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Suffering (Psalms)

Dr. King references the biblical Book of Psalms regarding the topic of suffering.

I Have A Dream

South Carolina (SC), Georgia (GA), Mississippi (MS), Louisiana (LA), Alabama (AL)

In the most famous of his speeches, given from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial at the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, Dr. King drew on themes from previous sermons and speeches, including an address he called The American Dream. Citing Lincoln and the Emancipation Proclamation, the US Constitution, and the Declaration of Independence, King calls upon the nation to fulfill its promise of freedom and justice for all of its citizens. Although he began by reading from a manuscript, he later abandoned it and spoke directly to the crowd of more than 200,000.

Letter from MLK to Reverend Earl White

Thursday, October 11, 1962
Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King offers his gratitude to Reverend Earl White for his participation in and support of the movement in Albany.

SCLC Citizenship Education Program

Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

The SCLC issues a notice for more teachers to assist with their Citizenship Education Program. The training held at the Dorchester Center in McIntosh, Georgia, teaches potential instructors on how to educate community individuals about utilizing their basic first-class citizenship rights.

Letter from Phyllis E. Ames to MLK

Sunday, October 25, 1964
New York (NY), New York, NY

Phyllis E. Ames, on behalf of the National Association of Negro Business and Professional Women's Young Adults of the New York Club, congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Our God is Able

In this chapter from "Strength to Love,"Dr. King proclaims that God is able to do anything. He asserts that while man's intellect and natural disasters may cause us to question God, He is omnipotent.

Telegram from King Children to Master Billy Watchel

Thursday, January 2, 1969
New York (NY)

The King children thank Billy Wachtel for the Christmas gifts he sent to them.

Expenses for Delegates

Kentucky (KY), Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), GEORGIA, Florida (FL), South Carolina (SC), North Carolina (NC), Virginia (VA), Texas (TX)

This detailed list breaks down the travel, registration and room costs for delegates of several Southern states throughout the country.

CORE List of Cities Where Lunch Counters Have Opened Since February 1st, 1960

Monday, February 20, 1961
Arkansas (AR), Florida (FL), Kentucky (KY), West Virginia (WV), Oklahoma (OK), North Carolina (NC), Missouri (MO), Tennessee (TN), Virginia (VA), Texas (TX), Maryland (MD)

This document is a list of locations where lunch counter sit-ins have occurred, provided by the Congress of Racial Equality

Letter from MLK to the United Presbyterian Church

Wednesday, June 14, 1967
New York, NY

In this letter, Dr. King thanks Rev. Edward Williams for the support of the United Presbyterian Church Commission on Religion and Race. He encloses a receipt for $5000 for partial payment of a grant for the salary of Hosea Williams. Williams was National Program Director for SCLC from 1967 to 1969 and was arrested more than 125 times for his civil rights activism.

Doctrines

Dr. King records a definition of the word "doctrine."

Draft Statement of Reverend Dr. MLK Jr.

New York (NY), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This statement, not written in Dr. King's hand, responds to Joseph Alsop's syndicated column in the New York Herald Tribune. Dr. King clarifies that SCLC has no affiliation with the Communist Party. He also states the SCLC has not continued a relationship with Jack O'Dell since he was relieved of his responsibilities.

And There Was Love

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Jerry Peace writes a poem entitled "And There Was Love" regarding the state of blacks in America during the Civil Rights Movement. Peace asserts, "The street became filled with hate. Whips sang, horses prances, gas floated" as he depicts the violent truth many Negroes faced daily.

Letter from Cummins E. Speakman to MLK

Tuesday, August 1, 1967
Hawaii (HI)

Dr. Speakman requests that Dr. King recommends the Maunaolu College of Maui to any individuals interested in coming to Hawaii.

Letter from William Rutherford to MLK

Friday, June 9, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Geneva, Switzerland, VIETNAM, Arkansas (AR), FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, RUSSIAN FEDERATION, CHINA, ISRAEL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, NEW ZEALAND

William Rutherford expresses his enthusiasm for being a new addition to Dr. King's team. Rutherford also encloses newspaper clipping on the Pacem in Terris meetings.

Walter Winchell: American Talking Back

VIETNAM, Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, California (CA), New York (NY), New York, NY, Texas (TX), Philadelphia, PA

In this article, Walter Winchell provides excerpts of news articles and adds his own commentary to each. Following an excerpt about Dr. King's having a conference to coordinate civil disobedience activities, Winchell urges his leaders to write to Dr. King and "tell him to stop posing as a Man of Peace and 'fess up that his big "act" is causing more trouble than Ho Chi Mihn." Other recipients of Winchell's attention in this column include President Lyndon B. Johnson.

Letter from MLK to Dr. Lester Kendel Jackson

Monday, April 30, 1962
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Indiana (IN)

Dr. King writes to Dr. Jackson of St. Paul Baptist Church regarding Dr. Jackson's recent visit to Atlanta. Dr. King offers a heartfelt apology to Dr. Jackson for not meeting with him due to sequence of miscommunications and unavoidable events.

God

Dr. King writes notes regarding philosophy, God, and the world. King quotes Dr. Shirley Guthrie, "It is the Lord; let him do what seemeth Him good."

Letter from William Reynolds to MLK

Thursday, April 20, 1967
Berkeley, CA, San Francisco, CA

Mr. Reynolds writes Dr. King requesting to use quotations from his April 5th speech to encourage a higher attendance at future vigils in the Bay Area.

Letter from MLK to Al Capp

Tuesday, June 30, 1964
Boston, MA, St. Augustine, FL, New York (NY), Massachusetts (MA), Florida (FL)

Dr. King writes Al Capp, formally known as the Cartoonist Alfred Gerald Caplin, acknowledging his previous correspondence. King asserts that his organization deplores violence regardless of race and hopes that Caplin's "current hostility will be overcome, and that he will exercise a deep concern for the welfare of all people of this country."

Index Card with Dr. King's Handwritten Theology Notes

This notecard seems to elucidate some of Dr. King's personal insights on the relationship between Christianity and society.This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses. Topics covered include theology, philosophy, and history. Some material from these reference notes would later emerge in his speeches and sermons.

Letter from MLK to E. H. Lehman

Pennsylvania (PA), Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King expresses concern regarding the illegal seating of elected representatives from Mississippi.

Letter from George W. Monroe to President Johnson

Monday, February 26, 1968
Jacksonville, FL, Washington, D.C.

A former employee of the US Naval Air Station in Jacksonville, Florida, George Monroe, writes again to President Johnson regarding an injury he received and the discrimination he was met with in trying to receive his sick pay and disability benefits. President Johnson had given Monroe's complaint to the Commanding Officer of the USNA in Jacksonville, however, Monroe was still facing difficulty getting help and wrote again to President Johnson to ask for his help. Dr.

Letter from Grace M. Meade to Ralph Abernathy

Thursday, April 18, 1968
Washington (WA)

This message from Grace Meade to Ralph Abernathy relates the details of a Seattle, Washington funeral service conducted for Dr. King.

Letter from Patricia Kleps to MLK

Thursday, July 13, 1967
San Francisco, CA

Dr. King informs Mrs. Patricia Kleps that he will be unable to fulfill her request to speak at the First Unitarian Church in San Francisco. However, Dr. King pledges to contact her around January of 1968 to possibly schedule a date for him to address her congregation.

Letter from Esther G. Stone to MLK

Sunday, January 21, 1968
Columbus, OH, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR

Esther G. Stone writes to Dr. King to express her opinions on Negro leadership, American politics, and the Vietnam War. Stone writes that President Lyndon Johnson has done so much for Negroes and that Mrs. Johnson did not deserve the hurtful remarks of Eartha Kitt.

What is Man?

Sunday, January 12, 1958
Montgomery, AL

Citing views from historical and contemporary figures, Dr. King asserts that the definition of "man" lies somewhere between God and an animal. Dr. King contends that, although man is limited by time and space, humans are not animals, because they have the capacity for rational thought. However, the central theme that Dr. King argues is that humanity is inherently evil and must constantly strive for high moral standards.

Letter from Wallace Terry to MLK

Wednesday, April 11, 1962
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Wallace Terry extends his appreciation for Dr. King's visit to Washington, D. C. and sends best wishes from Jack Eisen to Mrs. King.

Letter From Octavia Wynbush Strong to MLK

Saturday, February 13, 1965
Missouri (MO)

Mrs. Strong offers Dr. King a copy of her play "Listen, America," with hopes that he might use it in his "wonderful work."

A Challenge to the Churches and Synagogues

Dr. King expresses concern for the religious institutions of America. His concern is centered on the obligation that churches and synagogues have to advance civil rights and desegregation, while he goes on to reveal the parallels and connections between religion and society's values.