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MLK Remarks at the Launching of SCLC's Crusade for Citizenship

Wednesday, February 12, 1958
Florida (FL), Massachusetts (MA), GERMANY, Georgia (GA), South Carolina (SC), Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), Louisiana (LA), Arkansas (AR)

Dr. King delivered this speech at a launch meeting for the Crusade for Citizenship in Miami, Florida. He discusses the denial of African Americans' right to vote by relating it to other former disfranchised Americans such as those who did not own property and women. Dr. King discusses the hypocrisy in some American officials' advocacy of democratic election in other European countries as well as the social and economic welfare of all Americans.

Letter from Mrs. G. Wayne

VIETNAM, Philadelphia, PA

Mrs. G. Wayne, a white American mother, expresses support for Cassius Clay and everyone who denounces the Vietnam War.

Letter from Bea Lazar to Dora McDonald

Friday, December 22, 1961
New York (NY), New York, NY

Bea Lazar thanks Miss McDonald for sending a copy of a recent speech given by Dr. King. She praises the speech as a lesson that Americans "sorely need." She also encloses a contribution to the SCLC as a Christmas present.

Tenth Annual Institute of the Montgomery Improvement Association

Thursday, December 9, 1965
Montgomery, AL, Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL)

This program for the Tenth Annual Institute of the Montgomery Improvement Association gives a detailed history of the organization's events from 1955 to 1965. "Highlights At A Glance" include: accounts of violence and community bombings, school integration, freedom rides, The Montgomery Bus Boycott, and the establishment of the SCLC. Photographs of leadership, churches, voter registration, and marches appear throughout. This document also shows Dr. King's handwritten notes, copies of related news articles, and the individual programs for each day of the Institute.

The Blame in Birmingham

Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, South Carolina (SC)

The article, "The Blame in Birmingham", discusses the situation in Birmingham where four little girls were killed during a Sunday school class when a bomb was detonated. Governor Wallace's reaction and the consequences of the actions are mentioned in the article.

Letter from Mary Mikutel to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Young Mary Mikutel offers her condolences to Mrs. King in the wake of Dr. King's assassination.

Letter from Brigitte Horburger to MLK

GERMANY

Brigitte Horburger sends Dr. King a photograph of a black child and white child playing the piano together. Under the photograph it states, "To produce real harmony you must play both the black and white keys."

Looking Forward: The Montgomery Improvement Association, Inc.

Montgomery, AL

This pamphlet outlines the ten points the Montgomery Improvement Association uses to promote healthy race relations.

Letter from Chester Bowles to MLK

Tuesday, December 31, 1957
Connecticut (CT), Montgomery, AL, INDIA

Chester Bowels writes Dr. King requesting the use of his quotes to submit to the Saturday Evening Post. Mr. Bowels also regrets to inform Dr. King that he cannot join the national committee to raise funds to fight for Negros voting rights in the Southern states.

Letter from the University of Capetown to MLK

Friday, February 18, 1966
SOUTH AFRICA, Atlanta, GA, Geneva, Switzerland

Monica Wilson asks if Dr. King can deliver the T. B. Davie Memorial Lecture at the University of Cape Town.

Letter from Douglas Elleby to MLK

Wednesday, December 30, 1964
BRAZIL, SWEDEN, Atlanta, GA

The Governor of Brazil, Adhemar de Barros, congratulates Dr. King on his receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize. Governor Barros expounds on what the Nobel Peace Prize stirred in the Brazilian nation. Sao Paulo, the larges city in Brazil, aspires to form a sense of fellowship with Dr. King and extend the appropriate honors for a man of peace.

Nobel Lecture Itinerary

Oslo, Norway

This is an itinerary for the King family for the Nobel Peace Prize luncheon and lecture.

Letter from MLK to E. D. Johnson

Monday, April 30, 1962
Illinois (IL)

Dr. King responds to E. D. Johnson's letter expressing appreciation for encouragement by providing knowledge regarding the arrogance of Mr. Johnson's son. Dr. King stresses the importance of valuing the internal factors of self-respect, integrity and selflessness, opposed to the external factors of color, skin and wealth.

Statement to SCLC Board: Alabama Movement

Friday, April 2, 1965
Alabama (AL), Baltimore, MD, Montgomery, AL, GERMANY, Nashville, TN, Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Marion, AK, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Tennessee (TN)

Dr. King discusses the various issues within the State of Alabama. Dr. King and the SCLC have maintained leadership in the Alabama Movement and have proposed a plan to continue the acts of nonviolence.

The Task of Christian Leadership Training for Education in the Local Community

Atlantic City, NJ, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), New Jersey (NJ)

This undated manuscript was used as the basis for a speech Dr. King gave at the National Sunday School and Baptist Training Union Congress in Atlantic City, New Jersey in 1944. Dr. King defines community, lists three current problems within the community and explains the role of Christian leaders and education in a community. Dr. King identifies the most pressing problems as the economy, divisions within Christianity and race relations.

Telegram from George Woods to MLK

Friday, July 30, 1965
Philadelphia, PA

George Woods, Vice President of the Philadelphia Branch of the NAACP, telegrams Dr. King regarding his upcoming visit. Woods asks about a rumor being spread that Dr. King would not make the appearance because King was allegedly being hosted by the Quaker Fellowship House. The trip was called off and then rescheduled.

Report of Director of Mission Development

Chicago, IL, New York (NY), North Carolina (NC), Indiana (IN)

Rev. Dr. Archie Hargraves was a distinguished urban minister and church leader who served America's cities for more than half a century. In this report he gives a summary of individual organizations under Mission Development, of which he was the Director. All of these organizations aimed to augment employment and economic opportunities for their respective surrounding communities.

Letter from Leonard Chadwick to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Berkeley, CA

Chadwick, a student at Lincoln school of Berkeley, California, offers encouragement to Dr. King and his continuous efforts for social good.

Letter from Albert E. Manley to MLK

Tuesday, September 3, 1963
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Spelman College President Albert E. Manley congratulates Dr. King for the "highly effective" March on Washington. Manley commends Dr. King for his "I Have A Dream" speech. He found the speech inspirational and considers it to be "one of the greatest speeches of this century." As a result of their continued support to the struggle, the Manleys enclose a financial contribution to assist the work of the SCLC.

Handwritten Note from Harry Wachtel to Dora McDonald

Harry Wachtel, confidant and legal counsel to Dr. King, writes a note to Dora McDonald referencing an enclosure intended for Dr. King.

Women's Response to the Rising Tide of Violence

Monday, February 21, 1966
Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

Women's Response to the Rising Tide of Violence was a two day day conference in Philadelphia. The women who gathered agreed that violence was not a spontaneous action, but something that grows out of the environment. The way to combat such violence it enforce positive action with long-term solutions through social, economic, and political programs.

Telegram from Margaret Saunders to MLK

Friday, October 21, 1960
Columbus, OH, Atlanta, GA

Margaret Saunders sends a telegram to encourage Dr. King while he is in jail.

Lette from Alta Yount to MLK

Tuesday, April 11, 1967
Arizona (AZ), Atlanta, GA, Los Angeles, CA, California (CA)

Alta Yount expresses her approval of a speech that Dr. King delivered. She also requests some copies of it.

Letter from Katharine Gunning to President Johnson

Tuesday, May 2, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, Washington, D.C., VIETNAM, CHINA

Katharine Gunning of New York writes President Johnson and copies various dignitaries, including Dr. King. Gunning voices her opposition to the Vietnam War, in particular the bombing campaign, which she views as an escalation of the war.

Letter from MLK To W. H. Jackson

Tuesday, April 24, 1962
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Dr. King responds to a letter from W. H. Jackson, regarding the Chicago Sunday Evening club. Mr. Jackson receives information on the possible effects his previous letter may have on Dr. King's white friends.

"DuBois State Memorial Proposed; Would Be in Great Barrington"

Monday, February 12, 1968
New York (NY), Massachusetts (MA), Pennsylvania (PA)

William F. Bell writes an article concerning a proposed W. E. Dubois State Memorial in Great Barrington.

Letter from Jack Egle to MLK

Tuesday, April 12, 1966
FRANCE, Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Jack Engle, European Director of the Council on Student Travel, thanks Dr. King for intervening during the "Nuit des Droits Civiques" in Paris. He also informs Dr. King that the ad hoc committee formed for the event will be disbanded at an upcoming meeting.

New Wars For Old

Alfred Noyes writes a poem entitled, "New Wars For Old." Mr. Noyes focuses on various aspects of life and repeatedly asks, "when have we prayed for peace."

Letter from Eartha Kitt to MLK

Eartha Kitt expresses her admiration for Dr. King and his cause.

Letter by William Castleman on Northern Marches

Thursday, August 11, 1966
Illinois (IL)

William Castleman, Executive Director for the American Federation of Senior Citizens, commends Dr. King on the effectiveness of the marches in the North and says they should not be abandoned. At the time this letter was written, Dr. King had led numerous marches in Chicago and other urban cities focusing on equal housing. The correspondence references the Founding Fathers and the Constitutional rights that allow peaceful solution of the nation's problems.