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Letter from MLK to James K. Shipman

Friday, November 17, 1967

Dr. King thanks James Shipman, Chairman of the Organization Committee of the Ohio Association of Community-Junior Colleges, for an invitation to speak at Cuyahog Community College. Dr. King regretfully declines the invitation due to schedule demands related to planning for the first four months of 1968.

Revelation Baptist Church Program for "A Knock at Midnight"

Sunday, September 27, 1964

This program outlines the Revelation Baptist Church Sunday Worship Service on September 27, 1964. The booklet lists Reverend Fred L. Shuttlesworth, co-founder of the SCLC, as the church's presiding minister. On this occasion, Dr. King addressed the congregation from the pulpit with the sermon "A Knock at Midnight," which had been published the year before. Dr. King's handwritten notes seem to outline another talk on the back cover.

Inter-Faith Mass Meeting

Sunday, June 11, 1967

This program is for an Inter-Faith Mass Meeting that was co-sponsored by Mt. Zion Baptist Church and Zion Baptist Church. The meeting took place on June 11, 1967 and features Dr. King as the speaker.

MLK Handwritten Signature

This note contains handwriting that says "Best Wishes-Martin Luther King, Jr."

Letter from MLK to L. LeVard Colbert

Friday, December 27, 1963

Dr. King thanks L. LeVard Colbert for his contribution to SCLC. Dr. King states that his donation will be utilized to assist with voter registration and ending segregation in the South.

Evil

Dr. King quotes Harris Franklin Rall's "Christianity," highlighting the topic "the evil of the universe."

Outline for The Secret of Adjustment

In this sermon, Dr. King notes applicable methods used to deal with the tensions in life. It is said that "the secret to adjustment is to find contentment." King further references the experience of the Apostle Paul and what he learned in confronting this problem.

Letter from Myles Horton to Friends of Highlander

Friday, December 8, 1967

Myles Horton, the co-founder of the Highlander Research and Education Center, explains that he has been working on a program for the Appalachian area. He also mentions that the Center sponsors voter registration, political education programs and a series of workshops to help Negro candidates run for local and state offices.

Letter to MLK from Ida Kinney

Ida Kinney sends Dr. King a letter expressing her support for his work. She informs him that she would like to begin making monthly financial donations toward the movement.

Letter from Abram Eisenman to MLK

Sunday, April 16, 1967

Abram Eisenman expresses appreciation and admiration for Dr. King's work. Eisenman also
addresses the divide of supporters within the Civil Rights Movement concerning the Vietnam War.

Letter from Charles E. Waring to MLK

Wednesday, March 13, 1968

Calling himself "a pale face Christian," Charles E. Waring writes Dr. King to acknowledge that all Christians must aid African Americans in their fight for fair representation and respect as equal human beings. He denounces whites who condemn Dr. King and asks, "what can we white Christians do to help recover the leadership of the Negro cause to worthy men?"

abstract needed

Friday, March 8, 1968

Letter from Ed Clayton to Martin Gal

Wednesday, October 16, 1963

Ed Clayton, Public Relations Director for SCLC, writes Martin Gal, Producer of WMSB TV, to inform him that Dr. King will not be able to make an appearance on his television production because of his focus on the Civil Rights Movement.

Three Dimensions of a Complete Life

This sermon is one draft of Dr. King's "Three Dimensions of a Complete Life." It was first delivered by Dr. King to the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama.
Another version is entitled, "The Dimensions of a Complete Life." The first dimension is concerned with the well-being of the self. The second dimension is concerned with the well-being of others. The last dimension is concerned with reaching towards God.
As Dr. King implies, if all of these dimensions are equal, then a complete life will be obtained.

Style

Dr. King references Voltaire and his views regarding the impact of the style in which one chooses to express himself.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Thursday, September 10, 1964

Joan Daves sends Dr. King an advertisement for "Why We Can't Wait", which will appear in the Washington Afro-American. The advertisement has also been published in Ebony magazine.

Social Ethics

Dr. King writes notes on social ethics from the Book of Nahum.

Letter from MLK to Miss Joanne Adams

Thursday, November 7, 1963

Dr. King responds to a letter from Joanne Adams, a teenager from Central High School, stating that letters like hers from young people around the country inspire him that youth are so conscious of the issues that affect our world.

Letter from Newsweek to MLK

Tuesday, December 5, 1967

This document is a letter to Dr. King from Newsweek noting the enclosure of a quote made, in a column, December 4, 1967.

Letter from Huub Coppens to Dora McDonald

Friday, October 2, 1964

Huub Coppens, Secretary of "The Tribune" in the Netherlands, writes Dora McDonald in hopes of Dr. King accepting their invitation to visit their homeland in the near future.

Letter from Oliver Hunkin to MLK

Tuesday, February 27, 1968

In this letter Oliver Hunkin, of the British Broadcasting Corporation, offers his gratitude to Dr. King for an interview that he gave to Gerald Priestland of BBC-2.

Mixed Marriage

This illustration, created by Reg Manning, depicts Dr. King presiding over an interracial marriage between the Civil Rights Movement and "Veatnik War Protests." This drawing was published in the "Arizona Republic."

Telegram from Trinity Cathedral to MLK

Friday, May 24, 1963

Members of Trinity Cathedral in Newark, New Jersey offer their support to Dr. King and others "who are endangering your lives for the sake of others." Dr. King received this telegram in the midst of the desegregation campaign in Birmingham, 1963.

Telegram from Arrowsmith to MLK

Wednesday, June 1, 1966

Arrowsmith issues a telegram inquiring about Dr. King's potential visit to the country of Australia.

Registration Form for WCLC Assembly Session

Thursday, June 24, 1965

The Western Christian Leadership Conference sends this pamphlet to potential participants and encourages registration for the Assembly Session in July, 1965. Dr. King is featured as the Mass Meeting Speaker.

Address by MLK at the 30th Anniversary of District 65

Wednesday, October 23, 1963

This document, an address given by Dr. King on the 30th anniversary of District 65, includes handwritten notes. In the address, Dr. King talks about the importance of the Declaration of Independence and the Emancipation Proclamation to human rights.

Telegram from Mrs. Ernest Bavely to MLK

Wednesday, October 19, 1960

Mrs. Bavely sends a supportive telegram to Dr. King during his confinement at the Fulton County Jail. She assures him "children of tomorrow, tomorrow, and tomorrow, will inherit those values for which you are striving."

Card from Dr. and Mrs. H. R. Holman

Dr. & Mrs. H. R. Holman send a holiday card with wishes for a prosperous New Year.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

Friday, August 5, 1966

An anonymous writer sends a letter to Dr. King and several other civil rights leaders. Although the exact message of the letter is unclear, the writer quotes numerous Biblical passages and Christian prayers. The writer, intermittently, also refers to the recipient as "Michael."

Where Do We Go From Here Book Mailing

The people listed here received an advance copy of Dr. King's "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community," which was published in 1967.