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Letter from John Coventry Smith to MLK

Tuesday, March 9, 1965
New York (NY), BRAZIL

John Coventry Smith, a member of the United Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A., invites Dr. King to Brazil to speak at the Campinas Presbyterian Theological Seminary during his tenure in the South American country. Mr. Smith asserts that Dr. King's appearance is of importance to the young potential leaders of Brazil. Dr. King will further enlighten the Protestants in Brazil of the Christian faith to the racial issues in the United States.

A Realistic Look at Race Relations

Thursday, May 17, 1956
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL)

Dr. King gives the three views one can take regarding the state of race relations: optimism, pessimism, and realistic. Dr. King argues for a realistic stance because America has accomplished much in race relations, but still has a long way to go. He further explains that he thinks segregation is in its last days.

Letter from Kenneth Ives to MLK

Monday, August 28, 1967
Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA

Kenneth Ives writes a letter and encloses his research that could be beneficial to Dr. King. Ives studied the effects of various social policy efforts on individuals and on society in general.

Letter from Mrs. Bill Green to MLK

Monday, May 27, 1963
Chattanooga, TN

Mrs. Bill Green, an uneducated white woman, informs Dr. King on the spiriutal words she has recieved from God. Mrs. Green asserts that she recieved this insight after she envisioned the struggle Dr. king has endured. She lists four ideas surrounding the lack of collectivity amongst the races and the acknowledgment of the power of prayer.

Man

Dr. King quotes Proverbs 3:5 on human insight and knowledge and reflects upon its meaning.

Letter from Rev. Pavel Titera to MLK

Saturday, December 11, 1965
CZECH REPUBLIC, Atlanta, GA

Pavel Titera responds to a letter from Dr. King, in which he expressed his hope for a coming to visit. Titera sends well wishes for Dr. King and his family, and encloses a photograph of his family "as a token of the brotherly love."

Higher Education Opportunities for Southern Negroes

Sunday, January 1, 1967
Washington, D.C., New York, NY, Boston, MA, Virginia (VA), Texas (TX), Alabama (AL), Arkansas (AR), Florida (FL), Georgia (GA), Kentucky (KY), Louisiana (LA), Mississippi (MS), North Carolina (NC), South Carolina (SC), Tennessee (TN)

The Southern Education Foundation provides a detailed list of references concerning various opportunities, organizations and procedures related to higher education. This pamphlet was strategically designed to assist organizations and community leaders seeking to improve educational opportunities for students of color.

Letter from T. Z. Riggins to MLK

Sunday, July 26, 1964
Washington (WA)

T. Z. Riggins writes Dr. King a thoughtful letter commending his leadership and the influence he brings to America. Aside from Abraham Lincoln, Riggins views Dr. King as the only leader who can bring people together. Riggins believes that Dr. King's job was assigned to him by God and expresses his pride that Dr. King was chosen to "lay the foundation" for the US.

God

This scripture, deriving from the Old Testament biblical book of Isaiah, illustrates God as holy.

MLK Statement Regarding an Attack on the First Amendment

Monday, October 30, 1967
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C., California (CA), Berkeley, CA, Wisconsin (WI), New York (NY), New York, NY, Ohio (OH), Selma, AL

Dr. King addresses violations of First Amendment Rights in this statement regarding the events at Birmingham, Alabama in 1963.

Letter from Ehru E. Hart to SCLC

Wednesday, April 6, 1966
California (CA)

Hart sends commendations to Dr. King after hearing him speak, and requests copies of the speech.

Negro Population

Alabama (AL), Arkansas (AR), Florida (FL), Georgia (GA), Kentucky (KY), Louisiana (LA), Mississippi (MS), North Carolina (NC), South Carolina (SC), Tennessee (TN), Texas (TX), Virginia (VA)

This document compares the number of Negro registered voters and the potential number of registered Negro voters to the Negro population in the Southern United States.

Telegram from L. M. McCoy to MLK

Friday, April 21, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, BRAZIL

L. M. McCoy telegrams Dr. King stating that the Methodist Church of Brazil is eager to have him as the Centennial speaker. McCoy believes that Dr. King can share his wisdom with Brazil leaders regarding the social conditions in America.

Adverse Letter from an Anonymous Sender

An unknown sender states their concerns about the direction Dr. King is leading the movement.

Letter from MLK to Wesley A. Hotchkiss

Tuesday, March 1, 1966
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Dr. King thanks Dr. Wesley A. Hotchkiss from the United Church of Christ for his generous contribution of $11,000 to the SCLC. King includes a list of how they money will be spent to assist with voter registration.

Thank you from SCLC to donor Dr. Jerry Flint

Monday, March 25, 1968
California (CA)

Dr. King is writing to express his deep appreciation for the generous contribution made by Jerry Flint. He acknowledges the importance of the continuous support of the contributors so that the fight for social justice and peace can continue.

The Burning Truth in the South

New York, NY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Alabama (AL), Wisconsin (WI), Montgomery, AL

This article reprinted from "The Progressive," details the discriminatory conditions experienced by blacks in the South and urges support in the nonviolent struggle for freedom and equality.

MLK Announces End of Montgomery Bus Boycott

Thursday, December 20, 1956
Montgomery, AL

Dr. King, as President of the Montgomery Improvement Association, issued this statement following the US Supreme Court’s decision declaring laws requiring segregation on busses unconstitutional. He announces that the year-long bus boycott is officially over and urges Negroes to return to the buses the next morning on a non-segregated basis. Negroes need to adopt a spirit of understanding toward their white brothers, he says. It is time to move from protest to reconciliation.

Letter from Annis Pratt to MLK

Saturday, January 13, 1968
Washington, D.C.

Professor Annis Pratt of Spelman College writes about her support for the proposed Poor People's Campaign. She suggests that the problems traditionally associated with race may be more economic in nature, and encloses a check from her husband and herself for the march.

House Un-American Activities Committee

Friday, May 15, 1964
California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, Kentucky (KY), Louisville, KY, Mississippi (MS), New Orleans, LA

This article summarizes the consequences that derive from the House Un-American Activities Committee labeling Civil Rights leaders as communists.

Letter from Adie Marks to Harry Belafonte

Thursday, February 2, 1967
New York, NY, Selma, AL, Texas (TX), Louisiana (LA), Mississippi (MS)

Adie Marks writes Harry Belafonte in an effort to organize an event consisting of several artists and organizations to combat issues African Americans face in America.

Letter from Abraham Lincoln High School to MLK

Wednesday, June 28, 1967
California (CA), Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL

Earl Saunders, an art teacher at Abraham Lincoln High School, writes to Dr. King regarding awards of merit for Dr. King's contribution to the Civil Rights Movement. Dr. King and Mr. Saunders are both alumni of Boston University's School of Theology.

A Look To The Future

Monday, September 2, 1957
Tennessee (TN), EGYPT, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

For the twenty-fifth anniversary of the Highlander Folk School, Dr. King delivers the speech "A Look To The Future." He uses a timeline to explain the adversities African Americans endured to gain recognition as American citizens. He also points out the efforts of the Ku Klux Klan and the White Citizens Councils to make African Americans second class citizens. Lastly, Dr. King points out that America should be more maladjusted in order to avoid failing to cope with the demands of the normal social environment.

Letter to Dr. Ralph Abernathy from Frank Binswanger

Wednesday, April 24, 1968
Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA

Frank G. Binswanger of the Philadelphia Civic Center, assures a recommitment to the cause for which Dr. King served and extends condolences to Dr. Abernathy regarding the loss of Dr. King.

Letter from Martin Peretz to MLK

Monday, October 9, 1967
Boston, MA

In this letter, Martin Peretz of Harvard University, expresses interest in having lunch with Andrew Young, Dr. King and his wife after a Belafonte Concert in Boston.

Social Ethics

EGYPT

Dr. King cites the Old Testament biblical book of Exodus regarding social ethics.

"Danger in Demonstrations"

Monday, August 8, 1966
Chicago, IL, New York, NY, New York (NY), Selma, AL

This article, from the newspaper "Chicago's American," criticizes Dr. King's demonstrations on open housing in Chicago.

Speeches by the Leaders

Washington, D.C., UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, ISRAEL, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Illinois (IL), Virginia (VA), Mississippi (MS), Georgia (GA), Albany, GA, Chicago, IL, Michigan (MI), Detroit, MI, Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA, Jackson, MS, Massachusetts (MA), Cambridge, MA, GERMANY, Berlin, Germany, Boston, MA, New York (NY), New York, NY, Louisiana (LA), New Orleans, LA, California (CA), Arkansas (AR), Little Rock, AR, Maine (ME), South Carolina (SC), New Hampshire (NH), Colorado (CO), Tennessee (TN)

In this booklet, the NAACP compiled famous speeches from the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. Included are speeches from A. Philip Randolph, Roy Wilkins, James Farmer, Rev. Eugene Carson Blake, Rabbi Joachim Prinz, Whitney M. Young, Matthew Ahmann, John Lewis, Walter Reuther, and Dr. King. The booklet concludes with a pledge and a picture of the throng of supporters that attended the event. test

Letter from Julia Smith to MLK

Thursday, January 11, 1962
Michigan (MI), Missouri (MO)

Julia Smith asks Dr. King to pray for her because she wants to study nursing at Michigan State University, a predominately white school at the time. She also reminds Dr. King of their previous encounter in St. Louis, Missouri where she shook his hand.

Letter from Jack Greenberg to Chauncey Eskridge

Thursday, December 14, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Jack Greenberg responds to a letter from Chauncey Eskridge regarding bonds posted for the Birmingham demonstration cases. Greenberg reacts to court decisions related to the cases and provides the next steps for the Shuttlesworth v. City of Birmingham case.