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Men Who Live Differently

James E. Will shares a Christian perspective on conformity and its relation to humanity and God.

Letter to Participants in Team Ministry to Southern Cities from Jack Sisson and Oscar McCloud

Friday, May 12, 1967

Subsequent to the collective participation in the Team Ministry to Southern Cities, the members formed a consensus that a mandatory urgent meeting was necessary. The meeting will entail the regrouping of Team Ministry, community conflict, Project Equality, and the follow-up plans in three southern locations.

Telegram from Franklin D. Roosevelt, Jr. to MLK

Franklin Delano Roosevelt Jr. requests the presence of Dr. King to serve on a panel discussing Title VII and Equal Employment. The Department of Labor event also included civil rights lumaniaries such as A. Philip Randolph, Roy Wilkins, James Farmer and Whitney Young. Roosevelt, fifth child of the late president Franklin Delano Roosevelt, served as the Chairman of the United States Equal Employment Opportunity Commission from May 26, 1965 to May 11, 1966.

Letter from Paul Rosing to MLK

Tuesday, March 26, 1968

Dr. King is notified by Paul Rosing of the Borromeo Seminary College that he has been placed on the mock ballot for their "Choice 68" campaign. He asks that Dr. King submit any type of potential campaign literature, speeches and etc.

Letter from Lucy Melhuish to MLK

Thursday, March 21, 1968

Lucy A. Melhuish requests Dr. King's assistance in acquiring copies of speeches from the Poor People's March on Washington. Ms. Melhuish is a graduate student working on her doctorate degree at California State College.

The Power of Silence

Dr. King provides an account of several passages from the Bible, outlining his notes and interpretation.

Letter from Annalee Stewart to MLK

Monday, April 19, 1965

Annalee Stewart, Legislative and Branch Liaison for the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom, invites Dr. King to speak at the organization's fiftieth anniversary banquet. She provides a historic backdrop for the organization and explains its current focus on "Peace, Freedom and Bread."

Congratulations from Darien Public Schools Superintendent to MLK

Monday, January 4, 1965

Mr. Coffin congratulates Dr. King on his receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize. Mr. Coffin also provides Dr. King with information on the initiatives of the Darien Public Schools to further progress the civil rights movement.

Robert Greene's Resolutions

Thursday, February 1, 1968

Robert Greene, of Puerto Rican and African American ancestry, resolves to censure the State of New York. He lists a plethora of racist activities and "Orwellian deceptions" as causes.

Secrets of a Happy Marriage

Dr. King expounds upon the secrets of a happy marriage. His first point is that the husband and wife must comprehend the nature of sexes. He describes the dichotomy of a man and woman's perception of contentment. The second point Dr. King makes is that the married couple must have an understanding of the nature of marriage itself. He further asserts that a successful marriage must be built on a mutual compromise. The final contention by Dr. King is each individual must instill the sacredness of marriage.

New Housing Developments - West

This outline entails the location, prices, floor plans and descriptions of new homes for Negro families.

Letter from Mrs. Catherine Hartman to MLK about a New Publication

Tuesday, August 1, 1967

In this letter Mrs. Catherine Hartman of Atheneum Publishers sends Dr. King a new publication, asking that Dr. King read it and offer any comments.

Letter from David Puckett to MLK

Saturday, September 3, 1966

David Puckett writes Dr. King on behalf of the poor whites in the Uptown area of Chicago. Puckett asks Dr. King to support the upcoming rally and march, where they will demand the release of Sam Joseph O'Donnell and protest against the police.

Letter from Leon Levy to MLK

Tuesday, December 26, 1961

Leon Levy congratulates Dr. King on his leadership and the efforts of the SCLC. Mr. Levy contributes to the organization and states that he follows Dr. King's work with interest.

Letter from Audrey Mingo to MLK

Tuesday, May 16, 1967

Mrs. Mingo asks for detailed information regarding Dr. King's trips to the Holy Land and Africa.

Letter from Congressman Edward R. Roybal to MLK

Tuesday, January 5, 1965

California Congressman Roybal responds to a message from Dr. King regarding the seating of the Mississippi delegation. Roybal reminds Dr. King of his record on matters related to civil rights.

The SCLC Story in Words and Pictures

These images are part of a pamphlet that provides an intimate look into SCLC's activities.

Letter from Marguerite B. Pilling to Dr. Ralph D. Abernathy

Monday, April 29, 1968

Marguerite B. Pilling writes Dr. Abernathy to show her support of the Civil Rights Movement. She believes the Negro could actually bring the United States back to a time of decency by bringing back prayer in public schools and removing violence from TV.

Letter from Joseph Berke to MLK

Tuesday, April 11, 1967

Joseph Berke replies to Dr. King's response to an invitation to attend the Dialectics of Liberation and shares his content with one of Dr. King's speeches on the war in Vietnam.

Letter from George Fedak to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

George Fedak writes Mrs. King to express his sympathy for Dr. King's death.

I Have Decided to Start With Myself

Monday, August 14, 1967

This dictation of the SCLC's Tenth Anniversary Convention Banquet includes speeches given by Dr. King, Mrs. Dorothy F. Cotton, and Andrew Young. The keynote address given by Mr. Sidney Poitier concluded the evening, along with a presentation of an award.

SCLC Executive Board Approves Montgomery March

Dr. King’s handwritten notes report on SCLC Executive Board approval of four of his recommendations: a March on the State Capitol in Montgomery, a nationwide economic withdrawal from Christmas shopping to commemorate the tragic deaths of children in Birmingham, a massive direct action program in Danville, Virginia, and selective buying campaign in the South to get better jobs for Negroes

Letter from the Secretary General of the Oversees Vietnamese Buddhist Association

Saturday, April 29, 1967

In this correspondence VO VAN AI request assistance in denouncing the massacre at the School of Youth For Social Services in Vietnam.

Outline for "Levels of Love"

In this handwritten outline, Dr. King highlights the subject of love. The document titled, “Levels of Love," focused on four categories: utilitarian love, romantic love, humanitarian love and Christian love.

Letter from Moss Kendrix to MLK

Wednesday, February 27, 1963

Mr. Kendrix wishes to meet with Dr. King to discuss a certain rumor concerning him and the Coca-Cola Company.

Letter from Alice Houghton Sherill to MLK

On behalf of the Detroit Women for Dr. Martin Luther King, Alice Houghton Sherrill thanks Dr. King for the envelopes received from his secretary. Mrs. Sherrill extends her welcome to Dr. King for his upcoming visit to Detroit and offers the group's assistance during his stay.

Telegram from C. C. Shell to MLK

C. C. Shells writes Dr. King suggesting that segregationist Lester Maddox run for President of the United State with Dr. King as Vice President.

Letter from Sharon J. Brown to MLK

Friday, March 22, 1968

Sharon Brown, a fifth grader at Our Lady of Perpetual Help School, asks Dr. King how his congregation worships. She explains that this question is for a class project.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dr. Edward A. Jones

Tuesday, April 16, 1963

Dora McDonald writes Dr. Edward Jones to thank him for translating the letter from Mr. Wasalu for Dr. King.

Letter from Henry H. Arrington to Paul Whelehon about P. Ballantine & Sons Employment of Negroes

Thursday, January 12, 1967

The letter references letters between Arrington and John Farrell, regarding the employment of a Negro representative. Mr. Kiah Sayles, a representative of P. Ballantine & Sons, explained that P. Ballantine & Sons was the first company to hire Negro models which elevated Negroes in executive positions. Sayles went on to explain the liberal hiring policy of Coyle Beverage, a distributor of P. Ballantine and Sons.