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Notice from Leadership Conference on Civil Rights

Wednesday, April 10, 1968
Washington, D.C.

Here is a letter to stimulate local civil rights organizations to undertake visits to House and Senate members during Easter Recess. The visits were to push for legislative goals such as "at least a million jobs for the hardcore unemployed, decent low cost housing for all and repeal of punitive welfare restrictions." The Leadership Conference on Civil Rights issued this notice, in the days following Dr. King's assassination.

Peace and Freedom Party

Sunday, January 1, 1967
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, VIETNAM, California (CA)

The Peace and Freedom Party was originally established in the Northern region of California in 1967. This pamphlet features the party's political platform in addition to voter registration procedures.

Memo from the American Lutheran Church to Denver Area Pastors

Virginia (VA), Washington, D.C., Denver, CO

David Brown of the American Lutheran Church sends an article and copy of a letter from a pastor responding to the article to Denver area pastors. The article, published in "Common Sense," depicts Dr. King as a "Marxist tool" and agitator.

Letter from Clair Callan to MLK

Thursday, January 7, 1965
Nebraska (NE), Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), Atlanta, GA

Representative Callan of Nebraska writes Dr. King to thank him for his recent telegram regarding the Mississippi Congressional Delegation. After giving serious consideration to Dr. King's recommendation to vote against seating the Mississippi Congressman, Callan states that he came to the conclusion that "a refusal to seat the Delegation in question would not further the cause of the Negro in that state," and consequently voted for the seating.

Typical Theistic Personalism

Dr. King sketches notes on theistic personalism with references to Friedrich Leibniz, George Berkeley, Immanuel Kant, and Hermann Lotze.

SCLC Answers Attorney General Cook

Friday, August 16, 1963
Atlanta, GA

Mr. Clayton releases a statement concerning accusations made against Dr. King. In the statement, Georgia Attorney General Eugene Cook states that Dr. King refused to give him information him concerning a known communist named Jack O'Dell. Dr. King confirms that he has, in fact, cooperated with Cook and that O'Dell no longer works for the organization.

How to Deal with Grief and Dissappointment

Dr. King discusses the many avenues and remedies for disappointment. He includes a verse from the Book of Jeremiah and describes disappointment to be a "hallmark of life." Dr. King asserts that the first proper reaction is acceptance. Furthermore he suggests that one must express their grief with a person of trust. Dr. King stresses that the third and most important resolution to disappointment is to refrain from rationalization.

MLK Reflections on the Selma March, Bloody Sunday, SNCC and Communism

Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King discusses the Selma to Montgomery march, calling it the "most powerful and dramatic civil rights protest ever held in the south." Dr. King also addresses criticism of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee's tactics. He concludes these notes by responding to claims that he has communist ties, denying any foreign or left-wing influence on his actions. Of Bayard Rustin and C. T.

Beyond the Los Angeles Riots

Saturday, November 13, 1965
Los Angeles, CA, Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA

Dr. King discusses the legacy of the Los Angeles riots in nonviolent protest. A decade after the Montgomery Civil Rights demonstrations, Dr. King speaks to the improvement of Southern African Americans' lives and the degradation of Northern African Americans' situations.

Quote from AFL-CIO President George Meany

New Jersey (NJ)

This is a picture of George Meany, President of AFL-CIO, giving an address to the Jewish Labor Committee meeting in Atlantic City, NJ on March 26, 1960. The picture is inscribed with a quote which reads: "What we want for ourselves, we want for all humanity."

Letter from MLK to Ohio Senator Frank J. Lausche

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King thanks Senator Frank J. Lausche (D-OH) for his support in passing the 1964 Civil Rights Act. Senator Lausche also served as Governor of Ohio.

Is It All Right To Break The Law?

Monday, August 12, 1963
New York (NY), Birmingham, AL, New York, NY, Alabama (AL)

Excerpts from Dr. King's 1963 "Letter from a Birmingham Jail" are used to establish an affirmative answer to the question, "Is It All Right to Break The Law?"

Statement Before the National Democratic Platform and Resolutions Committee

Saturday, August 11, 1956
Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL)

Dr. King addresses the National Democratic Platform and Resolutions Committee. He calls for strong federal action in the South to prevent violence and to uphold the decisions of the Supreme Court pertaining to the end of segregation.

Proposed Resolution on East-West Relations

FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, VIETNAM, CUBA

The Council for Christian Social Action of the United Church of Christ, citing President Johnson's State of the Union statement that he hopes to end the Cold War, indicates its support of government efforts to create a dialogue with the Soviet Union and other Eastern European countries. The Council asks that the Senate ratify the outer space treaty and the U.S.-Soviet consular convention and that Congress approve an East-West trade bill and lifting restrictions on the Food for Peace program.

Letter from Richard K. Goidel

Friday, March 15, 1968
Brooklyn, NY

Mr. Goidel, a student editor, requests a photograph from Dr. King to be featuredd in an article referencing the recent Time Magazine's Choice "68. Dr. King was nominated as a candidate for by Time magazine's Choice '68 collegiate Presidency. Sadly, Dr. King was assassinated two weeks later.

Letter from L. Howard Bennett to MLK

Monday, March 27, 1967
Washington, D.C., VIETNAM

L. Howard Bennett writes Dr. King and encloses statistical information regarding African American involvement in the Vietnam War.

Letter from MLK to Society of Brothers

Tuesday, October 5, 1965
Pennsylvania (PA)

Dr. King thanks the Society of Brothers for its recent donation to the SCLC and explains why the donation is important to the work and needs of the SCLC.

SCLC News Release on Voter Registration

Monday, February 19, 1962
Atlanta, GA, PUERTO RICO, Mississippi (MS)

This press release from the Southern Christian Leadership Conference describes Dr. King's prediction that many African-Americans would register to vote in the upcoming election. Dr. King also remarks that President Kennedy "has not lived up to his civil rights campaign promises."

God (Malachi)

Dr. King references various Bible passages that are related to God.

Our Pastor: A Characterization of Dr. Martin Luther King Sr.

Atlanta, GA

This document portrays a picture of Dr. King Sr. with an excerpt written by Emily Dodson McCrary.

Letter from Fra Morton Sims to MLK

Monday, April 3, 1967
Indiana (IN), Atlanta, GA

Dr. King is encouraged to read a US News & World Report article entitled, "One Negro Woman's Advice to Her People." The article approaches the issues of the African American community from an understanding perspective.

Letter from Joan Daves to Coretta Scott King

Thursday, October 15, 1964
New York, NY

Joan Daves expresses her gratitude toward Mrs. King for her support of her husband throughout his work in the Civil Rights Movement, following his receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Request for Help

Monday, November 6, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Virginia (VA)

Marcellus M. Harper requests assistance from Dr. King in relation to economic improvement. In his letter of appeal, Mr. Harper requests that Dr. King speaks on gossip, unity, improving conditions and ways of living, and economic improvement.

The Student Voice

Wednesday, March 1, 1961
Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), Washington, D.C., Florida (FL), Georgia (GA)

SNCC's Newsletter, The Student Voice, updates readers on the progress of the civil rights movement throughout the United States. This issue gives details on incidents of discrimination throughout the South, boycotts, "Stand-Ins," and education opportunities for African Americans.

Letter from MLK to Coretta Scott King

Saturday, October 1, 1960
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

In an intimate letter to Mrs. King, Dr. King informs her of his recent arrival to the State Prison in Reidsville, Georgia. He urges her "to be strong in faith" as she is also pregnant with their third child at the time. He expresses his hope for a family visit that coming Sunday, and his desire to remain intellectually engaged during his four-month sentence.

Letter from Bernard LaFayette, Jr. to MLK

Friday, March 24, 1967
Chicago, IL, New York (NY), VIETNAM, Atlanta, GA

Before Mr. LaFayette leaves for New York to join the Spring Mobilization to end the war in Vietnam, he offer suggestions towards the housing problems that have occurred in Chicago. He states that there should be an urban renewal project that could possibly help low-income citizens afford respectable housing.

Letter from Laurie Bush to MLK

Thursday, November 30, 1967
New York (NY)

Laurie Bush writes to Dr. King requesting information about the Civil Rights Movement for his or her research paper.

Letter from William T. and Scottie Lee Ellis to MLK

Saturday, May 25, 1963
Alaska (AK), Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

The Ellis family informs Dr. King about demonstrations in Alaska, while offering up words of gratitude for civil rights efforts in Birmingham.

Letter from Tom Perry to MLK

Tuesday, December 26, 1967
CANADA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., VIETNAM

Tom Perry thanks Dr. King for inspiring him to continue his work in the peace movement in Canada.

Letter from Florida Writer to President Lyndon Johnson on True Equality

Florida (FL), Washington, D.C., Detroit, MI

This letter from a Florida resident to President Johnson expresses the writer's views on the nation's racial challenges.