Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"New York (NY)"

Letter from Burke Marshall of the Department of Justice to MLK Regarding Paul Chapman

Wednesday, May 6, 1964

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General for the Civil Rights Division of the Department of Justice, writes Dr. King in reference to a previous telgram correspondence concerning an assault on Reverend Paul Chapman. Burke writes that his department can take no action due to a lack of evidence indicating a crime.

Letter from SNCC Communication Director Horace Julian Bond to MLK

Sunday, May 31, 1964

Horace Bond, writing on behalf of the Council of Federated Organizations, asks Dr. King to join other civil rights organizations in writing a letter to President Johnson to support the organization's bid for a meeting with the President.

Freedom and Destiny

Dr. King discusses the topics of freedom and destiny as it relates to man.

Remarks at the Lincoln Memorial

Wednesday, August 28, 1963

Mathew Ahmann, Executive Director of the National Catholic Conference for Interracial Justice, asserts that the citizens of the US have permitted evil and racial discrimination for too long. He joins forces with those against inequality with hopes for a better lifestyle for all Americans regardless of the color of their skin.

Letter from Queen N. Lewis to Coretta Scott King

Monday, April 16, 1956

Queen N. Lewis reaches out to Mrs. King to inquire about an upcoming trip to Detroit, Michigan. She mentions that she is a member of a church congregation that donated $1000 to the cause and informs Coretta that there is more she would like to discuss with her at a later date.

Telegram from MLK to Berry Gordy

Wednesday, April 12, 1967

Dr. King congratulates Berry Gordy, Jr. for being awarded the Business Achievement Award from the Interracial Council for Business Opportunity.

The Meaning of the Sit-Ins

This document describes the growing civil rights movement. It discusses the tactics various civil rights organizations are using and briefly touches on the tactics of opposition groups.

Letter from Mrs. Joan Kimmey to Coretta Scott King

Friday, April 12, 1968

On behalf of the Baha'is in Teaneck, New Jersey, this letter offers condolences to Mrs. King for the recent assassination of her husband, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Heartfelt sentiments express admiration for Dr. King's vision, dedication, and teachings.

Letter from Joan Daves to Carlota Frahm

Monday, October 26, 1964

Joan Daves denies permission to Norwegian Publishers to reprint Dr. King's "I Have A Dream" speech in connection with "Why We Can't Wait." Daves asserts that the speech will be part of Dr. King's forthcoming publication.

Notecard Regarding the Religion of Feeling

On this handwritten notecard, Dr. King outlines several and their views on the psychology of religious beliefs. This is an example of one of many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books, and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Social Philosophy

Dr. King quotes Paul Tillich’s “Systematic Theology.”

Value

Dr. King references Ralph Perry's "Present Philosophical Tendencies" and "The Present Conflict of Ideals" in relation to the subject of value.

True Democracy

Reverend O. J. P. Wetklo explains his ideas of true democracy, which he gives a Christian foundation and compares to the natural world. He calls true democracy "a perfect brotherhood of man," and he argues that each individual member of society must take responsibility for the whole.

Letter to MLK from Joan Daves about New Publication

Wednesday, September 2, 1964

In this letter Joan Daves reports to Dr. King a proposal for a French edition of "Strength to Love" based on a specified advance and royalty.

Telegram from Roy Wilkins to MLK

Wednesday, October 11, 1967

Mr. Wilkins invites Dr. King to attend a meeting with Dr. K. O. Mbadiwe, former Nigerian Minister, and other Negro leaders in the United States to discuss the increasing conflict in Nigeria.

Letter from Dorothy Hunt to MLK Regarding "The Critic"

Monday, March 2, 1964

Dorothy Hunt of The Thomas More Association begins this letter by thanking Dr. King for his prompt reply to their request about contributing to "The Critic." She then asks Dr. King if he would be able to do a piece for "The Critic," and if they could purchase the first American newspaper and magazine rights to a chapter from his book. This letter includes Dora McDonald's holograph shorthand in red ink.

Suggested SCLC Organizational Structure

This document outlines the preliminary organizational structure of SCLC with brief descriptions of roles and responsibilities.

Letter from MLK to R. B. Taylor

Wednesday, October 13, 1965

Dr. King thanks Dr. R. B. Taylor for his generous contribution to the SCLC. King discusses how the funds are allocated to assist with voter registration, education and finding jobs for blacks.

Pride of Achievement

Dr. King quotes II Chronicles 26:15 regarding King Uzziah and cites Ralph Sockman’s “The Higher Happiness.”

Letter from Rabbi Roland B. Gittelsohn to S.C.L.C.

Wednesday, June 21, 1967

In this letter, Rabbi Roland B. Gittelsohn enclosed a contribution of twenty-five dollars for S.C.L.C.

Letter from Lee Tishler to MLK

Sunday, May 21, 1967

Ms. Lee Tishler gives support and praise to Dr. King for speaking out against the conflict in Vietnam.

Letter from Linda Frawley to MLK

Sunday, March 24, 1968

Linda Frawley, the campus coordinator for Suffolk University, requests any "pseudo-campaign" materials that Dr. King may be able to send. The materials are to be used in the National Intercollegiate Presidential Primary, sponsored by Time Magazine.

Letter from Donna Mitchell to MLK

Thursday, May 16, 1963

Donna Mitchell, an African American youth from Detroit, writes Dr. King to extend her support and express her appreciation for what he and others are doing in Birmingham, Alabama.

Congressional Record: The President's Housing Bill, or, How To Succeed in Politics Without Really Trying

Senator Charles Percy forwarded this article, published in the Congressional Record, to Dr. King. The article discusses President Johnson's attempted housing referendum, known as the Fair Housing Bill, in March of 1968.

MLK Sermon: Non-Conformist

Sunday, January 16, 1966

Dr. King delivers this sermon at Ebenezer Baptist church in Atlanta, Georgia. He references the statement Representative Julian Bond made regarding the Vietnam War and discusses the responsibility of Christians to be morally noble instead of socially respectable. He references multiple biblical figures and explains the importance of not conforming to society.

Letters from Irwin G. Perkins to MLK

Tuesday, June 7, 1966

Irwin Perkins, Minister of Donlands United Church, invites Dr. King to visit Toronto for their church's anniversary in the month of October. Perkins expresses their enjoyment of Mrs. King's inspirational visit the previous month and states that his expenses will be covered if he is able to attend.

Letter from Lilyann Mitchell to MLK

Lilyann Mitchell wrote this letter of support to Dr. King and included a copy of a poem she had written describing him. She writes that it has been published in multiple newspapers.

Letter from Robert Dent to MLK

Wednesday, May 20, 1964

Chairman Robert Dent welcomes Dr. King to San Diego County on behalf of the Board of Supervisors. Dent highlights the growth of Southern California in industry as well as the county's work towards equality. Dent also discusses the importance of Christianity in their endeavors.

Man

Dr. King interprets Jeremiah 51:17 to mean that man compared to God is stupid and man's knowledge compared to God's infinite knowledge is nothing.

Letter from Jean L. Bennett to Dora McDonald

Friday, May 20, 1966

Ms. Jean L. Bennett writes to Ms. McDonald regarding the Platters recording of the song "We Ain't What We Was." She believes that the SCLC should adopt this song as an actual theme song for it was inspired by Dr. King. The Platters were a successful vocal group during this time.