Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Nevada (NV)"

Letter from Franklin H. Williams to MLK

Friday, October 23, 1964

Ambassador Williams congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize and invites him to a United Nations reception.

Hegel's Social Ethics

Dr. King writes notes on Hegel's social ethics. He quotes, "The principle triad here consist of law in the sense of abstract right, morality, and social ethics." According to Hegel, abstract right may be defined as being a person and respecting other people, while morality refers to one's conscience and social ethics regards another triad, being family, civil society, and the state.

Response to SCLC Attendance at Cooperative League Meeting

Friday, July 28, 1967

Following up a letter sent by Dr. King's secretary, Dora McDonald, Stanley Dreyer, president of The Cooperative League of the USA, writes to Rev. Jesse Jackson. Mr. Dreyer hopes that it will be possible for Rev. Jackson to be present at the meeting held in Des Plaines, Illinois on August 11.

Does MLK Have the Right? the Qualifications? the Duty? to Speak Out on Peace

SCLC National Executive Director Andrew Young addresses recent articles criticizing Dr. King's expressions on peace. Young argues that these attacks are largely based on misconceptions of Dr. King's views. He states that the media is quick to attack Dr. King, but whenever critics retract their statements, nothing is reported. To combat this, Young includes a sampling of accurate articles on Dr. King to "redress the imbalance."

Man: Sinner

Referencing Psalms 14:3, Dr. King discusses the completeness of sin in relationship to man.

How to Deal with Grief and Dissappointment

Dr. King discusses the many avenues and remedies for disappointment. He includes a verse from the Book of Jeremiah and describes disappointment to be a "hallmark of life." Dr. King asserts that the first proper reaction is acceptance. Furthermore he suggests that one must express their grief with a person of trust. Dr. King stresses that the third and most important resolution to disappointment is to refrain from rationalization.

Letter from Lucy Melhuish to MLK

Thursday, March 21, 1968

Lucy A. Melhuish requests Dr. King's assistance in acquiring copies of speeches from the Poor People's March on Washington. Ms. Melhuish is a graduate student working on her doctorate degree at California State College.

Letter to Joan Daves to Philip Hanson

Thursday, December 17, 1964

Here Mr. Hanson conveys his appreciation for the permission to include words from Dr. King's "Why We Can't Wait", in his performance "The Rebels".

Photograph of MLK

Guenther Jacobs from Germany sends Dr. King a photo for him to autograph.

Letter from Ernest Shaefer to Dora McDonald

Saturday, March 18, 1967

Ernest Shaefer, Executive Secretary for the Hadley Executive Committee, writes Miss McDonald to finalize a date and place for Dr. King to give a lecture in support of the Hadley Memorial Fund.

Letter from Burton Cain to MLK

Thursday, September 7, 1967

Burton Caine informs Dr. King of the dilemma with the American Jewish liberal's continuation in the Civil Rights Movement. Caine recounts repeated instances of Negroes singling out Jews in verbal attacks. He emphasizes this irony given that Jews have been active supporters of the Civil Rights Movement. Unsure if Dr. King stands in solidarity with anti-Semitic views, Caine asks Dr. King to issue a statement to clarify his beliefs.

Telegram to MLK from Truman B. Douglass

Thursday, November 24, 1966

Truman B. Douglass, the chairman of the National Citizens Committee for the Child Development Group of Mississippi (CDGM), informs Dr. King that he has appealed to President Johnson for a meeting regarding the funding of CDGM.

Invitation from J.E.L Graham to MLK

Wednesday, July 13, 1966

J.E.L. Graham, President of the Hamilton Branch of the United Nations Association in Canada, invites Dr. King to speak on the theme of Human Rights during one of the organizations quarterly meetings.

Letter from Dr. Earl C. Jackson, Sr. to MLK

Wednesday, August 7, 1963

Earl Jackson writes Dr. King requesting feedback regarding his upcoming speaking engagement as one of three keynote speakers during a large conference in Delaware.

Handwritten Letter from MLK to Dr. Westin

Dr. King writes to decline the invitation of Dr. Alan F. Westin to serve on the Honorary Advisory Board of the Center for Research and Education in American Liberties at Columbia University. He cites the urgent demands on his time by the civil rights movement as his reason.

Hope

Dr. King quotes John Milton, who lost his sight, on the brilliance of the divine light that he experiences in his darkness.

Dexter Avenue Baptist Church Program

Sunday, September 6, 1959

This program of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church's morning worship features Dr. King as the speaker for the service. The program further announces that Dr. King has donated one hundred dollars to the Scholarship for African students.

Letter from G. Merrill Lenox to MLK

Friday, April 19, 1963

G. Merrill Lenox, Executive Director for the Metropolitan Detroit Council of Churches, informs Dr. King he is being remembered and in the daily prayers of thousands during his incarceration in the Birmingham Jail.

Letter from Clifford P. Case to MLK

Monday, July 20, 1964

Senator Clifford P. Case, U. S. Senator from New Jersey, writes Dr. King regarding the Civil Rights Act being passed. Case encloses a copy of the bill as it passed, with an explanation of "the major changes from the House version."

Operation Breadbasket Seminar

This brochure explains the economic development program "Operation Breadbasket." It consists of Negro and white clergymen of all faiths who are working to build a solid economic base among Negro people.

Newsletter from Rev. Ellis Vanderbilt

Wednesday, May 1, 1968

On April 14, 1968, a group of Black and White Christians met to form the first integrated Baptist Church in South Carolina. The congregation bought an abandoned church, however, the church members needed additional financial assistance, so the Reverend Vanderbilt solicited contributions of at least $100.00.

Letter from Nancy F. Oakes to Rev. Ralph Abernathy

Tuesday, April 30, 1968

Nancy Oakes writes a letter of support to Reverend Ralph Abernathy and wishes him success with the March for the Poor People's Crusade.

Letter from Sam Gasbarre to MLK

Monday, August 21, 1967

Sam Gasbarre, identifying himself as a white American, writes Dr. King to support his opinion that the Vietnam War is evil and should end.

Letter from the American Embassy in New Delhi, India to MLK

Friday, September 24, 1965

The Embassy of the United States invites Dr. King to come and visit India for at least a month. He can lecture in his special areas of interests. The embassy states that the best time to come is between November and April.

Letter from Juanita McKinly to MLK

Thursday, February 24, 1966

Juanita McKinly requests Dr. King visit her home to evaluate the less than standard living conditions of the building. As a key figure for addressing social ills, many people sought the help of Dr. King in relation to individual concerns.

Religion

Dr. King writes that religion is paradoxical.

Thank-U-Gram from Rev. Phil Stovin to MLK and Harold E. Stassen

Saturday, February 24, 1968

Rev. Phil Stovin extends his support to Harold E. Stassen and Dr. King for organizing Write-In votes in the 1968 Presidential Election.

Letter from Rev. A. A. Ackerman to MLK

Saturday, January 27, 1962

Reverend A. A. Ackerman, Pastor of Bethel AME Church, writes Dr. King in hopes that he can make an appearance and speak at his church.

SCLC Voter Registration Agenda

This document captures the Southern Christian Leadership Conference's voter registration agenda in Detroit, Michigan between August 18 and August 23, 1967.

Three Stages of Christological Controversy

Dr. King lists three stages of Christological controversy. The third is the "relation" between the former two.