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Letter from a Weary Taxpayer to MLK

A weary taxpayer writes Dr. King informing him that a 15 million dollar bond issue was passed to pave roads in Cobb County; however, blacks cannot buy property in the area. The writer is angered because Negroes still have to help pay off the bond through taxes and asserts that the case must be taken to federal court.

Letter from Andrew Young to Harry Belafonte

Monday, February 28, 1966

Andrew J. Young writes Harry Belafonte applauding him on his television show "The Strolling Twenties." Unlike average shows, Belafonte delivers "high calibre performances" with the ability to articulate the realities of the American Negro. Young further expresses hope that the 1966 Freedom Festival in Chicago has a similar effect.

Joint Statement of MLK and SCLC

Friday, April 30, 1965

Dr. King and John Lewis deliver a statement concerning a meeting presided over by Harry Belafonte. The meeting was intended to discover ways that the SCLC and SNCC could cooperate and concluded with an agreement for both organizations to work together but separately towards a voting bill and other goals.

Three Year Proposal for the Renewal of the Negro Church in America

In this three-year proposal for the renewal of the Negro Church, there are several line items and subfields describing various ways in which this goal may be accomplished.

News from the SCEF

Monday, February 19, 1962

The Southern Conference Educational Fund writes a statement regarding "two young leaders of integration" who visited a fellow leader in jail and also got arrested. Charles McDew, a Negro and Chairman of the SNCC, and Robert Zellner, a white man and staff member of the SNCC, were charged with criminal anarchy just for bringing books and fruit to a friend who was arrested for participating in demonstrations.

Letter from Pastor Paul S. Barru to MLK

Friday, May 21, 1965

The pastor of First Presbyterian Church in Glenwood Springs, Colorado sends the SCLC a contribution on behalf of his church and the Denver Christian Center. He references a recent Wilcox County, Alabama tour which he feels reflects the type of "creative" activity that is most beneficial for exposing "a window into the rural South for the ignorant North."

Letter from Lotte Kallos to MLK

Friday, January 17, 1964

Lotte Kallos writes Dr. King on behalf of the Student Union of Lund University in Sweden, inviting him to speak after receiving word of his upcoming visit to Europe.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ray Gibbons

Wednesday, December 27, 1961

Dora McDonald returns a check from Alice E. Gwinn to Dr. King because it is made out to the Council for Christian Social Action, and it needs to be endorsed before Dr. King can deposit it.

Letter from Yolinda Pelmore to MLK

Friday, December 8, 1967

Yolinda Pelmore, a young student, asks Dr. King how he became famous. The reading theme for her class prompted her to write.

Affidavit of Theo R. Wright

Friday, May 10, 1963

In an attempt to redirect the focus of Negro students in Birmingham, Superintendent Theo R. Wright presents a sworn affidavit detailing his responsibilities and plans to revitalize the educational direction of Birmingham Public Schools.

Memorandum from William Rutherford to Staff Members

Friday, December 29, 1967

William Rutherford, Executive Director of SCLC, sends a memorandum to the staff informing them of a program entitled "Poverty in Mississippi," which is being broadcast on Channel UHF in the Atlanta area on January 7, 1968.

Telegram from Dr. L. K. Jackson to President John F. Kennedy

Dr. L. K. Jackson of St. Paul Baptist Church writes to President Kennedy regarding "barbaric" demonstrations against Negroes in the South.

United Nations Seminar Brochure

This pamphlet offers information on the registration, time, place, and cost of the United Nations Seminar being held in Washington D.C from October 17-21, 1966. Enclosed is a registration form for the Seminar.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dick Smyth

Tuesday, March 26, 1963

Dora McDonald informs Dick Smyth that Dr. King is unable to accept the speaking engagement at the moment but they will contact him once Dr. King has an engagement in the area.

Letter from Mrs. Eva Claytor to MLK

Wednesday, December 14, 1966

In this letter Mrs. Claytor of New York, NY, identifies herself as an "admirer" and is writing to inform Dr. King that his proposed book title "Where Do We Go From Here [sic]" conflicts with a previously published and copyrighted work of the same title in England.

Metaphysics

Dr. King quotes William James' perception of metaphysics.

Support from Gardner Taylor to MLK

Mr. Taylor expresses his disappointment in the City of Atlanta's decision to arrest Dr. King along with 14 other individuals.

Letter from Secretary to Daniel C. Thompson

Tuesday, December 11, 1962

Dr. King's Secretary writes Dr. Daniel Thompson of Howard University and encloses a foreword written by Dr. King, discussing violence and the philosophies of Mahatma Gandhi.

Letter from Thomas Scroth to MLK

Wednesday, April 3, 1968

Dr. King receives an invitation to the Forum Committee dinner in Washington, DC. This correspondence provides details of the format and location of the event.

Thank you from SCLC to donor Dr. Jerry Flint

Monday, March 25, 1968

Dr. King is writing to express his deep appreciation for the generous contribution made by Jerry Flint. He acknowledges the importance of the continuous support of the contributors so that the fight for social justice and peace can continue.

My Dream: The Violence of Poverty

In this draft of an article that appeared in the New York Amsterdam News January 1, 1966, Dr. King points out that although the Negro in America is freer, he is “an impoverished alien in an affluent society.” He cautions that the Administration will fail in its War on Poverty if it substitutes welfare programs for the creation of new jobs. He says the Negro’s nonviolent movement directed at the violence of poverty as well as the violence of segregation.

Letter from Herman Will, Jr. to MLK

Thursday, April 27, 1967

Herman Will, Associate General Secretary for the Division of Peace and World Order, General Board of Christian Social Concerns of the Methodist Church expresses his appreciation to Dr. King.

Letter from Weston C. Pullen to MLK

Tuesday, July 2, 1963

Weston C. Pullen, Vice President for Broadcasting at Time Incorporated, thanks Dr. King for his expedited response and cooperation "in filming a message on civil rights."

Letter from Lova Delabarre to MLK

Sunday, July 10, 1966

Washington state native Lova Delabarre informs Dr. King that her church youth group is studying on the subject of nonviolence. As a white person, Delabarre extends her full support to Dr. King in his efforts for equality and justice. She humbly states, "I pray that some day we will live as one. May God help and guide you in your work."

Judgement or Justice

Dr. King quotes a book entitled "Sea Dreams," by Alfred Lord Tennyson, regarding judgement and justice.

Letter from Clarence G. Petersen to MLK

Thursday, August 25, 1966

Clarence G. Petersen tells Dr. King that he should avoid marching in the city of Cicero. Petersen describes Cicero as a slum with old houses and an oppressive, industrial atmosphere. While Petersen supports Dr. King's campaign, he believes it'd be best if the city were avoided for Dr. King's safety.

City Wide Freedom Rally Featuring MLK

Friday, March 20, 1964

This 1964 program from a rally in Canton, Ohio, features Dr. King as speaker.

Letter from George G. Hill to MLK

Wednesday, April 14, 1965

George Hill expresses that he will continue to support the SCLC but feels the need to make two suggestions regarding the Alabama boycott and Vietnam War. He questions the use of economic force in obtaing equal rights and suggests the need to connect with underprivileged around the world.

Telegram from St. James Baptist Church to MLK

Tuesday, September 23, 1958

Rev. W.C. Barnett, pastor of St. James Baptist Church, sent this telegram expressing well wishes, from his congregation, towards Dr. King.

Letter from Robert N. Balkind to Andrew Young

This document is a letter of condolence written by the chief executive of a manufacturing company and addressed to Andrew Young, mistakenly listed as head of the NAACP (National Association for the Advancement of Colored People). The writer laments Dr. King's assassination and offers a contribution in his "name, honor, and memory."