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Letter from Dora McDonald to Mr. Arrignton

Monday, May 16, 1966

Miss McDonald writes on behalf of Dr. King concerning a photograph request. She informs Mr. Arrington that Dr. King will be unable to honor his request due to his apprehension surrounding for profit merchandise.

Letter from Carey McWilliams to Dora McDonald

Monday, January 9, 1967

Carey McWilliams writes Dora McDonald acknowledging confirmation of Dr. King's commitment to speak for "The Nation's" conference in Los Angeles.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Baruch Treiger

Thursday, October 21, 1965

Dr. King thanks the National Women's League for its continued financial support of the SCLC.

In Memoriam MLK: New York Times

Tuesday, April 9, 1968

This newspaper clipping is one of several full-page "In Memoriam" dedications featured in various newspapers following the assassination of Dr. King. The clippings by the NAACP accompany a letter from the Public Relations Director of the organization to the Reverend Ralph D. Abernathy, newly installed as the head of the SCLC in the aftermath of Dr. King's death.

Letter from Louis C. Blount to MLK

Friday, August 5, 1966

Louis Blount of the Great Lakes Mutual Life Insurance Company in Michigan encloses a check to the SCLC.

Broadside Regarding Julia Brown's Speech on MLK's Communist Connections

This broadside advertises a speech to be given by former FBI agent Julia Brown. Brown was to speak on the alleged communist connections of Dr. King.

61:19 General Correspondence 1961 (R)

Tuesday, October 24, 1961

Maude Reid request a manuscript copy of Dr. King's speech at New Calvary Baptist Church in Detroit, Michigan.

Letter from Robert L. Brandfon to MLK

Thursday, June 23, 1966

Dr. Robert L. Brandfon, a history professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, requests Dr. King's permission to include "Letter from Birmingham Jail" in a book for college students entitled "Readings in the History of the South Since 1900."

Letter from E.E. Adams to MLK

E. E. Adams relates his thoughts about the constitutionality of urban renewal.

Telegram from Minsters of Operation Breadbasket to Robert E. Slater

Wednesday, November 22, 1967

The John Hancock Mutual Life Insurance Company is called to discuss racial discrimination. Ministers from Operation Breadbasket explain that they will commence an investigation to possibly eradicate the unequal employment practices of the company.

Letter from Stephen Sargent to Ralph David Abernathy

Monday, April 8, 1968

Stephen Sargent, a young student, writes to Rev. Ralph Abernathy on the day of Dr. King's funeral service. Stephen's letter mentions his enclosure of a check to the SCLC to assist in the cause for freedom.

Love

Dr. King quotes Tertullian on the subject of love from “Adversus Marcionem.”

Letter from Bob Strain to MLK

Monday, December 25, 1961

Bob Strain writes Dr. King after reading an article in Newsweek entitled "Albany Movement." He apologizes for the ignorant behavior of fellow whites and expresses his desire to be a part of the movement. He also conveys his admiration for Dr. King and his work.

Letter from Edward Kuhn, Jr. to MLK

Thursday, December 7, 1961

Edward Kuhn, Jr. provides Dr. King with Bernards Taper's short book on the Tuskegee Gerrymander Case and requests his feedback. Dr. King is informed that his comment will be placed on the "jacket" of the book.

Letter from Rev. R.T. Eissfeldt to University of Illinois President Dr. David D. Henry

Thursday, January 28, 1965

Rev. R.T. Eissfeldt thanks Dr. David Henry, President of the University of Illinois, for forwarding to him Dr. King's letter pertaining to the SCLC's summer project.

Letter from MLK to Reverend George W. Goth

Sunday, October 27, 1963

Dr. King writes Reverend George Goth of Metropolitan United Church declining his invitation to make an appearance at his church. Dr. King has engagements for the remainder of the year that hinder him from committing to any further appearances.

Letter from Frank S. Gotshall to MLK

Friday, March 1, 1968

Frank S. Gotshall compliments Dr. King's as a "fine champion," but he asserts that the problem of race relations in America is worsening. To prevent race mixing, Gotshall proposes that each race be given its own area in which it can live.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Florence Wright

Wednesday, August 1, 1962

Dora McDonald informs Florence Wright that Dr. King is currently in jail in Albany, Georgia. Dora McDonald reassures Miss Wright that her encouraging words will mean a great deal to Dr. King.

Letter to Senator Abraham Ribicoff from Earl Whitted Jr.

Wednesday, December 21, 1966

In this reply to Sen. Ribicoff, Earl Whitted endorses the idea of a guaranteed fixed annual income for the poor, under certain stipulations. It is proposed that a Federal Housing Project area would also provide various economic services to the underprivileged. This program would accomplish education and self-sustainability for those that have been politically and economically disadvantaged.

MLK's Transcript from Crozer Theological Seminary

Wednesday, December 6, 1950

In 1948, Dr. King entered Crozer Theological Seminary in Chester, Pennsylvania. Engaging in a sincere quest for knowledge, he sought stimulation in the works of several prominent areas, like philosophy and theology. As a result of his efforts and achievements at Crozer, Dr. King was chosen as the Valedictorian of the graduating class of 1951.

Proposal for Preventing Denial of the Right to Vote

Thursday, October 29, 1964

William L. Higgs proposes that the Democratic Caucus in the US Senate adopt a resolution that no Democratic Senator shall become chairman of a Senate Standing Committee if his seat was won in an election where there was substantial denial of the right to vote based on race. In Mississippi only 6% of eligible Negroes are registered to vote, yet US Senator James Eastland chairs the powerful Senate Judiciary Committee that considers legislation regarding the right to vote and also the appointment of judges charged with enforcing those laws.

Letter from Nelson A. Rockefeller to MLK

Tuesday, July 18, 1967

Governor Nelson Rockefeller writes Dr. King thanking him for sending a copy of his book "Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community?".

Letter from MLK to Randolph Compton - February 22, 1968

Thursday, February 22, 1968

Dr. King thanks Randolph Compton for his one thousand dollar donation to the SCLC. He also acknowledges that this contribution assists in the work of voter registration and securing decent jobs and decent housing for the poor.

The Bible

Dr. King records notes regarding Protestant Orthodoxy and its great error in dealing with the Bible.

Letter from R. D. Earnhardt to Ralph David Abernathy

Sunday, April 28, 1968

R.D. Earnhardt requests a meeting with Rev. Abernathy to discuss Dr. King's death and the plan to proceed with the "Poor People's March on Washington, DC.

People in Action: Albany Justice

Dr. King discusses numerous injustices in Albany, a pacifist movement to Cuba, and police brutality against Negroes.

Jesus' Ethical Character

Dr. King documents biblical passages that highlight Jesus' virtues.

Letter from MLK to Margaret Flinsch

Friday, January 5, 1968

In this letter to Mrs. Margaret Flinsch, Dr. King personally thanks Flinsch for her generous contribution to SCLC and explains how her support benefits SCLC's efforts.

SCLC Seventh Annual Convention

Tuesday, September 24, 1963

This pamphlet advertises the 1963 Southern Christian Leadership Conference Annual Convention. It contains detailed information about the event, including members of the planning committee and scheduled presenters.

Negro Leaders On "Meet the Press"

Monday, August 29, 1966

This is a transcription of the Meet the Press interview with Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, Roy Wilkins, and other leaders representing civil rights organizations. The nationally broadcasted news segment covered many pertinent social topics including demonstrations and riots, city movements, the Vietnam War, and the progression of the Civil Rights Movement. The interview structure consisted of a panel, which prompted relevant questions, and moderator Edwin Newman.