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War by Executive Decree

Citizens for Governmental Restraint favors the impeachment of President Lyndon Johnson for declaring the war in Vietnam by Executive Order.

Letter from A. Morsbach to MLK

Tuesday, October 18, 1966

A. Morsbach writes Dr. King regarding his tour to the Holy Land. Having years of experience with group travel, Morsbach informs Dr. King that he plans to check the background of Concreta Tours. He further suggests that King investigate Concreta Tours prior to concluding final travel arrangements.

March for Poor People

This document outlines the problem of poverty in America and suggests active participation as the only answer to the issue of poverty. The author argues that the March of Poor People to Washington is an opportunity to become involved in the effort to counteract poverty in America.

Refinement By Fire

This brochure provides an overview of the SCLC Citizenship Education Program held at the Dorchester Community Center in Georgia.

King Plans Capital Shantytown 'In a Tumbledown Shack'

This article describes Dr. King's plans, as observed by a detractor, for the 1968 March of Poor People to Washington.  The Associated Press reports that shacks and poor people from all over the nation will descend on the nation's capital to make the nation aware of their presence. President Lyndon B. Johnson, when reached for comment, said he hoped to work with the groups.

Letter from Edmond F. Tommy to Senator Edward W. Brooke

Monday, April 3, 1967

Mr. Toomy, a veteran of the first World War, writes to Senator Brooke detailing his stance on current military efforts. He provides a historical outline of war related events in relation to the United States military. He asserts that other Negro leaders are hindering progress in the Civil Rights movement due to their lack of patriotism.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK about a Publication

Monday, May 18, 1964

Joan Daves informs Dr. King about the German publishers and their inquiry about a special introduction for the German edition of "Why We Can't Wait." Joan Daves also asked for Dr. King's opinion about whether the press conference should be in Berlin or elsewhere.

Letter from Wyatt Tee Walker to Eugene Cook

Friday, August 16, 1963

Wyatt Tee Walker writes a letter to Attorney General Eugene Cook to clarify their previous conversation. Mr. Walker addresses multiple issues that were misunderstood. He then encourages Attorney General Cook to provide his office with a list of any questions and informs him that he is releasing the text of this letter to the news media.

Thank You Letter from MLK to Reverend Terrell

Friday, May 5, 1967

Dr.King expresses his deep appreciation to Union Baptist Church for their generous contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Suggestions for S.C.L.C.

Dr. King drafts a list of suggestions for the SCLC and lists the contact information for several of the organizations members.

Letter from Charles A. Halleck to MLK

Thursday, December 31, 1964

Charles A. Halleck expresses gratitude for Dr. King's letter outlining his reasons for opposing the seating of the five congressmen for the state of Mississippi.

Letter from Paul Johnson to MLK regarding American Politics

Thursday, January 4, 1968

In this letter, Paul Johnson tells Dr. King about how there is a concern about the state of the 1968 elections before soliciting Dr. King's response to a series of questions.

People In Action: Birmingham, U.S.A.

In this first of a two-part article for the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King writes about the circumstances surrounding SCLC’s decision to develop Project C, a campaign confronting racial injustice in Birmingham. Three factors led to the decision. First, the city was the home of the Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights, SCLC’s strongest affiliate. Second, Birmingham represented the hard-core segregationist South. And third, the South’s largest industrial center was suffering economically from the loss of vital industry and its poor image on race relations.

Letter from MLK to Quentin N. Burdick

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Quentin Burdick, a United States Senator from North Dakota, for supporting the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from Wallace Best to MLK

Sunday, April 25, 1965

Wallace Best encloses a donation to the SCLC but advises against purusing economic boycotts. According to Best, an economic boycott will "greatly demean the conduct of your noble cause....."

Support Letter to MLK

Thursday, February 1, 1962

A Jewish man sends Dr. King a letter expressing his support for "Stride Toward Freedom" and informing Dr. King about his connection to the black community.

Letter from J. G. Anoma to MLK

Tuesday, November 30, 1965

J. G. Anoma writes Dr. King to contribute to the movement of advancement of human dignity in the U. S. In addition, Anoma encloses a poem he wrote in Africa in honor of Dr. King and his accomplishments.

Senator Mark Hatfield Address on Vietnam

Thursday, March 16, 1967

In this address to the Harvard Young Republicans Club about the Vietnam War, Senator Mark O. Hatfield provides historical background on the conflict, defines the driving force of Ho Chi Minh as nationalism not Communism, and recounts the numerous times the U.S. has spurned overtures to negotiate a settlement. He proposes a political settlement after a suspension of bombing and de-escalation of the war. Hatfield first publicly opposed the Vietnam War as Governor of Oregon; he was the first prominent Republican to express opposition.

Letter from MLK to Louis O. Kelso

Friday, January 26, 1968

In this letter, Dr. King thanks Attorney Louis O. Kelso for sending him an autographed copy of, "How to Turn Eighty Million Workers into Capitalists on Borrowed Money."

Letter from Dow Kirkpatrick to MLK

Tuesday, October 23, 1962

Dow Kirkpatrick, Pastor of First Methodist Church in Evanston, Illinois, invites Dr. King to dinner during his visit to Evanston.

Letter from MLK to Colonel Harold C. Wall

Thursday, January 11, 1968

In a letter to Colonel Harold C. Wall, Dr. King writes to appeal the Selective Service case of Thomas E. Houck Jr. He has been classified as 1-A by Local Board #75, meaning he was available for unrestricted service. Dr. King wanted to change Houck's classification to 1-O based on Houck's moral devotion to peace.

Letter from Peggy Duff to MLK

Wednesday, September 13, 1967

Peggy Duff writes Dr. King on behalf of The Campaign for Disarmament in West Germany to request a meeting with him while he is London. Ms. Duff references an earlier meeting with Dr. King in which he mentioned a projected trip to Europe in order to receive an Honorary Degree at Newcastle University. She informs him that the organization is interested in having him speak at a meeting on the war in Vietnam.

Letter from Pastor William A. Lawson to MLK

Sunday, September 25, 1966

Pastor Bill Lawson writes Dr. King seeking his help with spreading the Civil Rights Movement in Houston. He asks King to establish a permanent SCLC office in Houston and engage in nonviolent demonstrations.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Louis Andrews Sims

Tuesday, November 6, 1962

Dr. King informs Mrs. Louis Andrews Sims that due to his multiple responsibilities within the SCLC and his various pastoral duties, he will not be able to accept speaking engagements at this time. He assures her that if his schedule clears up, he will be happy to accept her "gracious invitation."

Biography of MLK

Margaret B. Young details the events and accomplishments of Dr. King's life.

Letter from Robert J. Beaubien to MLK

Friday, December 18, 1964

Robert Beaubien congratulates Dr. King for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Resolution from the Richmond Baptist Association Ministers Conference

Monday, April 8, 1968

This resolution, adopted by the Richmond Baptist Association Ministers Conference, condemns the brutal assassination of Dr. King.

Letter from Malcolm X to MLK

Wednesday, July 31, 1963

Malcolm X invites Dr. King, along with other Negro leaders, to give an analysis and a solution on the current "race problem" at a rally in New York on August 10th.

Letter from Ann Pagenstecher to MLK

Wednesday, August 31, 1966

Ann Pagenstecher from Harvard College Library offers Dr. King a copy of a bibliography that lists publications, both, by and about him. She shares supportive words with Dr. King, applauding his crusade regardless of the outcome. The attached bibliography contains a brief biography of Dr. King's life and seven pages of literature including books and articles from prominent publications such as Ebony Magazine, The New York Times, and The Christian Century.

Letter from Martin Gal to MLK

Thursday, August 8, 1963

Martin Gal, Producer in Public Affairs at WMSB TV, requests permission rights to Dr. King's "Letter from Birmingham Jail" for broadcasting purposes. Gal seeks to create a short pictorial documentary with Dr. King reading the text as a voice-over.