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A New South A-Coming

This pamphlet discusses the courageous stand of African American high school students against racial discrimination in the South. The efforts demonstrated by these young people to bring about change of many undemocratic practices were significantly noted in Negro history.

Letter to Eugene Exman from D. McDonald Referencing an Enclosure

Wednesday, September 5, 1962

Dora McDonald, Dr. King's secretary, sent this correspondence to Eugene Exman, regarding the enclosure of a letter by Dr. King to Melvin Arnold.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to Mr. Gosta Dahl

Thursday, June 11, 1964

In this letter, dated June 11, 1964 to Mr. Gosta Dahl, Joan Daves expresses the importance of "Why We Can't Wait" and why they feel it is a "...potentially more successful" work than Dr. King's other two books. Accordingly, they request minimum advance and royalty schedules. She asks that Mr. Dahl check with the Swedish publishers to see if they would raise their offer, for the use of Dr. King's work.

Materialism

Dr. King quotes Hugh Elliott’s “Modern Science and Materialism.”

Invitation from Edwin H. Tuller to MLK

Wednesday, January 29, 1964

Edwin Tuller requests Dr. King show special attention to the invitation from the European Baptist Federation. Mr. Tuller is certain that Dr. King's presence in Europe at this time would be "extremely beneficial" with the progression of "racial brotherhood."

And What of Marriage Master?

Marriage vows are handwritten on the backside of this printout of a poem written by Kahlil Gibran entitled, "And What of Marriage Master?".

Letter from Andrew Young to James Bevel and Dave Delliger

Tuesday, March 14, 1967

Andrew Young writes Revered James Bevel and Mr. Dave Dellinger confirming Dr. King's acceptance to speak at a rally in New York, New York on April 15th. Young further addresses logistical issues that may arise in the execution of the event, as well as how to best increase participation.

Humanism

Dr. King quotes Algernon Charles Swinburne's "Hymn of Man" and William Ernest Henley's "Invictus" as representative of humanist thought.

Telegram from Roy Wilkins to MLK

Wednesday, December 21, 1966

Mr. Wilkins, Chairman of the Call Committee, writes to assure Dr. King's participation in an upcoming conference. Worldwide interest is developing and Dr. King's presence and leadership is very important.

Draft of Statement to TIME Magazine from MLK

Friday, January 12, 1962

In this statement, Dr. King is pleased to know that the President is calling for new civil rights legislation. Unfortunately, the President did not express anything new nor directly address the issue. Dr. King emphasizes the urgent need for the President to demand vigorous civil rights legislation in order to expedite school integration and the right to vote.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK Regarding Publicity Directors of Harper and NAL

Monday, May 18, 1964

In this letter, Joan Daves asks Dr. King about his availability for the Publicity Directors for Harper and NAL. Joan Daves also reminds him about Stuart Harris and Jay Tower's desire to meet him.

Letter from Dick Thorp

Thursday, March 21, 1968

Dick Thorp, the Choice '68 coordinator for Andrews University, writes seeking a political platform and general campaign material to aid the student association in preparation for the Choice '68 primary sponsored by Time magazine.

How to Believe in a Good God in the Midst of Glaring Evil

Dr. King outlines a sermon entitled "How to Believe in a Good God in the Midst of Glaring Evil." In this sermon, King asserts that in many instances the facts of life contradicts a believer's faith, and poses reasons why one should hold firm to their faith.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Otto Fuerbringer of Time Magazine

Tuesday, February 18, 1964

Dora McDonald inquires about receiving additional copies of the Time Magazine issue that featured Dr. King as the Man of the Year. She informs Otto Fuerbringer that Mrs. King's relatives in her hometown of Marion, Alabama were unable to buy copies of the magazine.

Letter from MLK to Joyce Armstrong

Thursday, November 7, 1963

Dr. King responds to Joyce Armstrong, a student at Central High School, regarding her concerns on equality. Dr. King expresses his deep appreciation and states, "it is gratifying to us to know that so many young people are dedicated to the cause of Freedom."

Atlanta Operation Breadbasket Bi-Annual Report

Tuesday, February 6, 1968

Reverend Fred C. Bennette, Jr. issues the bi-annual report for the Atlanta Chapter of Operation Breadbasket. Reverend Bennette expounds on the mission of Dr. King and the SCLC to create economic opportunities through advances in employment.

Letter from Hubert H. Humphrey to Mr. Alan F. Westin

Monday, March 21, 1966

Vice President Hubert Humphrey congratulates Professor Alan Westin for the creation of the Center for Research and Education in American Liberties.

Letter from MLK to Rabbi Philip Hiat

Friday, February 8, 1963

Dr. King responds to Rabbi Hiat's suggestion to provide an "opportunity for dialogue between Jewish and Negro religious leadership." In addition to confirming his participation in the dialogue, Dr. King commits to sending an additional letter with the names of "men who have much to contribute" along with some potential subject headings for the agenda.

American Committee On Africa Invitation to Protest Apartheid

Tuesday, March 7, 1967

This form letter informs and invites the recipients to attend functions sponsored by the American Committee on Africa in protest against Chase Manhattan Bank's financial relationship with the apartheid regime in South Africa.

MLK Sermon About Courage and Cowardice

The document is a single draft page from Dr. King's larger work "Strength to Love," with annotations handwritten by Dr. King. On this page, he discusses courage and self-affirmation.

Letter from Mrs. G. Wayne

Mrs. G. Wayne, a white American mother, expresses support for Cassius Clay and everyone who denounces the Vietnam War.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Nagle

Dr. King comments on a Supreme Court ruling that outlaws prayer and Bible reading in public schools. He asserts that the decision is consistant with the Constitution and is meant to keep any single religion from dominating the government.

Paint

Noting the vastness of the sky and "heavens," Dr. King comments on the Earth, stars, and surrounding planets.

Letter from E. J. Moorer to Dr. King

Wednesday, July 21, 1965

E. J. Moorer of the Alabama Young Democratic Congress asks Dr. King to speak at one of their events.

Letter from Gregory Ferguson to MLK

Wednesday, March 20, 1968

Mr. Ferguson invites Dr. King to be the commencement speaker for the 1968 graduating class of Berkeley High School in Williamsburg, Virginia. The school can only afford $150 for a speaker, but he feels Dr. King's presence would make a great impact on the student body.

Statement from the Eisenhower Administration to the NAACP

Sunday, June 26, 1955

In an address to the NAACP, Vice President Richard Nixon discusses the reasons that progress has been made in the Eisenhower Administration and the goals that the organization needs to continue working toward.

Letter from J. Reynolds to MLK

J. Reynolds expresses his opinion on Dr. King's recent activism in Memphis and describes it as a "riot." Mr. Reynolds questions Dr. King's intentions and highlights the negative outcome of the demonstration.

Letter from L. Alexander Harper and Charles E. Cobb to Edith M. Lerrigo

Monday, October 24, 1966

Edith Lerrigo writes with concern regarding the support of the "Crisis and Commitment" call by several civil rights leaders. Lerrigo endorses Dr. King's decision to refuse his signatory on the document supporting the call, stating that this act "should have been sufficient to give pause to groups like the YWCA before jumping on the moderate bandwagon."

Handwritten Thank You Letter From MLK

Dr. King expresses his gratitude for contributions made to the SCLC, and informs the reader of the results of recent studies regarding illegitimate birth rates among negroes as opposed to whites.

Letter to William H. Andrews from MLK

Wednesday, July 10, 1963

Dr. King expresses his deep appreciation for the members of the Georgia Family Circle's contribution to the SCLC. Dr. King explains the inability of the SCLC's continuance of the movement in Birmingham without their "dollars for freedom." He further expounds on the importance of their moral support.