The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"North Carolina (NC)"

MLK Handwritten Notecard on "Scientific Method"

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines "Scientific Method."

Letter from the Saskatchewan Teachers Federation to MLK

Thursday, November 12, 1964

The Saskatchewan Teachers' Federation, a Canadian organization, congratulates Dr. King on being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. The Federation extends an invitation to Dr. King to serve as the guest speaker, which will involve meetings in four to five cities. The year of 1965 is the "golden jubilee year" and their desire to have an extraordinary individual as their guest speaker.

MLK Address at the National Biennial Convention

Wednesday, May 14, 1958

Dr. King delivers this speech at the National Biennial Convention of the American Jewish Congress. The convention took place May 1, 1958 in Miami Beach, Florida. Dr. King discusses how the Jewish and Negro communities are unified by the escape of bondage. They share a common fight against the deadly enemies of oppression. He continues on to discuss the things that need to be done in order for African Americans to reach great potential along with the importance of fighting for and obtaining democracy.

Telegram from Charles Hayes to to MLK

Charles Hayes, an official of the AFL-CIO, sends Dr. King best wishes for a "speedy recovery." He also thanks Dr. King for sending Ralph Abernathy to speak at a banquet held for the organization.

Condolence Letter to Mrs. King from Socorro Santos

Friday, April 5, 1968

This letter from a middle school student is one of condolence written to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King’s assassination.

Anonymous Support for MLK

Sunday, October 30, 1960

An anonymous individual expresses his or her support and concerns about Dr. King's affiliation with presidential candidate John F. Kennedy.

Telegram from Roy Wilkins to MLK

Friday, October 21, 1960

Roy Wilkins sends a message of warm wishes on behalf of the NAACP to Dr. King while he is serving a sentence at the Fulton County Jail in Atlanta.

Flight Schedule Proposal for MLK and Party

Henderson Travel Service, Inc. created this suggested flight schedule for Dr. King, Ralph D. Abernathy, Andrew Young, Bernard Lee, and Dora McDonald.


Dr. King discusses the danger of subjective religion without objective religion.

Letter from A.C. Spectorsky to MLK

Friday, March 15, 1968

Editorial Director, A.C. Spectorsky, requests comments from Dr. King regarding an interview with Senator Charles Percy from the April issue of PLAYBOY Magazine. The Illinois Republican
discusses a range of subjects including American military presence in Vietnam, President Lyndon B. Johnson's leadership style, and Negro-white relations.

Letter from Ruth W. Carr to SCLC

Wednesday, April 5, 1967

Ruth W. Carr gives a donation of $350.00 on behalf of her late husband, Clarence Carr. Mrs. Carr explains that it was her husband wish before death to contribute to the work of the SCLC.

The Nationalism of Ezra

This note card outlines Ezra views on "mixed marriages."

Letter from Howard Moore, Jr. to MLK

Tuesday, February 20, 1968

Howard Moore, a partner in the Law Offices of Ward, Moore and Alexander, informs Dr. King of the establishment of the Southern Legal Assistance Project (SLAP). Mr. Moore describes how SLAP has already achieved a victory in representing a soldier who was accused of cursing his white officers. He also asks Dr. King to consider being named as an adviser for the project.

Anti-Semitism, Israel and SCLC:- A Statement on Press Distortions

Sunday, August 27, 1967

This is a document that addresses the impression that the press created reporting that the SCLC was part of a group that condemned Israel and endorsed the policies of the Arab powers. This document also includes the annual report of the president by Dr. King.


Dr. King records Friedrich Schleiermacher's views on religion, sin and redemption.

Liberation: Our Struggle

Sunday, April 1, 1956

Dr. King contributes an article to the "Liberation" publication explaining the reasons for the 1955 Montgomery Bus Boycott. He conveys the issues involving segregation on buses, the demise of Negro inferiority and the miscalculations of white Montgomery civic leaders. According to Dr. King, "Every attempt to end the protest by intimidation, by encouraging Negroes to inform, by force and violence, further cemented the Negro community and brought sympathy for our cause from men of good will all over the world."

Letter from Katharine Gunning to President Johnson

Tuesday, May 2, 1967

Katharine Gunning of New York writes President Johnson and copies various dignitaries, including Dr. King. Gunning voices her opposition to the Vietnam War, in particular the bombing campaign, which she views as an escalation of the war.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK Regarding Royalties Earned from "Stride Toward Freedom"

Tuesday, March 5, 1968

This document references royalties earned in the amount $39.00 from the Van Logham Slaterus' publication of "Stride Toward Freedom".

Press Statement: MLK Agrees to Moscow Trip Regarding Vietnam

This press release announces that Dr. King has agreed to join with other Nobel Peace laureates for a meeting in Moscow in early October [1967] with the Ambassador of North Vietnam and the Ambassador of the National Liberation Front regarding a possible Vietnam peace settlement. Dr. King will go with Fr. Georges Dominique Pire of Belgium, who won the Peace Prize in 1958. The mission is the result of a private Norwegian initiative with financial backing from the Norwegian government.

Statement from the Eisenhower Administration to the NAACP

Sunday, June 26, 1955

In an address to the NAACP, Vice President Richard Nixon discusses the reasons that progress has been made in the Eisenhower Administration and the goals that the organization needs to continue working toward.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding the "Times"

Tuesday, June 9, 1964

Joan Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, provided a detailed advertisement schedule for his latest book "Why We Can't Wait." Advertisements appeared in the Times, Harper, The Atlantic, Christian Herald and the Christian Century to name a few.

Social Ethics

Dr. King's references a chapter and verse from the biblical Book of Zephaniah. He notes that the passages concerning social phenomena such as infidelity, pride, selfishness and oppression are still "entirely up to date."

Dr. King's Revealing Report On 'Summer of Discontent'

Dr. King's responses to the events in Birmingham, Alabama during the summer of 1963 are reported in this Chicago Sun-Times article.

Letters To Mrs. Fillmore from MLK

Thursday, April 19, 1962

Dr. King responds to Mrs. Fillmore's previous letter, offering some suggestions to help her. He apologizes that he cannot use SCLC funds because that money is currently in use for the civil rights struggle. Dr. King suggests alternative organizations and programs that may offer her assistance.

Letter from James Farmer to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967

Chairman J. Farmer gives Dr. King a report from the National Advisory Committee of CORE.

Telegram from Robert Mangum to MLK

Tuesday, October 31, 1961

Mr. Mangum sends his support to Dr. King as he serves his time in Jefferson county jail.

Letter from Judith D. Greenberg to MLK

Saturday, March 23, 1968

Judith Greenberg of the Stern College for Women asks Dr. King about material for a report concerning Choice '68.

Letter from John Lewis to MLK

Thursday, July 22, 1965

In this letter, John Lewis requests a loan for the amount of $10,000 from the Southern Christian Leadership Conference so that the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee can meet their payroll and cover pressing bills. He then speaks on the importance of continuous dialogue between the SCLC and SNCC.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Robert Goldwin

Wednesday, March 20, 1963

Dora McDonald informs Dr. Robert A. Goldwin the four essays on "100 Years of Emancipation" have been received and placed on Dr. King's desk for him to read upon his return from out of town.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

The anonymous author details some of the hardships of his life and expresses his desire to incarcerate Dr. King permanently.