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Letter from Eugene Exman to MLK

Wednesday, November 15, 1961
New York, NY, Montgomery, AL

Mr. Eugene Exman's, expresses disappointment in Dr. King for not having received his manuscript for a forthcoming book of sermons, and urges him to expedite the manuscript.

Letter from Maria A. Mochulski to MLK

Pittsburgh, PA, Atlanta, GA

Duquesne University requests that Dr. King provide information for the candidate he is supporting for the presidential elections of 1968. The universities Choice '68 committee is interested in having Dr. King speak to the student body.

Letter from MLK to Lillian M. Robertson

Wednesday, July 31, 1963
Pennsylvania (PA), Atlantic City, NJ

Dr. King writes Lillian Robertson acknowledging receipt of her letter inviting him to speak at the annual meeting of the Baptist Pacifist Fellowship in Atlantic City. The Reverend closes by stating it will be after the first of the year before he can make a definite commitment.

Contribution Letter from Dr. and Mrs. Bacon to Dr. King

Friday, February 23, 1968
North Carolina (NC)

Dr. and Mrs. Bacon are writing to express their support and concern for the "last chance" SCLC project. Enclosed in the letter is $200 contribution to help further support the initiative.

Letter to MLK from Rual Boles

Wednesday, March 8, 1967
Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA

Mr. Boles, a businessman in Chicago, thanks Dr. King, Rev. Jackson, and the SCLC staff for contributing to the success of his struggling business. He is also appreciative for the efforts of Operation Breadbasket in equipping Negro-owned small businesses to effectively compete in the American economy.

Letter from Harry Daniels to MLK

Monday, February 12, 1968
Washington, D.C., FRANCE

This letter from Mr. Harry Daniels to Dr. King addresses, among other things, Medicare, the upcoming presidential election, and government lending.

SCLC's Dr. King Ranked by Negroes as Most Influential Leader

Tuesday, January 9, 1968
New York, NY, Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

This 1968 SCLC news release relays that Dr. King has been identified "as the most influential Negro leader in America today." Dr. King had less than a hundred days before that influence would cost him his life.

Letter from Nancy F. Oakes to Rev. Ralph Abernathy

Tuesday, April 30, 1968
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., New York, NY

Nancy Oakes writes a letter of support to Reverend Ralph Abernathy and wishes him success with the March for the Poor People's Crusade.

Nationalism

Dr. King refers to Jeremiah 1:5, explaining that this passage represents a departure from nationalism toward a more universal emphasis.

MLK Address Regarding the Negro Family

Thursday, January 27, 1966
Virginia (VA), California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

In this address, Dr. King discusses the struggles of the Negro family. He states that the Negro family's life determines the individuals' capacity to love. Dr. King also discusses how American slavery has impacted the Negro family.

Letter from L. Hayne To Whom it May Concern

L. Hayne requires Dr. King, and only Dr. King, to endorse a check before he will accept it.

Northern District of Mississippi Court Order

Tuesday, November 8, 1966
Mississippi (MS)

District Court Judge Claude F. Clayton for Mississippi, issues an order sustaining part of the motion for supplemental relief on behalf of minor plaintiffs, Sharper T. Cunningham and Darlene Cunningham vs. Grenada Municipal Separate School District of Mississippi.

Telegram from MLK to Mr.& Mrs. Dick Gregory

Washington (WA)

In this telegram, Dr. King praises Mr. Gregory for his stance regarding human justice on behalf of another oppressed minority, the Nisgually Indians.

Telegram from Sylvester Nichols to Mrs. King

Friday, May 3, 1968
Brooklyn, NY

Mrs. King received many telegrams, following the assassination of Dr. King. This telegram, in particular, came from Sylvester Nichols and the members of the Brooklyn branch of the National Association of Negro Musicians. The association wanted to extend sympathy to the King family and to inform Mrs. King that they would continue to live out Dr. King's principles.

Letter from Solomon and Dorothy Zeltzer to Dr. and Mrs. King

Wednesday, April 26, 1967
California (CA)

The Zeltzer family send warm regards and support to the King family.

Information on the National Welfare Rights Organization

Washington, D.C., Los Angeles, CA, New York, NY, New York (NY), Columbus, OH, Chicago, IL, Pittsburgh, PA

The National Welfare Rights Organization (NWRO) is a nationwide membership organization of welfare recipients. The goals of the NWRO are to develop a system that guarantees adequate income, dignity, justice and democracy.

The New York Times: New Way Sought to Teach Rights

Sunday, February 20, 1966
New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Columbia University and its Teachers College plan to begin a nationwide initiative to improve the teaching of civil rights. The plan will not only apply to elementary and secondary schools but also to college, universities and adult education forums. Instead of using textbooks, teachers will utilize case studies and films to keep information up to date.

61:19 General Correspondence 1961 (R)

Tuesday, October 24, 1961
Michigan (MI), Georgia (GA)

Maude Reid request a manuscript copy of Dr. King's speech at New Calvary Baptist Church in Detroit, Michigan.

Letter from Joan Sinkler to MLK

HUNGARY, CUBA, New York, NY, VIETNAM

Joan Sinkler writes Dr. King expressing that she is disappointed with him for not mentioning "the racist and colonialist character" of the Vietnam War. Sinkler asserts that the US did not go to war to protect Hungary, Cuba or Tibet.

Reading, Writing, and Race Relations

Thursday, June 1, 1967
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dorothy Singer wrote this piece,"Reading, Writing and Race Relations", regarding the racial integration in schools. Singer discusses several studies and their findings regarding integration.

Letter from Paul H. Douglas to MLK

Thursday, July 2, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Paul H. Douglass extends his gratitude to Dr. King, Roy Wilkins and their followers for the "passage of the Civil Rights Bill."

Ebony: Advice For Living

Thursday, May 1, 1958
New York (NY), New York, NY, Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Dr. King answers readers' questions regarding family dynamics, the NAACP, outer versus inner beauty and the image of Negroes in literature and the media. He advocates for open communication and pleasant attitudes in familial relationships, and he offers hope that the portrayal of Negroes in movies and "other public channels" is improving.

Draft of Speech to the National Press Club

Thursday, July 19, 1962
Albany, GA, Montgomery, AL, Washington, D.C.

Dr. King's speech to the National Press Club in Washington D.C. was delivered a week after he was incarcerated in Albany, Georgia. This draft shows Dr. King's notes on his address about the Civil Rights Movement.

God in the Book of Psalms

Dr. King references Bible verse Psalm 71:19. He outlines why the idea of a finite God is incongruent with the "theistic absolutism" found in the Old Testament.

Letter from Marc de Jesus to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Marc de Jesus writes to Mrs. King following Dr. King's assassination.

Sermon Outline Notes - MLK

This document is an outline handwritten by Dr. King, who frequently wrote such outlines as a precursor to a sermon. The topic centers on man's talent and his reasons for using--or more importantly, not using--that talent.

Facing Life's Inescapables

Brooklyn, NY

Dr. King uses an allegory regarding life to express that if an individual follows God's plan they will live an abundantly happy life.

A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart

GHANA, ISRAEL

Dr. King uses Matthew 10:16 as the text for this sermon delivered August 30, 1959 at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery. Soft mindedness, he asserts, makes men gullible, superstitious, and fearful of change and fosters the belief that science and religion are in conflict. It contributes to racial prejudice and is capitalized upon by dictators. But tough mindedness, King says, must be tempered by a compassionate heart. The nonviolent struggle for freedom and justice must combine tough mindedness and tenderness of heart.

The Quiet Work: How to Win Jobs and Influence Businessmen

Friday, December 16, 1966
Philadelphia, PA, Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA, Florida (FL), Louisville, KY

This SCLC news release details the history of Operation Breadbasket and its progress in the field of economic opportunity for African-Americans.

Letter to Kenneth Gibbs from Dora McDonald

Monday, September 30, 1963
New York (NY), New York, NY

Ms. McDonald sends Mr. Gibbs a letter of thanks for his kind letter of support and encloses an autographed cover of TIME magazine on behalf of Dr. King.