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Letter from Arnold Aronson to Cooperating Organizations

Friday, August 30, 1963
Washington, D.C., New York (NY), Birmingham, AL, Mississippi (MS), Georgia (GA), South Carolina (SC), MEXICO, Oregon (OR), Illinois (IL), Texas (TX)

Arnold Aronson writes cooperating organizations to ensure that following the March on Washington, the government delivers on the stipulations of the Civil Rights Bill.

Letter from Kivie Kaplan to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, July 26, 1967
Massachusetts (MA), Missouri (MO), New York, NY

Kivie Kaplan discusses with Dora McDonald the order of 200 books with autographed signatures from Dr. King. Mr. Kaplan has appointed direction of the order to Miss Roberta Halpern of the Publication Division of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations.

Letter from J. Raymond Oliver to MLK

North Carolina (NC)

J. Raymond Oliver writes Dr. King concerning his visit to North Carolina that was cut short in order to stay out of the media.

Dr. King's Notes on Ministry

Dr. King explains his perspective on the path of ministry as a career. In this brief paragraph, he notes that ministry is a very noble career but it is also difficult.

SCLC Retreat November 1967

South Carolina (SC), New Jersey (NJ), Washington, D.C., Baltimore, MD, St. Augustine, FL, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Nashville, TN, Birmingham, AL, Cleveland, OH, Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Reverend Andrew Young discusses civil disobedience at the SCLC's retreat in South Carolina. Dr. King and Jesse Jackson also make presentations at the retreat. Jesse Jackson states "we are too conscious of philosophy" and mentions "what's significant to the people is jobs or income." Dr. King talks about upcoming projects that will involve civil disobedience.

Letter from Rev. Samuel B. McKinney to MLK Regarding Travel Arrangements to Seattle

Monday, November 6, 1961
Washington (WA)

In this letter, Rev. McKinney reviews details regarding Dr. King's itinerary for his visit to Seattle. He mentions that the community has worked exceedingly hard to gain city-wide support for his first visit to the Pacific Northwest.

Coronet Magazine: After Desegregation-What

Sunday, January 1, 1961
Washington, D.C., Texas (TX), Louisiana (LA), Georgia (GA)

In this draft of an article for Coronet Magazine, Dr. King outlines the challenges that Negro college students will face after desegregation and the impact of the student movement as a whole. He argues that desegregation is not the same as integration, but that the former must happen in order for the latter to exist. Dr. King also explains that Negro students are gaining a much richer education by participating in sit-ins and other civil rights demonstrations, which will prepare them for society once desegregation is a reality.

MLK and New York Protest Meeting Speakers

Friday, June 2, 1961
New York (NY), New York, NY, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Montgomery, AL, Brooklyn, NY

The SCLC releases a statement to the media regarding Dr. King and other Southern leaders trip to New York to address a series of mass protest meetings. This document outlines a schedule of meetings and also announces that Congressman Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. and Actor Harry Belafonte will join the protest.

Letter from Nils K. Stahle to MLK

Friday, November 27, 1964
SWEDEN, Stockholm, Sweden, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Nils K. Stahle, Executive Director of the Nobel Foundation, invites Dr. King to visit the Nobel House in Stockholm while he is Sweden for a special ecumenical service.

Malcolm X Memorial Flyer

Thursday, February 22, 1968
New York, NY

The United Federation of Parents, Teachers and Students present the Malcolm X Memorial flyer saluting American Freedom Fighters. Honorees include LeRoi Jones, Bill Epton and Dr. Benjamin Spock. Slated guest speaker, H. Rap Brown and many other community activists/entertainers.

Humanism

Dr. King discusses the weakness of "non theistic humanism."

TV Guide Requests Article on TV's Contributions to Civil Rights

Tuesday, April 11, 1967
Pennsylvania (PA)

TV Guide, in a letter signed by editor Merrill Panitt dated April 11, 1967, invites Dr. King to write an article of 1500 to 2000 words on the positive role television has played in fostering better relations between the races. The previous year, the magazine published a series on television?s impact on society that was largely negative. A proposed series for the 1967-1968 television season would recognize some of the good things television has accomplished. Dr. King is offered $1000 for the article.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Thomas W. Johnson Declining an Invitation to Write an Article

Thursday, December 1, 1966
Nashville, TN

This letter from Dora McDonald to Thomas W. Johnson is in response to a request for Dr. King to write an article for the December 12, 1966 edition of The Forum. Dora McDonald informs Thomas W. Johnson that Dr. King regrets his inability to accept the invitation at this time.

U.S. News & World Report: New Negro Threat

Monday, August 28, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., New York, NY

U.S. News & World Report reports that Dr. King plans on using "civil disobedience on a massive scale," including marches, sit-ins and boycotts in "riot-torn" Northern cities.

Letter from Gus C. Zucco to MLK

Friday, October 12, 1962
Pennsylvania (PA)

Gus Zucco writes Dr. King regarding the changes of his schedule in hopes that he will be able to speak in Pennsylvania.

Jesus

Dr. King outlines some thoughts on the effect Jesus' life had on his followers.

Mississippi Project

Mississippi (MS)

The Mississippi Project is developed by SNCC which rooted from the evident white supremacy in this state. The organization sought to take action to eradicate the societal restrictions of the American Negro. The summer project will involve voter registration, freedom schools, community centers, and many more sectional projects.

Worship: A Selected Bibliography

Chicago, IL, London, England, Boston, MA, Cleveland, OH, New York (NY), Connecticut (CT)

This sixteen-page document lists a bibliography of worship materials dated May of 1941.

People to People: The Negro Looks at Africa

Saturday, December 8, 1962
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York, NY, Memphis, TN, WESTERN SAHARA, Tennessee (TN), South Africa

In his column in the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King reports on the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa that brought together a cross-section of the Negro community to discuss foreign policy toward Africa. He writes that colonialism and segregation are siblings and that the future of the emerging nations of Africa and the American Negro are interrelated. He speaks of the contradictions in policy toward Africa, the need for more Negroes in the diplomatic corps, and the importance of action by the Administration against racism at home and racism in US foreign policy.

Note Card Entitled Atheism

Atheism is cited from Sparrier in this note card.

Telegram from Harold Willens to Dora McDonald

Friday, May 10, 1968
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Los Angeles, CA

Mr. Willens forwards a telegram to Dora McDonald that he had previously sent to Andrew Young. Willens invited Ralph D. Abernathy to be a guest on "Issues and Answers." Abernathy initially declined the invitation only later to accept, which lead Willens to inform him of the potential "impact and consequences."

Notes on Movies

Monday, October 9, 1967

The writer states that the movie industry needs more stories without the 'Playboy' touch. He argues that this should come from the "masses" and not "society."

Breadbasket and National Tea Agree

Monday, December 12, 1966
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Operation Breadbasket teams up with the National Tea Company to improve employment and business opportunities for Negroes.

Letter to MLK from Moynihan about Invitation to Conference

Monday, March 27, 1967
Cambridge, MA, Atlanta, GA

A formal letter from the Joint Center for Urban Studies of MIT and Harvard University invites Dr. King to a Conference on Social Statistics and the City at Executive House in Washington, DC, June 22 and 23, 1967. Signed by Director Daniel P. Moynihan, the correspondence cites the inadequacy of the 1960 US census in enumerating the Negro, Puerto Rican, and Mexican populations, a concern about the impact on voting rights, and the need for better enumeration in the 1970 census.

Letter from MLK and Others to H. Brownell

Wednesday, January 11, 1956
Tallahassee, FL, Alabama (AL), Louisiana (LA), Washington, D.C.

Dr. King and other prominent clergymen "urgently request" a conference with U.S. Attorney General Brownell to discuss discrimination against bus passengers.

Letter from Edward F. Bell to MLK

Thursday, April 1, 1965
Detroit, MI, Montgomery, AL

Attorney Edward Bell offers his legal services to Dr. King and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Joseph S. Clark to MLK

Friday, July 17, 1964
Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Senator Joseph S. Clark informs Dr. King of the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and expresses his gratitude for Dr. King's support.

Letter from Edris Head to MLK about Mormans and the Presidential Election

Saturday, May 20, 1967
Massachusetts (MA)

In this letter, Mrs. Head conveys to Dr. King her opinion of potential presidential candidate George Romney while criticizing the Mormon clergy and their road to priesthood. Additionally, Mrs. Head compares Dr. King to Gandhi and Jesus.

Letter from John R. Yungblut to CSK

Monday, August 2, 1965
Atlanta, GA

Mr. Yungblut of Quaker House, writes Mrs. King to inquire whether the King Children may be interested in participating in a youth dramatics program.

Letter from J. M. Koelbe to Dr. King

Friday, August 12, 1966
Minnesota (MN)

Mr. Koelbe writes Dr. King about his financial distress. He also tells Dr. King that he admires him for his courage and gives him encouragement for the future.