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Which Way for the Negro Now?

Monday, May 15, 1967

In his thirteenth civil rights cover story, Newsweek General Editor Peter Goldman reports on a movement in crisis, with fragmented leadership, impatient black followers, and increasingly alienated white supporters. Goldman and reporters interviewed top leadership ranging from the Urban League’s Whitney Young to black power advocate Stokely Carmichael. This article asks what will become of the Negro Revolution.

Letter from Gwedolyn Johnson to MLK

Tuesday, February 27, 1962

Gwedolyn Johnson of Friendship Baptist invites Dr. King to a public speaking engagement held on his behalf. She encourages Dr. King to speak directly to the youth in an effort to increase moral and social activism. She requests a specific date in addition to estimated traveling costs.

The Atlanta United Negro College Fund Inter Alumni Council Flyer

This flyer, from the Atlanta United Negro College Fund Inter Alumni Council, announces its Annual UNCF Statewide Recognition Banquet.

MLK Itinerary

This is Dr. King's itinerary for the period December 28 thru January 1 for an unknown year.

Draft Letter from MLK to Mr. Smith

Dr. King writes Mr. Smith thanking him for his contribution to the SCLC. He expresses that contributions help American Negroes to "continue in the struggle for freedom and equality."

Amsterdam News: The Terrible Cost of the Ballot

Saturday, September 1, 1962

Dr. King excites public confidence towards the Civil Rights Movement by describing a devastating occurrence.

Habakkuk

This note card contains Dr. King's notes on the Old Testament book of Habakkuk.

A Statement to the South and Nation

This seemingly unexceptional document signifies the birth of the SCLC. Dr. King, Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth and Rev. C. K. Steele assembled a consortium of leaders in Atlanta following the end of the Montgomery Bus Boycott. The Southern Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration issued this statement that addresses the intimidation, discrimination and economic disparity Negroes face in the South. The statement appeals to the federal government to intervene against assaults that block basic civil rights.

Congressional Record Regarding Antipoverty Funding

Wednesday, December 6, 1967

This Congressional Record documents a statement regarding the antipoverty bill. The statement, made to the public by the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights, urged Congress to support funding towards eradicating poverty for both black and white citizens.

Outline Written in MLK's Handwriting Entitled: Be Ye Perfect

The document, shown here, is a combination of a handwritten outline and notes for the preparation of a sermon. Under the title, "Be Ye Perfect", Dr. King described Jesus, in relation to rational and moral perfection.

Hungry Club Speech

Wednesday, May 10, 1967

This document is a draft copy of Dr. King's Hungry Club Speech, in which he speaks on the subject "America's Chief Moral Dilemma." He states that the dilemma is "the means by which we live have out distanced the ends for which we live." Dr. King thoroughly discusses the three major evils that contribute to this dilemma: the evil of racism, the evil poverty, and the evil of war. He also discusses the progress of the Civil Rights Movement as it enters a new phase of fighting for "genuine equality."

Statement on Selma-Montgomery March of March 21-26

Sunday, April 25, 1965

This statement by Father Dom T. Orsini expounds on the details of the March 21-26, 1965 Selma-Montgomery March. Orsini expresses that he is proud of the youth and their enthusiasm in participating in the march and suggests that insisting improper relations took place would be ridiculous.

History

Dr. King provides the pessimist's perception of history.

Handwritten Notecard Regarding "Pelagianism"

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines "Pelagianism". This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Letter from MLK to Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King writes Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy to commend him for his courage and work in directing the Civil Rights Act of 1964 through Congress.

Letter Envelope from MLK, Addressed to Mrs. Ernest Erber

This envelope is addressed to Mrs. Ernest Erber from the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from MLK to Agnes Mack

Saturday, December 10, 0196

Dr. King sends Agnes Mack a form to complete so that she may receive a copy of the "I have a Dream" speech.

Telegram from Sylvester Nichols to Mrs. King

Friday, May 3, 1968

Mrs. King received many telegrams, following the assassination of Dr. King. This telegram, in particular, came from Sylvester Nichols and the members of the Brooklyn branch of the National Association of Negro Musicians. The association wanted to extend sympathy to the King family and to inform Mrs. King that they would continue to live out Dr. King's principles.

Letter from Joseph W. Williams to MLK

Wednesday, November 4, 1964

Joseph W. Williams congratulates Dr. King on being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

K.O. Mbadiwe Contacts MLK

Friday, February 16, 1968

Kingsley Ozuomba Mbadiwe, Nigerian nationalist and politician, informs Dr. King of his travels to the United States. Mbadiwe ensures that he will contact King upon arrival. Dr. King and Mbadiwe were working on a proposal for a solution to the Nigerian-Biafran civil war. A peace mission to Nigeria was planned for April 1968.

Letter from Paul Stagg to MLK

Monday, April 22, 1963

Paul Stagg, Program Director of the American Baptist Home Mission Societies, invites Dr. King to attend their convention along with a delegation of pastors from around the country. One of the highly anticipated sessions of the convention centers around the theme, "The Gospel in a World of Revolution."

Anonymous Letter to Ralph Abernathy

Reverend Ralph Abernathy received this brief correspondence from an individual asking about a King James Bible. The note advises Reverend Abernathy to read Matthew 26:11.

Memorandum from Benjamin F. Payton Regarding Meredith Mississippi March

Benjamin F. Payton, Executive Director of the Commission on Religion and Race of the National Council of Churches, constructs this document as a debriefing on the Meredith Mississippi March. It is evident that the march is symbolic of the nation's struggle with racial conflict and aims to dismantle fear among African American voter registration. James Meredith, Mississippi citizen and first African American to desegregate the University of Mississippi, had organized and led the march.

Justice Harlan Concurring

This newspaper article discusses John Marshall Harlan's dissent with the case of "Plessy vs. Ferguson," and how Harlan was not acknowledged when the case was overturned.

Breadbasket Food Chain Sign Contract

Saturday, November 19, 1966

These articles highlight a contract that was signed by High Low Foods Inc. and Operation Breadbasket to increase the number of jobs for Negroes.

Letter from Anonymous Critic to MLK

A critic sends Dr. King a series of newspaper clippings in order to communicate an adverse view about "negro people." The author brings special attention to an enclosed article about Stokely Carmichael and asks for his view. After accusing Dr. King of receiving money from the Communist Party, the writer states "I will never know why you was given the noble award."

Letter from Arthur James to MLK

Arthur James, a member of the Movement for the Advancement of Black Brotherhood and Culture, invites Dr. King to speak at Lincoln University.

Note from Joan Daves to MLK

Wednesday, September 4, 1963

A representative of Joan Daves is enclosing a check for $120 for the Spanish edition of the book "Stride Toward Freedom."

Letter from John Moody

Thursday, February 22, 1968

Mr. Moody discusses his hopes of creating an event that will demonstrate the phenomenon of Harumbe, with hopes of it becoming a National holiday. The proposed name of this day is "Harumbe", a Swahili term meaning Let's Get Together. Moody suggests May 19, the birthday of Malcolm X, as the date for this event to occur. Additionally, Moody provides an outline for the festivities, and requests that Dr. King contribute his suggestions after reviewing the proposal.

Dr. MLK and the American Dream

The article talks about Dr.King addressing the issue of racial imbalance in Boston public schools. Dr. King expresses his opinion that "racial segregation is politically unsound and relegates persons to the status of things, stigmatizing persons of color as untouchables in a caste system.