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Dr. King writes on the concept of Calvinism.

Jesus Christ (Two Natures)

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr's notion of the "two natures of Christ." Reinhold Niebuhr was a scholastic mentor of Dr. King and was therefore cited in several of his theological works.

We Would See Jesus

Dr. King summarizes a biblical passage from the Book of John, in which he describes "inquiring Greeks" from a rich heritage who came to Philip and made the simple request, "sir, we would see Jesus." These words are also the title of one of Dr. King's sermons delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church.

SCLC Administrator Job Description

Monday, August 29, 1966

This document outlines the responsibilities of the role of an Administrator for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Thoughts on Nobel Prize

Dr. King uses a statement by Mahalia Jackson and the philanthropy of Sir Alfred Nobel to encapsulate the purpose of the Civil Rights Movement. Jackson refers to the racial problems in America as "family business," but Dr. King believes that in order for man to become a brotherhood, society has to search for truth like Alfred Nobel.


Dr. King records a short biography of the theologian Jerome.

Letter to MLK from N.P. Feinsinger

Friday, April 28, 1967

In this letter, Feinsinger is consulting Dr. King about the Russell Bull Scholarship and hoping that he can proceed with the selection process.

Letter from David Sutton to MLK

Wednesday, June 16, 1965

The associate director of Alumni Relations at Drexel Institute of Technology invites Dr. King to speak at the newly formed Downtown Luncheon Club. Mr. Sutton mentions that the alumni of Drexel revere Dr. King's philosophy and principles of nonviolence. He also informs Dr. King about the confirmed attendance of Pulitzer Prize winner James Michener.

Letter from the Speakers Bureau to MLK

Thursday, March 28, 1968

The Speakers Bureau writes Dr. King as they are preparing to publish a new edition of the Speakers Booklet for 1968-69. They request Dr. King's biography, topics of discussion, a recent photo, and ask his general availability.

Letter from Dinkar Sakrikar to MLK

Friday, September 23, 1966

D.Sakrikar writes to solidify the plans for the donation of a bronze statue of Mahatma Gandhi.

The SCLC Story in Words and Pictures

These images are part of a pamphlet that provides an intimate look into SCLC's activities.

Letter from MLK to James Marley

Tuesday, October 15, 1963

Dr. King thanks James Marley for his contribution to the SCLC and gives a brief summary of how the funds benefit the Negro communities.

The People Speak

Tuesday, December 20, 1966

The neighborhood residents initiate a self-reliant program entitled, "Self-Help Policy-67 Model", due to the inadequacies within the federal government's Anti-poverty Program and the War on Poverty Program. These individuals are considered "The New Breed" and are working to cease their economic disparities. They correlate the biblical story of Nicodemus to associate the promised land of economic freedom.

Race Relations Sunday

Sunday, February 13, 1955

The National Council of the Churches of Christ in the United States of America writes a message regarding race relations. The message discusses God's stance on prejudice and racism, stating that any prejudice act is against the will of God.

Letter from Shelia Mills to MLK

Sunday, December 13, 1964

Shelia Mills, a 7th grade student, commends Dr. King for his efforts within the nonviolence movement and for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Stokley Carmichael

Tuesday, November 29, 1966

In this letter, Dora McDonald informs Stokley Carmichael about an enclosure of an autographed photograph of Dr. King.

Letter from MLK to Murray Thomson

Thursday, November 9, 1967

Dr. King regretfully informs Murray Thomson he will not be able to speak at the upcoming conference in Portland, Ontario due to commitments for the Civil Rights Movement in the US and his pastoral duties for Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Georgia.

Letter from Gerald G. Fenn to MLK

In this letter, Geraldine Fenn described the many ventures that occurred the previous year. Her main focus was on 4-H and combining agriculture with race relations. She felt that by understanding and respecting people from different backgrounds, it could then lead to a collective of peace and love.

Reception Honoring Ambassadors of the Organization of African Unity

In 1966, while President Lyndon B. Johnson was in office, Dr. King received this invitation to a reception at the White House. The reception honored Ambassadors of the Organization of African Unity States.

Letter from Jeremiah Rome to MLK

Wednesday, August 2, 1967

Mr. Rome writes to Dr. King to state that African-Americans need good white people, to create job opportunities for the black race.

Letter from MLK to Helga Gulbrandsen

Thursday, March 12, 1964

Dr. King responds to an invitation to visit Oslo, Norway under the auspices of the Norwegian Fellowship in the fall of 1964. He informs Ms. Gulbrandsen that he cannot commit to accepting the invitation due to his uncertain schedule, but assures her that he will keep her invitation on file. However, Dr. King's handwritten notes found on the letter indicate that he was unable to accept the invitation.

Letter from Joe Cheru to MLK

Tuesday, July 11, 1967

Joe Cheru advises Dr. King to adopt a technique called "organized massive write-in." Using this method, he suggested that Dr. King could channel greater support from people who could not participate directly by being physically present for demonstrations.

Letter from Benjamin Spock to MLK

Monday, February 21, 1966

Dr. Spock, pediatrician and Vietnam anti-war activist, writes Dr. King to enlist his support for an anti-war effort by joining in a "statement of common concern" with other "key spokesman for major American interests and institutions." He proposes that the group hold a press conference to release the statement with the intention of encouraging collective action against the Vietnam War. Dr. Spock indicates that he would like to hold the press conference on March 7, 1966. Dr. Spock hopes the group can get an audience with President Johnson to discuss their concerns.

MLK Statement on Libel Suit

Wednesday, July 14, 1965

Dr. King makes a public statement regarding a libel suit. He explains that he has been served papers but is not at liberty to comment.

War and Pacifism

Dr. King examines War and Pacifism. He determines that absolute pacifism is not acceptable, but neither is war. He cites several different philosophies of pacifism and nonviolence set forth by such figures as Nels Ferre, John H. Hallowell, A. J. Muste and Mahatma Gandhi.

Letter from Kennon Brownlee to MLK

Thursday, October 12, 1967

Kennon R. Brownlee, a social science major at Bishop College, asks Dr. King for his opinion concerning the war in Vietnam.

Letter from MLK to Dorothy O. Bucklin

Thursday, December 5, 1963

Dr. King graciously declines Mrs. Bucklin's invitation to speak in Green Lake, Wisconsin under the "auspices" of the American Baptist Convention. Mrs. Bucklin serves as Associate Executive Secretary of the American Baptist Home Mission Society.

Letter from Benjamin F. Smith to the Editor of Detroit Free Press

Friday, March 31, 1967

In a letter to the editor of the Detroit Free Press, Benjamin Smith criticizes US involvement in Vietnam. He advocates ending the war as 80% of South Vietnamese people want peace, while 67% of Americans "favor a rough war."

Letter from John E. Smylie to MLK

Friday, May 31, 1963

In this letter, Chaplain Smylie requests for Dr. King to preach at Occidental College. Smylie states, "We would be honored to have you or one of your representatives at Occidental."

Primacy of Events

Dr. King notes Alfred North Whitehead’s view on the primacy of events over space and time.