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Letter from Lenore Romney to Michigan State's Robert L. Green

Friday, May 19, 1967

Mrs. Lenore Romney, wife of Michigan Governor George Romney, expresses her disappointment to Robert L. Green about his perceived misreading of a Women's City Club article in the New York Times.

Order of Commitment

Wednesday, October 18, 1967

An Order of Commitment was issued for Dr. King on October 18, 1967 following a conviction for contempt of Court. The charge stemmed from a matter dating back to the 1963 Birmingham campaign. He was sentenced to five consecutive days in Jefferson County Jail, the famed location where "Letter from Birmingham Jail" was conceived.

American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa: Advance Registration

Monday, January 9, 1967

Theodore E. Brown, the Director of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa, sends a letter with attached registration forms for the Third Biennial National Conference.

Letter from Gloria Glissmeyer Regarding the State of the Nation

Thursday, February 29, 1968

The following document is a letter written by Gloria Glissmeyer discussing the state of the nation during the Spring of 1968. The letter summarizes a series of events ranging from the Presidential Commission on Civil Disorder to the number of Americans killed in Vietnam.

Definitions

Dr. King defines a set of words such as, "Gospel" and "Justification."

People In Action Column: "Can We Ever Repay Them"

Saturday, June 9, 1962

This column by Dr. King in the New York Amsterdam News highlights Dr. C.O. Simpkins, leader of the United Christian Movement. Following cross burnings on his front lawn, death threats, and other harassment, both his home and summer house were bombed. The arsonists returned again the next day to ensure the complete destruction of both buildings.

Birmingham Manifesto

The Birmingham Manifesto was formulated as a testament to explain the reasons why efforts were being made to desegregate Birmingham. According to the Manifesto, broken promises were made by city and state officials, which led to plans of direct action.

Address to Members of the Hungry Club

Wednesday, December 15, 1965

Dr. King discusses the Negro's dilemma in an address to the members of the Hungry Club in Atlanta, Georgia. He argues that some of the challenges facing the Negro are: taking advantage of all the new federal programs, encouraging youth to go into higher education, and developing massive action programs to rid unjust systems. Dr. King also states three myths the Negro should explore: the myth of time, the myth of "exaggerated progress," and the myth of "total reliance on the boothstrap philosophy."

Letter from Rodney Armanie to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Young Rodney Armanie writes to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King's assassination.

Letter from Ken Pardue to MLK

Monday, March 18, 1968

Ken Pardue, the Election Commission Chairman of the Student Association at West Texas University, invites Dr. King to be a guest speaker at Choice '68, a program conducted by Time magazine.

Meet the Press Interview with Roy Wilkins and MLK

Sunday, August 25, 1963

This document is a transcript of NBC’s “Meet the Press” televised press conference with Dr. King and Roy Wilkins. The program is moderated by Ned Brooks. Frank Van Der Linden, Robert MacNeil, Richard Wilson, and Lawrence Spivak are panelists. Some of the topics covered are the goals of the March on Washington, a concern about whether the Civil Rights Movement is pushing too hard, and past political affiliations of Bayard Rustin.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

The author of this letter writes Dr. King concerning the state in which Negroes live. The author feels as if Dr. King only addresses the faults of the white race instead of those of his own race.

Letter From William S. Minor to MLK

Tuesday, June 22, 1965

William S. Minor writes Dr. King thanking him for responding to a personal invite regarding research on racial revolution.

Letter from Ralph Saylor to MLK

Mr. Saylor assures Dr. King that he still has the support of the white community regardless of his stance on the Vietnam War.

Letter from Joan Daves to Howard Gotlieb

Monday, May 15, 1967

Joan Daves responds to Mr. Gotlieb regarding a request to write Dr. King's biography from archival material in the possession of Boston University. At the present time and for various reasons, Dr. King has decided not to approve this project.

Letter from AJ Muste to MLK

Monday, October 19, 1964

A.J. Muste encloses a letter from Cherian Thomas to Dr. King and references a previous telegram he sent congratulating Dr. King on winning the Nobel Peace Prize.

Statement on The Negro's Political and Economic Power

Friday, October 14, 1966

Dr. King discusses the inferior political and economic power of the American Negro against the backdrop of emerging Black Power organizations. He reveals several new non-violent programs the SCLC targeted at economic and social justice: youth training and political reformation in the South. It is in accordance with the philosophy of non-violence that Dr. King believes the vast majority of Negroes will birth a "community in which neither power nor dignity will be black or white."

Letter from Rev. Max F. Daskam to MLK

Friday, March 22, 1963

The Unitarian Church of Germantown requests the return of Dr. King's presence for their Pulpit Schedule of the current year. Years have passed since Dr. King has visited and the church "would rejoice" if he could provide a date.

Letter from William H. Chester to Rev. A. D. King

Thursday, May 16, 1963

William Chester, Regional Director of the International Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union, writes Rev. A. D. King as a follow-up to their earlier telephone conversation regarding the transports unions supporting the Negro community in Alabama. Chester provides suggestions for how the SCLC should try to secure the participation of the large unions, such as the Teamsters and the National Maritime Union. Chester also addresses a copy of the letter to Dr. King, Rev. Abernathy and Rev. Shuttlesworth.

Telegram to Dr. King about Vietnam

Monday, April 10, 1967

The Magee Volunteers for International Developement have communicated with Dr. King regarding the international projects within Vietnam.

Letter from Dinkar Sakrikar to MLK

Monday, October 18, 1965

Dinkar Sakrikar writes Dr. King in reference to a proposed statue of Gandhi for a children's park. The statue seeks to reflect friendly relations between India and the United States. They ask Dr. King for his consideration along with a swift response.

SCLC Tenth Anniversary Convention Banquet Featuring Sidney Poitier

Monday, August 14, 1967

This document contains speeches given at the SCLC's Tenth Anniversary Convention Banquet. Sidney Poitier, a Bahamian American actor, gives the keynote address. He makes a very compelling statement during his address asserting, "to change the world we must change men." Also featured are brief speeches by Dr. King, Andrew Young, and Dorothy Cotton.

Tillich's Method

Dr. King quotes Paul Tillich’s “The Protestant Era.” He used this quote in his doctoral dissertation, “A Comparison of the Conceptions of God in the Thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman.”

Humanism

Dr. King discusses the relationship between God and humanist thinking.

Letter from MLK to Roger Boone

Tuesday, August 31, 1965

Dr. King thanks Roger Boone for his financial contribution to the SCLC. He emphasizes the importance of contributions like Boone's to the SCLC's ability to continue its work.

Ethics

Dr. King writes on the topic "ethics," according to Proverbs 6: 17-19.

Letter from Robert K. Hudnut to MLK about a Monument

Thursday, July 1, 1965

In this letter Robert K. Hudnut of the St. Luke Presbyterian Church offers an idea to Dr. King, namely to build a monument for those that have given their life in the line of civil rights. Hudnut proposes to call the monument "A Martyrs' Monument."

Social Philosophy

Dr. King documents Paul Tillich's view towards Marxism.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Nils Sundholm of the Swedish Ecumenical Council

Monday, December 28, 1964

Dr. King thanks Rev. Nils Sundholm of the Swedish Ecumenical Council for his efforts during Dr. King's visit to Sweden. Dr. King also requests the names of others who he should thank.

Memo to SCLC Contributors

This memo from the SCLC Staff highlights political activity taking place in Louisville, Kentucky, Blue Ridge, Georgia, and Cleveland, Ohio. The organization had used the energy from demonstrations to fuel voter registration campaigns. They share stories of collaborations and success that have resulted from their efforts.