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Invitation from the United States Commission on Civil Rights

Wednesday, November 8, 1967
Washington, D.C.

Dr. king is invited to participate in the National Conference on Race and Education by the United States Commission on Civil Rights.

SCLC Flyer: Going Out of Business

Texas (TX)

The Fort Worth chapter of the SCLC issued this flyer advising its fellow Negro residents to boycott Bill Sodd's Meat Store because of discrimination.

Unfair to Put Blame on Mississippi Poor

Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C., VIETNAM

This editorial in the Tupelo (MS) Daily Journal claims it is unfair to attribute the proposed Poor People's Campaign in Washington, D.C. to poor Mississippians, who are uneducated and have no knowledge of Congress or how to mount a massive protest. The piece takes both Dr. King and Stokely Carmichael to task for suggesting that the wheels of government be ground to a stop until their demands are met.

Telegram from Mrs. Terry Brown to MLK

Monday, March 8, 1965
Montgomery, AL, Michigan (MI)

Mrs. Terry Brown writes Dr. King reflecting on her participation in the Great Freedom March. She also expresses to Dr. King how his words are a source of inspiration.

Letter from Mrs. Ted Gustafson to MLK

Sunday, December 10, 1967
New York, NY, Minnesota (MN)

Mrs. Ted Gustafson writes Dr. King to express her dismay with pastors and the pulpit, providing her belief that a Saint is long overdue.

Letter from MLK to Al Capp

Tuesday, June 30, 1964
Boston, MA, St. Augustine, FL, New York (NY), Massachusetts (MA), Florida (FL)

Dr. King writes Al Capp, formally known as the Cartoonist Alfred Gerald Caplin, acknowledging his previous correspondence. King asserts that his organization deplores violence regardless of race and hopes that Caplin's "current hostility will be overcome, and that he will exercise a deep concern for the welfare of all people of this country."

Negro Pioneers: The Story of George Washington Carver

New York, NY, New York (NY)

This children's book depicts George Washington Carver's life and educational journey. Carver is best known as an inventor, specifically finding many uses for the peanut, which is used in the production of shaving cream, shampoo, paper, and ink.

Letter from Ludovic Luke Barrie to MLK Regarding World Bible Society

In this letter, Ludovic Luke Barrie grants Dr. King the title “Honary President of The World Bible Society, Inc.” for all of his accomplishments.

Letter from Marlys Michels to MLK

Tuesday, April 4, 1967
Minnesota (MN)

Miss Michels informs Dr. King that she will no longer contribute to the SCLC. She disagrees with Dr. King's statements on the Vietnam War, as well as his support of Adam Clayton Powell.

Sacrifice

Dr. King interprets Proverbs 21:3 to mean that God wants righteousness and justice not burnt offerings.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Tuesday, June 9, 1964
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Joan Daves writes to Dr. King to thank him for making a visit, in reference to his book. Ms. Daves mentions the positive reactions from the audience and how she believes that their positive feedback will make for a good start of the book.

Marx

Dr. King references German philosopher Karl Marx regarding his teachings. King states, "Marx teaching resolves into three principal elements: a philosophy of history, and economic theory, and a practical program for the realization of a new social order."

Letter from Eric McRae to MLK

Sunday, March 11, 1962
California (CA), Selma, AL

Eric McRae, a fourth grade student from Lincoln School, writes to Dr. King for his efforts to promote voter registration with the Freedom Marches in Selma, Alabama.

Telegram from Bea and Andy Stanley to MLK

Sunday, October 23, 1960
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

Bea and Andy Stanley send Dr. King a telegram while he is in the Fulton County Jail in Atlanta. The Stanley's express, "we are inexpressibly proud that the determination to end segregation is upheld with such dignity and self sacrifice."

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK Regarding Publicity Directors of Harper and NAL

Monday, May 18, 1964
New York, NY

In this letter, Joan Daves asks Dr. King about his availability for the Publicity Directors for Harper and NAL. Joan Daves also reminds him about Stuart Harris and Jay Tower's desire to meet him.

Correspondence from Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, November 20, 1964
New York (NY), New York, NY, BELGIUM, FRANCE

Joan Daves writes Dr. King and attaches a letter from Pierre Servais, a publisher who plans to translate King's book "Strength to Love" to French. Servais also inquires if Dr. King can visit Paris or Brussels while he is in Europe, as his appearance would create an excellent opportunity to launch the sale of his book.

Youth in the World of Work

Michigan (MI), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Daniel H. Kruger describes many aspects of current labor trends in regards to automation, education and employment ratios in the United States.

Letter about Publication with Reprint of MLK's Remarks

Thursday, December 28, 1967
New York (NY)

In this letter, Paul Kurtz, the editor of the Humanist, asks Dr. King to look over and comment on the enclosed copy of his piece that will be printed in Humanist.

Letter from Mr. & Mrs. Mills to Rev. Abernathy

Saturday, April 27, 1968
Texas (TX)

This letter from a couple in Austin, Texas is a "message of encouragement" to Rev. Ralph D. Abernathy, recently appointed as the head of the SCLC in the aftermath of Dr. King's assassination.

Letter from Dr. King's Secretary, Maude L. Ballou

New York (NY)

In this standard response letter, Dr. King's personal secretary highlighted the progress made in his recovery from a nearly fatal stabbing in Harlem. It also notes that Dr. King would respond to his many "well wishes", once he had been cleared by his physicians.

MLK Speech at NAACP Sponsored Rally for Civil Rights

Sunday, July 10, 1960
Los Angeles, CA, Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C.

Dr. King gives a speech in which he addresses a myriad of issues on the subject of civil rights.

Anonymous Support for MLK

Sunday, October 30, 1960

An anonymous individual expresses his or her support and concerns about Dr. King's affiliation with presidential candidate John F. Kennedy.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Lucks Regarding Assistant Pastor

In this letter, Dr. King advises Rev. Lucks on choosing an assistant pastor.

Letter from Dolores H. Autuore to MLK

Thursday, September 28, 1967
New York, NY

Mrs. Autuore encloses some checks that were misplaced temporarily while offering her gratitude to Dr. King for his visit to Pine Island.

Crisis In the Nation

Washington (WA)

Dr. King and Joseph E. Lowery inform an anonymous recipient of an urgent meeting of the SCLC Executive Board.

Letter from Mary Ann Quilter to MLK

Tuesday, March 26, 1968
Ohio (OH), Atlanta, GA

Ms. Quilter informs Dr. King of a political event taking place on campus and asks him for any campaign literature he can provide and a picture of himself.

Letter from the KKK Kids to MLK

Mississippi (MS)

An anonymous member of The K.K.K. Kids writes Dr. King expressing that he or she believes Dr. King to be "a very ignorant person."

Metaphysics

Dr. King quotes from F. H. Bradley's "Appearance and Reality."

Letter from Hosea Williams to Project Leaders and Field Staff

Tuesday, March 5, 1968
Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Louisville, KY, Kentucky (KY), Tennessee (TN), New York (NY), Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA), Boston, MA, Massachusetts (MA), North Carolina (NC), Virginia (VA), Baltimore, MD, Maryland (MD), New Jersey (NJ), Pittsburgh, PA, Cincinnati, OH, Ohio (OH), Milwaukee, WI, Wisconsin (WI), Chicago, IL, South Carolina (SC), Detroit, MI, Cleveland, OH, Washington, D.C.

Hosea Williams, Director of National Mobilization for the Washington Poor People's Campaign, informs each project leader of their immediate supervisors of mobilization.

Letter from Arthur LeSueur to MLK

Friday, May 12, 1967

Arthur LeSueur, a War World II veteran, expresses his support of Dr. King's endeavors to gain equality in America. He hopes that Dr. King will not be discouraged by the great injustices he has faced and will continue to hold strong to his position.