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"New Orleans, LA"

Address by MLK to American Jewish Committee

Thursday, May 20, 1965

In this speech, Dr. King addresses the Civil Rights Movement and the use of nonviolent demonstration tactics. He distinguishes between civil disobedience, which involves breaking laws that one does not agree with, and nonviolent demonstration, which involves using one's right to protest. He states that nonviolent protest is inherently American, citing examples from the Civil War, the Suffragettes, and the American Jewish Committee's own lobbying from the early 20th Century.

Letter from Ms. McDonald to Ms. Elinor G. Galusha

Thursday, October 27, 1966

In this letter dated October 28, 1966, Ms. McDonald tells Ms. Galusha that she may use an excerpt from Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech.

Letter from Clarence G. Petersen to MLK

Thursday, August 25, 1966

Clarence G. Petersen tells Dr. King that he should avoid marching in the city of Cicero. Petersen describes Cicero as a slum with old houses and an oppressive, industrial atmosphere. While Petersen supports Dr. King's campaign, he believes it'd be best if the city were avoided for Dr. King's safety.

Western Union Telegram Sent to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. from Richard Charles Boone 1965

Friday, November 5, 1965

Richard Charles Boone sent Dr. King this 1965 telegram informing him of possible racial hostility in Miami between the black community and Cuban immigrants moving into the city.

Religion (Its Inescapableness)

Dr. King quotes Nels F. S. Ferre's "Faith and Reason" on religion as the "inescapable" bind between us and the universe.

On Using Christian Words

Dr. King references Henry Nelson Wieman's book "On Using Christian Words."

Perceiving God (Wieman)

Dr. King summarizes Henry Nelson Wieman's article "Can God Be Perceived" that appeared in The Journal of Religion (1943).

Letter from MLK to Rev. W.C. Dobbins

Monday, October 21, 1963

Dr. King informs Rev. Dobbins that he is unable to meet with him in the next few months, but possibly will be able to in the coming spring.

Collage of Tourist Sites in Los Angeles, CA

These are collection of photos that show different tourist sites in Los Angeles, CA.

Telegram from MLK to Jack Greenberg

Dr. King agrees that the United Civil Rights Leadership Council should be dissolved.

Sworn Deposition of MLK

Monday, December 10, 1956

Dr. King records an event that happened on a train between Nashville and Montgomery, during which a policeman denied him access to the general waiting room.

Letter from Eugen Bosch to MLK

Monday, March 13, 1967

Eugen Bosch writes to Dr. King to tell him that, "As always, King was rational and understanding and put the whole thing in the right perspective." Bosch is hopeful that Dr. King will help James Meredith, who had decided to run for Congress in a special election against the incumbent, Adam Clayton Powell, Jr.

Letter from L. Hayne To Whom it May Concern

L. Hayne requires Dr. King, and only Dr. King, to endorse a check before he will accept it.

Letter from T. Jansma of the Dutch Baptist Union to MLK

Friday, September 10, 1965

T. Jansma, General Secretary of the Dutch Baptist Union, asks Dr. King to deliver a speech to Baptists in Amsterdam while he is in the city to receive an honorary degree.

Draft of Dedication Page for "Why We Can't Wait"

This document is a rough draft of the dedication page of Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait;" the draft reveals Dr. King's wish for his children.

Notecard Containing the Definition of Evil

In this notecard Dr. King details the reason for suffering. He references notes from "City of God" by St. Augustine.

Political Cartoon: Nourishing the Enemy

Thursday, April 20, 1967

This political cartoon satirizes various elements of antiwar protesters regarding Vietnam. The inference is that events and positions originating from those elements are in essence aid and comfort to the enemy. "King Speeches" is prominently displayed.

Letter from Henry S. Huntington Expressing Concerned About Vietnam

Saturday, February 17, 1968

Huntington expresses deep concern regarding the Vietnam War. Huntington believes that humor and ridicule is a weapon against the war that is being used too little. He urges Dr. King and his supporters to each send a message to the president, and also write a letter to the local paper asking peace-lovers to state a message ridiculing President Johnson. In conclusion, Huntington hopes to gain other peace organizations to join in the Ridicule For Johnson Movement.

Letter from Mrs. Forest Dana to MLK

Tuesday, May 9, 1967

Mrs. Forest Dana writes Dr. King to express her displeasure in his outspoken stance against the Vietnam War. She acknowledges the withdrawal of her support and feels that he has done a disservice to Negroes in America. She believes he should focus on civil rights and not interfere with the war.

Citizens Action for Racial Brotherhood, Inc. Program

Friday, June 4, 1965

The Citizens Action for Racial Brotherhood organized this program where Dr. King makes a special address.

Letter from Floyd Mulkey to MLK

Saturday, December 16, 1967

Floyd Mulkey writes Dr. King a letter, commending him on his plans for the Poor People's Campaign in Washington, D.C.

News Release About Upcoming Lecture by Coretta Scott King

This news release announces Coretta Scott King's upcoming lecture on the Crusade for Voter's Registration entitled "Free in 64-with 6,000 more."

Handwritten Notecard Regarding Sin

On this note card, Dr. King discusses the repercussions of sin according to Albrecht Ritschl.

Letter from Frederic C. Smedley to MLK

Monday, August 14, 1967

Frederic C. Smedley, a lawyer and peace activists, presents Dr. King with a proposed plan aimed at applying pressure on President Johnson and other political leaders to end the war in Vietnam. The plan includes such actions as bombarding Congress with letters, demanding that President Johnson resign, and urging Republicans to nominate a ticket with candidates in support of an anti-Vietnam war policy. If none of the suggestions are effective, Smedley encourages a push for an independent ticket.

Letter from Helen White to MLK

Monday, July 31, 1967

Ms. White seeks the opinion of Dr. King for her research on American Aristocracy.

Support Letter to MLK

Wednesday, January 10, 1962

Kiser writes Dr. King to enclose a financial contribution and expresses the need for better integration.

Netherlands Request Autograph

Saturday, December 16, 1967

Theo Roling, of The Netherlands, urges Dr. King to promote peace in the world. He requests Dr. King's signature for his Nobel Prize autograph collection.

House Illustrations by the Fair Housing Council in Greater Cleveland

African Americans face discrimination in several suburbs of Cleveland Ohio. The Fair housing Council developed to promote integrated housing options.

Transcendentalism

Dr. King provides background information on Ralph Waldo Emerson's theory of transcendentalism.

Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution

Sunday, August 1, 1965

Dr. King delivers the commencement address at Oberlin College in Ohio on June 14, 1965. Nothing is more tragic, he says, than sleeping through a significant period of social change by failing to adopt the new mental attitudes that the new situation demands. He suggests that to remain awake through a great revolution one must embrace a global perspective and work for peace, racial justice, economic justice and brotherhood throughout the world.