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Letter from Coretta Scott King to Velma B. Hall

Wednesday, October 12, 1960

Mrs. King addressed this correspondence to Velma Hall, in 1960. In this document, Mrs. King extended apologies for the delay in sending her biographical information.

Invitation from Southern Methodist University to MLK

Wednesday, August 4, 1965

Bert Moore invites Dr. King to be the guest lecturer at Southern Methodist University. He says that their organization has participated in demonstration and has raised awareness in their community. He also says that next year will be an important year for their school and for Dallas as a whole, and they need a man of Dr. King's stature to come.

SCLC Action Committee Meeting

Monday, March 11, 1968

Dr. King writes to members of the Action Committee informing them of the date, time, and duties required for the meeting.

Letter from Alice Murphy to MLK

Thursday, March 19, 1964

Alice Murphy informs Dr. King that she is considering writing a segment about the current situation in Alabama. It is necessary that she speak directly with him, as she does not want to say anything "without some degree of personal knowledge."

Letter From Otis Roberts to MLK

Friday, June 30, 1967

Otis Roberts, a Grants Officer for the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, asks that Dr. King send him a signed copy of the enclosed Grant Award for SCLSC's Basic Adult Education Project for Urban Negroes.

The Miami Herald: Who Threw the Bomb?

Wednesday, September 18, 1963

In this newspaper clipping, "Washington Post" columnist Charles Morgan Jr. argues that the responsibility for the Birmingham bombings lies with the entire community.

Letter from Charles T. Dubin to MLK

Sunday, February 11, 1968

Attorney at Law, Charles T. Dubin writes Dr. King to express his approval of the nonviolent practices of the SCLC, and assures Dr. King of the legal effect on the American judicial system. Dubin closes by imploring that Dr. King does not place himself in jeopardy and danger of life and limb.

Letter from James R. Cary to MLK

Friday, January 17, 1964

A representative from the Southwest Wisconsin Education Association invites Dr. King to serve as the keynote speaker at the organization's annual convention. The executive secretary tells Dr. King that they are interested in his "experience with education in the south and the entire United States," and feel that he would greatly enhance the convention by delivering the keynote speech. The sender also congratulates Dr. King on his recent "Man of the Year" honor by Time Magazine.

SCLC Fund Appeal from MLK

Dr. King discusses SCLC's continued priority work in the South. the Los Angeles riots and the need for ongoing voter registration. He makes the point that, "contributions are more than money - they are affirmations of confidence and dedication to democratic change."

Newsletter from Rev. Ellis Vanderbilt

Wednesday, May 1, 1968

On April 14, 1968, a group of Black and White Christians met to form the first integrated Baptist Church in South Carolina. The congregation bought an abandoned church, however, the church members needed additional financial assistance, so the Reverend Vanderbilt solicited contributions of at least $100.00.

SCLC: MLK Still Most Influential Negro According to Studies

Friday, November 3, 1967

The SCLC issues a news release stating that Dr. King is the most influential Negro leader in America. Dr. King, along with other prominent members of the SCLC, was serving a five-day jail sentence in Birmingham, Alabama at the time of the news release.

The Atlanta Board of Education

Friday, September 15, 1967

The Atlanta Board of Education neglects to solve educational issues in the Negro community. There are protests and demonstrations from those who object to the disdain of action. Julian Bond purposes a course of action designed to educate, convince, and force action from the board.

Jesus

Dr. King highlights the significant characteristics of Jesus Christ.

Letter from Abby Seldes to MLK

Young Abby Seldes writes Dr. King to inform him of how inspirational his words are. Seldes mentions that she is a 12-years-old from Pennsylvania and an avid supporter of Dr. King's leadership. She also discusses her parents' participation in the March on Washington.

Letter from Roland de Corneille to MLK

Tuesday, November 3, 1964

Rev. Roland de Corneille of the Martin Luther King Fund of Toronto congratulates Dr. King for being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Postcard from Anonymous Sender to MLK

Tuesday, September 5, 1967

This postcard from an anonymous author contains a newspaper clipping which was published in the Athens Daily News. In the article, Archie Moore, former light heavyweight champion, gives his views about a "guaranteed national income."

Letter From Dora McDonald to Sarah Harvey

Tuesday, May 28, 1963

Ms. McDonald thanks Mrs. Harvey for her contribution to the SCLC, and informs her that Dr. King will contact her on his return from Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter from N. M. Nel to MLK

Thursday, March 17, 1966

N. M. Nel writes to inform Dr. King that his visa application for South Africa has been denied.

Telegram from Clark Macgregor to MLK

Tuesday, September 17, 1963

Clark Macgregor sends a telegram to Dr. King informing him of his vote against the dismissal of the Mississippi Challenge.

Atheism

Dr. King writes on the topic atheism.

Pilgrimage for Democracy

Sunday, December 15, 1963

Dr. King makes an address at the "Pilgrimage for Democracy" in Atlanta during the winter of 1963. He opens with the Supreme Courts ruling to cease segregation in schools and how Atlanta served as the "epitome of social progress." He continues to elaborate on how the city needs to continue its desegregation efforts to achieve justice. Dr. King numerically highlights the inadequacies of the integrated schools in Atlanta and expresses the reality of the continuing segregation in the city's public accommodations.

Notes Regarding Civil Rights Act of 1965

This handwritten note describes the positive effects of the Civil Rights Act for Negroes. According to the notes, "What we have won in blood, toil and sacrifice we will not squander in apathetic complacency."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Alan J. Rankin

Tuesday, April 25, 1967

Dora McDonald writes Alan Rankin on behalf of Dr. King regarding a possible visit to McMaster University.

How 700 Ibos were Killed by Mistake

Sunday, January 21, 1968

This article reports on the massacre of 700 Ibos by federal troops in the Ibo town of Asaba, Nigeria.

Letter from Effie Wilderson to MLK

Mrs. Wilderson writes to Dr. King informing him that the white Christian Church is in support of non-violence and equality for the Negro people.

Letter from Thomas Baker to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Thomas Baker, a student in New York City, sends his condolences to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King's assassination.

Man

Dr. King quotes Jeremiah 17:5 and suggests that “those of us who oppose humanism” might speak against it like Jeremiah did and provide a rational defense of theism.

Memo from Dora McDonald to MLK

Dr. King's secretary forwards him information for an event in Copenhagen in which his presence is requested. Dr. King's brief response is indicated on the top of the memo.

Telegram from MLK to Senator Robert Kennedy

Monday, March 18, 1963

Dr. King requests that Senator Robert Kennedy initiate an investigation into complaints about the actions of police during demonstrations in Petersburg, Virginia.

Telegram from Carole Hoover to MLK

Thursday, November 2, 1967

Carole Hoover offers encouragement to Dr.King while he is incarcerated in Birmingham.