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Letter from Mrs. Behlen to Ralph Abernathy

Tuesday, April 9, 1968
New York (NY)

Mrs. Behlen congratulates Ralph Abernathy for the wonderful job he did during the funeral services for Dr. King.

List of SCLC Board Members

This document is a list of all board members of the SCLC.

Letter from Maria A. Mochulski to MLK

Pittsburgh, PA, Atlanta, GA

Duquesne University requests that Dr. King provide information for the candidate he is supporting for the presidential elections of 1968. The universities Choice '68 committee is interested in having Dr. King speak to the student body.

Letter from MLK to Charles A. Melton

Monday, April 25, 1966
Pennsylvania (PA), Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Alabama (AL)

Dr. King declines an invitation to visit Westchester, Pennsylvania due to the time he must devote to the Chicago campaign and helping political candidates in Alabama.

New South: The Current Crisis In Race Relations

Saturday, March 1, 1958
Montgomery, AL, New York, NY, Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), New York (NY), Georgia (GA), NIGERIA

Dr. King, as President of the Montgomery Improvement Association, examines the race relations crisis. He discusses how segregation makes the Negro feel inferior and unaccepted. Dr. King also affirms that he will not accept a system of violence and the "evils of segregation."

Remarks of MLK: En Granslos Kval Pa Operan

Thursday, March 31, 1966
SWEDEN, EGYPT, Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL)

In this address, Dr. King expresses his Dream for America and his sincere appreciation for Sweden's support for "the cause of racial justice in America."

Letter from Rev. Sterling E. Glover and Rev. Henry Payden to MLK

Wednesday, May 24, 1967
Cleveland, OH

Reverend Glover informs Dr. King that he was surprised to hear that a statement was released regarding the planned summer conference. It was Reverend Glover's impression that no information would be released to the press, so that relations between the United Pastors Association and the SCLC would not be tainted.

Get Well Letter from William H. Allen, M.D.

Tuesday, September 30, 1958
New York, NY

William H. Allen, M.D. sent this letter to Dr. King expressing sympathy to Dr. King, for his nearly fatal stabbing. Dr. Allen, further into the letter, encouraged Dr. King to continue to pray in order to eliminate evil in the world and hoped he will remain protected to continue his mission for freedom.

Telegram from MLK to Terry Shaw

Thursday, July 1, 1965
Selma, AL, Atlanta, GA

Dr. King telegrams Terry Shaw stating that the staff of SCLC sends their "deepest sympathy" in his time of grief.

Certificate Honoring MLK

Friday, March 31, 1967

This certificate serves to honor MLK for his contributions "in the field of racial relations."

Letter from Robert S. Browne to MLK

Monday, April 10, 1967
New Jersey (NJ), New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

Robert S. Browne informs Dr. King that he disagrees with the editor the New York Times. Browne conveys his support to Dr. King for his nonviolent philosophy.

Letter from The Very Rev. Raymond J. Swords to MLK

Friday, October 30, 1964
New York, NY, Massachusetts (MA)

Fr. Raymond J. Swords, S.J., President of the College of the Holy Cross, writes to Dr. King, expressing how joyous he was to hear that King was selected as the 1964 Nobel Prize Winner.

Ritschl (God)

Dr. King quotes Albrecht Ritschl’s “The Christian Doctrine of Justification and Reconciliation.”

Letter from the National Committee Against Discrimination in Housing

Wednesday, November 1, 1967
New York (NY)

Mr. Rutledge and Mr. Wood inform several civil rights activists of the practices of the New York City housing agencies to exclude African Americans and Puerto Rican Americans from upper level administrative posts.

Letter from James Harrison to Otis Roberts

Friday, December 22, 1967
Washington, D.C.

James Harrison, SCLC's comptroller, explains an itemized breakdown of finances related to a grant from the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare.

Letter from the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament to MLK

UNITED KINGDOM, London, England, Washington, D.C.

Canon L. John Collins, a founder of the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament, invites Dr. King to speak at a rally in Trafalgar Square in London, England. The proposed rally will be based on the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, and Collins would like to provide a direct link between the rally and the Washington March through the participation of both Bayard Rustin and Dr. King.

Letter from Peter S. Shults to NAACP

Wednesday, August 25, 1965
Vermont (VT), New York, NY

Peter Shults writes the NAACP requesting a comment on a postcard he received that depicts Dr. King as a communist. He asks multiple questions regarding the validity of the picture on the postcard.

MLK Statement from the Harlem Hospital

Tuesday, September 30, 1958
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Dr. King writes from the Harlem Hospital in New York as a result of being stabbed by Izola Currey. King asserts that he does not have any ill feelings towards Currey, and hopes that she receives the help she needs to become a functional member of society. King also thanks his supporters for all the cards, telegrams, and phone calls which fortified him throughout his tribulation. Dr. King ends by saying he is "impatiently waiting to rejoin [his] friends and colleagues to continue the work that we know must be done regardless of the cost."

Letter from Clara Urquhart to MLK

Monday, November 2, 1964
UNITED KINGDOM, London, England, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, NORWAY, Oslo, Norway

Clara Urquhart invites Dr. King to speak at the Human Right Day Commemoration, sponsored by Amnesty International, on November 9, 1964.


Dr. King describes art as "alleviating the ills of life."

The New Covenant

Dr. King writes about the New Covenant, according to Jeremiah 31:33.

Postcard from Dekker Family


The Dekker family of Holland sends its support to Dr. King.

Letter from Jacob Hoffman to MLK

Monday, June 7, 1965
Pennsylvania (PA), Pittsburgh, PA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Jacob Hoffman, principal of M. Hall Stanton Public School, requests that Dr. King record on a tape a few inspirational words for the graduating sixth grade class. Mr. Hoffman, also, mentions a new project called the, "New Dimensions Project," which is to inspire students to achieve higher standards.

A Resolution for Dr. King from the Church Women United in Atlanta

Atlanta, GA

This is a resolution honoring Dr. King's life and work upon his untimely death.

Article Written by MLK for The Progressive

INDIA, INDONESIA, GHANA, BRAZIL, Little Rock, AR, Albany, GA, Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA), Boston, MA

In this unfinished draft of an article for The Progressive, Dr. King writes about the social ills of America through the context of what he calls the two most important documents in American history: the Declaration of Independence and the Emancipation Proclamation.

Letter from Ruth Wood to MLK

Virginia (VA)

Ruth Wood of Virginia offers her gratitude to Dr. and Mrs. King for their efforts in search of a better society. Mrs. Wood also expresses her pleasure at attending Ebenezer Baptist Church and intends to attend the upcoming SCLC meeting.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Wednesday, August 28, 1963
New York, NY, Washington, D.C.

Joan Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, writes to Dr. King regarding his "I Have A Dream" speech.


Dr. King writes on the concept of Calvinism.

"The Drum Major Instinct" Ebenezer Baptist Church

Sunday, February 4, 1968
Atlanta, GA

The Drum Major Instinct, a sermon delivered by Dr. King at the Atlanta Ebenezer Baptist Church, frames the “instinct” as being responsible for the social ills of the world. Dr. King proclaims that racial inequality in America and the war in Vietnam are the result of nations engaging in a “bitter colossal contest for supremacy.” He suggests that the only way to end this “suicidal thrust” is to abide by an altered definition of the instinct – the definition of Jesus Christ.

Letter from Frederic C. Smedley to Lyndon B. Johnson

Saturday, May 6, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, Washington, D.C., VIETNAM

Frederic C. Smedley, a lawyer and peace activist, writes to President Johnson suggesting a program to help end the war in Vietnam. Smedley urges President Johnson to implement the plan to bring an end to the longstanding fight.