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Letter from MLK to Douglas A.C. Davis

Friday, December 13, 1963
CANADA

Dr. King informs Douglas A. C. Davis that due to his current commitments, he will be unable to accept Davis' invitation to speak at the University of Western Ontario during the current academic year.

Letter from Mrs. George E. Bass to MLK

Tuesday, May 10, 1966
Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA

The President of the Planned Parenthood Association of Philadelphia expresses disappointment to Dr. King regarding his inability to personally accept the Margret Sanger Award in Human Rights. However, she states that Mrs. King was "a most eloquent substitute." Additionally, she reiterates a request for Dr. King to speak at the Philadelphia Planned Parenthood Association's Annual Luncheon on January 25, 1967.

Letter from Ben Cashion to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967
ALBANIA, Birmingham, AL, Arkansas (AR), Oklahoma (OK)

Ben Cashion writes Dr. King sharing some of his observations. Cashion suggests that Dr. King takes his time and get closer to God to provoke efficient change.

Who They are and Why They Struck

South Carolina (SC)

This article stresses the unfair treatment of twenty-two Claussen Bakery workers. This article also addresses why the workers went on strike.

Letter from Beatrice Sutton Rogers to MLK

Wednesday, April 19, 1967
Illinois (IL), VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, CHINA, Washington, D.C.

Beatrice Rogers writes Dr. King expressing her disappointment with his change in his position after he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. She encloses an article from the Washington Post in which critics discuss a speech King gave regarding Vietnam War.

Letter from V.R. Hardy to MLK

Pennsylvania (PA)

V.R. Hardy lectures Dr. King regarding his methods of obtaining equality. He asserts that such methods will only result in a race of people wallowing in self-pity. Hardy cites the long-term oppression of Jews as a case in point of how to overcome the tragedies of the past.

Letter from Marc de Jesus to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Marc de Jesus writes to Mrs. King following Dr. King's assassination.

Letter from A. Morsbach to MLK

Tuesday, October 18, 1966
New York, NY, ISRAEL

A. Morsbach writes Dr. King regarding his tour to the Holy Land. Having years of experience with group travel, Morsbach informs Dr. King that he plans to check the background of Concreta Tours. He further suggests that King investigate Concreta Tours prior to concluding final travel arrangements.

Letter from Vernon R. Byrd to MLK

Wednesday, April 4, 1962
BERMUDA, Atlanta, GA

Vernon R. Byrd invites Dr. King to be the speaker at the Annual Men's Day Service at St. Paul African Methodist Episcopal Church in Bermuda.

Court Summons for MLK

Monday, November 4, 1963
Alabama (AL)

The Circuit Court of Dallas County issues Dr. King a summons to appear before the Grand Jury.

Letter from C. B. Olmstead to MLK

Tuesday, July 13, 1965
California (CA), Los Angeles, CA

Olmstead writes that he is unable to reconcile Dr. King's support of civil disobedience with his plans for peaceful demonstrations. He contends the purpose of King's sustained agitation is to provoke violence. He feels the Civil Rights Act of 1964 should become the mechanism for opposing discrimination, not further boycotts and sit-ins.

SCLC Newsletter: Of Riots and Wrongs Against Jews

Wednesday, July 1, 1964
New York (NY), New York, NY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Florida (FL), St. Augustine, FL, Mississippi (MS)

This draft of an article for the July-August 1964 edition of the SCLC newsletter discusses recent riots in New York City and Rochester, New York. The riots are a disappointment not only because they deviate from the path of nonviolence, but also because the rioters looted many Jewish-owned businesses. The article closes by listing examples of Jews helping in the fight for racial equality in the United States.

Letter from Bronx High School Student Paul Kylar to MLK

Wednesday, May 31, 1967
New York (NY)

Paul Kylar, a student from the Bronx, writes Dr. King to convey support for his plea for peace. Kylar mentions that he attended a peace parade and how elated he is to know that Dr. King works for all people and not just Negroes.

Western Union Telegram from Albert Shanker to MLK

New York, NY

Mr. Shanker, President United Federation of Teachers AFL-CIO, thanks Dr. King for his support during a teachers' strike.

Tentative Schedule for MLK

Atlanta, GA, Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), New York, NY, New Jersey (NJ), Baltimore, MD, Washington, D.C., Virginia (VA), Cleveland, OH, Detroit, MI, Chicago, IL

This document outlines Dr. King's tentative schedule of cities and states he will tour.

Revision on Preferential Treatment

The document contains an addition to a chapter for Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" In this insert, Dr. King seeks to clear up questions surrounding preferential treatment for negroes. According to the text, "The program of special aid for Negroes and other deprived groups is in no sense discrimination in reverse."

Letter from Rabbi Arthur J. Lelyveld to MLK

Thursday, March 8, 1962
Montgomery, AL, Cleveland, OH

Rabbi Arthur J. Lelyveld writes to Dr. King asking him to participate in a "Social Action Forum," in Cleveland, Ohio.

Letter from Ernest M. Bettenson to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, September 19, 1967
UNITED KINGDOM, Atlanta, GA

Ernest M. Bettenson, the Registrar at the University of Newcastle Upon Tyne, writes Miss McDonald to solidify arrangements for Dr. King's visit to the University. The sender informs Miss McDonald that tradition mandates meal arrangements for the recipient of an honorary degree and outlines several options to assist Dr. King in accommodating this practice.

Descartes

Dr. King quotes Rene Descartes' discovery of his famous principle. The idea, "I think, therefore I am," Descartes says, is essential, irrefutable and fitting to be the first principle of his philosophy.

Funny Story for MLK

Thursday, July 12, 1962
Alabama (AL), Tuskegee, AL, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Albany, GA, Tennessee (TN)

The writer (signature illegible) gives his moral support for Dr. King during his incarceration in Albany, Georgia. He relates an anecdote of his own experiences that ends with a heartfelt, and humorous, punchline.

An Interview With MLK

Atlanta, GA, Montgomery, AL, New York (NY), Birmingham, AL, Boston, MA

A young student from Towns Elementary School in Atlanta interviews Dr. King for a class assignment. The student asks important questions relating to Dr. King's family background, career in ministry and his influence in the civil rights movement. When asked about being the recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize, Dr. King responds by saying, "It is more of a tribute to the thousands of gallant people who have participated in the struggle for equality, and who have done it in a peaceful, courageous manner."

Memorandum from MLK and the World's Fair

Tuesday, April 21, 1964
Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), New York, NY

This is a draft for Dr. King's correspondence regarding the endorsement of the "Stall In" at The World's Fair. The mass demonstration is lead by the Unity Council, of which Dr. King is associated with. Though he does not agree with the demonstration, he assures that his solidarity with the Council members remains.

Manifesto of the Meredith Mississippi March

Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, and Floyd McKissick sign the Manifesto of the Meredith Mississippi March, which represents a "public indictment and protest of the failure of American society." In solidarity, they demand courses of actions to deal with voting fraud, strengthened civil rights legislation, and impartial application of the law.

Letter from MLK to Henry Luce of Time Magazine

Thursday, January 16, 1964
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Dr. King thanks Henry Luce of Time magazine for naming him "Man of the Year." However, Dr. King believes that this honor is shared among the millions of individuals who committed themselves to the struggle for civil rights. Dr. King also acknowledges Luce for publishing the accomplishments of Negro professionals.

Methodology, Tests of Truth

Dr. King discusses Henry Nelson Wieman's test of truth in religion described in "The Source of Human Good."

Statement by MLK Regarding His Five-Day Jail Sentence in Birmingham

Monday, October 30, 1967
Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Washington, D.C., UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King releases a statement regarding his return to Birmingham, Alabama to serve a five-day jail sentence. He states that he is happy to serve the sentence, but sad that the Supreme Court did not "uphold the rights of individual citizens." He also questions why the United States' resources are being used to fund the Vietnam War rather than to help the poor.

Letter to Dr. King from Elder G.W. Watkins

Friday, August 2, 1957
Texas (TX)

Elder G. W. Watkins writes Dr. King requesting that he and his organization join the fight to regain Cassius Clay's (Muhammad Ali) title as the Heavy Weight Boxing Champion of the World.

Letter from the Faculty of the Tuskegee Institute to President Kennedy

Thursday, May 16, 1963
Tuskegee, AL, Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Members of the faculty and staff of Tuskegee Institute issue a plea to President John F. Kennedy to intervene in the Birmingham crisis of 1963. They request that the President use an upcoming speech to discuss Constitutional rights, send the FBI to Alabama to investigate "charges of police brutality," and revoke federal funds that support segregation and persuade business leaders to desegregate public facilities.

Schedule of Buses for Pacem in Terris Participants and their Guests

Geneva, Switzerland

This schedule of bus routes is intended for Pacem in Terris participants and their guests. Trips include travel to Convocation sessions and a concert held at Victoria Hall.

Agenda of the General Committee of the Department of Racial and Cultural Relations

Thursday, January 26, 1961
Tennessee (TN), Nashville, TN, New York, NY, New York (NY), Texas (TX)

This document is an agenda and lists meeting minutes regarding the approval of actions, nominations, budget, and miscellaneous items for the Department of Racial and Cultural Relations.