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Those Who Fail To Speak

Saturday, June 5, 1965

Dr. King discusses the stagnant progress of desegregation despite the fact that a decade has passed since the Supreme Court's ruling on Brown v. Board of Education.

Letter from MLK to Benjamin E. Mays

Tuesday, February 11, 1964

Dr. King sends Dr. Mays a check for $200 and informs him that he will not be able to attend the Founders' Day celebration.

In A Land Where Murder is Respectable

This pamphlet, issued by the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, features a map of Alabama highlighting 18 murders of African Americans and white civil rights workers.

Letter from Gardner Taylor to MLK

Thursday, September 30, 1965

Rev. Gardner C. Taylor sends a financial contribution to the SCLC on behalf of the Progressive National Baptist Convention.

Letter from Pastor G. Murray Branch to MLK

Wednesday, June 7, 1967

In this letter, Pastor Branch invites Dr. King to be the speaker on the 90th Anniversary of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church.

Otline: The Philosophy of Nonviolence

This document outlines Dr. King's speech, "The Philosophy of Nonviolence." He notes both the means and ends of nonviolence and explains that the "highest expression" of non-injury is love. He describes nonviolence as an activism technique and outlines the goals of the philosophy.

More State Funds Urged for Negro Banks

Monday, January 23, 1967

This article reports about Operation Breadbasket's request for more funding from the State of Illinois to further its economic development efforts in the African American community.

SCLC News Bulletin

Wednesday, November 1, 1967

This SCLC bulletin to supporters details the organization's progress in numerous locations, including its growing presence in northern cities such as Cleveland, Operation Breadbasket in Chicago, and the Citizenship Education Program. A "Fiscal Facts" section stresses that Dr. King receives no salary from SCLC, nor any other income from his work with the organization.

Antiwar Slogans

Tuesday, March 21, 1967

The Spring Mobilization Committee issues a list of official slogans for Vietnam War protest placards. Groups and individuals who intend to protest are asked to use these slogans on their self-made placards with the phrase "STOP THE WAR NOW" printed at the bottom.

Letter from Tom Perry to MLK

Tuesday, December 26, 1967

Tom Perry thanks Dr. King for inspiring him to continue his work in the peace movement in Canada.

Abelard on Universals and theMethod of Descartes

Dr. King references Peter Abelard, medieval French philosopher and theologian. He discerns that universals cannot be things or words. Rather, the universal is a concept. King maintains that this quandary is relevant to "Schoolmen" and particularly the dogma of the Church. He continues by also noting philosopher Rene Descartes, and that "he was at fault in overemphasizing mathematical method."

The Church Says No on Proposition 14

Thie Council of Churches in Northern and Southern California argues against the goals of Proposition 14. This 1964 ballot proposition sought to amend the California consitution by nullifying the Rumford Fair Housing Act. Prop 14 would go on to pass, but two years later the California Supreme Court deemed it unconstitutional.

Letter from MLK to Professor Zeegus

Dr. King commends Professor Zeegus for his organization, Heart of Africa, and its mission to "mobilize public support for the struggle of the American Negro in efforts to help achieve freedom and equality."

MLK's Statement Regarding Civil Rights Activists' Murders

Friday, December 11, 1964

This statement by Dr. King was written regarding the lynching and murders of three civil rights activists: James Cheyney, Andrew Goodman, and Michael Schwerner. When Mississippi officials refused to pursue the prosecution of those involved, national outrage prompted the ensuing major federal intervention.

MLK's Address to the Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity

Monday, October 12, 1964

This address by Dr. King was delivered to the Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity the day before it was announced that he had been awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. In addressing the topic "Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution," Dr. King argues that the church must inspire it's members to be active and advocate against injustice, reaffirm the misconduct of racial segregation, and work towards social change in a nonviolent and peaceful manner.

Letter from H. L. Wynter to Dora McDonald

Monday, May 17, 1965

H. L. Wynter writes to Ms. McDonald stating new developments regarding Dr. King's visit to Jamaica in hopes that Dr. King and Mrs. King can adjust.

Transcript of MLK's Rally Speech in Yazoo City, Mississippi

Tuesday, June 21, 1966

In this transcript of Dr. King's speech to the citizens of Yazoo City, he addresses the issues of poverty and racism within the state. He explains that while Mississippi is a in a "terrible state," it can be improved through the use of the principles of nonviolence to help bring about social change.

People in Action: The Solid Wall Cracks

Friday, March 22, 1963

In this draft of an article for the April 13, 1963 New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King discusses the cracks in the wall of segregation in Albany, GA: first the city’s closure of segregated public facilities to avoid protests by the Albany Movement, then the repeal of segregation from the city’s code.

Knowing God (Wieman)

Dr. King notes Henry Nelson Wieman's ideas on how man comes to know God.

Letter from Herbert J. Kramer to John W. Bloomer

Tuesday, February 13, 1968

Herbert J. Kramer informs the managing editor of Birmingham News, about "America's New Commitment" and the "Plowshare Pledge."

On Being a Good Neighbor

Dr. King tells the Biblical story of the "Good Samaritan on the Road to Jericho," in which a traveler has been robbed, beaten and left for dead. Dr. King connects this story to the Declaration of Independence and offers an analysis of the modern era. Following the example of the "Good Samaritan," he encourages looking beyond "race, religion and nationality" to help those wounded by injustices.

Freudianism

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr on the subject of Freudianism from "The Nature and Destiny of Man."

Letter from The Pierre Berton Show to MLK

Thursday, September 17, 1964

Mrs. Elsa Franklin, program organizer for The Pierre Berton Show, invites Dr. King to be a guest on the program. She describes the show as "Canada's foremost television talk show."

Letter from John Lewis to Rev. Ralph Abernathy

Tuesday, August 31, 1965

John Lewis thanks the Southern Christian Leadership Conference Board of Directors for their five thousand dollar contribution to the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee.

Telegram from the Church of Sweden to MLK

Tuesday, March 3, 1964

The Church of Sweden invites Dr. King to take part in a great church event in the fall of 1964. The church assures Dr. King that all expenses will be paid for his travel and the archbishop of Sweden will provide him with the official invitation letter.

Telegram from Mrs. Willie Bass to MLK

Thursday, September 23, 1954

Mrs. Willie M. Bass sent this telegram expressing her hope for Dr. King's speedy recovery during his stay at Harlem Hospital.

Letter from Rev. Milton Reid to MLK

Tuesday, January 28, 1964

Rev. Milton Reid invites Dr. King to Petersburg, Virginia to be the speaker at the 190th Anniversary of the First Baptist Church. Rev. Reid mentions to Dr. King that the church holds historical significance because meetings about abolishing slavery were held at the church by Nat Turner and John Brown. Reid asks Dr. King to suggest another speaker if he is unable to accept the invitation.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Yves Montand

Tuesday, April 5, 1966

Dr. King extends his gratitude for the "Palais des Sports" event in Paris, France which brought support financially for the movement. Dr. King stress the duality between France and America in the "total struggle."

Letter from Audrey Mizer to MLK

Sunday, December 3, 1961

Audrey Mizer encourages Dr. King to continue his good works because "the world cannot be robbed of any good." Mizer then discusses her opposing views to a statement in a Christian Monitor Column regarding Red China's admission to the United Nations.

Thank You Letter from MLK

Tuesday, January 9, 1968

MLK wrote this thank you note to a supporter, Mrs. C.C. White, at a time when some former supporters were worried about a lack of racial unity or SCLC's position against the Vietnam War.