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Letter from Thomas H. Rogers to MLK

Saturday, February 11, 1967

On Race Relations Sunday, Thomas H. Rogers writes this letter to express his brotherhood and prayers for Dr. King. Emphasizing that one live a life acceptable to God, Rogers believes that God, not man, makes the only judgement. Though of a different race than Dr. King, Rogers sees Dr. King as his brother in Christ and encourages him to do God's biding.

Letter from Rabbi Maurice Eisendrath to MLK

Monday, April 24, 1967

Rabbi Maurice Eisendrath, President of the Union of American Hebrew Congregations, thanks Dr. King for speaking out not only against the Vietnam War, but also in support of helping the poor. Rabbi Eisendrath tells Dr. King that he has"ignited the conscience of America, as no other man, on the struggle for racial justice."

Kant

Dr. King outlines principles of Kantian philosophy regarding morality and religion.

Letter from Anne Jewett to MLK

In this letter dated May 5, 1967, Jewett informs King of her song. Let There Be Peace. Jewett believes that this simple song is what churches and peace marchers need, so that they can be heard. She has given the song to King in hopes that the people everywhere will be able to sing out.

SCLC Annual Report by MLK, 1965

Wednesday, August 11, 1965

Dr King delivered this report at the SCLC's ninth annual national convention in Birmingham, Alabama. Serving essentially as a State of the Union address for the SCLC, the report touches on the major topics of the Civil Rights Movement and the recent achievements and goals of the SCLC.

Memorandum from Alfred Duckett to MLK

Monday, March 13, 1967

This memo addresses fundraising events that Mr. Duckett wishes to pursue.

Letter from MLK to John Williams Mannix

Monday, September 23, 1963

Dr. King informs Mr. Mannix that he will not be able to speak in Washington for the Junior Bar Section of the Bar Association.

Letter from Chester Robinson to Harry Belafonte

Friday, October 6, 1961

In this letter, the Executive Director and Field Organizer of WSO - West Side Organization, in Chicago, asks Harry Belefonte to work with some of the youth in their community.

MLK Address to the National Press Club

Thursday, July 19, 1962

Dr. King gives an address to the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. He discusses his recent conviction for marching in Albany, the economic status of the Negro, racial issues, communism, the church, and the practice of nonviolent resistance. He states that the church is the most segregated institution in America. Dr. King also states that racial issues are a national problem and that the goal of the Negro is freedom.

Christianity

Dr. King references Emil Brunner's argument on Christianity.

Letter of Support from Bishop W.M. Jones

Wednesday, September 4, 1963

Bishop W. M. Jones drafts this correspondence to Dr. King, offering prayers to him and his co-workers.

Telegram from Zaira Singh to Pope Paul VI

Wednesday, February 14, 1968

Mrs. Singh, a Roman Catholic, requests that Pope Paul VI becomes a hostage in Hanoi, in order to end "barbarous American bombardment."

Draft of MLK's An Open Letter to Negro Youth

In an open letter to Negro Youths, Dr. King urges them to stay committed to the nonviolent principles of social change in their plight to gain broad access to education and employment.

Letter from Leonard Newell to MLK

Friday, March 1, 1968

Leonard A. Newell writes to Dr. King to ask for his opinion about the pursuit of a consumer strike to protest the War in Vietnam.

Urban League Feeling a Financial Squeeze

Wednesday, September 15, 1965

This article focuses on the Chicago Urban League's struggle to gain financial support from contributors. According to the organization's director Edwin C. Berry, former contributors failed to accept the fact that the goals and scope of the league would preclude the organization from becoming a "protest group."

Man (His Need for God)

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr’s “The Nature and Destiny of Man.”

Letter from MLK to Reverend and Mrs. Sargent

Monday, November 15, 1965

Dr. King expresses his gratification for the courtesies of Reverend and Mrs. Sargent during his recent visit to Paris. He also updates the couple regarding the planned SCLC fundraiser expected to take place in France.

From Reverend M. L. Jackson to MLK

Friday, May 4, 1962

Rev. Jackson expresses his appreciation and support for the work of Dr. King. Rev. Jackson pledges his dedication to the cause and encourages Dr. King to continue his monumental work.

Letter from Louis C. Blount to MLK

Friday, August 5, 1966

Louis Blount of the Great Lakes Mutual Life Insurance Company in Michigan encloses a check to the SCLC.

News from Southern Conference Educational Fund

Monday, February 19, 1962

This statement from the Southern Conference Educational Fund discusses the details regarding the arrest of Charles McDew and Robert Zellner in Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

Letter from Reverend Michael Scott to MLK

Monday, December 3, 1962

Reverend Michael Scott, of the International Committee for the Study of Group Rights in London, writes Dr. King expressing that the organization would like him to become an Honorary President. Scott explains, "this need not involve more than our being able to use your name."

Letter from Don DuMont to MLK

Sunday, October 24, 1965

Mr. DuMont expresses his disapproval of Dr. King's leadership of the negro race and the association of the movement with Christianity, because he seeks proof that Dr. King's movement is not "Communist-inspired." Dumont was an evangelist who ran unsuccessfully for a variety of political offices.

Letter from Viola Burrell to MLK

Monday, January 31, 1966

Mrs. Burrell writes to Dr. King, expressing her concern for black people in the work environment.

MLK Requests Federal Protection from US Attorney General

Friday, February 19, 1965

Dr. King sends this urgent request for protection to US Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach. Negro citizens were brutalized while protesting the arrest of James Orange. Alabama State Troopers prevented protestors from seeking medical attention by refusing to allow them to leave Zion Methodist Church.

Letter from Mrs. David Bowen to MLK

Mrs. David Bowen suggests that SCLC start a poor people's campaign. She says that they should focus on a specific group of people instead if just problems in general. She also says that she and others will be willing to help when they know how to find the people who truly need it.

Letter from Dora McDonald to A. Dale Fiers

Friday, September 23, 1966

Miss Dora McDonald writes Dr. Fiers regarding Dr. King's visit to Dallas, Texas.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Thursday, April 27, 1967

Joan Daves reminds Dr. King of her request for an available copy of his "doctors dissertation", for possible national and international publication.

Letter from MLK to the Nobel Institute

Wednesday, January 25, 1967

Dr. King nominates Thich Nhat Hanh, a Buddhist monk from Vietnam, for the Nobel Peace Prize. He describes Hanh's accomplishments and assures that he is "an apostle of peace and non-violence.

Letter from Bishop P. Randolph Shy to MLK

Friday, August 11, 1967

Presiding Bishop of The Christian Methodist Episcopal Church, P. Randolph Shy, declines Dr. King's invitation to attend an upcoming convention. Bishop Shy mentions that he will make a contribution "through our churches to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference."

Letter from J. M. Koelbe to Dr. King

Friday, August 12, 1966

Mr. Koelbe writes Dr. King about his financial distress. He also tells Dr. King that he admires him for his courage and gives him encouragement for the future.