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Telegram from Congressman Seymour Halpern to MLK

Friday, February 5, 1965
Selma, AL, Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C.

In this telegram to Dr. King in Selma jail, Congressman Seymour Halpern expresses his regret that he is unable to travel to Mississippi.

White House Message on Civil Rights

Friday, January 26, 1968
Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS)

President Johnson's message to Congress explains strides the U.S. has made in the social, educational and economic conditions of minorities in America. It also discusses areas that need improvement such as infant mortality rates and poverty levels among non-whites. The President calls for legislation to prevent violence against those exercising their civil rights, to strengthen enforcement powers of the Equal Employment Opportunities Commission, to prevent discrimination on federal and state juries, and to guarantee fair housing.

Letter from Dorothy Dunbar Bromley to Andrew Young

Monday, April 24, 1967
Atlanta, GA

Mrs. Bromley informs Reverend Andrew Young that she would like to write Dr. King's biography.

Canon L. John Collins Writes MLK Regarding Nuclear Disarmament

London, England, NETHERLANDS, GERMANY

Reverend Canon L. John Collins writes Dr. King inquiring if he would allow his name to be used as a sponsor for an international financial appeal of the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament.

Letter from Rev. J. Edward Lantz to MLK

Wednesday, November 4, 1964
Atlanta, GA

Rev. Lantz, Executive Director of the Southern Office of the National Council of the Churches of Christ, congratulates Dr. King for being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from P. D. Thompson to MLK

Wednesday, June 16, 1965
Johannesburg, South Africa, New York (NY)

P. D. Thompson, a member of the South African Institute of Race Relations, writes to Dr. King seeking help with South Africa's race relations.

SCLC Resolution on Afro-American Unity

Thursday, August 17, 1967
Atlanta, GA

In this resolution approved at its Tenth Annual Convention, SCLC affirms the need for Afro-American unity. The organization commits to conduct regional unity conferences involving all sectors of the Negro community, hold Identity Workshops on history and culture, and develop economic and political power so that Negroes can own and control their own communities. The resolution concludes by affirming the importance of black spiritual power, economic power, and political power.

Telegram from Ted Aretha to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967
Birmingham, AL, New York (NY), Alabama (AL), New York, NY

Ted Aretha sends words of encouragement to Dr. King during his time in the Birmingham City Jail.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Jean Bennett

Friday, May 13, 1966
Nevada (NV), Chicago, IL

Dora McDonald writes Jean Bennett on behalf of Dr. King expressing his regards for offering to donate a substantial portion of the royalties from the recording of "We Ain't What We Was" to an organization of his choice.

Letter to MLK from the Women For: Organization

Thursday, May 25, 1967
California (CA), VIETNAM

The WOMEN FOR: organization sent Dr. King a letter with their enclosed policy regarding the conflict in Vietnam. Women For: is a non-partisan civic organization that is actively involved in local, national, and international affairs. The group of over 2,000 women believed, unanimously, that the United States should cease all military occupation.

Telegram from Charles William Butler to MLK

Tuesday, March 30, 1965
Detroit, MI, Baltimore, MD

Charles William Butler, Pastor of New Cavalry Baptist Church, informs Dr. King that he will not be present at a board meeting. The lateness of the invitation and his involvement in Detroit, Michigan prevent his attendance.

Letter from Robert L. Green to Dora McDonald Regarding Dr. King's Biological Sketch

Monday, January 22, 1968
Michigan (MI)

This letter from Robert L. Green, Associate Professor, Michigan State University to Dora McDonald is to request copy of Dr. King's biographical sketch to be forwarded to an individual at Yeshiva University. The biographical sketch will be used in conjunction with Dr. King's paper "The Role of Behavioral Scientist in the Civil Rights Movement" which will be published in the American Psychological Association Journal and the Journal of Social Issues.

The Dimensions of a Complete Life

Sunday, November 13, 1960
New York, NY, Iowa (IA), INDIA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Cambridge, MA

Dr. King's speech at Cornell University cites the new and complete city of God described in the Book of Revelation to propose that life at its best is complete in three dimensions. He states that a complete or three-dimensional life includes an inward concern for one's personal ends, an outward commitment to the welfare of others, and an upward connection with God.

Letter from the National Committee Against Discrimination in Housing

Wednesday, November 1, 1967
New York (NY)

Mr. Rutledge and Mr. Wood inform several civil rights activists of the practices of the New York City housing agencies to exclude African Americans and Puerto Rican Americans from upper level administrative posts.

Manichaeism

Dr. King describes Manichaeism, a religion and philosophical doctrine that originated in Persia.

Address by MLK to Southern Association of Political Scientist

Friday, November 13, 1964

Dr. King addresses the issues of poverty, unemployment, education, health, and housing disparities within the nation. Granted, many strides have been made but there is still more work to be done. Equality has still not come full circle in regards to these social issues. Dr. King urges the people to continue the fight of social justice in all aspects of inequality.

Note to MLK from Mrs. Ed Brooke

This note from Mrs. Ed Brooke is extremely negative towards Dr. King, accusing him of inciting riots and calling him names.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Queen Mother Moore

Wednesday, March 20, 1968
New York (NY), Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS)

Dora McDonald communicates with Queen Mother Moore to discuss Dr. King's inability to meet with her prior to the Washington Campaign for Jobs or Income. Queen Mother Moore was an important figure during the Civil Right Movement and a founder of the Republic of New Afrika.

Letter from Harold Franklin to MLK

Saturday, May 2, 1964
Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL)

Harold Franklin expresses appreciation to Dr. King for granting him scholarship aid.

Telegram from Women's Auxillary of the Chicago NAACP to MLK

Wednesday, February 23, 1966
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

The Women's Auxiliary of the Chicago Branch of the NAACP informs Dr. King he will be the recipient of their 1966 Humanitarian Award.

Letter from MLK to George E. Bass

Thursday, April 7, 1966
Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak at the Annual Luncheon for the Planned Parenthood Association.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding Saturday Review

Monday, May 11, 1964
New York, NY

Joan Daves, literary agent to Dr. King, wrote Dr. King to gain insight on his preference for a sentence revision to appear in his book "Why We Cant Wait."

Idealism

Dr. King cites several statements regarding idealism.

Letter from Patricia Kleps to MLK

Thursday, July 13, 1967
San Francisco, CA

Dr. King informs Mrs. Patricia Kleps that he will be unable to fulfill her request to speak at the First Unitarian Church in San Francisco. However, Dr. King pledges to contact her around January of 1968 to possibly schedule a date for him to address her congregation.

The Powell Affair - A Crisis of Morals ad Faith

Monday, February 6, 1967
Massachusetts (MA), Connecticut (CT), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York (NY)

The National Committee of Negro Churchmen express disapproval regarding the unseating of Adam Clayton Powell as Representative of the 18th Congressional District of New York, and Chairman of the House Education and Labor Committee. The organization issues a call to Congress and the Democratic Caucus for Powell's re-instatement.

Letter from Shirley Katzander to MLK

Tuesday, March 14, 1967
New York, NY

Shirley Katzander, Director of Promotion for "The Reporter," requests Dr. King's commentary on an article written by Meg Greenfield titled "What is Racial Balance in the Schools?"

Kant

Dr. King outlines principles of Kantian philosophy regarding morality and religion.

God

Dr. King cites "Totem and Tabu" and "The Future of an Illusion" for Sigmund Freud's view on the origin of the idea of God.

Program from the SCLC's Tenth Annual Convention

Monday, August 8, 1966
Jackson, MS

This is the Tentative Programme of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference's Tenth Annual Convention. The convention was held in Jackson, Mississippi at a Masonic Temple and hosted by the Reverend Allen Johnson. The four day convention was themed "Human Rights - The Continuing Struggle."

Immorality

Dr. King cites a quotation from the book entitled "War and Peace" by Leo Tolstoy. Mr. Tolstoy includes a dialogue between two characters in the book that discuss immorality. One character references "Hender's Theory" to expound upon the reality of life and death.