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Anonymous Letter to MLK

An anonymous author instructs Dr. King on how he should prepare his people for the end of the world.

Letter to MLK from Immaculate Heart College

Saturday, October 31, 1964

Sister Mary Williams, President of the Immaculate Heart College, congratulates Dr. King on behalf of her faculty and students on his selection to receive the Nobel Peace Prize.

Telegram from Congressman Charles E. Bennett to MLK

Friday, July 9, 1965

Florida Democratic Congressman Charles Bennett informs Dr. King that the Celler Bill does not apply to all states, though he feels that it should. The Celler Bill, introduced by New York Democratic Congressman Emmanuel Celler, would prohibit the purchase of rifles, shotguns and handguns by direct mail.

Letter from MLK to Teamsters President Jimmy Hoffa

Monday, April 12, 1965

Dr. King thanks James Hoffa, President of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters, for his organization's $25,000 contribution to the SCLC. Dr. King explains the current works and beliefs of the SCLC and also stresses the importance of supporters like the Teamsters.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Theall

Dr. King states that he is regretful to hear of Rev. Theall's circumstance and recommends that he contact Attorney Jack Greenberg, Chief Council of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund.

Letter from MLK to Carmen Baptista

Dr. King writes Carmen Baptista expressing deep appreciation for his letter of encouragement and for sending a recording of his song, "Coming Down the Road."

Telegram from Mr. and Mrs. B. E. Mays to MLK

Wednesday, October 26, 1960

This telegram was sent from Benjamin Elijah Mays and his wife to Dr. King at the State Prison in Reidsville, Georgia.

Telegram from Mrs. King to David Rogers

Tuesday, January 14, 1969

Mrs. King sends Mr. Rogers her appreciation for his effort in turning Dr. King's birthday into a federal holiday.

A Look to 1964

This is a draft of the article "A Look to 1964" written by Dr. King. Published on January 1, 1964 in the New York Amsterdam News. In the article, Dr. King addresses the strides the African American people have taken towards the struggle for equality.

Telegram from Roy Wilkins to MLK

Thursday, January 5, 1967

Roy Wilkins, the chairman of the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights, urges Dr. King to attend a special meeting in Washington, D.C. to plan a course of action on pending civil rights legislation.

Customer's Reciept from MLK to Morehouse College

This document is a customer's receipt from Dr. Martin L. King Jr. to Morehouse College.

Crusade for Citizenship Memorandum

Tuesday, February 4, 1958

Dr. King creates an outline that entails the purpose and goals for the Crusade for Citizenship. Dr. King will deliver this information in a mass meeting to clarify the aims of the SCLC's "crusade." The dual purpose for this sector of the SCLC is to increase the number of Negro voters and to liberate all Southerners. Dr. King further elaborates on the intricacies of the movement.

Letter from Wyatt Tee Walker to Constance Baker Motley

Friday, June 22, 1962

Mr. Walker informs Mrs. Motley, Associate Council of the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, that either he or Dr. King will be in attendance at the upcoming Lawyers Conference.

etter from Mrs. Howard Wood to MLK

Mrs. Howard Wood conveys her support to Dr. King and the Civil Rights Movement after reading the novel "Stride Toward Freedom."


Dr. King describes art as "alleviating the ills of life."

Letter from Jack Thayer to Mrs. King

Friday, January 19, 1968

Jack Thayer, of KLAC Radio, writes to Mrs. King thanking her for a recent guest appearance on "Two-Way Radio," in Southern California.

Letter from Mrs. George E. Bass to MLK

Tuesday, May 10, 1966

The President of the Planned Parenthood Association of Philadelphia expresses disappointment to Dr. King regarding his inability to personally accept the Margret Sanger Award in Human Rights. However, she states that Mrs. King was "a most eloquent substitute." Additionally, she reiterates a request for Dr. King to speak at the Philadelphia Planned Parenthood Association's Annual Luncheon on January 25, 1967.

Letter from M. C. Chagla to MLK

On behalf of the Indian Council for Cultural Relations, the president, C. Chagla invites Dr. King to deliver the seventh series of Azad Memorial Lectures.

Letter from Barry Diamond to MLK

Wednesday, March 27, 1968

Barry Diamond, Chairman of Choice 68 at the University of Florida, informs Dr. King that his name will be on the ballot and invites him to speak at the University. Diamond explains that Choice 68 is "a national collegiate presidential primary sponsored by Time Magazine."

Statement Regarding Fred L. Shuttlesworth's Court Appearances

Tuesday, July 12, 1966

This document explains Rev. Shuttlesworth upcoming court appearances as a result of his civil rights activities. He faces charges for blocking a sidewalk during a demonstration and for protesting at Drake Memorial Hospital.

Letter from Morris A. Morse to Rev. Abernathy

Sunday, April 28, 1968

Morris Morse sends his condolences regarding the death of Dr. King. Mr. Morse further explains his opposition of the idea of building a two million dollar church in Dr. King's honor, because he believes that the reverend would not want such a memorial when so many people are in need.

Guide for Churchmen in Interracial Conflict Situations

Wednesday, March 29, 1967

In this document, the Southern Field Service encourages church leaders to aid in African American social justice mobilization.

Letter from L. E. Stahl to SCLC

Thursday, April 13, 1967

Ruth Stahl encloses a financial contribution to the SCLC for their commitment to improving the issues of the world. Mrs. Stahl intended to join the NAACP but decided to contribute to progressive organizations instead.

Letter from E. Paul Weaver to MLK

Tuesday, January 9, 1962

E. Paul Weaver writes to Dr. King enclosing a small contribution for the work of the SCLC. Weaver also requests that the Dr. King visit Camp Mack as a guest speaker. The Executive Secretary of Church of the Brethren, one of three historic peace churches in the U. S., informs Dr. King of the Brethren's strong stand against slavery long before the Civil War.

Letter from MLK and Albert A. Raby

Monday, July 10, 1967

Albert Raby and Dr. King assert that the Weston project is "a national test case for the integrity of Title VI of the 1964 Civil Rights Act." The population of Negroes in DuPage County is extremely low and the jobs would not offer for them an equal opportunity.

Letter from Monica Wilson to MLK

Friday, February 18, 1966

Monica Wilson reaches out to Dr. King on behalf of a student organization at the University of Cape Town to obtain a response to their invitation asking Dr. King to deliver the T. B. Davie Memorial Lecture.

Letter Regarding MLK

Wednesday, February 21, 1968

This letter from Dad to Frank and Mark commends Dr. Kings use of the 'march' as means to secure a better life for the Negro. The author goes on to say the integration benefits both the Negro and whites in the supply and demand of labor.

Letter from Ralph Abernathy to F. D. Kirkpatrick

Monday, March 4, 1968

Rev. Abernathy commends Rev. Kirkpatrick on his job with the Steering Committee and discusses the enclosure of receipts.

Letter from Floyd Haynes to MLK

Friday, October 23, 1964

Floyd Haynes, Editor of the black-owned "Buckeye Review," invites Dr. King to speak at a civic forum. The event is a joint effort of the newspaper and the Interdenominational Ministerial Fellowship of Youngstown, Ohio. Haynes also congratulates Dr. King on being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Shirley Leonard to MLK

Sunday, December 31, 1961

Shirley Leonard encloses a check for ten dollars to help Dr. King further integration.