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Non-Violent Procedures to Inter-Racial Harmony


Dr. King proclaims that race relations is a crisis that has existed for many years in America. As a result of unjust race relations, Negroes have embarked upon the current fight for equal rights.

Adverse Postcard to MLK

Boston, MA, Atlanta, GA, Tennessee (TN)

American Opinion illustrates a propaganda postcard of Dr. King that accuses him of being a communist. The photo on the postcard was taken at the Highlander School in 1957 which trained leaders in nonviolent passive resistance.

The Answer to a Perplexing Question


"Why Could Not We Cast Him Out?" is a chapter in Dr. King's book "Strength to Love." In this chapter, Dr. King discusses the methods in which man attempts to deal with evil in the world. Two methodologies are distinguished. The first concerns man's independent attempt to remove evil and the second stems from man's ideology of making God solely responsible for eliminating evil. Dr. King concludes that neither method is successful and that man has to find a medium between the two.

Letter to MLK Regarding Support and Donation

Saturday, September 27, 1958
New York, NY, New York (NY)

A New York couple and their 9 year old son, mailed Dr. King this get well letter praying for his recovery and saluting him for his work.

Letter from Leon Lowry to the King's

Saturday, December 8, 1962
Florida (FL), Atlanta, GA

A. Leon Lowry invites the Kings to speak at Beulah Baptist Institutional Church in Florida for their Men's and Women's services.

Letter from Jessie Jackson to C. L. Franklin

Tuesday, February 21, 1967
Chicago, IL, Detroit, MI, Texas (TX), Atlanta, GA

Reverend Jessie Jackson writes this letter to Reverend C. L. Franklin of the New Bethel Baptist Church in Detroit, Michigan. Jackson expresses his gratitude for Franklin's suggestions and assistance during a recent stay in Detroit. He also appreciates the solidarity exhibited towards the SCLC.

Telegram Called in From Attorney General Nicholas Deb Katzenbach to MLK

Friday, February 19, 1965
Washington, D.C., Selma, AL, Alabama (AL)

Katzenbach responds to an urgent telegram from Dr. King concerning State Troopers that had trapped Demonstrators inside a church and refused to let them obtain medical attention. Katzenbach tells Dr. King that he is aware of the situation and that the Department Attorneys and the FBI were already on the scene in both Selma and Marion and investigations had already begun.

Note Cards on God

Dr. King's writes on the possibility of finding God from the First Book of Chronicles.

Letter from Irving Engel to MLK

Monday, August 2, 1965
New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, ISRAEL, GHANA

Dr. King has been invited to visit Israel. While they are delighted to have him, because of the demands of the Civil Rights Movement, it is suggested that he make this visit while he is at the meeting of the Organization of African Unity in Ghana in order to be considerate of his time.

SCLC Audit Notice

Tuesday, December 19, 1967
Atlanta, GA

Mr. Rutherford writes to inform Citizens Trust Company that there will be an audit of the SCLC. Rutherford requests that the bank send a list of any and all accounts associated with SCLC.

Address by MLK at 47th NAACP Annual Convention

Wednesday, June 27, 1956
San Francisco, CA, Montgomery, AL, INDIA

Dr. King addresses the audience at the 47th NAACP annual convention in San Francisco, California. King begins with background information of slavery and its physical and mental effects on Africans, then tells the "Montgomery Story." This story begins with a mental transformation among blacks, which led to the Montgomery boycott. As a result of the boycott, blacks were empowered and began fighting injustice and seeking changes in unfair legislation.

Letter from Albert E. Manley to MLK

Tuesday, September 3, 1963
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Spelman College President Albert E. Manley congratulates Dr. King for the "highly effective" March on Washington. Manley commends Dr. King for his "I Have A Dream" speech. He found the speech inspirational and considers it to be "one of the greatest speeches of this century." As a result of their continued support to the struggle, the Manleys enclose a financial contribution to assist the work of the SCLC.


Dr. King describes Psalms 135:5 as henotheism: belief in a god without denying the existence of other gods. Because God is the only one worthy of worship, King concludes that the Hebrews were practical monotheists.

Letter from Senator Hugh Scott to MLK

Wednesday, July 1, 1964
Pennsylvania (PA), Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

US Senator Hugh Scott, writes Dr. King expressing thanks for the Reverend's letter of recent date. In addition, Scott reveals that he sponsored the Civil Rights legislation long before the present act was introduced. Scott also expresses that he would enjoy speaking with Dr. King during his next visit in Washington, D. C.

How My Theology Has Changed

Dr. King highlights seven main ways in which his theological views have changed since his final year at Crozer Theological Seminary.

Telegram from Lawrence F. O'Brien to MLK

Thursday, August 5, 1965
Washington, D.C.

Lawrence O'Brien, Special Assistant to President Johnson, invites Dr. King to the signing of the Voting Rights Act in Washington, D.C.

Estimated Budget

This document drafts out SCLC's estimated budget for the 1964-1965 fiscal year.

Letter from Ralph J. Bunche to MLK

Monday, March 18, 1968
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY)

Ralph J. Bunche sends an invitation to Dr. King, asking him to join the International Sponsors Committee at the New School for Social Research in New York City. This committee was developed in honor of Norman Thomas, an advocate for human rights.

Letter from Wendell K. Jones to MLK and Leon M. Sullivan

Tuesday, April 4, 1967
Georgia (GA), Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA, SOUTH AFRICA, Los Angeles, CA, Boston, MA, Atlanta, GA

This is a letter of support to Dr. King from Wendell K. Jones for his tireless work on behalf of African Americans. Mr. Jones also recognizes Rev. Leon M. Sullivan for helping African Americans in Massachusetts.

Letter from W.O. Gill to MLK

W. O. Gill expresses his gratitude for the generosity that Coretta Scott King extended to him. He then tells Mrs. King that his secretary is sending her a check for $2.00, and that he looks forward to being able to visit with Dr. King. He ends the letter with a quote from the bible.

Letter from James R. Hoffa to MLK

Monday, March 29, 1965
Detroit, MI, Alabama (AL), Washington, D.C.

Teamsters President James (Jimmy) Hoffa requests a meeting with Dr. King to discuss the boycott in Alabama and how it relates to existing contractual agreements with interstate carriers.

Letter from Emma D. Roberts to MLK

Friday, April 17, 1964
Pennsylvania (PA)

Ms. Roberts expresses her support for Dr. King's "campaign for civil rights for Negroes," which she contrasts with the efforts of other groups that involve violence.

Letter from Frank Jones to MLK

Tuesday, August 14, 1962
Atlanta, GA, Albany, GA

Reverend Frank Jones sends Dr. King a letter expressing his concern about the recent occurrences in Albany, Georgia.

Letter from Matthew Killian to MLK

Tuesday, February 6, 1968
Alabama (AL), FRANCE

Matthew Killian shares his outrage with the unjustified suffering that violence creates. Mr. Killian continues by providing support to Dr. King in an interpretation of a scripture concerning Peter and the woman at the foot of the cross. In closing, Killian wishes blessings upon the Reverend for his efforts to complete his work.

Letter from Executive Director of Catholic Interracial Council to MLK

Friday, July 14, 1967
Chicago, IL

The following document is a cover letter of enclosed letters John A. McDermott sent seventeen Negro state legislators "congratulating them on their fight for fair housing".

Letter from Berry Gordy to Reverend Wyatt Tee Walker

Thursday, July 18, 1963
Detroit, MI, Atlanta, GA

Mr. Gordy writes to Mr. Walker to negotiate album production and royalty rates for Dr. King's speeches.

Statement Before the Credentials Committee by MLK

Saturday, August 22, 1964
Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), SOUTH AFRICA

In this statement before the Credentials Committee of the Democratic National Committee, Dr. King urges that the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party be seated and recognized at the convention. Dr. King declares that the Democratic Party in Mississippi itself is unjust and vows to keep black Mississippians off of the voting rolls. Dr.King uses the analogy of how can we as Americans preach "freedom and democracy" in Africa and Asia, yet refuse to provide its own citizens with such rights.

Letter from Gino Gullace to MLK

Wednesday, December 1, 1965
New York, NY, ITALY

Dr. King is asked to participate in a worldwide survey on the topics of "Happiness" and "Life After Death." The survey is sponsored by OGGI magazine a weekly publication in Milano, Italy.

Letter from Charles C. Diggs Jr. to the General Motors Corporation

Tuesday, July 18, 1967
Washington, D.C., Detroit, MI

In this letter, Congressman Charles Diggs of Michigan asks Mr. Louis Seaton of General Motors for his comments in regards to automobile dealerships. The Congressman then points out that General Motors is the only one of the "Big 3" automobile companies that has not taken initiative in having a Negro franchise holder.

Senate Subcommittee on Urban Reorganization Statement

Thursday, December 15, 1966

In a hearing on the plight of inner cities, Dr. King focuses on injustices in the urban ghettoes, stating that the problem is not primarily a race issue but an economic one. He calls for a rebalancing of national priorities and links the plight of America's poor to the squandering of resources on war.