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Letter from E.G. Avery to MLK

Monday, December 9, 1963
Oklahoma (OK), Washington, D.C.

E. G. Avery commends Dr. King for his "I Have a Dream" speech from the March on Washington. Mr. Avery requests a copy of the full content of the speech because he had only partially heard the address on the radio.

Reviews of Strength to Love

Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C., Birmingham, AL, New York, NY

These reviews of Dr. King's "Strength to Love" illustrate King's use of theological beliefs in conjunction with the struggle for civil rights reform.

Letter from Rene Remond to MLK

Tuesday, November 15, 1966
FRANCE, SPAIN, Atlanta, GA

The "Centre Catholique des Intellectuels Francais" is an organization focused on raising the consciousness levels of its members through public conferences, debates, and discussions. Rene Remond informs Dr. King that they have enclosed additional information to prepare him on the discussion involving Christians and violence.

Letter from Robert L. Green to MLK

Friday, December 15, 1967
Michigan (MI), Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Washington, D.C.

Michigan State University Associate Professor Robert Green sends Dr. King the final report of the Chicago Adult Education Project funded by the Department of Health, Education, and Welfare.

Letter from John H. Herriford to MLK

Friday, November 11, 1960
Minnesota (MN)

John Herriford, a student at the University of Minnesota, offers Dr. King advice on how to improve sit-in demonstrations.

Perceiving God (Wieman)

Dr. King summarizes Henry Nelson Wieman's article "Can God Be Perceived" that appeared in The Journal of Religion (1943).

Address by MLK to American Jewish Committee

Thursday, May 20, 1965
New York, NY, Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL, GERMANY

In this speech, Dr. King addresses the Civil Rights Movement and the use of nonviolent demonstration tactics. He distinguishes between civil disobedience, which involves breaking laws that one does not agree with, and nonviolent demonstration, which involves using one's right to protest. He states that nonviolent protest is inherently American, citing examples from the Civil War, the Suffragettes, and the American Jewish Committee's own lobbying from the early 20th Century.

Letter from K. B. M. Crooks, Jr. to MLK

Tuesday, November 7, 1967

K. B. M. Crooks, Jr., of the Southeast Regional Office of the National Urban League, writes to Dr. King about a letter of recommendation for Lonnie King, Jr.

Sin

Dr. King compares the understanding of several philosophers on the subject of sin.

Man, a Being of Becoming

Dr. King documents ideas regarding the philosophy of man. Using the metaphor of a "flowing stream," he addresses man's experience from infancy through adulthood.

Letter from Uvee Mdodana Arbouin to MLK

Monday, April 19, 1965
New York, NY

Uvee Arbouin thanks Dr. King for a past letter and encloses a financial contribution. She expresses that he has never received a donation that is "backed with" so much gratitude for his leadership.

Letter from MLK to Senator Phillip A. Hart

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King writes Senator Phillip A. Hart expressing gratitude for his support in passing the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from MLK to Rev. James Endicott

Monday, December 18, 1967
CANADA

Dr. King acknowledges the receipt of Rev. Endicott's telegram inviting him to speak at a rally in Toronto. He regretfully declines the invitation due to the volume of work with his organization.

Telegram from MLK to Robert Kennedy

Monday, June 4, 1962
Washington, D.C., Jackson, MS

Dr. King issues an urgent request for Robert Kennedy's immediate involvement in the prosecution of four students who were arrested while engaged in a peaceful demonstration in Jackson, Mississippi. Dr. King has also received information of gross violations of the students' constitutional rights.

MLK Address at the AFL-CIO Fourth Constitutional Convention

Monday, December 11, 1961

Dr. King delivers a speech at the Fourth Constitutional Convention of the AFL-CIO to address the lack of equality and rights for laborers and people of color. Dr. King encourages those at the convention to remain steadfast in the fight for social justice in order to overcome the mountain of oppression.

Letter from Gordon Bryant to MLK

Tuesday, February 9, 1965
AUSTRALIA

Gordon Bryant, a representative of the Parliament of Australia, extends an invitation to Dr. King to assist the Aboriginal people of Australia in gaining equal rights.

Telegram from MLK to President Lyndon B. Johnson

Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King urges President Lyndon B. Johnson to conduct a full investigation concerning the government's involvement with Medgar Evers' suspected murderer.

Letter from Dimitri Papaspyrou to MLK

Thursday, January 26, 1967
GREECE, ISRAEL

Dimitri Papaspyrou, the President of the Parliament of Greece, welcomes Dr. King to Athens during his upcoming pilgrimage to the Holy Land.

Letter from Cummins E. Speakman to MLK

Tuesday, August 1, 1967
Hawaii (HI)

Dr. Speakman requests that Dr. King recommends the Maunaolu College of Maui to any individuals interested in coming to Hawaii.

Letter from Rev. John B. Morris to MLK

Wednesday, October 19, 1960
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Rev. John B. Morris writes Dr. King while he is in the city jail in Atlanta, Georgia. Morris asserts that Dr. King's stay in jail will "renew strength to the student movement."

Letter from MLK to Rabbi Albert A. Goldman

Tuesday, July 13, 1965
Ohio (OH)

In this letter, Dr. King informs Rabbi Albert A. Goldman that he will not be able to be a speaker at the Community Thanksgiving Services at The Isaac M. Wise Temple this year.

Letter from Mrs. Raphael Demos to Mrs. Coretta Scott King

Monday, February 10, 1958
Massachusetts (MA), Alabama (AL), Boston, MA, Montgomery, AL

Mrs. Demos thanks Mrs. King for her Christmas card and expresses congratulations on the birth of Martin Luther III. Mrs. Demos goes on to provide Coretta with various updates occurring in her own life.

Letter from Clement Alexandre to MLK

Tuesday, September 23, 1958
New York (NY), New York, NY

Clement Alexandre sent Dr. King this get well letter following his nearly fatal 1958 stabbing in Harlem.

God

Dr. King writes about God, according to Isaiah 6:1.

Letter from MLK to Dr. Benjamin Spock

Tuesday, June 16, 1964
Cleveland, OH, Ohio (OH)

Dr. King thanks Dr. Spock, famed pediatrician and social activist, for his recent contribution to the SCLC.

Whitehead's Doctrine of Freedom

Dr. King examines Alfred North Whitehead’s doctrine of freedom as described in “Science and the Modern World.”

Spirit

Dr. King writes that there is no way of defining the essential nature of spirit because it is manifested only in the activities of intellect, sensibility and will.

Letter from Theodore Brown to MLK

Friday, April 21, 1967
New York, NY, New York (NY), GERMANY

Theodore Brown writes Dr. King requesting his signature on a telegram to President Johnson from the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa expressing disapproval of South Africa's rule over South West Africa and requesting U.S. support for turning over administration to the United Nations.

Letter from MLK to Sargent Shriver

Monday, June 28, 1965
Washington, D.C., Birmingham, AL

This letter to Sargent Shriver provides details about the SCLC's 1965 Annual Convention in Birmingham, Alabama. Dr. King also extends an invitation for Mr. Shriver to open the conference with an address about poverty, unemployment, and urban migration.

Letter from Archon Bowen to MLK

Monday, February 26, 1968
Atlanta, GA

Mr. Bowen, Chairman of the Nominating Committee for Sigma Pi Phi Kappa Boule, expresses concern to Dr. King regarding a decrease in membership due to a high mortality rate of members throughout the nation. Enclosed is a membership nomination form to be completed and returned to the Chairman.