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Letter from David Kairys to MLK and SCLC

Saturday, June 17, 1967
New York, NY

Mr. Kairys writes Dr. King to express his support of Dr. King's stand against the Vietnam War as well as Dr. King's approach to civil rights issues.

If I were a Negro

Thursday, March 23, 1967
ISRAEL, Berlin, Germany

Rabbi I. Usher Kirshblum writes Dr. King to share an article he wrote in the "Jewish Center of Kew Garden Hills Bulletin." The article references the expelling of Congressman Adam Clayton Powell and criticizes the African American response towards his defense. The author states, "If I were a Negro I would not waste my time in defending Powell's wrong acts but would rather speak of the many good acts he performed." Rabbi Kirshblum goes on to praise the views of men like Dr. King and Rev. Roy Wilkins, while rejecting those of Stokely Carmichael.

Money

Dr. King cites Albert Knudson's "The Principles of Christian Ethics."

Memo from Gloria Fraction to Andrew Young

Friday, June 17, 1966
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Gloria Fraction states Dr. Dorothy Sutton Branch spoke with Dr. King about meeting a group in Lawndale. She also inquires of Andrew Young when Dr. King would be available for an interview with a reporter.

Letter from High School Student to MLK

Friday, November 3, 1967
Mississippi (MS)

Sheila Gavin is a high school student writing to Dr. King to inquire about his choice to be a part of the civil rights movement.

Letter from Alfred Martin of the Jefferson Democratic Association to MLK

Thursday, December 28, 1961
California (CA), San Francisco, CA, Atlanta, GA

Alfred Martin, representing the Jefferson Democratic Association, offers his support to Dr. King and the struggle for equality in the south. He forwards two documents to Dr. King pertaining to his potential run for Congress and his ideas to assist Negroes in being able to vote. Martin also encloses a donation and apologizes for his inability to send more.

NAACP Remembers MLK

Tuesday, April 9, 1968
New York, NY

The NAACP released this comprehensive tribute in Dr. King's memory. The tribute was printed in The New York Post on the day of Dr. King's funeral.

Black Power: The Politics of Liberation in America

Maryland (MD), VIETNAM, Mississippi (MS), New York, NY, Greenwood, MS

Stokely Carmichael and Dr. Charles Hamilton are in partnership with SNCC to promote the Black Power Movement. SNCC creates "freedom gifts" to provide the community with the expression of the "humanistic spirit" and goal of the movement. These freedom gifts range from posters, poetry, calendars, and more.

Letter from Culbert G. Rutenber to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967
Massachusetts (MA)

Professor Rutenber, of Andover Newton Theological School, writes Dr. King on behalf of Lovic Dean, an African American minister, who has requested Dr. King send him "the best books" to build a library on the subject of pacifism.

Telegram from Nelson Rockefeller to MLK

Thursday, March 18, 1965
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), New York (NY), Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL)

New York Governor Nelson Rockefeller writes to Dr. King in appreciation for notice of the Selma to Montgomery March. He describes the leadership of Dr. King and others involved in the Civil Rights Movement as "the finest American tradition."

Letter from MLK to Elsa Wischkaemper McIntyre

Tuesday, November 12, 1963
California (CA), Birmingham, AL, New York, NY

Dr. King writes Elsa McIntyre thanking her for her financial contribution to the SCLC. He also informs her of how her contribution will aid in the organization's work to fight discrimination.

Letter from Amelia Jones to MLK and the SCLC

Friday, February 18, 1966
Ohio (OH)

The Toldeo NAACP Branch invites Dr. King to be their keynote speaker. Amelia Jacobs Jones, representing the NAACP, requests that suggested dates regarding Dr. King's availability be forwarded to her.

Letter to MLK from A Friend of Justice and Democracy

Tuesday, February 14, 1967
California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., Florida (FL)

An anonymous individual writes Dr. King to declare that the Jewish people are responsible for the oppression of Negroes.

Letter from Philip H. Partridge to Hon. Stephen Young Regarding Evil Commentary

Tuesday, January 11, 1966
Ohio (OH), Washington, D.C., VIETNAM, CHINA

In this letter to Mr. Young, Mr. Partridge outlines a series of "attacks" that have been placed against him following his public speech based on political opinions.

Why Should SCLC be Departmentalized?

This document defines and discusses the departmentalization of the SCLC. It also outlines the job duties of the following positions: Executive Director, Program Director, Director of Affiliates, Field Secretary, Field Worker, and Subsistence Worker.

Letter from Calvary Presbyterian Church to MLK

Tuesday, May 16, 1967
Ohio (OH)

Enclosed in this letter from Dr. John Bruere, of Calvary Baptist Church, is a magazine entitled "Faith at Work - The Magazine of Christian Experience." The featured article, "The Church That Stayed," highlights a church that has endured the deterioration, violence, and looting of the neighborhood surrounding it. The author goes on to discuss the increase in membership and their attempt to represent Christ in every situation.

Letter from George G. Hill to MLK

Wednesday, April 14, 1965
Hartford, CT

George Hill expresses that he will continue to support the SCLC but feels the need to make two suggestions regarding the Alabama boycott and Vietnam War. He questions the use of economic force in obtaing equal rights and suggests the need to connect with underprivileged around the world.

Letter from Moreland Griffith Smith to MLK

Wednesday, February 17, 1965
Washington, D.C., Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA

Moreland Griffith Smith, Chairman of the Alabama Advisory Committee, invites Dr. King or a representative to an open meeting which will be held in Alabama. The purpose of the meeting is to gather information regarding equal protection under the law in areas such as housing, voting, and employment.

Statement from MLK to Time Magazine

Friday, January 12, 1962

Dr. King writes to Time Magazine regarding the President's call for "new civil rights legislation." He expresses the unfortunate lack of originality in the President's statement on the issue and stresses the importance of executive action.

Letter from Ruth Frank Rosenwald to MLK

Washington, D.C., Texas (TX), GERMANY, VIETNAM

Ruth Frank Rosenwald writes urging Dr. King to commend Robert Kennedy for his advocacy of peaceful alternatives to war and to invite him to issue a joint call for a meeting of civil rights and peace leaders and President Johnson for dialogue on U.S policy in Vietnam, Santo Domingo and West Germany.

A Letter to MLK to President Lyndon B. Johsnon

Friday, April 13, 1962
Atlanta, GA

In a letter to MLK, President Lyndon B. Johnson addresses the issue of Federal employment in Atlanta. Johnson informs King of the previous meeting held with the Civil Service Commission and the steps being taken to move forward.

Letter from Larry N. Boyd to MLK

Thursday, March 18, 1965
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY)

Larry N. Boyd, President of The United Piedmont Society, writes Dr. King expressing support for the SCLC's fight to achieve human rights for the Negroes throughout the South.

Letter to Dora McDonald from Harper & Row, Publishers

Wednesday, October 24, 1962
New York, NY

The secretary of Mr. Mel Arnold of Harper and Row Publishers, sent this correspondence to Dr. King secretary, Miss. Dora McDonald. The content of the letter thanked Miss. McDonald, for sending a previous letter and requested additional chapters for Dr. King's second book. The book was entitled "Strength to Love."

Letter from the Student Christian Movement in Uppsala, Sweden

Wednesday, October 28, 1964
SWEDEN

Bolennart Andersson, President of the Student Christian Movement in Uppsala, Sweden, sends a congratulatory letter and an invitation to Dr. King to speak to their student union.

Letter from Robert Starbuck to the SCLC

Wednesday, May 19, 1965
Berlin, Germany, GERMANY, Atlanta, GA

Robert Starbuck encloses a contribution to the SCLC on behalf of supporters from Berlin, Germany. Starbuck has affiliations with many individuals tied to the American Civil Rights Movement and believes that it is imperative to contribute to the cause.

Prospectus for Department of Affiliates

Herbert Coulton, Director of Affiliates, gives members of the SCLC a list of requirements for positions within the organization.

Letter from William M. Grayson to MLK

Tuesday, January 30, 1962
West Virginia (WV), Atlanta, GA

William M. Grayson, the President of the local NAACP chapter in West Virginia, requests the help of Dr. King to assist the organization in gaining more members. Grayson asks that Dr. King provide a schedule and availability for when he could possibly provide aid.

Letter from Franklin I. Gamwell with Enclosed Copy of the Interracial News Service Newsletter

New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Arkansas (AR), Virginia (VA), Louisiana (LA), Connecticut (CT), Washington, D.C., South Carolina (SC), Tennessee (TN), North Carolina (NC), Maryland (MD), Texas (TX), Mississippi (MS), Florida (FL), UNITED KINGDOM, Memphis, TN

Franklin I. Gamwell, of the Student Interracial Ministry, requests if Dr. King would like to have an intern student at Ebenezer Baptist Church for 1963.
Interracial News Service describes the experiences of many Student Interracial Ministry participants and the pastors of the churches they spent the summers with.

Invitation from J.G. Kennelly to MLK

Wednesday, April 24, 1963
CANADA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

J.G. Kennelly invites Dr. King to address the Christian Culture Forum during their 1963-1964 season in Hamilton, Canada.

MLK Statement from the Harlem Hospital

Tuesday, September 30, 1958
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Dr. King writes from the Harlem Hospital in New York as a result of being stabbed by Izola Currey. King asserts that he does not have any ill feelings towards Currey, and hopes that she receives the help she needs to become a functional member of society. King also thanks his supporters for all the cards, telegrams, and phone calls which fortified him throughout his tribulation. Dr. King ends by saying he is "impatiently waiting to rejoin [his] friends and colleagues to continue the work that we know must be done regardless of the cost."