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Sin (Definition)

Dr. King quotes Henry Nelson Wieman’s “Normative Psychology of Religion.”

Adverse Letter about Adam Clayton Powell

An anonymous author asserts that Adam Clayton Powell is not a good leader and he "got in the limelight as he has done by filth."

Letter from Thomas Johnson to MLK

Monday, November 20, 1967
New York, NY, Detroit, MI

Thomas Johnson, a reporter for the New York Times, writes to Dr. King requesting his participation in a symposium to be published in Playboy, regarding the civil rights movement.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Queen Mother Moore

Wednesday, March 20, 1968
New York (NY), Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS)

Dora McDonald communicates with Queen Mother Moore to discuss Dr. King's inability to meet with her prior to the Washington Campaign for Jobs or Income. Queen Mother Moore was an important figure during the Civil Right Movement and a founder of the Republic of New Afrika.

Letter from J. Martin England to MLK

Thursday, September 9, 1965
New York (NY), New York, NY, VIETNAM, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, South Carolina (SC)

J. Martin England of The Ministers and Missionaries Benefit Board of the American Baptist Convention expresses his appreciation for Dr. King's philosophy and work.

Handwritten Notecard Regarding Universalism

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines some fundamental principles of "Universalism".

Letter from Autieve Smith of Revelation Baptist Church to MLK

Tuesday, August 25, 1964
Cincinnati, OH

Autieve Smith writes on behalf of Revelation Baptist Church to express their happiness in Dr. King's acceptance in being a part of their program with the Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights Choir. Smith informs Dr. King of the time and place of his address and asks that he provide the committee with the needed information to plan his accommodations.

Civil Rights Act of 1957

Monday, September 9, 1957
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C.

The Civil Rights Act was signed into law on September 9, 1957 by President Dwight D. Eisenhower. Commonly referred to as the Civil Rights Act of 1957, this was the first such federal law since Reconstruction. The law was aimed at ending voter discrimination tactics such as poll taxes and literacy tests, but it also created the Civil Rights Commission to ensure proper administration of the law.

Letter from the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam

Sunday, March 12, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY

The Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam outlines a list of requests for its members, including weekly communications and completed bus questionnaires.

Letter from Thomas Johnson to MLK

Nashville, TN, New York, NY

Thomas Johnson, managing editor for 'The Forum' at Fisk University, explains that a new chapter of SNCC has recently been charted at the school. Johnson also requests that Dr. King write an editorial for their next publication.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Martin Peretz

Wednesday, October 11, 1967
Massachusetts (MA)

In this letter, Ms. McDonald informs Dr. Peretz that Dr. King will be able to have lunch with him and that he will be accompanied by Reverend Andrew Young, Reverend Bernard Lee and herself.

Black Americans Take the Lead in War Protest

New York (NY), New York, NY, VIETNAM, CHINA

In this press release, the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam has mustered a significant following of supporters who are in staunch opposition to United States involvement in Vietnam. Black community leaders such as Stokley Carmichael, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and Rev. James Bevel reflect the growing discontent of blacks who "view this war as a war against a colored people" merely serving the economic interests of America.

Richard Millard Congratulates MLK

Wednesday, October 28, 1964
Boston, MA, Massachusetts (MA), Atlanta, GA

Richard Millard, the Dean of the College of Liberal Arts at Boston University, congratulates Dr. King for winning the Nobel Peace Prize.

Sin

Dr. King notes Niebuhr's definition of sin as the unwillingness to acknowledge the effect God has on one's existence.

Letter from MLK to Carl Heassler

Detroit, MI, VIETNAM

In this letter, Dr. King offers words of gratitude to Mr. Heassler for his letter of support. He goes on to critique the War in Vietnam with a nonviolent philosophy.

The Student Voice: The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee Newsletter

Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), Washington, D.C., Florida (FL), Georgia (GA), Indiana (IN), Louisville, KY, New Orleans, LA, Maryland (MD), Mississippi (MS), Missouri (MO), North Carolina (NC), Oklahoma (OK), South Carolina (SC), Tennessee (TN), Texas (TX), Virginia (VA), New York (NY), California (CA), PUERTO RICO, ISRAEL, Montgomery, AL, Illinois (IL), Kentucky (KY), Jackson, MS

In this issue of The Student Voice, the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee writes about the progress being made in the Civil Rights Movement, including recent ... desegregation of all public golf courses in Mobile, Alabama and the desegregation of lunch counters in Atlanta, Georgia.

Letter from Ruth Olsen to Dora McDonald

Monday, July 6, 1964
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Iowa (IA)

Ruth Olsen of St. Ansgar's Lutheran Church writes Dora McDonald requesting 30 copies of Dr. King's "Why We Can't Wait."

Letter from Harriet Davis to Dr. King Regarding Eugene Peterson's editorial

Sunday, July 30, 1967
Georgia (GA)

In this letter, Harriet Davis informs Dr. King that she is a white women who has decided to teach at a Fairmont High School, which was formerly completely Negro. Although she has received criticism for her decision she proclaims that her motivations are right. She then informs Dr. King that she fears not being able to understand her co-workers and students.

Letter from Grace Graham to MLK

Tuesday, June 18, 1963
Oregon (OR), Montana (MT)

Grace Graham, Chairman in the School of Education extends an invitation for Dr. King to give a series of lectures at several colleges in the Northwest. In addition to the University Oregon, other colleges include Montana State and Portland State.

Letter from Marvin T. Robinson to MLK

Monday, November 20, 1967
California (CA), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Reverend Marvin T. Robinson, Pastor of Friendship Baptist Church, requests that Dr. King submit a written statement on personal stationary for the Souvenir Journal, a Seventy-Fifth Anniversary release issued by the Friendship Baptist Church.

Letter from Juanita to MLK

Thursday, June 1, 1967
Chicago, IL

Juanita offers praise and gratitude to Dr. King for his assistance regarding some imprisoned associates. Juanita also offers her prayers to Dr. King.

Schleiermacher (Elements of Pantheism)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “Speeches on Religion” and writes that it reminds him of Spinoza’s intellectual love of God. The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”

SCLC's Dr. King Ranked by Negroes as Most Influential Leader

Tuesday, January 9, 1968
New York, NY, Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

This 1968 SCLC news release relays that Dr. King has been identified "as the most influential Negro leader in America today." Dr. King had less than a hundred days before that influence would cost him his life.

Memorandum from Theodore Brown to MLK and Others

Wednesday, May 17, 1967
New York, NY, South Africa, Washington, D.C.

Theodore Brown informs Dr. King and other civil rights leaders of a previous letter to President Johnson regarding United States-Africa relations.

Letter from E.B. Putnam to MLK

Washington, D.C.

Mrs. E.B. Putnam writes Dr. King regarding her concerns with the Communist Party's presence in America. She believes they are using race issues to gain power. The author also tells Dr. King that he should focus on leading people to Christ and not on race relations.

Minutes of the Council of United Civil Rights Leadership Meeting

Wednesday, March 23, 1966
New York, NY, Washington, D.C., VIETNAM

These minutes from the meeting of the Council of United Civil Rights Leadership give a description of the topics discussed. Topics included: meeting with President Johnson, Office of Economic Opportunity memoranda, Inter-organizational conflict and fundraising.

Letter from Mildred Hood to MLK

Saturday, May 7, 1966
Chicago, IL

Mildred Hood explains to Dr. King what she and her daughter experienced at the Cook County Hospital in Chicago. Hood wants to know what she can do about the situation.

The Student Protest Movement Special Report

Thursday, February 25, 1960
North Carolina (NC), Virginia (VA), Norfolk, VA, Tennessee (TN), Florida (FL), South Carolina (SC), Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), Kansas (KS), Oklahoma (OK), Atlanta, GA

The Southern Regional Council outlines several facts regarding the Student Protest Movement leading up to February 25, 1960. The contents of this report include detailed examples, legal precedents and public reaction accounts. Also included, is an analysis of the conditions that caused the student protest movement, as well as ideas for solutions.

Bayard Rustin Statement on Schwerner, Goodman and Chaney

Tuesday, August 4, 1964
Mississippi (MS)

Baynard Rustin notes the recent violence against three Negro male volunteers in the voter registration drive. Mr. Rustin describes the death of these men as acts that violate the "constitutional rights" of the Negro people. In the hopes of Mr. Rustin, this occurence will initiate a new force of the nonviolent movement.

Telegram from UFT President Albert Shanker to MLK

Wednesday, September 13, 1967
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Albert Shanker expresses his appreciation to Dr. King for his support throughout the tumultuous 1967 education crisis in New York City.