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It is Not Enough to Condemn Black Power...

Saturday, October 1, 1966
Mississippi (MS), Chicago, IL

Dr. King addresses the "Black Power" movement in this two-page document. He also explains his thoughts and experiences relating to the tactics and goals of the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Wilma Fondel to MLK

Thursday, May 18, 1967
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA, ISRAEL

Wilma Fondel expresses interest in attending Dr. King's pilgrimage to Israel.

Reader's Digest: Martin Luther King's March on Washington

Monday, April 1, 1968
Washington, D.C.

This April 1968 article by William Schulz warns that the Poor People's March on Washington and the planned disruption of the nation's capital pose an enormous challenge to security forces and may humiliate the country internationally.

Letter from Mrs. M. Happe to MLK

Friday, February 11, 1966
Chicago, IL

Mrs. M. Happe, a poor white woman, expresses gratitude to Dr. King for his campaign to clean up the slums in Chicago. She asserts that poverty is an issue, but education is the main problem and individuals cannot display appropriate behavior that they have never experienced.

Letter from John Thomas Porter to MLK

Thursday, June 28, 1962
Atlanta, GA, Denver, CO, Michigan (MI), Birmingham, AL

Mr. Porter, pastor of First Baptist Institutional Church, writes to Dr. King concerning a previously discussed letter of recommendation. The letter will address a vacant pastoral position in Birmingham, Alabama.

God

Dr. King references the Old Testament book of Job. In this scripture, Job regains hope in the midst of tribulation.

Telegram from Planned Parenthood to MLK

Saturday, June 11, 1966
Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

Medora Bass, Planned Parenthood President, asks Dr. King for a response to an invitation to speak at the organization's upcoming annual luncheon.

Birthday Card From Mrs. King to MLK

Mrs. King wishes Dr. King a happy birthday.

SCLC Staff

Thursday, March 9, 1967
Washington, D.C., Chicago, IL

This is a list of the SCLC staff members, their positions, and their responsibilities.

Funeral Service for Mrs. Sharon Joann Moss

Saturday, October 10, 1964
Ohio (OH), Detroit, MI, Cincinnati, OH

Sharon Joann Moss, wife of Otis Moss Jr., passes at an early age and is given a funeral service which includes numerous members from the civil rights movement. Dr. King delivered the eulogy for the service and many other prominent members operated as pall bearers.

Notes on a Letter from Birmingham Jail

Dr. King records notes on three different topics. First, he examines the concept of extremism and individual responses in their respective environments. Next, he expresses disappointment with the white church and its leadership. The final note describes the challenges and hardships of early Christians.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Herman Strase

Thursday, October 28, 1965
GERMANY, SOUTH AFRICA

Dr. King expresses appreciation for Mr. Strase position on justice for all. More specifically, he praises Strase for his written sentiments concerning apartheid policies of the Union of South Africa government.

Letter from Barnes and Smith to MLK

Thursday, October 18, 1962
Wisconsin (WI)

Account Executive M. J. Orman proposes that Dr. King use a reflective decal manufactured by his company as a fundraising item.

Letter from Cleonia and Frank to MLK

Tuesday, February 23, 1960
Montgomery, AL

Cleonia and Frank, of Montgomery, Alabama, convey their support to Dr. King and the civil rights movement.

Letter from John and Elfriede Kallpelz to MLK

Sunday, November 24, 1963
GERMANY, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

John and Elfriede Kallpelz send Dr. King a financial contribution in honor of the late President Kennedy. Mr. Kallpelz, a native of Atlanta writing from Germany, explains the closeness he feels to Dr. King's work.

Letter from Douglas Mosley and Dwight Eisenhower Campbell to MLK

Thursday, September 3, 1964
Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

The Methodist Youth Fellowship of Philadelphia extends an invitation for Dr. King to speak at their Freedom Rally in early 1965. The officers of the fellowship also request the address of Reverends Walter Fauntroy and Wyatt Walker of SCLC.

Letter From Joan Daves to MLK

Tuesday, August 4, 1964
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA, Berlin, Germany

Joan Daves writes Dr. King to inform him of her meeting, in Germany, with publishers before the Frankfurt Bookfair.

Telegram from John Barber and Rev. L. C. Filer to MLK

Albany, GA, Connecticut (CT)

John Barber, President of the New Haven Branch of the NAACP, sends his support to Dr. King while he serves time in Albany County Jail. Barber expresses sympathetic concern and promises to register financial support soon.

Letter from Senator Hubert H. Humphrey to MLK

Tuesday, July 7, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Minnesota Senator Hubert Humphrey thanks Dr. King for his praise regarding Humphrey's role in the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Humphrey would become Vice President later that year.

War on Poverty

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King calls for the end of poverty in the African American community through the mobilization of interracial coalitions. He states that the negative effects of discriminatory laws will not cease to end by the enforcement of the Civil Rights Bill, nor will it cease if the laws were immediately repealed, but only by the building of alliances among the black and white communities will these issues be eliminated.

Letter from Sue M. Stiles to MLK

Sunday, May 24, 1964

Sue Stiles writes Dr. King to assert her viewpoints and beliefs according to her childhood and upbringing. In expressing these truths, Stiles affirms her support in Dr. King's practices in human rights and encloses a financial contribution.

SCLC Board Members

This document lists the SCLC's executive board of 53 members.

Letter from J. R. Coan to Alumni of Turner Theological Seminary

Friday, January 12, 1968
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), New York, NY

Mr. Coan, acting director of Turner Theological Seminary at the Interdenominational Theological Center, issued this correspondence to all of Turner Theological Seminary's Alumni. The letter announces the details and record of minutes for the Seminary's Third Annual Founders' Day Convocation.

Letter from David Mays to Dora McDonald

Monday, October 28, 1963
Tennessee (TN)

David Mays, Chairman of the Department of Speech and Theatre at Austin Peay State College in Clarksville, Tennessee, participates in a continued correspondence with Dora McDonald. Mays inquires if the speech he requested will be under separate cover, as it was not enclosed in the recent letter. He also requests Dr. King's permission to make copies of the speech in order to pass out to students in his Principles of Rhetoric class.

Prayer by Dean L. Harold DeWolf at Civil Rights Rally

Sunday, June 26, 1966
Jackson, MS, Mississippi (MS), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This is a prayer by Dr. King's doctoral advisor, Dean L. Harold DeWold of Wesley Theological Seminary, given at the Civil Rights Rally on the Capitol grounds in Jackson, Mississippi.

Letter from K. B. M. Crooks, Jr. to MLK

Tuesday, November 7, 1967

K. B. M. Crooks, Jr., of the Southeast Regional Office of the National Urban League, writes to Dr. King about a letter of recommendation for Lonnie King, Jr.

Letter from MLK to L. LeVard Colbert

Friday, December 27, 1963
Chicago, IL, Birmingham, AL

Dr. King thanks L. LeVard Colbert for his contribution to SCLC. Dr. King states that his donation will be utilized to assist with voter registration and ending segregation in the South.

Telegram from Mr. and Mrs. Bartley to MLK

Brooklyn, NY

Dr. King was sent this telegram from a couple who had recently heard him speak, prior to his nearly fatal 1958 stabbing in Harlem.

Letter from Carlos G. Randall to MLK

Wednesday, April 5, 1967
MEXICO, New York, NY, New York (NY)

Carlos Randall writes Dr. King expressing that he once really liked him, but now he is unsure due to King's stance on Vietnam. He asserts "So now the USA is a purveyor of violence?" and asks if Dr. King believed that he would be able to give a similar speech in Moscow or Pekin and still freely receive his letter.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

ISRAEL

The author objects to Dr. King's journey to Jerusalem with his followers. He also expresses his perception of the Negro race.