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"Norfolk, VA"

Telegram from Trinity Cathedral to MLK

Friday, May 24, 1963

Members of Trinity Cathedral in Newark, New Jersey offer their support to Dr. King and others "who are endangering your lives for the sake of others." Dr. King received this telegram in the midst of the desegregation campaign in Birmingham, 1963.

Immortality

Dr. King cites the Old Testament Book of Isaiah regarding the topic of immorality.

Letter from MLK to Ambassador Adlai Stevenson

Monday, December 28, 1964

Dr. King thanks Adlai Stevenson, America's ambassador to the UN, for sponsoring a reception in his honor following his trip to Oslo to receive the Nobel Peace Prize. He commends Stevenson on his dedication to promote peace and reason in helping to solve world problems.

Letter from Malcolm R. La Place II to MLK

Sunday, March 17, 1963

Malcolm La Place of WMAL TV News writes Dr. King regarding his address to the Capital Press Club. He hopes to arrange a videotape session as well.

Letter from Gino David Dassatti to MLK

Tuesday, May 9, 1967

Gino David Dassatti expresses his concern that Dr. King's stand on the war in Vietnam may deem him a traitor. In Dassatti's words, "The blood of these Americans will rest forever on your soul and conscience."

Letter from John R. Hanson to MLK

Monday, January 11, 1965

Congressman Hansen of Nebraska thanks Dr. King for the telegram he sent urging House Representatives to vote against the seating of the Mississippi Delegation. The Democratic Representative informs Dr. King that he was one of the 86 Congressmen "who requested a roll call vote on the issue."

Letter from MLK to Elder Grant

Dr. King declines an earlier proposal suggested by Mr. Grant, due to a lack of resources and time.

Letter from Walter E. Sanford to MLK

Wednesday, February 19, 1964

Walter Sanford, Labor Adviser for the United States Department of Labor, writes Dora McDonald regarding Mr. John Dube's visit to Atlanta. In Dr. King's absence, Dube will meet with his Executive Assistant, Wyatt T. Walker, to discuss the structure of the SCLC and techniques employed to "promote improved civil rights for the Negroes in the US."

Telegram from Delmer Brown to MLK

Friday, February 5, 1965

Due to recent student activities at the University of California, Berkeley, Mr. Brown requests Dr. King's involvement in a lecture series devoted to discussing issues concerning civil disobedience.

Letter of Support to MLK

Wednesday, January 3, 1962

Mr. Hillyer and his children Nitra, Linda, and Jonathan send a donation of thirty-five dollars to Dr. King, in memory of the late Mrs. Hillyer.

We Salute You!

Thirteen members of Ebenezer Baptist Church are praised for their years of service and role in making the church monumental.

Letter from MLK to Bert Onne

Wednesday, April 20, 1966

Dr. King takes an opportunity to thank Bert Onne of Stockholm for his assistance in supporting the SCLC's Freedom Movement in Chicago.

A Call to Vietnam Week

This article discusses the Call to Vietnam Week, scheduled to take place April 8 through the 15th. The goal of this event was to promote grass roots awareness of war's destruction.

Letter of Appreciation from Alabama State Teachers Association to MLK

Tuesday, June 6, 1967

The Executive Secretary of the Alabama State Teachers Association expresses his gratitude for services rendered by Dr. King at an Annual Convention via a $500.00 check.

Letter from Tenant to MLK

A tenant from a "slum" building writes to Dr. King requesting help for the building in which she lives. Throughout the letter she lists several problems with the building and hopes that Dr. King can offer assistance.

Man

Dr. King quotes Psalms 144:4 and comments briefly on this biblical passage.

Letter from Oscar Seitz to MLK

Tuesday, June 6, 1967

Mr. Seitz expresses his appreciation for the efforts of Dr. King and the SCLC by enclosing a check to the organization.

MLK's Statement Upon Return to Montgomery

Friday, October 24, 1958

Dr. King expounds on his brutal attack by the "deranged woman" Izola Ware Curry, in which he was stabbed near the heart. He stresses the importance of remaining committed to nonviolence and says he is grateful for the outpouring of sympathy and affection he received while in the hospital.

Schleiermacher (Christianity)

Dr. King cites a quote by philosopher Schleiermacher regarding "the God-consciousness."

Letter from Bayard Rustin to MLK

In a statement to the Democratic National Convention, the authors of this document proclaim that they are seeking freedom. They say that immediate change will only come if the elected Chief Executive is committed to giving life to the Constitution. In an attempt to achieve this, they request that all of the Presidential nominees meet the people's delegation.

Religion and Race Memo

Friday, July 15, 1966

The Religion and Race organization distributes a memo to discuss the various topics involving the meaning of "black power", the United Presbyterians joint actions within the Mississippi March, the testimony's end in Wilcox County, and Project Equality.

Letter from MLK to Senator Everett McKinley Dirksen

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King thanks Senate Minority leader Senator Everett McKinley Dirksen (R-Illinois) for his role in helping to pass the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Dirksen was one of a handful of Republican Senators that helped break a southern Democratic filibuster designed to prevent the passing of this legislation.

My Jewish Brother

Wednesday, February 2, 1966

Dr. King responds to a recent anti-Semitic remark made by a fellow civil rights leader. He discusses the need for Hebrew prophets to revitalize the moral conscious of society. "Let justice roll down like the waters of righteousness as a might stream."

Articles Regarding Strides Made in the Civil Rights Movement

This SCLC news bulletin published around 1964, discloses information regarding Dr. King and others staying in the Birmingham jail. Also included are updates on the progress of the Civil Rights Movement in various cities, additions and changes within the SCLC and relationships with familiar and notable personalities.

Letter from Monica Wilson to MLK

Friday, November 12, 1965

Monica Wilson invites Dr. King to deliver the T.B. Davie Memorial Lecture at the University of Cape Town. She explains that they do not have a large budget but are willing to pay for travel and hotel expenses.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Yankowski to MLK

Monday, July 4, 1966

Mr. and Mrs. Yankowski of New York inform Dr. King of their plan to open a museum for junior high students featuring Americans of great importance. They request a collection Dr. King's past articles and photographs to be highlighted in the museum.

Importance of Negro History and Independence

Monday, May 1, 1967

Dr. King speaks to society's misunderstanding of Negro thought and the resulting tensions in race relations. He attributes this misunderstanding to the lack of Negro history authentically represented in books. Contrived myths created by "omission and commission in books" have reinforced prejudice and faulty sense of white supremacy. He observes that illusions cloud reality and render hostility. Society's unresolved problems are aggravated by racial misconceptions.

Support Letter from Nelson A. Rockefeller to MLK

Wednesday, January 27, 1965

New York Governor, Nelson A. Rockefeller, and Happy [Rockefeller] had the opportunity to spend time with Dr. King and his family after the Nobel Peace Prize Award ceremonies. Admist the renewal of personal attacks against Dr. King, Nelson Rockefeller offers his support and encouragement.

Letter from Secretary to Daniel C. Thompson

Tuesday, December 11, 1962

Dr. King's Secretary writes Dr. Daniel Thompson of Howard University and encloses a foreword written by Dr. King, discussing violence and the philosophies of Mahatma Gandhi.

Letter from Donald Keys to MLK

Tuesday, August 31, 1965

Donald F. Keys writes to Dr. King about Dr. King's invitation to speak at a planned Washington Mobilization on Vietnam. Keys also tells Dr. King that he may have to go to Africa at the time of the meeting, and requests that Mrs. King deliver his address in his absence.