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President Kennedy's Record

Friday, February 9, 1962

In this February 1962 column for the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King acknowledges President Kennedy's appointment of Negroes and executive order ending employment discrimination. But he calls the President “cautious and defensive” in providing strong leadership in civil rights and criticizes him for not ordering an end to discrimination in federally-assisted housing.

Letter from Mrs. Ellen H. Mapes to MLK

Tuesday, March 21, 1967

Mrs. Ellen H. Mapes' letter to Dr. King to discusses her concerns regarding living in urban environments. She maintains that personal responsibility initiatives are more in order than current ones, e.g. family planning and self-improvement through education and job training.

Letter from Marie Williams and Rev. Harvey Spivey to MLK

Monday, February 7, 1966

Marie Williams and Rev. Harvey write to Dr. King expressing gratitude for the work of SCLC. They further request a donation for their church's building fund.

Letter from MLK to Richmond M. Rudden

Wednesday, October 27, 1965

Dr. King defers an invitation to speak at Lafayette College until a later date.

Letter from Harry Walker to Dora McDonald

Thursday, September 21, 1967

Harry Walker summarizes a recent conversation he held with Dora McDonald, Mrs. Tobye Karl, and Particia Hederman that outlined the dates of future speaking engagements for Dr. King.

Revolution In The Classroom

Friday, March 31, 1967

Dr. King addresses the Georgia Teachers and Education Association about the education of children in the South.

Standing By The Best in an Evil Time" E

Sunday, August 6, 1967

In this sermon, Dr. King addresses the evil in the world and suggest to his congregation that they counter this by being strong and steadfast in the Lord. Dr. King also touches on the current issues in society and how to continue the use of nonviolence as means to for peace and social justice.

Letter from Charles and Leslie Gray to MLK about Contribution

Wednesday, December 13, 1967

In this letter, the Grays send an enclosed contribution to Dr. King in support of his "approach in the civil rights movement."

Religion and Race Memo

Friday, July 15, 1966

The Religion and Race organization distributes a memo to discuss the various topics involving the meaning of "black power", the United Presbyterians joint actions within the Mississippi March, the testimony's end in Wilcox County, and Project Equality.

Letter from Inam Rahman to MLK

Friday, July 10, 1964

Inam Rahman, member of the Indian Council for Cultural Relations, sends Dr. King a copy of the letter from the President of the Council inviting him to present a speech at the Azad Memorial Lectures.

Thank You Letter from Dr. King to Chas. E. Elmore

Tuesday, July 30, 1963

This letter dated July 31, 1963 was written by Dr. King to Mrs. Chas Elmore. In it he thanks her for the kind letter she wrote to him about his letter from the Birmingham Jail.

Letter from Ann and George Laringer to MLK

Friday, June 9, 1967

George Levinger's extends his gratitude to Dr. King for his stand against Vietnam. Levinger states, "One can preach nonviolence at home and ignore the violence abroad."

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Friday, March 8, 1968

Telegram from MLK to Frank Brown

Thursday, January 6, 1966

Dr. King sends his condolences to Frank Brown following the death of Mr. Brown's wife, Margaret.

Letter from Nancy Keppy to MLK

Wednesday, January 31, 1962

Nancy Keppy, a high school student from Alabama, asks Dr. King to share his thoughts on integration and segregation.

Letter from David Darrin to Jeannette Rankin

Sunday, January 21, 1968

Here, in this document, David Darrin writes to the Honorable Jeannette Rankin, National Women's Party, regarding the organization of The National Council for Promoting World Peace.

Letter from David Kairys to MLK and SCLC

Saturday, June 17, 1967

Mr. Kairys writes Dr. King to express his support of Dr. King's stand against the Vietnam War as well as Dr. King's approach to civil rights issues.

War

Dr. King quotes Napoleon, Gen. Dwight Eisenhower, Gen. Douglas MacArthur, and Gen. Omar Bradley on war as impractical.

Paint

Dr. King writes about the magnificent wonders of the galaxy.

Letter from Mark Staib to MLK

Mark Staib, a debater at John Carroll University, requests that Dr. King sends information on the debate topic: "Resolved: that the federal government should guarantee a minimum annual cash income for every citizen."

Declaration from the Southern Democratic Conference

The Southern Democratic Conference writes about new laws sponsored by the Jefferson County Legislative Delegation. Under the new legislation, the writer(s) feel as though the laws were "designed to dilute the citizen strength of the Negro and to deprive the black minority of opportunities hitherto available to the white group."

SCLC Newsletter: Of Riots and Wrongs Against Jews

Monday, July 27, 1964

Presented here, is a draft of an article published in the July-August 1964 edition of the SCLC Newsletter. The article highlights the discontentment of the author in relation to acts of violence against Jewish citizens.

God

Dr. King describes Psalms 135:5 as henotheism: belief in a god without denying the existence of other gods. Because God is the only one worthy of worship, King concludes that the Hebrews were practical monotheists.

Letter from Congressman William Ryan to MLK

Friday, July 9, 1965

Congressman William Ryan gives Dr. King an update regarding the pending 1965 Voting Rights Act that is still under debate in Congress. Ryan, a staunch supporter of the bill, mentions his persistent efforts to keep the legislation from being blocked by adversaries.

Letter from J. Carter Fahy to Mr. Roy Wilkins about NAACP Name Change

Friday, July 28, 1967

In this letter to the president of the NAACP, Fahy suggests changing the name of the NAACP to NAABA, replacing "colored people" with "Black Americans."

Letter from Edward F. Bell to MLK

Thursday, April 1, 1965

Attorney Edward Bell offers his legal services to Dr. King and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in the Civil Rights Movement.

Capitalism

Dr. King quotes the Honorable John Rankin's remarks regarding capitalism. He discusses two motives that make human beings work: "fear of punishment and the hope of reward."

Letter from Joan Daves to Carlota Frahm

Monday, October 26, 1964

Joan Daves denies permission to Norwegian Publishers to reprint Dr. King's "I Have A Dream" speech in connection with "Why We Can't Wait." Daves asserts that the speech will be part of Dr. King's forthcoming publication.

Letter from MLK to The Honorable E.L. Bartlett

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King writes Alaskan Congressman Edward Lewis Bartlett to express appreciation for his vote in support of passing the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Telegram from Bayard Rustin to MLK

Wednesday, October 19, 1966

Bayard Rustin invites Dr. King to join other civil rights leaders for a meeting that will be held in New York, NY.