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Letter from Roslyn Wilkins to MLK

Friday, June 11, 1965

Roslyn Wilkins of California asks Dr. King for his opinion on interracial marriage. Wilkins asserts that her mother would rather her marry a Japanese man because, as Wilkins is white, they are closer in color.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

The author suggests that Dr. King focus on six specific things to accomplish in 1968.

Godm (Micah)

Dr. King refers to the biblical book of Micah to write about Micah and Hosea's similar reference to the strength of the love of God.

Letter from MLK to Laura Graves

Monday, October 21, 1963

Dr. King thanks Laura Graves for her recent letter which presented suggestions and advice regarding the prejudice in the American community. King states, "with persons of good will increasingly speaking on behalf of racial injustice, the day will arrive more quickly."

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Thursday, September 10, 1964

Joan Daves sends Dr. King an advertisement for "Why We Can't Wait", which will appear in the Washington Afro-American. The advertisement has also been published in Ebony magazine.

MLK Handwritten Note Card - "Peace of Mind or Soul"

In this handwritten note card, entitled, simply, "Peace of Mind or Soul," Dr. King quotes Dr. C.G. Jung on the subject of neurosis.

Letter from MLK to J. S. Beckington

Wednesday, June 15, 1966

Dr. King thanks Mr. J. S. Beckington for his contribution to the SCLC. King also expresses how important the loyal supporters are to his organization.

Letter from Robert D. Heslep to MLK

Tuesday, February 6, 1968

The Philosophy of Education Society, Southeastern Region writes Dr. King giving full moral support in the development of "The Poor People's Washington Campaign."

Letter from MLK to Jessie Treichler

Friday, September 7, 1962

Dr. King writes Jessie Tresichler to inform her that he and his wife will be unable to accept her invitation to Antioch College. He explains that his calendar will not allow him to accept any more speaking engagements and that Coretta is an expecting mother.

SCLC News Release - MLK Statement on Continued Racial Violence in Alabama

Tuesday, February 22, 1966

This 1966 SCLC news release contains a statement from Dr. King concerning further racial violence in Birmingham, Alabama and the need for prompt action.

Letter from MLK to Al Capp

Tuesday, June 30, 1964

Dr. King writes Al Capp, formally known as the Cartoonist Alfred Gerald Caplin, acknowledging his previous correspondence. King asserts that his organization deplores violence regardless of race and hopes that Caplin's "current hostility will be overcome, and that he will exercise a deep concern for the welfare of all people of this country."

Letter from Arthur Spence to MLK

Wednesday, August 31, 1966

Spence writes Dr. King defending the critical perceptions that some whites hold of blacks. As an African American, Spence feels that some members of his race have developed bad habits.

Letter from MLK to Lenn Latham

Dr. King expresses gratitude for support of his work and advises that nonviolence is the only way to achieve change.

Letter from the Pacifist Crusade "John XXIII" to MLK

Sunday, April 11, 1965

Members of the Pacifist Crusade of Argentina extend support to Dr. King in his quest for peace. The group explains the background of the organization and express their goal of world peace through reconciliation.

A Perspective for Christian Peace Concern

Brewster Kneen writes about the roles that Christians and the church play in the peace-making process. He cites Saint Peter and Saint Luke to support his argument.

Letter from Philip Harnden to MLK

Friday, February 16, 1968

After reading Dr. King's book, "Why We Can't Wait," Philip Harnden, a sophomore at Wheaton College, writes Dr. King expressing his newly changed insight on the Negro struggle. Mr. Harnden inquires about Dr. King's nonviolent approach and the black community beginning to abandon nonviolence by adopting more aggressive means to achieve their goals.

Ritschl, Albrecht

Dr. King provides a biographical sketch of German theologian Albrecht Ritschl.

Letter from MLK to Former Supporters

Dr. King addresses former supporters concerning his controversial stance on Vietnam. He examines the country's colonial history and struggle for independence as contributing factors to America's current military presence in Vietnam. The civil rights leader defends his commitment to nonviolence as an "exceptional moral responsibility" that must transcend international borders.

Letter from Robert L. Green to Dora McDonald

Friday, November 3, 1967

Mr. Green encloses a foreword to Dr. Neal Sullivan's book by Dr. King.

Letter Dated 2/1/63 from Frank Elliott to MLK

Friday, February 1, 1963

Frank Elliot is writing to notify Dr. King that he has received the revised sermon "Antidotes of Fear," and it will be in the galley proofs. Elliot states that the galley proofs will be sent to Dr. King's office no later than Feburary 7th. He wants to meet with Dr. King to discuss any problems that may arise.

Letter from J. Purcell to MLK

Friday, February 9, 1968

A "Poor White Texan" sends Dr. King a letter of support and encourages him to run for President. The writer explains that it is not until the people achieve racial unity that the world will be at peace.

Letter from Joan Daves to Hoki Ishihara

Monday, August 24, 1964

Joan Daves encloses a copy of a manuscript of the proposed speech to be given in Berlin by Dr. King. Daves also indicates the fifty-dollar fee for the one-time publication of Dr. King's comments about the late President Kennedy.

Introduction of Senator Edward M. Kennedy

Monday, August 8, 1966

Dr. King introduces Senator Edward M. Kennedy at a SCLC banquet and highlights his accomplishments.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Jack Delano

Tuesday, July 6, 1965

Dr. King accepts Mr. Delano's invitation to appear for an hour on WIPR-TV during his visit to Puerto Rico.

MLK Style Sheet: Why We Can't Wait

Here we see what is known as a style sheet for Dr. King's third book, "Why We Can't Wait." Dr. King's book was published in 1964 following the success of the infamous SCLC Birmingham desegregation campaign.

MLK Address at the University of Chicago

Thursday, January 27, 1966

Dr. King delivers this speech at the University of Chicago on January 27, 1966. He expounds upon the struggles of the Negro family in America, explaining the social and economic challenges the Negro faces along with the affects of slavery.

Evil

Dr. King defines the concept of good and evil by refrencing Philip S. Richards' "Belief of Man."

Greatness

Dr. King quotes Ernest Fremont Tittle's "The Lord's Prayer," in which Tittle explains how Jesus measured greatness.

Existentialism

Dr. King outlines concepts of existentialism as viewed through the doctrine of French existentialist writer Jean Paul Sartre.

SCLC Direction

Thursday, November 17, 1966

Ira Sandperl writes on what he believes should be the direction of SCLC. It is stressed that SCLC should engage in a universal nonviolent human rights movement.