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"Orangeburg, SC"

Negro's Defense Against Acts of Violence

Dr. King describes nonviolent direct action and its effects against oppressors of the movement. He speaks about the undaunted fight and relentlessness even in the face of brutality.

Letter from MLK to Rev. A C K Arbouin

Friday, May 5, 1967
New York (NY)

This letter is in response to and appreciation of contributions, made to the SCLC, by Reverend A C K Arbouin.

Letter from Mrs. Ray Mitchell to MLK

Monday, August 12, 1963
Atlanta, GA

Mrs. Ray Mitchell constructs this thoughtful letter to Dr. King thanking him not only for sending her a copy of his book, "Strength to Love," but also for his diligence as a clergyman.

Thank You Note to Martin Luther King Jr. from Mt. Olive Baptist Church

Sunday, July 30, 1967

This letter was written to Dr.King from the Mt.Olive Baptist Church. They were sending a donation to the SCLC and thanking them for rebuilding their church that had been burned.

We Shall Overcome

Tuesday, September 24, 1963
New York (NY)

This program serves as a memorial exercise for Addie Mae Collins, Denise McNair, Carol Robertson and Cynthia Wesley.

Ebenezer Project Bill

Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Citizens Trust Company reminds the SCLC of an upcoming payment related to the "Ebenezer Project."

Judaism (View of Jesus)

Dr. King outlines some principles regarding Judaism according to the "Jewish Encyclopedia."

Letter from MLK to Johnie Lee Halle

Thursday, July 20, 1967
Texas (TX), VIETNAM

Dr. King informs Mr. Halle that he has no intention of linking the Civil Rights Movement to the peace movement. He asserts that the Vietnamese have consistently been the victims of colonialism, and argues that war and violence are not acceptable means of resolving conflicts.

The Bill of Rights Poem

Monday, July 30, 1962
New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. Alfred G. Suarez writes a poem regarding the necessity of the Bill of Rights.

Letter to Hermine Popper from MLK

Friday, January 12, 1968
New York (NY)

Dr. King expresses his appreciation to Hermine Popper and her husband Bob for their generous contributions. He also requests a copy of Hermine's book to read for his enjoyment.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK about Speaking Out Article

Friday, September 11, 1964
GERMANY

Joan Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, communicates with Mr. Hunt of Speaking Out regarding payment and schedule of a feature article to be written by Dr. King.

Letter From Leslie W. Dunbar

Wednesday, September 13, 1961
New York (NY), New York, NY, Atlanta, GA, Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA

Leslie Dunbar outlines information regarding a grant and various agency protocols from the Southern Regional Council for voter registration.

Telegram from MLK to Sargent Shriver

Friday, May 12, 1967
Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL)

Dr. King commends Mr. Shriver and the Office of Economic Opportunity for funding the Southwest Alabama Farmers Cooperative Association. Dr. King asserts that this decision is a positive step in the War on Poverty that will directly affect countless numbers of impoverished people.

Lorene Doss Request for MLK Assistance with a Class Project

Monday, February 19, 1968
Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL)

Lorene Doss, a high school senior at Sadie V. Thompson, requests the assistance of Dr. King on a project for her government class. The topic of her project is "What are the Main Causes of Poverty".

Shriver Turnabout on Poverty Project Criticized

Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), New York (NY), Chicago, IL, Cleveland, OH

William C. Selover writes this article covering the criticism around Sargent Shriver's decision to cut funding for the poverty relief program, Child Development Group of Mississippi. Shriver, Director of the Office of Economic Opportunity, had created Head Start programs and used the CDGM as a model for programs across the country. Several accusations are rendered as cause to the cut, including Shriver giving in to political pressure from segregationist senators of Mississippi. Many believe that once again poor people had "been sacrificed to political expediency."

Letter from MLK to George Murphy

Tuesday, October 9, 1962
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King thanks Rev. Murphy for giving witness in Albany, Georgia. Dr. King also comments on an upcoming vote and the role of churches in race relations.

Letter from Dora McDonald to T. M. Benson

Wednesday, August 14, 1963
Colorado (CO), Birmingham, AL

Dr. King's secretary responds to a request from Peak Publications to use a portion of Dr. King's "Letter from Birmingham Jail" in a tract. Ms. Dora explains to the company's representative that the letter will be published in an upcoming book, hence Dr. King has made a commitment to the publisher to refuse permission for reprints.

Memo from Joan Daves to MLK

Tuesday, May 12, 1964
New York, NY

In this memo, Joan Daves informs Dr. King about the final payment for an excerpt from Life Magazine, titled "Why We Can't Wait."

Letter from Paul D. Metzger to MLK

Tuesday, November 3, 1964
Philadelphia, PA

Paul D. Metzger, President of the Student Association at Central High School, writes Dr. King inviting him to speak at a forum concerning the issues of civil rights in America. Dr. King's response to this invitation is enclosed at the culmination of the letter.

Letter from Dora McDonald to John Langone

Wednesday, November 8, 1967
Massachusetts (MA)

Ms. McDonald informs Mr. Langone due to other writing commitments for the next several months, Dr. King is unable to accept his invitation to write an article for his journal, Psychiatric Opinion.

Letter from Steve Adams to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965
California (CA)

Steve Adams devotes his support to Dr. King and the nonviolent movement. He mistakenly expresses condolences to Dr. King on the death of his father. However, Dr. King's father "Daddy King" would not pass away until November of 1984.

Letter from Norue Crickson to MLK

Tuesday, March 9, 1965
Michigan (MI)

Twelve-year-old Norue Crickson commends Dr. King for his civil rights efforts. He expresses that from now on he will offer his "prayers for this cause."

Schleiermacher (Religion as Contemplation)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “Speeches on Religion.” The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”

Letter from J. Saba to Clarence B. Jones

Friday, April 5, 1968
New York, NY, Washington, D.C.

"In this the blackest hour of our nation...," J. Saba refers to the assassination of Dr. King. Saba speaks to the urgency to preserve the "American Dream", in light of Dr. King's untimely death. He offers two fitting suggestions: first to establish a MLK, Jr. Memorial Library on Non-Violence and Civil Rights and second to erect a MLK, Jr. Interfaith Chapel at Morehouse College.

Response Letter to Mr. Frank Abrams from Dr. King

Friday, October 24, 1958
Montgomery, AL, New York, NY

Dr. King addressed this letter to Mr. Frank Abrams, as an expression of thanks, in response for his well wishes. As a another gesture of thanks, Dr. King indicated that he also enclosed a copy of his first book "Stride Toward Freedom."

Letter from Time Magazine's Henry Luce to MLK

Wednesday, February 13, 1963
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Time Magazine's Henry Luce extends a special invitation for Dr. and Mrs. King to attend their 40th Anniversary dinner. Luce warmly hopes that Dr. King will be their "honored guest." He also mentions the possibility of President John F. Kennedy being in attendance.

Last Page of Riverside Speech

Tuesday, April 4, 1967

This document is the last page of Dr. King's Riverside Speech, the only page of this version of the speech in the collection. The speech ends with a quotation from James Russell Lowell's "Once to Every Nation."

Article: "MLK Writes Co-Religionists from Jail"

Thursday, June 13, 1963
Pennsylvania (PA), Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New Orleans, LA, Louisiana (LA)

The Witness Magazine published the first of Dr. King's "Letter from a Birmingham Jail." The second part will appear in the next issue on June 27, 1963. The article describes Dr. King's letter as "one of those rare 'to-read-twice' documents."

Letter from John H. Sengstacke to MLK

Monday, May 6, 1957
Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL

Mr. Sengstacke informs Dr. King that he will be presented with the Certificate of Award in honor of his selection to the 1956 Chicago Defender Honor Roll.

Letter from Barbara Austin to SCLC

Monday, June 26, 1967
New Jersey (NJ), Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

Mrs. Austin writes the SCLC concerning Dr. King's views on Vietnam. She encloses a contribution to the organization because of Dr. King's courage to speak out against the war.