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Materialism

Dr. King documents a quote by Robert Flint, a Scottish theologian and philosopher in reference to "materialism" from the "Baird Lectures."

Materialism

Dr. King quotes Hugh Elliott’s “Modern Science and Materialism.”

Letter from William S. Stein to MLK

Friday, May 6, 1966
Selma, AL, Alabama (AL), Chicago, IL

William Stein informs Dr. King that the Executive Council of the Episcopal Church will be contributing to SCLC.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dolly Davis

Wednesday, February 27, 1963
New York (NY)

Dora McDonald informs Dolly Davis that Dr. King is absent from the city and they're looking forward to receiving the galleys to "the New World of Negro Americans" by Harold Isaacs.

Enclosure to MLK - A Call for a National Fast by CALCAV

This is an enclosure that accompanied a letter dated March 22, 1968 from John C. Bennett to Dr. King. Dr. King spoke often of the need of fasting to repent for the sin of Vietnam, and was closely associated with the Clergy and Laymen Concerned about Vietnam (CALCAV). Between the writing of this letter and the event itself, Dr. King would be assassinated.

Introduction to the Demands of the Freedom Movement

Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

This document discusses the injustices and inequalities that Negroes are facing in Chicago's urban communities. The author outlines the struggles blacks endure in a variety of different arenas such as racism, discrimination, poverty, unemployment and segregation.

Telegram from MLK to L. Venchael Booth

Ohio (OH), Atlanta, GA

Dr. King congratulates Dr. Booth on receiving the Doctor of Divinity degree from Morehouse College.

Letter from H. D. Bollinger to MLK

Wednesday, November 27, 1963
Nashville, TN, Chicago, IL, Nebraska (NE)

H.D. Bollinger requests Dr. King's appearance at the Eighth Quadrennial Conference at the Methodist Student Movement in Nebraska. Mr. Bollinger informs Dr. King that the students are "very anxious" to have him as a principle speaker. The theme of the conference will be "The Church in the World." The church is aware of Dr. King's hectic schedule and ensures him that they will provide an honorarium if he were to accept this speaking engagement.

King's Way Hurts Rights Movement

Washington, D.C., Massachusetts (MA), Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Mr. White, author of this article, argues that the political fallout from Dr. King's stance on America's involvement in Vietnam hinders the goals of the Civil Rights Movement.

Fellowship of Reconciliation Campaign Proposal

Thursday, October 27, 1966
New York (NY), VIETNAM, CANADA, Washington, D.C., UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

The Fellowship of Reconciliation announces its "Thanksgiving-To-Tet" campaign and includes details of the types of aid that will be given to the people of Vietnam.

Statement of the Committee for Emmett Doe

VIETNAM, Georgia (GA)

The Committee for Emmett Doe issues a statement both explaining Doe's situation and also asking for support. Doe, an Army paramedic, faced court-martial for allegedly cursing a white superior. He was later acquitted of the charges.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Elizabeth Babcock

Tuesday, February 2, 1965
New York (NY), Selma, AL, Alabama (AL)

Dora McDonald informs Mrs. Babcock that she received the contribution for the SCLC on behalf of Dr. King. Miss McDonald tells Mrs. Babcock that Dr. King is imprisoned in Selma, Alabama and that he will respond upon his release.

Letter to MLK from Charles Weaver

Wednesday, May 3, 1967
Pennsylvania (PA), Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

Charles Weaver sends a letter of support to Dr. King for all of his contributions to peace and describes him as the ideal Christian prophet.

God

Dr. King references the Old Testament book of Deuteronomy to illustrate God's perfection.

Ethical Relativism

Dr. King outlines an unknown author's views on ethical relativism.

Receipt for Sigrid L. Sharp

Thursday, August 20, 1964
California (CA)

Acknowledging receipt of a letter and a $100 contribution to the SCLC, Dr. King sends his appreciation to Mary Sarvis. Dr. King makes reference to an enclosed receipt of the contribution.

Letter from Rev. L. K. Jackson to MLK

Tuesday, April 9, 1963
Indiana (IN), New Jersey (NJ), Washington, D.C., Baltimore, MD, Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA

Reverend L. K. Jackson thanks Dr. King for his hospitality while he was in Atlanta. Jackson states that his only regret was not seeing more of Dr. King and his wife.

Letter from Mr. & Mrs. Ernest Geerten to MLK

Monday, April 17, 1967
Berkeley, CA

Mr. & Mrs. Ernest Geerten express their appreciation for Dr. King's address at Riverside Church and extend their complete support.

Pamphlet on Benjamin E. Mays

Benjamin E. Mays, the President of Morehouse College, is highlighted in this pamphlet.

Letter from D. McDonald to Prafulla Chandra Das

Monday, March 6, 1967
INDIA

In this response letter regarding a request for a prefatory message from Dr. King, Miss Dora McDonald, Dr. King's personal secretary, cites his extensive obligations in conveying regrets. It became increasingly common for Dr. King to decline such requests as his work and mission progressed.

Letter from MLK to Melvin Grussing Regarding a Contribution

Monday, February 26, 1968
Indiana (IN)

Dr. King writes to express gratitude for the generous contribution of $126 to the SCLC. He conveys that such support enables SCLC to continue programs to complete the task of voter registration in the South.

Letter from Congressman F. Bradford Morse to MLK

Monday, October 4, 1965
Washington, D.C., Massachusetts (MA)

Massachusetts 5th District Representative F. Bradford Morse expresses his disappointment that the Home Rule bill for the District of Columbia was not approved. He informs Dr. King that further action is unlikely to be taken in 1965.

Society

New York (NY)

Dr. King quotes a statement from Charles H. Cooley's "The Social Process," in which Cooley defines society as a living, unified group of processes.

Declaration from the Southern Democratic Conference

Birmingham, AL

The Southern Democratic Conference writes about new laws sponsored by the Jefferson County Legislative Delegation. Under the new legislation, the writer(s) feel as though the laws were "designed to dilute the citizen strength of the Negro and to deprive the black minority of opportunities hitherto available to the white group."

University of West Indies News Release

Thursday, May 27, 1965

The University of West Indies releases a statement announcing Dr. King's acceptance to preach the University's Valedictory Sermon.

Letter from Margit Sahlin to MLK

Saturday, October 24, 1964
SWEDEN, Stockholm, Sweden

Margit Sahlin of the Church of Sweden invites Dr. King to a "symposium with prominent and interested Swedes" during his trip to Scandinavia.

Letter from Ralph Ahlberg to Ralph David Abernathy

Tuesday, April 9, 1968
New York (NY)

Minister Ahlberg extends condolences on behalf of The Congregational Church of Rockville Centre to Rev. Abernathy upon the assassination of Dr. King.

Letter from Hubert Humphrey to MLK about an Invitation

Wednesday, July 20, 1966
Jackson, MS, Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS)

In this letter, Mr. Hubert Humphrey, Vice President of the United States, writes to Dr. King declining his invitation to address the 10th Annual Convention of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

The Dimensions of a Complete Life

Sunday, November 13, 1960
New York, NY, Iowa (IA), INDIA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Cambridge, MA

Dr. King's speech at Cornell University cites the new and complete city of God described in the Book of Revelation to propose that life at its best is complete in three dimensions. He states that a complete or three-dimensional life includes an inward concern for one's personal ends, an outward commitment to the welfare of others, and an upward connection with God.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Tullberg to MLK

Tuesday, April 18, 1967
New Hampshire (NH), Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

The Tullberg family from New Hampshire conveys their support to Dr. King for his stance against the Vietnam War. They believe that the war is a violation of the basic principles of human rights.