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Letter from Mrs. Weitzler to Bayard Rustin

Friday, January 26, 1968
Washington, D.C., New York (NY), Connecticut (CT), VIETNAM

Mrs. Weitzler assesses the meaning of the "March on Washington" and the impact it has had on her.

53rd Annual NAACP Convention

Tuesday, June 5, 1962
New York, NY, Texas (TX), Michigan (MI), Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), Georgia (GA)

Serving as an itinerary for the 53rd Annual NAACP Convention, this document outlines the schedule, location, and speakers of the seven-day event.

Letter from Irene M. Koch to MLK

Tuesday, August 9, 1966
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL)

Irene M. Koch uses a Native American legend of a man walking in the moccasins of his enemy to gain understanding of his enemy. She relates this legend to the current civil rights movement and specifically the civil rights movement in Chicago, Illinois.

A Decade of SCLC

Atlanta, GA

In this 10th Anniversary Journal for the SCLC, there are several topics covered to highlight the ten years of activity of the organization. Beginning with a story of the Civil Rights Movement's beginning, featuring Rosa Parks, to an article entitled "Where Do We Go From Here?"; this booklet summarizes many of the efforts made during the ten year existence of the SCLC.

Telegram Request to MLK on the Kennedy Assassination

Thursday, December 5, 1963
Tokyo, Japan, Atlanta, GA

This Western Union Telegram was sent to Dr. King from Tokyo, requesting commentary concerning John F. Kennedy's assassination for the magazine Midorikawa.

Handwritten Draft Letter from MLK

Dr. King expresses his gratitude for the generous contribution made by Mr. Hunter and addresses questions that were asked in a previous letter.

Religion

Dr. King quotes Robert Flint’s “The Philosophy of History.”

Invitation From L. Rosenberger to MLK

Thursday, April 2, 1964
BRAZIL, New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

The First International Congress of Negro Culture invites Dr. King to their conference in Brazil.

A Statement to the South and Nation

Mississippi (MS), Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Georgia (GA), HUNGARY, South Africa

This seemingly unexceptional document signifies the birth of the SCLC. Dr. King, Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth and Rev. C. K. Steele assembled a consortium of leaders in Atlanta following the end of the Montgomery Bus Boycott. The Southern Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration issued this statement that addresses the intimidation, discrimination and economic disparity Negroes face in the South. The statement appeals to the federal government to intervene against assaults that block basic civil rights.

Letter from MLK to Lavera Davis

Monday, March 1, 1965
Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

Dr. King declines an invitation from the Fifty-Ninth Street Baptist Church to speak at an upcoming Civil Rights Day event.

Oxford Movement

UNITED KINGDOM

Dr. King explains the Oxford Movement, a nineteenth century movement within the Anglican Church.

MLK Index Card

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines a definition of "Nature". This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Letter from Cass Canfield to Joan Daves

Wednesday, December 28, 1966
New York, NY

Cass Canfield from Harper & Row, Publishers thanks Joan Daves for sending the outline of Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go from Here." Cass suggests that in the book Dr. King "should stress that the Negro problem is part of the poverty problem."

Walter Reuther Remarks at the March on Washington

Wednesday, August 28, 1963
Washington, D.C.

Walter P. Reuther, President of the International Union, UAW, expounds upon the cause of freedom and democracy in America from the perception of the external world. Reuther highlights the rights guaranteed by the United States Constitution and how they have been denied to African Americas living as "second-class" citizens. He further discusses the necessary duties of the United States Congress to recognize and initiate civil rights programs.

Telegram from SCLC to Ella Mae Moton

Tuesday, August 17, 1965
Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), Selma, AL

Staff of the SCLC and Citizenship Education Program inform Ella Mae Moton that her expenses for the trip to Georgia will be taken care of.

CORE - Progress Report #1

Friday, August 20, 1965
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Benjamin Brown details the structure of the latest publication from the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE). The CORE Guide to Negro History will be a composite of contributing essays, pictures, prized Negro literature and evaluations of social progress by current civil rights leaders. Beacon Press is listed as the potential publisher for the groundbreaking book.

In the Battle for Desegregation

Tuesday, September 1, 1964

Francis Keppel, U.S. Commissioner of Education, expresses his thoughts on the solution for desegregation. Keppel believes the best way to end segregation is through education, providing children with an education and outstanding teachers.

Photo of MLK and Mr. David

Jackson, MS

Mr. David sends Dr. King a picture displaying the two outside a Jackson, Mississippi Holiday Inn.

Telegram to Charles Wherry from Frances Lucas

Saturday, November 23, 1968
California (CA)

Frances Lucas writes to Mr. Wherry in Mrs. King's stead thanking him for his kindness and congratulating him on a film project. He also conveys appreciation from Mrs. King for the memorial of her husband at California State College.

Letter from Henry R. Luce to MLK

Thursday, January 30, 1964
New York (NY), New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Henry R. Luce expresses his appreciation for Dr. King's letter that will be placed in his personal archives as a "highly treasured memory."

Lucky to Be an American

An anonymous person tells Dr. King that he has lost his place as the most liked American. The author infers that Dr. King should not look for everything free and work for his success.

An Evening of Negro Culture and History

PERU, MEXICO, Atlanta, GA

This booklet, entitled "Black is Beautiful and It's So Beautiful To Be Black," contains information from an SCLC event held August 16, 1967 that sought to explore Negro culture and history.

Reviews of Strength to Love

Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C., Birmingham, AL, New York, NY

These reviews of Dr. King's "Strength to Love" illustrate King's use of theological beliefs in conjunction with the struggle for civil rights reform.

Albany Manifesto

Sunday, July 15, 1962
Albany, GA, Georgia (GA)

The "Albany Manifesto" declares the Albany Movement to be uncompromisingly opposed to segregation. The manifesto positions the group to continue to exercise its free speech and free assembly rights to protest segregation. Protesters insist upon the speedy resolution of the charges against seven hundred protesters that had been languishing for more than six months.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mrs. Oliver Kannon

Wednesday, July 11, 1962
Pennsylvania (PA)

Miss McDonald informs Mrs. Kannon that Dr. King will be unable to accept the Easton NAACP's invitation to speak.

Follow Me

Dr. King outlines a sermon. "Follow Me" and "The Call of Christ" are considered as possible titles.

The Future of Integration

Friday, August 21, 1959
Wisconsin (WI)

Dr. King discusses the various forms of segregation and the corresponding legislative acts that affect African Americans at the National Convention of the Fellowship of Reconciliation. King also provides details of how he hopes integration will take place.

Memorandum from Benjamin F. Payton Regarding Meredith Mississippi March

New York (NY), Memphis, TN, Mississippi (MS), Jackson, MS

Benjamin F. Payton, Executive Director of the Commission on Religion and Race of the National Council of Churches, constructs this document as a debriefing on the Meredith Mississippi March. It is evident that the march is symbolic of the nation's struggle with racial conflict and aims to dismantle fear among African American voter registration. James Meredith, Mississippi citizen and first African American to desegregate the University of Mississippi, had organized and led the march.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, August 7, 1964
New York (NY), New York, NY

Ms. Daves writes Dr. King concerning an invitation to speak from the University Settlement.

Letter from Harry Denman to MLK

Thursday, July 13, 1967
Nashville, TN

Mr.Denman writes Dr. King to share words of support and encouragement as Dr. King prepares to turn himself over to the Birmingham officials. Denman suggests that Dr.King should turn this event into a major demonstration.