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"North Carolina (NC)"

Letter from Andrew Young to James Bevel and Dave Delliger

Tuesday, March 14, 1967
New York, NY, Oregon (OR)

Andrew Young writes Revered James Bevel and Mr. Dave Dellinger confirming Dr. King's acceptance to speak at a rally in New York, New York on April 15th. Young further addresses logistical issues that may arise in the execution of the event, as well as how to best increase participation.

God is a Spirit

Dr. King outlines a sermon entitled "God Is A Spirit" and lists three different meanings for that assertion.

Letter from Ira Edmond Gillet to MLK

Friday, October 25, 1963
Oregon (OR), VIETNAM, GERMANY, NORTH KOREA, SOUTH KOREA, CUBA, SOUTH AFRICA

Mr. Gillet, a member of the Fellowship of Reconciliation and former missionary in South Africa, sends Dr. King his thoughts on a recent petition circulated by the American Committee on Africa. He explains that the actions called for in the petition would "do more harm than good." Gillet encloses a copy of the petition, highlighted with his own comments, which implores President Kennedy to impose sanctions on South Africa.

Letter from Omer Allison to MLK

Saturday, August 19, 1967
NORWAY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Mr. Allison expresses dissatisfaction with Dr. King's representation of the Negro race, the church and the Kingdom of God.

Wilkins Praises Darien Teacher Exchange Setup

Friday, December 11, 1964
New York, NY, Missouri (MO), Connecticut (CT)

Roy Wilkins, Executive Secretary of the NAACP, applauds Darien's efforts to integrate minority and suburban communities through its exchange program with New York City. The program "sought Negro teachers, business and professional people to live and work in their community."

Letter from Wyatt T. Walker to S. I. Hayakawa

Tuesday, July 30, 1963
California (CA), Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Wyatt Tee Walker writes S. I. Hayakawa, academic and political figure of Japanese ancestry, informing him that the SCLC is not a tax-exempt organization. Walker says that because it is not tax exempt they are free to do as they please, and he directs Hayakawa on where to send future contributions.

John Locke

Dr. King records a quote from English political theorist John Locke on the development of the human mind.

Letter from J. Carter Fahy to Mr. Roy Wilkins about NAACP Name Change

Friday, July 28, 1967
Massachusetts (MA), New York (NY), New York, NY, Cambridge, MA

In this letter to the president of the NAACP, Fahy suggests changing the name of the NAACP to NAABA, replacing "colored people" with "Black Americans."

Letter from MLK to Attorney Bell

New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King writes Attorney Bell thanking him for offering his services "to the Freedom Movement and the work of the SCLC."

Letter from Nancy and Bill Brodie to Mrs. King

Thursday, April 11, 1968

Nancy and Bill Brodie write Mrs. King to express their sympathy regarding Dr. King's assassination. As a method to comfort Mrs. King, Nancy includes a poem that she wrote for her father when he died.

Beyond Condemnation

Dr. King outlines a sermon entitled "Beyond Condemnation." He references the biblical story about a woman condemned to death by the Pharisees for adultery. Jesus commands "the person without sin to cast the first stone" as a lesson that all sins are equal and that no one should judge the flaws of others.

Reviews of Strength to Love

Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C., Birmingham, AL, New York, NY

These reviews of Dr. King's "Strength to Love" illustrate King's use of theological beliefs in conjunction with the struggle for civil rights reform.

Statement by Roy Wilkins to Congress

Thursday, January 12, 1967

The Leadership Conference on Civil Rights adopted this statement by Roy Wilkins, Chairman, for the opening of the 1967 Congressional session. Their agenda includes full compliance with all existing civil rights legislation, equality and justice in the courts, greater protection for those who exercise their civil rights, and an end to housing discrimination. Wilkins states that economic and social conditions must be created so that civil rights guaranteed by law can be realized.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, November 11, 1963
New York, NY

Mrs. Joan Daves references an enclosure of two copies of the Swedish-language edition of "Strength to Love," along with an advanced payment for the return of a signed copy.

Letter from John Language to MLK

Friday, October 13, 1967
Massachusetts (MA)

John Langone asks Dr. King to write an article for his psychology journal on violence.

MLK Report: Annual Address, MIA

Thursday, December 3, 1959
Los Angeles, CA, Montgomery, AL, ITALY, FRANCE, GERMANY, Virginia (VA), Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA, Georgia (GA)

In his final address to the Montgomery Improvement Association, Dr. King gives a status report on the various initiatives of the organization. He also gives a final farewell in hopes that the MIA is challenged to continue to fight in the struggle for equality.

Telegram from Selma Frazier to MLK

Wednesday, November 1, 1967
Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA

Selma Frazier and family send their support to Dr. King during his incarceration in the Birmingham jail.

Letter from Dr. Herzl Ragins to MLK

Wednesday, March 1, 1967
New York (NY)

Dr. Herzl Ragins writes to Dr. King, denouncing him because of his support for Adam Clayton Powell.

Letter from Carey McWilliams to Dora McDonald

Monday, January 9, 1967
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM, Los Angeles, CA, CHINA, Detroit, MI

Carey McWilliams writes Dora McDonald acknowledging confirmation of Dr. King's commitment to speak for "The Nation's" conference in Los Angeles.

March on Washington Lincoln Memorial Program

Wednesday, August 28, 1963
Washington, D.C.

This document outlines the program held at the Lincoln Memorial during the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.

Letter from MLK to Harry Wachtel, Esq.

Tuesday, November 22, 1966
New York (NY), New York, NY, South Carolina (SC)

Dr. King updates Attorney Harry Wachtel about a nonviolence workshop that took place at the Penn Center in Frogmore, South Carolina.

America's Chief Moral Dilemma

Wednesday, May 10, 1967
Atlanta, GA

In this 1967 speech to the Hungry Club, Dr. King addresses America’s chief moral dilemma by focusing on three major evils: racism, poverty, and war.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Yankowski to MLK

Monday, July 4, 1966
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

Mr. and Mrs. Yankowski of New York inform Dr. King of their plan to open a museum for junior high students featuring Americans of great importance. They request a collection Dr. King's past articles and photographs to be highlighted in the museum.

Letter from Dan C. Lortie to MLK

Monday, May 23, 1966
Chicago, IL

Professor Dan Lortie of the University of Chicago invites Dr. King to speak at the Colver-Rosenberger Lecture Series.

Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to MLK Regarding Monroe Defense Committee

Thursday, December 14, 1961
Cleveland, OH

In this letter, Benjamin E. Mays, the president of Morehouse College, inquires what Dr. King may know about the Monroe Defense Committee.

Letter from Al Capp to MLK

Wednesday, May 27, 1964
New York (NY)

Al Capp refuses to donate to the SCLC because he feels that organizations like Dr. King's promote violence against White Americans.

MLK Request from Princeton Committee for Negotiation Now

Friday, November 10, 1967
California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, San Francisco, CA, Washington (WA), Oregon (OR), Colorado (CO), Denver, CO, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Indiana (IN), Kentucky (KY), Louisville, KY, Michigan (MI), Detroit, MI, Missouri (MO), Massachusetts (MA), Boston, MA, Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA, New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Mary Temple of the Princeton Committee for Negotiation, invites Dr. King to make an appearance at a fundraising event.

Letter from Eric Malling to MLK

Tuesday, December 21, 1965
Atlanta, GA

Dr.King's letter to Dr. & Mrs.Rousseau

California (CA), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dr.King's letter to Dr. & Mrs. Rousseau was about his views on Vietnam. He believed that America's involvement in Vietnam was wrong and that the United States was on the wrong side of peace.

Invitation to President Kennedy's Inauguration

Washington, D.C.

This invitation was sent to Dr. and Mrs. King, inviting them to the inauguration ceremony of President-elect John F. Kennedy and Vice President-elect Lyndon B. Johnson.