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Letter of Condolence to Mrs. King from Deborah Easton

Friday, April 5, 1968

This handwritten letter of condolence was composed the day after Dr. King's assassination by a young student, Deborah Easton.

Vote of Confidence for Negro Leader

Wednesday, January 24, 1968

In this editorial, a study of 300 negro in 13 cities, was conducted to determine the public attitude towards Dr. King.

SCLC Annual Board Meeting Agenda

This 1965 SCLC annual board meeting agenda lists several key figures who are intended to discuss their respective projects and strategies during this two-day session.

Letter from MLK to George Murphy

Tuesday, October 9, 1962

Dr. King thanks Rev. Murphy for giving witness in Albany, Georgia. Dr. King also comments on an upcoming vote and the role of churches in race relations.

Telegram from MLK to US Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach

Dr. King asks Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach for an investigation of voter irregularities in the Georgia Democratic primary election.

Letter from MLK to Miss Joanne Adams

Thursday, November 7, 1963

Dr. King responds to a letter from Joanne Adams, a teenager from Central High School, stating that letters like hers from young people around the country inspire him that youth are so conscious of the issues that affect our world.

Letter from Milton R. Young to MLK

Wednesday, April 28, 1965

Republican North Dakota Senator Milton Young thanks Dr. King for a recent telegram expressing his views on pending voting rights legislation.

MLK's Statement Regarding Civil Rights Activists' Murders

Friday, December 11, 1964

This statement by Dr. King was written regarding the lynching and murders of three civil rights activists: James Cheyney, Andrew Goodman, and Michael Schwerner. When Mississippi officials refused to pursue the prosecution of those involved, national outrage prompted the ensuing major federal intervention.

Chicago Schedule

Dr. King lists the flight numbers and times associated with his travel from Atlanta to Chicago.

Dewey

Dr. King records John Dewey's views on philosophy and religion.

Papal Encyclicals by George W. Lawrence

George W. Lawrence elaborates on the traditions and methodologies of the Catholic Church. Lawrence clarifies the Social Doctrines and states that men are governed by four laws located in "the Natural," "the Eternal," "the Human," and the "(positive) Divine laws." Furthermore, Lawrence discourses additional political relations to the Catholic Church.

Telegram from James A. Dombrowski to Lindsay Almond Jr.

James A. Dombrowski urges J. Lindsay Almond to take a stand against segregation in the city of Lynchburg. This urgency emerged as a result of the jailing of six students who sitting-in at a local diner.

The Ultimate Doom of Evil

These sermon notes outline the inevitable fall of evil. Dr. King uses the work of influential American historian, Charles A. Beard to prove this claim. "A graphic example of this truth" is found in ancient proverbs that Dr. King aims to examine in detail.

Telegram from F. D. Jones to MLK

Thursday, November 19, 1964

Reverend F. D. Jones congratulates Dr. King for being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

God

Dr. King discusses the inevitability of God being an object. Dr. King quotes a theologian's perception that God's ability to be an object would cease his capacity to be one being among others.

Adverse Letter from an Anonymous Sender

An unknown sender states their concerns about the direction Dr. King is leading the movement.

The Future of Integration

Dr. King discusses "The Future of Integration." King opens with background history of three distinct periods of race relations. The first period extends from 1619 to 1862, the era of slavery. The next period extends from 1863 to 1954 when blacks were emancipated, but still segregated. The third period started on May 17, 1954 when segregation was deemed unconstitutional and integration commenced. Furthermore, Dr. King explains the changes that occurred as a result of integration and how it will affect blacks and whites in the future.

Letter from Hubert Humphrey to MLK

Friday, December 3, 1965

Vice President Humphrey thanks Dr. King for participating in a recent White House Conference, "To Fulfill These Rights," which focused on jobs, jobs training and economic security.

Letter to MLK from Carl Fuqua

Friday, February 1, 1963

Rev. Carl Fuqua writes a letter to Dr. King expressing regret that he could not attend the NAACP meeting due to a sudden virus.

Letter from Scott Farleigh and Tony Hazapis to MLK

Friday, August 25, 1967

Scott Farleigh and Tony Hazapis invite Dr. King to speak to the students at University of Oregon.

Letter from Rev. O. L. Westley to Local Board

In this undated letter, Rev. Westley writes to the "Local Board" on the behalf of Mr. Stanley Howard, who is claiming status as a conscientious objector after being called to serve "in the Armed Service" [sic].

Letter from C. L. Swartzentruber to MLK

Monday, February 3, 1964

School Superintendent C. L. Swartzentruber invites Dr. King to speak at Central Christian High School for their Fourth Annual Lecture-Music Series. He also congratulates Dr. King on being "Time's Man of the Year" and states that, as Mennonites, they are particularly interested in his nonviolent strategy.

The Civil Rights Struggle in the United States Today

Saturday, May 1, 1965

This pamphlet, published by the Association of the Bar of the City of New York, is a transcript of an address delivered by Dr. King titled "The Civil Rights Struggle in the United States Today." In his first speech before the organization, Dr. King recounts the history of the global civil rights movement.

Letter from Genevieve Young to Joan Daves Regarding MLK's Book Draft

Thursday, January 5, 1967

Genevieve Young, from Harper & Row Publishers, expresses concern regarding an outline for Dr. King's upcoming book. She suggests an alternative way to frame the outline, and advises Joan Daves to use her discretion as to whether or not the memorandum should be passed on to Dr. King.

Diary in Jail

Thursday, August 23, 1962

Dr. King wrote a personal diary of his day-to-day experiences while in an Albany, Georgia jail for attempting to pray in front of City Hall. He pledged to return to jail, if necessary, if the City Commission refused to negotiate with Negro leaders on demands for immediate desegregation of all public facilities.

Telegram from MLK to Jack Greenberg

Dr. King agrees that the United Civil Rights Leadership Council should be dissolved.

MLK Address to District 65, AFL-CIO

Saturday, September 18, 1965

This is the text of an address Dr. King gave to District 65, American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations. Dr. King references his stay in Birmingham Jail and expresses his optimism that the nonviolent movement will be successful.

Healing Treatment from Aurora Maynard to Coretta S. King

Aurora Maynard sends her support to Mrs. Coretta Scott King in the form of a self-authored poem entitled "Healing Treatment."

Letter from Dr. King to the Media Seeking Support for Negroes Living in Chicago

support from white media outlets to help fight for freedom of the average black citizen in chicago
ernie banks, billy williams, don bufords and floyd robinson

Telegram from Clark Macgregor to MLK

Tuesday, September 17, 1963

Clark Macgregor sends a telegram to Dr. King informing him of his vote against the dismissal of the Mississippi Challenge.