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"New Orleans, LA"

Letter from L. D. Reddick to Colleagues

Monday, November 21, 1966

L. D. Reddick's colleagues received this letter pertaining to the business of Dr. King's papers and where they should be housed.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Tuesday, August 4, 1964

Joan Daves requests confirmation of a possible press conference, subsequent luncheon, and speaking engagement made by Dr. King. This letter includes Dora McDonald's holograph shorthand in red ink.

Letter from Jitsuo Morikawa to MLK

Tuesday, February 25, 1964

Jitsuo Morikawa, Secretary for Evangelism at the American Baptist Jubilee Advance, asks Dr. King to address the organization's Evangelism Luncheon in Atlantic City, New Jersey.

Voter Registration and Population Statistics

This document lists statistical data for five southern states. The data categories include the overall voting-age populations, which is further broken down by race and registered versus unregistered voters.

Letter from Rabbi Aaron Decter to MLK

Thursday, April 1, 1965

Rabbi Aaron Decter congratulates Dr. King on his demonstration in Montgomery and invites Dr. King to a dinner.

Letter to President Johnson about the Murder of Jonathan Daniels

Tuesday, August 24, 1965

This letter from Keene, New Hampshire to President Johnson is in response to the murder of Rev. Jonathan Daniels, an Episcopal seminary student from Boston. Daniels was born in Keene. The letter mentions other murdered civil rights workers, condemns Southern justice and calls upon the President to introduce legislation permitting federal investigation and prosecution of racial violence.

Letter from Joe Cheru to MLK

Tuesday, July 11, 1967

Joe Cheru advises Dr. King to adopt a technique called "organized massive write-in." Using this method, he suggested that Dr. King could channel greater support from people who could not participate directly by being physically present for demonstrations.

Social Justice

Dr. King notes that Isaiah 1:11-17 describes various forms of worship and declares that God will not hear them but demands righteousness and fulfillment of social obligations. He compares this passage with the prophet Amos.

Religion

Dr. King cites Edward S. Ames' beliefs regarding religion.

Letter from Sigmund Diamond of Political Science Quarterly to MLK

Tuesday, January 30, 1968

Sigmund Diamond asks Dr. King if Political Science Quarterly can re-print his review of Ronald Segal's "The Race War: The World-Wide Clash of White and Non-White."

SCLC Voter Registration Prospectus 1961

The SCLC Voter Registration Prospectus discusses the importance of the Negro vote. The SCLC believes that by voting, the Negro "can be heard and demand equal consideration." They believe that for a voter registration drive to be successful it must be church oriented. Thus, this prospectus outlines the programs and organizations needed for a church-oriented registration drive. Also included is a list of duties for the SCLC staff and a proposed budget for the drive.

Address By Senator Edward M. Kennedy to the SCLC

Monday, August 8, 1966

Senator Edward M. Kennedy highlights Dr. King's efforts during the Civil Rights Movement. He also expresses concerns about poverty, unemployment, nonviolence, segregation and integrity.

Wilkins Praises Darien Teacher Exchange Setup

Friday, December 11, 1964

Roy Wilkins, Executive Secretary of the NAACP, applauds Darien's efforts to integrate minority and suburban communities through its exchange program with New York City. The program "sought Negro teachers, business and professional people to live and work in their community."

The New York Times: New Way Sought to Teach Rights

Sunday, February 20, 1966

Columbia University and its Teachers College plan to begin a nationwide initiative to improve the teaching of civil rights. The plan will not only apply to elementary and secondary schools but also to college, universities and adult education forums. Instead of using textbooks, teachers will utilize case studies and films to keep information up to date.

Telegram from Charles Morris to MLK

Mr. Morris, president of The Negro Business and Industrial Association, extends an invitation to Dr. King to participate in an initiative designed to combat the rioting in Negro communities.

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. in a Bon Voyage to Europe

Thursday, January 29, 1959

The Fair Share Organization presents Dr. King in a "Bon Voyage to Europe." Dr. King will be delivering an address for Indiana Reverend Julius James, a former Morehouse College classmate of Dr. King's. Also included are advertisements of people and businesses who donated to the Fair Share Organization.

MLK Notecard Regarding "Gallican Confession"

This is a notecard handwritten by Dr. King on the topic "Gallican Confession."

Statement by MLK re Citizen Diplomacy

Tuesday, October 5, 1965

Dr. King releases a statement that he was considering communicating by mail with the "major powers" involved in the Vietnam conflict. However; he now believes that with the changing factors of certain groups involved in the conflict, his proposed communication is no longer needed.

Letter from M. Emelene Wishart to MLK

Monday, April 24, 1967

M. Emelene Wishart is concerned that Dr. King is weakening the fight for civil rights by campaigning to end the Vietnam War. Wishart asks Dr. King if he is attempting to "embarrass the US administration or beat Carmichael in the civil disobedience game."

Letter from L. K. Jackson to MLK

Tuesday, January 22, 1963

Reverend L. K. Jackson commends Dr. King on his ongoing efforts in the Civil Rights Movement.

Man

Dr. King wrote these notes on Man from Psalms 89:48. He describes that while the Bible describes man as mortal, here appears the direct affirmation that every man shall die.

Letter from Silvio O. Conte to MLK

Tuesday, August 24, 1965

Representative Silvio Conte informs Dr. King that he received Dr. King's letter pertaining to the petition for home-rule of Washington D.C. Conte asserts that he is a strong advocate for home-rule of the district.

Background Paper on the Student Sit-in Protest Movement

The Division of Racial Minorities and the Division of Christian Citizenship of the National Council of the Protestant Episcopal Church give some background information on the "sit-in protest movement" and list three points in summary.

Letter from Louis Rome to MLK

Saturday, February 10, 1968

Louis Rome, Executive Director of the Michigan Commission on Crime, extends an invitation for Dr. King to speak at the Governor's conference being held in Detroit.

Martin Luther King To Speak in Ithaca

Tuesday, March 28, 1961

This article from the Ithaca Journal talks about Dr. King's speaking engagement at Cornell University's Bailey Hall in Ithaca. The article also gives some background information on Dr. King.

Letter from Mrs. S. M. Brock to MLK about an Inheritance

Monday, May 29, 1967

In this letter Mrs. S.M. Brock pleads with Dr. King for assistance in recovering her mother's inheritance. The inheritance was allegedly squandered by the mother's attorney. For the assistance, Mrs. Brock offers $50,000.

MLK Index Card

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines a definition of "Nature". This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Telegram from Simon Anekwe to MLK

Tuesday, December 19, 1967

Simon Anekwe urges Dr. King to visit Nigeria and states that Dr. King's intervention would save thousands.

Anonymous Letter on Chicago Slums

Thursday, February 10, 1966

A disgusted city taxpayer from Chicago writes to Dr. King regarding the condition of slums in Chicago. It is believed that Dr. King and other leaders should stop wasting time on marches and teach young Negroes religion.

Letter from William Connor to MLK

Saturday, August 12, 1967

William Connor encourages Dr. King to continue his efforts to speak the truth and practice Christianity. He emphasizes that there is no need to ignore the important issues of our time. Connor states, "Now, we've either got to put up, or shut up-as the saying goes."