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Letter from Hubert Reaves to MLK

Tuesday, March 12, 1968
Michigan (MI)

As an inmate in Jackson, Michigan, Hubert Reaves writes Dr. King to express his interest in the SCLC, and inform him of his future education in ministry at the Detroit Bible College. Mr. Reaves also includes a letter to Mr. Goodall inquiring about his inmate account and the sending of his letters.

Invitation from Aubrey T. Edwards to MLK

Tuesday, May 9, 1967
CANADA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Aubrey T. Edward, President of the Oakville Branch for the United Nations Association in Canada, invites Dr. King to make an address during the organizations designated Human Rights year.

Letter from Neil Crichton-Miller to MLK

Tuesday, October 20, 1964
London, England

Neil Crichton-Miller, the Producer of the Talks Department of the British Broadcasting Corporation, congratulates Dr. King on winning the Nobel Peace Prize. Crichton-Miller asks Dr. King if they can reschedule a previously cancelled interview with Richard Kershaw and Leigh Crutchley for the BBC's "Frankly Speaking" program. He would like to conduct the interview when Dr. King flies to Europe to receive the Nobel Prize.

Letter from Leonard Dorsey to MLK

Saturday, February 17, 1968
Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA

Leonard Dorsey requests Dr. King begin teaching the subject of Divine Retribution.

Dr. King Plans '67 Pilgrimage to Holy Land


This newspaper clipping outlines plans for Dr. King's Pilgrimage to the Holy Land.

Letter to MLK from Angry Citizen of Detroit

Friday, July 14, 1967
Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI)

A bothered citizen of Detroit writes Dr. King, who is referred to as the "negro champion," to express personal views on the status of the Negroes in the city.

Letter from MLK to Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King writes Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy to commend him for his courage and work in directing the Civil Rights Act of 1964 through Congress.

Statement by Dr. Robert W. Spike on the Mississippi Seating Challenge

Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS)

Reverend Dr. Robert W. Spike writes a statement concerning a plan to dismiss a seating challenge in the U.S. House of Representatives. Reverend Spikes discusses the political inadequacies concerning the denial of the Mississippi residents right to vote. Following the seating of the delegation, an investigation commenced to ensure the political legitimacy.

Letter from George F. Berlinger to MLK

Tuesday, July 6, 1965
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Mrs. George Berlinger of the Nathan Hofheimer Foundation, informs Dr. King that the organization will not be including the SCLC in their budget. The Nathan Hofheimer Foundation sought to improve the living conditions of the underprivileged.

Letter from Helen Harris to MLK

Wednesday, October 28, 1964

Helen Harris, Chairman of the First Unitarian Congregation of Toronto's Social Action Committee, congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Daniel A. Jezer to MLK

Thursday, March 7, 1968
Florida (FL), ISRAEL

Rabbi Daniel Jezer, of Temple Beth Shalom in Satellite Beach, Florida, responds to Dr. King's request for contributions to the SCLC. Rabbi Jezer, a past contributor to the SCLC, now feels in a quandary because of ?an anti-Israel, anti-Zionist platform? approved at the Conference of New Politics, which included delegates from the SCLC.

SCLC Tour of Northern Cities

Chicago, IL

Dr. King announces an SCLC tour of Chicago, Cleveland, Philadelphia and Washington, DC. He cites the wish to establish communication with people in the black ghettos of northern cities and to assist local leadership in taking movement issues into their communities. He mentions the moral and material support provided by northern allies for the southern struggle and a time to reciprocate.

Summit Conference Program

Sunday, December 15, 1963
North Carolina (NC)

This program outlines the schedule and issues of concern to be addressed at the Summit Conference.

Letter from Erma Hughes to Dora McDonald

Saturday, March 14, 1964
Texas (TX)

Ms. Hughes, college President and Founder, advises Ms. McDonald to inform Dr. King that he should anticipate numerous invitations after an article appears in the newspaper announcing him as a guest at her college.

A Call To Action-Lucis Trust

New York (NY), New York, NY

Lucis Trust wrote this "Call To Action" about the vast greivances that were occuring in America, as it related to the issue of race. He identified that African Americans were "condemned to an inferior way of life and excluded as a human being." Trust conveyed that a remedy must be provided for the ongoing injustice. The remedy he proposed is that the attitudes of White Americans needed to change, not only on a non-discriminitory basis, but by creating an atmosphere of inclusivism and goodwill.

Letter from MLK to the Erie, Pennsylvania NAACP

Friday, March 30, 1962
Pennsylvania (PA)

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak from Erie Branch of the NAACP.

Letter from Reese High School Student to MLK

Tuesday, November 21, 1967
Michigan (MI)

Ann Renwick, a senior at Reese High School, informs Dr. King of a term paper she is writing about him and requests information regarding his next visit to Detroit. She also expresses discontent with prejudices against Negros in her small all-white town, but is determined to change the mentality of her peers.

A Proposal for Unity Day

Tuesday, March 15, 1966

Joseph Polowsky composed a proposal to present to the United Nations for the creation of an April 25th holiday, to be known as Unity Day. This holiday is in commemoration of a conference of the war-time allied nations in San Francisco.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mr. R. Elliot

Wednesday, February 21, 1968
New York (NY)

This letter is in response to an inquiry made by Mr. R. Elliot, on February 8th, 1968, in regards to housing development plans for the Ebenezer Baptist Church.

SCLC Mail Log: February 23, 1968

Friday, February 23, 1968

This is a one-day mail log for incoming mail addressed to Dr. King and other SCLC associates. As an organizational tactic, the log kept track of the high volume of correspondence that came through the office.

John Locke

Dr. King records a quote from English political theorist John Locke on the development of the human mind.

Letter from Bernard Roche to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967
New York (NY)

Mr. Roche asks Dr. King whether he has considered that whites not only intimidate and murder African Americans, but also each other. He argues that whites don't treat anyone any worse than they treat themselves.

Letter from Benjamin E. Smith to MLK

Monday, May 7, 1962
New Orleans, LA, Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Louisiana (LA), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Tennessee (TN), Nashville, TN, Montgomery, AL, Baltimore, MD, Maryland (MD), South Carolina (SC), Florida (FL), Tuskegee, AL, Chattanooga, TN

This report highlights a Birmingham conference on the "Ways and Means to Integrate the Deep South" sponsored by the Southern Conference Educational Fund, Inc. This conference included several hundred white and black leaders who sought to integrate the South.

News Article about MLK's Church and Atlanta Housing Project

Atlanta, GA

In this article, the author highlights Dr. King's involvement with a recent urban housing redevelopment project. The author states that the Ebenezer Baptist Church will commit full sponsorship; he later discusses the various plans in more detail and the purpose to community it will serve.


Dr. King notes the subject of man, quoting Algernon Charles Swinburne's "The Hymn of Man."

New South: The Current Crisis In Race Relations

Saturday, March 1, 1958
Montgomery, AL, New York, NY, Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), New York (NY), Georgia (GA), NIGERIA

Dr. King, as President of the Montgomery Improvement Association, examines the race relations crisis. He discusses how segregation makes the Negro feel inferior and unaccepted. Dr. King also affirms that he will not accept a system of violence and the "evils of segregation."

Telegram From Mrs. Mary Kru to MLK

Saturday, March 12, 1966
Illinois (IL)

In this telegram, Mrs. Mary Kru writes to Dr. King, "your plans of operation put me out of work".

Peace of Mind or Soul

Dr. King quotes French physiologist Dr. Charles Richet.

Letter from MLK to Richmond M. Rudden

Thursday, January 26, 1967
Pennsylvania (PA)

Dr. King writes Richmond M. Rudden to decline an invitation to speak at Lafayette College due to upcoming non-violence workshops, voter registration drives and SCLC fundraising activities.

I Have A Dream

South Carolina (SC), Georgia (GA), Mississippi (MS), Louisiana (LA), Alabama (AL)

In the most famous of his speeches, given from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial at the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, Dr. King drew on themes from previous sermons and speeches, including an address he called The American Dream. Citing Lincoln and the Emancipation Proclamation, the US Constitution, and the Declaration of Independence, King calls upon the nation to fulfill its promise of freedom and justice for all of its citizens. Although he began by reading from a manuscript, he later abandoned it and spoke directly to the crowd of more than 200,000.