Dr. King's recent book "Why We Can't Wait," which contains the full text of the letter.

Letter from V.R. Hardy to MLK

V.R. Hardy lectures Dr. King regarding his methods of obtaining equality. He asserts that such methods will only result in a race of people wallowing in self-pity. Hardy cites the long-term oppression of Jews as a case in point of how to overcome the tragedies of the past.

Telegram from MLK to Adam Clayton Powell

Dr. King offers words of encouragement to Adam Clayton Powell during the loss of his seat and chairmanship in Congress.

Mail and Messages Note to MLK

Tuesday, December 12, 1967

This is a list of mail and messages for Dr. King dated 12/12/67. It includes a letter from his literary agent Joan Daves about a speech to be given at the University of Kansas, a publication from the Southern Regional Council, and phone calls about speaking engagements and media inquiries.

Letter from John Brush to MLK

Saturday, March 25, 1967

John W. Brush expresses his dissent with Senator Edward Brooke of Massachusetts for changing his stance on the Vietnam War. Brush also commends Dr. King on his oppositional stance.

Method of Ex Abstraction

Dr. King writes notes regarding philosopher Alfred Whitehead's theory of extensive abstraction.

Letter from Eric McRae to MLK

Sunday, March 11, 1962

Eric McRae, a fourth grade student from Lincoln School, writes to Dr. King for his efforts to promote voter registration with the Freedom Marches in Selma, Alabama.

SCLC Press Release About Telegram to Robert Kennedy

The SCLC issues a press release, which discloses the text of telegram from Dr. King to Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy.

Georgia Council on Human Relations: Program Highlights

This newsletter informs readers of the upheaval in the state of Georgia by reporting a variety of incidents around the state. The program focuses on events around Atlanta, including an attack in the Dixie Hills community in which two Molotov cocktails were thrown and, during the ensuing chaos, one man one was killed by a shotgun blast and three others wounded.

Letter from Silas Norman to MLK

Tuesday, July 20, 1965

Silas Norman, State Project Director of the Alabama SNCC, writes Dr. King to inform him that they have not received a response from a past telegram inviting him to speak at a rally in Lowndes County, Alabama.

Toward Responsible Freedom

This manuscript describes the state of the country democracy and the challenges resulting from rapid urbanization, social dislocation and complexities of technological existence. Community organization is the solution provided to establish a sense of self-reliance and local democracy.

Man

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr’s “The Nature and Destiny of Man,” noting that modern culture has come to understand more of nature and less of man.

Statement by Roy Wilkins to Congress

Thursday, January 12, 1967

The Leadership Conference on Civil Rights adopted this statement by Roy Wilkins, Chairman, for the opening of the 1967 Congressional session. Their agenda includes full compliance with all existing civil rights legislation, equality and justice in the courts, greater protection for those who exercise their civil rights, and an end to housing discrimination. Wilkins states that economic and social conditions must be created so that civil rights guaranteed by law can be realized.

Letter from F.A. Guilford to MLK

Wednesday, September 2, 1964

F.A. Guilford of Oxford University Press asks permission to reprint Dr. King's "Letter from Birmingham City Jail" for their third edition textbook "Free Government in the Making." He further requests to obtain the world rights to the letter for worldwide distribution.

Letter from Richard Clemence to MLK

Thursday, January 27, 1966

Richard Clemence, a white Air Force officer, thanks Dr. King for his service to the nation in bringing people together. Clemence wrtes that "your steady guiding hand and spirit have led many to see the light of moral right."

Do the Following to Keep National Attention Focused on Selma

Dr. King composes a list of activities that will keep national attention focused on Selma. Written on Waldorf Astoria Hotel stationary, the list includes measures such as contacting top level government officials like President Johnson, organizing a march, and enlisting the help of celebrities. Dr. King concludes the list by emphasizing "We must insist that voting is the issue and here Selma has dirty hands."

Letter from MLK to Reverend Charles R. Bell Jr. about Beating of a Prisoner

Tuesday, December 13, 1966

In this correspondence, Dr. King offers thanks to Rev. Bell for his letter about the "horrible beating" of a Negro prisoner in Wetumpka, Alabama.

Condolence Letter to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

This letter from a middle school student in New York City is one of condolence written to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King’s assassination.

Letter from Rev. Herbert H. Eaton to Dr. and Mrs. King

Tuesday, April 9, 1963

Reverend Eaton, pastor of the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, congratulates Dr. and Mrs. King on the birth of their child, Edith Bernice.

Should F.E.P.C. Become a Federal Law?

In this draft article Dr. King discusses employment discrimination and the need for the Fair Employment Practices Commission to become legislation.

Letter from Stanley M. Voice to MLK

Saturday, February 25, 1967

Stanley M. Voice writes to inform MLK why he is withdrawing support for SCLC in 1967. He thinks Negro leaders need a unified sense of direction.

Letter from Sheldon C. Singer to MLK

Friday, March 29, 1968

The Executive Vice President of Ring Radio informs Dr. King of attacks made by callers to the station's "Openline" program. He also invites Dr. King to respond to the attacks.

Kant

Dr. King outlines principles of Kantian philosophy regarding morality and religion.

MLK in his Study

This is a photograph of Dr. King in his study in Atlanta.

Letter from MLK to the Fourth Grade Class of Germantown Friends School

Friday, November 29, 1963

Dr. King thanks Kendall Bryant and the fourth grade class of the Germantown Friends School in Philadelphia for their letter and contribution following the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing. Dr. King also mentions the need for all races and ethnicities to work together to achieve the "Brotherhood of Man."

Letter from MLK to Rev. Theall

Dr. King states that he is regretful to hear of Rev. Theall's circumstance and recommends that he contact Attorney Jack Greenberg, Chief Council of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund.