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Letter from Harriet C. Kelley to MLK

Monday, January 8, 1962

Ms. Kelley explains to Dr. King why she cannot send a contribution to him. She is on a limited income and already donates both to the NAACP and the United Negro College Fund.

Letter from Robert K. Hudnut to MLK about a Monument

Thursday, July 1, 1965

In this letter Robert K. Hudnut of the St. Luke Presbyterian Church offers an idea to Dr. King, namely to build a monument for those that have given their life in the line of civil rights. Hudnut proposes to call the monument "A Martyrs' Monument."

Invitation from the United Federation of Teachers to MLK

Saturday, February 10, 1968

The United Federation of Teachers invite Dr. King to their annual Spring Conference Luncheon. At this particular event, civil rights activist Bayard Rustin will be honored with the John Dewey Award.

Pass The Ammunition

Ernie Sheffield voices his opinion on the "Department of War Violence and Brute Force" and the spending of a billion dollars a week on violence. He states that in their spending of valuable money not "even a dime" has been spent on a "Department of Peace, Goodwill and Coexistence."

Letter to Andrew Young from Irving Kaler

Thursday, February 16, 1967

Kaler writes to express excitement in the SCLC working with The Community Relations Commission of the City of Atlanta (of which he is a part). He looks forward to discussing ways in which both organizations can compliment each other.

Letter from Chip Hawkins to MLK

Monday, January 2, 1967

In this letter, Chip Hawkins questions Dr. King's affiliation with communist organizations and individuals. In addition, he requests that Dr. King publicly address the Communist accusations brought against him.

Autograph Request

Friday, August 19, 1966

James McInerney requests that Dr. King add to his autograph collection of "the most prominent leaders in the nation."

Letter from Hazel Gregory to MLK

Friday, July 19, 1963

Hazel Gregory, on behalf of the Montgomery Improvement Association, asks Dr. King about transportation to the March on Washington. She also commends him on his recent article published in "Ebony." Dr. King was president of the Montgomery Improvement Association from 1955 to 1960. The organization was founded after the arrest of Rosa Parks, which sparked the Montgomery Bus Boycott.

Letter from P. Edward Haley to MLK

Tuesday, August 8, 1967

P. Haley writes to express appreciation for Dr. King's works. Haley encloses copy of letter he and his wife sent to their Congressmen commending Dr. King's ideas concerning Vietnam and the riots. The Haleys are making an effort to start a nationwide campaign by encouraging their friends to write their congressman as well.

Speech from MLK about Jews Living in the Soviet Union

In this document, Dr. King protests the Soviet Union's treatment of the Jews there. He stresses the need for the Soviet Union to treat its Jewish community fairly. He says: "[w]e cannot sit complacently by the wayside while while our Jewish brothers in the Soviet Union face the possible extinction of their cultural and spiritual life."

Dr. King Leaves Montgomery for Atlanta

Tuesday, December 1, 1959

This news release announces Dr. King's decision to resign as Pastor of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama and move to Atlanta, Georgia. Relocating to Atlanta will enable Dr. King to Co-Pastor Ebenezer Baptist Church with his father, and will leave him in close proximity to the SCLC.

Letter from Erma Jewel Hughes to Wyatt Tee Walker

Friday, May 8, 1964

Erma Jewel Hughes requests Reverend Wyatt Walker to send two thousand copies of the "SCLC Story" to be sold by Erma Hughes Business College. Erma Hughes ensures a protection detail will be assigned to Dr. King during the entire time he is in Texas for the commencement speech given at the college.

Letter from Grace M. Meade to Ralph Abernathy

Thursday, April 18, 1968

This message from Grace Meade to Ralph Abernathy relates the details of a Seattle, Washington funeral service conducted for Dr. King.

American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa Memorandum

Wednesday, May 17, 1967

Theodore Brown, Executive Director of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa, provides a progress report on ANLCA's work on Nigeria, Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe) and Southwest Africa (now Namibia). He mentions that the group offered to help the Nigerian federal government and the four regions mediate the conflict that resulted in the Nigeria-Biafra Civil War (1967-1970).

Religious Education

Dr. King cites Henry Nelson Wieman's "Normative Psychology of Religion."

Telegram from Gabriel Allen to MLK

Gabriel Allen writes Dr. King to state his opinion on when civil rights will be achieved in America.

Women's Response to the Rising Tide of Violence

Monday, February 21, 1966

Women's Response to the Rising Tide of Violence was a two day day conference in Philadelphia. The women who gathered agreed that violence was not a spontaneous action, but something that grows out of the environment. The way to combat such violence it enforce positive action with long-term solutions through social, economic, and political programs.

Letter from Kenneth Ives to MLK

Monday, August 28, 1967

Kenneth Ives writes a letter and encloses his research that could be beneficial to Dr. King. Ives studied the effects of various social policy efforts on individuals and on society in general.

Card from the English Family

The English Family sends a card that lists words of encouragement for each day of the week.

Letter to MLK from Rual Boles

Wednesday, March 8, 1967

Mr. Boles, a businessman in Chicago, thanks Dr. King, Rev. Jackson, and the SCLC staff for contributing to the success of his struggling business. He is also appreciative for the efforts of Operation Breadbasket in equipping Negro-owned small businesses to effectively compete in the American economy.

Telegram from MLK to Robert Kennedy

Monday, June 4, 1962

Dr. King issues an urgent request for Robert Kennedy's immediate involvement in the prosecution of four students who were arrested while engaged in a peaceful demonstration in Jackson, Mississippi. Dr. King has also received information of gross violations of the students' constitutional rights.

SCLC Mail Log: January 29, 1968

Monday, January 29, 1968

This document contains a record of received mail for several members of the SCLC Executive Board.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Bodo Charles Ohly

Monday, July 17, 1967

Dr. King writes Mr. Bodo Ohly regarding the new stanza he wrote to the National Anthem.

Showdown for Nonviolence

Tuesday, April 16, 1968

Dr. King discusses the rationale and strategy for the 1968 Poor People's Campaign in Washington, D.C. He explains that the SCLC hopes to avoid a national holocaust by promoting massive nonviolent demonstrations.

Letter from Alan and June Fite to MLK

Wednesday, April 19, 1967

In this letter dated April 19, 1967, Alan and June Fite commend Dr. King for his speech given at a peace demonstration on April 15 and request a copy of the speech.

Letter from Concerned Citizen to MLK

Tuesday, March 12, 1968

A citizen writes Dr. King to express their disagreement and distaste for his work within the Civil Rights Movement. The citizen believes that Dr. King's work promotes more hatred and violence in the nation.

Telegram from Irving Block to MLK

Sunday, January 28, 1968

Rabbi Irving J. Block of the Brotherhood Synagogue in New York requests to meet with Dr. King regarding the Negro Jewish community.

Constitution and Bylaws of the SCLC

This booklet contains the constitution and bylaws of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

SCLC Continues Economic Withdrawal Against National Industries In Alabama

Tuesday, June 1, 1965

Featured in this Western Christian Leadership Conference newsletter, is an article by Junius Griffin regarding the SCLC. "SCLC Continues Economic Withdrawal Against National Industries In Alabama," describes the reasons and the situations in which the SCLC had to "use the nonviolent economic campaign as an expression of moral indignation and an appeal to the nation's conscience."

Jerome

Dr. King records a short biography of the theologian Jerome.