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"North Carolina (NC)"

Letter from Stephen R. Currier to MLK

Friday, December 2, 1966

Stephen Currier invites Dr. and Mrs. King to a Christmas party at his place located at "666 Fifth Avenue on the 35th floor."

The Voice: A Bulletin of Crozer Theological Seminary

Dr. King received a copy of this publication from Crozer, which provided alumni updates, religious articles, financial supporters, and current and upcoming seminary events.
Dr. King graduated with honors from Crozer in 1951 as class valedictorian.

Chicago Tribune: Man's Struggle for Freedom

Sunday, June 25, 1967

Clarence Seidenspinner writes this review for the Chicago Tribune regarding Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" His evaluation centers around Dr. King's progression from using nonviolence as strategy in Montgomery, to his focus on international affairs. He further explains Dr. King's first uneasy experience with the Black Power slogan and its effects.

Lace Laird Affirms his Support for MLK

Sunday, February 11, 1968

Lace Laird wrote to Dr. King acknowledging that he stood with Dr. King at multiple marches in Detroit. He further rendered his services to Dr. King for SCLC's 1968 Poor Peoples March on Washington.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, August 4, 1967

In this letter, Ms. Daves informs Dr. King of Harper and Row's efforts on behalf of "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?." She includes sales figures and discusses the "variance[s]" for the total number of copies.

Immortality

Dr. King quotes German philosopher Dr. Oswald Spengler regarding his ideology of immortality. According to Spengler, history holds no permanent value. King states "If such a philosophy of history is right there would be no reason to desire continued existence...immortality would have no meaning."

Pessimism

Dr. King quotes John Hodgdon Bradley from an article in the December 1932 Atlantic Monthly, “Letter from a Scientist to a Priest.”

Letter from Harry H. Wachtel to Randolph T. Blackwell

Friday, December 2, 1966

Harry Wachtel informs Randolph Blackwell that he's including $4,500 for the Southern Rural Action Project. The purpose of the project is to reduce the amount of poverty known to be prevalent in the south.

Letter from Congressman Adam Clatyon Powell to MLK

Friday, April 16, 1965

Harlem Representative Adam Clayton Powell informs Dr. King that all of the "War on Poverty" hearings will be cancelled until furtherl notice.

Letter from Sarah Harvey to MLK

Wednesday, February 7, 1962

Sarah Harvey states that the receipt of Dr. King's letter and book made her feel "very unworthy." Mrs. Harvey also makes financial a contribution.

The Miami Herald: Who Threw the Bomb?

Wednesday, September 18, 1963

In this newspaper clipping, "Washington Post" columnist Charles Morgan Jr. argues that the responsibility for the Birmingham bombings lies with the entire community.

Telegram from MLK to L. Venchael Booth

Dr. King congratulates Dr. Booth on receiving the Doctor of Divinity degree from Morehouse College.

Letter from Randall Elias to MLK

Thursday, May 27, 1965

Randall Elias offers the support of himself and the North Shore Chapter of Americans for Democratic Action for the civil rights march from Chicago to Springfield.

MLK to Confer in June to Plan Summer Drive Here

Monday, May 29, 1967

Referencing Dr. King and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, Bob Modic wrote about an upcoming meeting in Cleveland, Ohio. This meeting was in preparation for the implementation of a campaign to increase employment and housing opportunities for the city's African Americans.

Letter from Apuyva J. Mehta to MLK

Monday, October 2, 1967

Written on the day of Mahatma Gandhi's birthday, Mehta requests Dr. King's autograph.

Problem of Evil Notecard

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines his views on the problem of evil. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verse.

Memo on Food Crisis in India

Monday, March 20, 1967

Rodney H. Clurman, Executive Secretary of the World Food and Population Crisis Committee, writes this memorandum to committee members. Clurman sends this status report on the state of food affairs in India. He references a letter received from John Taylor who lives in Bihar, India and works for the Ford Foundation.

The Committee of Clergy and Laymen Speak on Vietnam

As a public service, the Committee of Clergy and Laymen Concerned about Vietnam have reprinted several statements and addresses of its members. The selected addresses of Dr. King were chosen because of their poignant exposition of the then current issues surrounding the Vietnam War. In the compilation's forward, Dr. Reinhold Niebuhr takes the opportunity to address two of the misconceptions that surrounded the included works of Dr. King.

Telegram from MLK to Senator Robert Kennedy

Monday, March 18, 1963

Dr. King requests that Senator Robert Kennedy initiate an investigation into complaints about the actions of police during demonstrations in Petersburg, Virginia.

Relation Between Eternal Objects and Actual Occasions

Philosophically rooted, the set of notes on this series of cards explores metaphysical claims for the understanding that each "eternal object" is necessarily connected to an "actual occasion." Dr. King quotes Alfred North Whitehead's "Science and the Modern World" and speaks to the actualization of an event as result of possibilities.

Letter from E.G. Avery to MLK

Monday, December 9, 1963

E. G. Avery commends Dr. King for his "I Have a Dream" speech from the March on Washington. Mr. Avery requests a copy of the full content of the speech because he had only partially heard the address on the radio.

Letter from MLK to Paul Andrews

Wednesday, December 4, 1963

Dr. King acknowledges Mr. Andrews' commitment to racial justice and expresses gratitude for his encouraging letter. Dr. King states that the most important contribution to justice anyone can make is a "thorough examination" of one's own behavior.

Letter to Coretta Scott King from Public School 33 Manhattan's Student Council

Wednesday, April 10, 1968

The Student Council of Public School 33 in Manhattan, NY, wrote this letter of condolence to Mrs. King. The council pledged to practice Dr. King's principles on nonviolence and mentioned how impressed they were to see Mrs. King on television, following Dr. King's death.

Letter from Ernest Shaefer to Dora McDonald

Sunday, November 6, 1966

Mr. Shaefer, Executive Secretary of the Hadley Executive Committee, requests information from Ms. McDonald regarding Dr. King's scheduled lecture in Kennett Square, Pennsylvania.

Letter to Mrs. King from Jose Nieto

Friday, April 5, 1968

This letter from a middle school student in New York City is one of condolence written to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King’s assassination.

Civil Rights Act of 1957

Monday, September 9, 1957

The Civil Rights Act was signed into law on September 9, 1957 by President Dwight D. Eisenhower. Commonly referred to as the Civil Rights Act of 1957, this was the first such federal law since Reconstruction. The law was aimed at ending voter discrimination tactics such as poll taxes and literacy tests, but it also created the Civil Rights Commission to ensure proper administration of the law.

Letter from Matthew T. Doherty to MLK

Tuesday, July 26, 1966

Matthew Doherty responds to an "eloquent and moving" appeal from Dr. King in the July 26th issue of The New York Times. Doherty discusses the recent surge in "black power" and its role in the ongoing struggle for equal rights. The writer also mentions his "small" contribution to aid Dr. King's efforts to "make this a better world for all of us."

Letter from MLK to a Former Supporter

Thursday, July 20, 1967

This is an edited copy of Dr. King's response to someone withdrawing support due to his position on the Vietnam War. King's detailed rewrites show efforts to avoid further misunderstandings about his position. He applies nonviolent philosophies to both the civil rights and peace movements, however, does not attempt to link the two. Rather than asking for Negroes to be exempt from the draft as a special privilege, he believes Negroes have an intimate knowledge of the effects of violence. As such, they should have a special moral obligation not to inflict violence on others.

Letter to MLK from Joan Daves about New Publication

Wednesday, September 2, 1964

In this letter Joan Daves reports to Dr. King a proposal for a French edition of "Strength to Love" based on a specified advance and royalty.

Letter from Henry Wagner to MLK

Thursday, July 27, 1967

Henry B. Wagner writes a letter to Dr. King regarding Congress' increased appropriation for the Federal Aviation Agency. Mr. Wagner would prefer that those funds be given to mass ground transportation to increase safety and convenience.