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Individualization and Participation

Dr. King records notes on the individualization and participation of man.

People in Action: Our New President

Saturday, February 1, 1964

In this article in the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King writes optimistically about the prospects for civil rights in the transition from President Kennedy to President Johnson. He believes that Johnson's Southern-ness may disarm the likes of George Wallace and that the President's proven commitment to civil rights and skills as Majority Leader in the Senate will aid in passing legislation.

Law Suit Against Wrens Nest

Wednesday, October 11, 1967

This letter from Mrs. A. L. Wilkinson to a lawyer, is urging this person to help a man to win his case against tha Association responsible for keeping Negroes from entering the Wren's Nest in Atlanta.

MLK Public Statement on the Poor People's Campaign

Monday, December 4, 1967

Dr. King announces several initiatives of the SCLC. He explains that due to severe displays of discrimination the SCLC and other organizations will continue the non-violent movement with a demonstration in Washington, D.C. Dr. King further paints the picture of inequality among the races by providing several illustrations of discrimination.

Letter from MLK to SCLC Action Committee

Tuesday, March 12, 1968

Dr. King reminds members of the Action Committee of their upcoming meeting. He requests that each member come prepared to "make a report on [their] category of activity concerning the Washington Mobilization."

MLK on Danville and the Problem of Violence

Friday, July 12, 1963

Dr. King discusses his perception of the nonviolent movement, and how the leadership maintains control even though minimal violent outbreaks may occur.

Invitation from Robert S. Bilheimer to MLK to Attend a Consultation Seminar

Tuesday, October 22, 1963

Robert S. Bilheimer, Associate General Secretary for the World Council of Churches, invites Dr. King to attend a consultation on Christian Practices and Desirable Action in Social Change and Race Relations.

Letter from Wilma Fondel to MLK

Thursday, May 18, 1967

Wilma Fondel expresses interest in attending Dr. King's pilgrimage to Israel.

Address by Dabbs entitled 'Quit You Like Men' Delivered at SCLC

Thursday, October 1, 1959

This address to the Fall Session of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference was delivered in October, 1959, by James McBride Dabbs. Dabbs speaks to the social condition in the United States, highlighting the equality of the races. Arguing that justice is a two way street, Dabbs brings up Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom," in which Dr. King defends the Montgomery bus boycott as an essential non-cooperation to show discontent.

Address by MLK at the 30th Anniversary of District 65

Wednesday, October 23, 1963

This document, an address given by Dr. King on the 30th anniversary of District 65, includes handwritten notes. In the address, Dr. King talks about the importance of the Declaration of Independence and the Emancipation Proclamation to human rights.

A Blind Woman's Request for MLK

Juilia Lockheart, a blind 75 year old woman, requests aid from Dr. King. Many people envisioned Dr. King to be the savior of their time; they would contact him with unrelated requests outside of the non-violent movement in hopes that he could be the remedy to their current issue.

Individualization and Participation

Dr. King quotes Paul Tillich's "Systematic Theology."

Letter from Dr. Earl C. Jackson, Sr. to MLK

Wednesday, August 7, 1963

Earl Jackson writes Dr. King requesting feedback regarding his upcoming speaking engagement as one of three keynote speakers during a large conference in Delaware.

Bible

Dr. King compares the views of Ralph Waldo Emerson and Friedrich Schleiermacher on the Christian Bible.

Letter from A. Dudley Ward to MLK

Tuesday, April 25, 1967

A. Dudley Ward, General Secretary for the General Board of Christian Social Concerns of the Methodist Church, forwards an enclosed resolution to Dr. King.

Telegram from Rodney Clurman to MLK

Wednesday, March 22, 1967

Rodney Clurman, of the World Food and Population Crisis Committee, outlines Dr. King's itinerary for a global trip that includes meeting with officials from Scotland, the Pope in Rome, and travelling to New Delhi.

Letter from Daniel B. Brewster to MLK

Monday, July 20, 1964

Senator Brewster thanks Dr. King for his kind letter and encloses a copy of the speech he delivered on the Senate floor before the Civil Rights Act of 1964 was passed.

The Crozer Theological Seminary Student Chapel - Order of Service

Friday, January 27, 1950

This order of service outlines the events taken place during student chapel at The Crozier Theological Seminary. The service was guided by presiding student, Fred Eugene Stom, and focused heavily on Christian affirmations and the reciting of the ten commandments.

MLK's Mandate for White Christians Review

Thursday, December 2, 1965

Dr. King provides a review for Kyle Hazelden's book, "Mandate for White Christians." In his review he gives an overview of the book's content, along with his opinion on its value.

Letter from Donald Louis Anderson to MLK

Friday, January 5, 1962

Donald Louis Anderson, member of the Democratic Party in Pittsburgh, writes to Dr. King to request his endorsement of their political movement in the South.

Loving Your Enemies

Sunday, November 10, 1957

In this sermon, Dr. King states that "love is the key to the solution of the problems which we confront in the world today." Dr. King notes that this is not a simple task, but it is necessary.

Three Stages of Christological Controversy

Dr. King lists three stages of Christological controversy. The third is the "relation" between the former two.

Theology

Dr. King quotes William Ernest Hocking's "The Meaning of God in Human Experience."

Letter from MLK and Others to President Dwight D. Eisenhower

Friday, January 11, 1957

A group of Southern religious leaders write to President Eisenhower concerning the extreme violence directed towards Negro people throughout the South. They request his immediate action to address the nation's moral and legal framework sustained by the presiding racial climate.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mr. Thomas J. Gilliam, November 8, 1967

Friday, November 8, 1968

In this correspondence to Mr. Thomas J. Gilliam, Miss. Dora McDonald - Dr. King's secretary, informed him that his letter came during his Dr. King's absence, but she had an opportunity to communicate with him. She expressed that Dr. King's calendar would not allow him to meet with Mr. Gilliam, for an interview, but suggested that he send in one or two questions for Dr. King to answer and send back.

Letter to Mrs. King from Hon. C.P. Carter and James H. Beverly

Sunday, April 7, 1968

This document was sent from the St. John Grand Lodge Masons of New Jersey, expressing their condolences for Mrs. King's tragic loss following Dr. King's assassination. The letter asks that God grant the King family peace, during their time of bereavement.

Letter From MLK to John R. Kellam Regarding Vietnam War

Thursday, July 13, 1967

Dr. King thanks Kellam for not only his letter but for forwarding a letter from Democratic Rhode Island Senator John Pastore. All three men oppose the war in Vietnam, and Dr. King responds that is becoming increasingly difficult to understand the reasons behind US foreign policy.

Letter from M. Carl Holman to MLK Regarding Event Invitation

Tuesday, September 26, 1967

Mr. Holman informs Dr. King he will soon receive a formal invitation to attend the Commission's National Conference on Race and Education in Washington, D.C. Mr. Holman is sending this advance notice with the hope Dr. King can fit the conference into his schedule.

Letter from William Seabron to MLK

Tuesday, April 25, 1967

Department of Agriculture Assistant to the Secretary, William M. Seabron writes Dr. King to enquire about fire insurance for "Negro citizens." He explains that a lack of fire insurance prevents citizens from improving existing homes or building new ones, following disaster. In addition, he requests any additional information Dr. King may find useful to the Department of Agriculture.

Telegram from Mike Bibler to MLK

Monday, April 1, 1968

Mike Bibler contends that "our lame duck president" can "do more for black people than any other man in history." This telegram was sent following President Johnson's announcement that he would not seek re-election.