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Letter from Marion Barry and Edward B. King to MLK

Friday, October 28, 1960
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Marion Barry and Edward B. King, Jr. extend their gratitude to Dr. King for his work, which has helped the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee in its efforts.

Letter From MLK to Ada Hill

Thursday, July 25, 1963
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, AUSTRALIA

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Hill for her letter commending his letter from the Birmingham jail. He assures Mrs. Hill her encouraging words will help give him the courage to continue in the struggle to make brotherhood a reality.

Letter from Eugene Exman to MLK

Thursday, March 22, 1962
New York (NY), New York, NY, Massachusetts (MA), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Eugene Exman expresses his delight that Dr. King will be completing the manuscript for a book of sermons. Exman also asks Dr. King to meet with him in August, if Dr. King plans to travel to Martha's Vineyard. The book of sermons mentioned in this letter eventually would be entitled "Strength to Love."

Letter from Burke Marshall to MLK

Thursday, April 9, 1964
Washington (WA)

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General, writes Dr. King acknowledging his previous telegram about racism in St. Augustine, Florida. In addition, Marshall refers a copy of the telegram to the attention of George B. Hartzog, Jr.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rabbi Joel Goor

Monday, August 17, 1964
California (CA)

Dora McDonald informs Rabbi Joel Goor of Dr. King's absence from the city due to an engagement to speak before the European Baptist Federation. She promises to have Dr. King signed a copy of his book for Goor to keep and appreciates Goor's support to the civil rights movement.

Letter from Martin Sargent to MLK

Tuesday, September 14, 1965
London, England, FRANCE

Martin Sargent expresses his and the American Church in Paris' appreciation for Dr. King's attendance and participation.

Letter from Dr. King to Mr. David George Ball

Thursday, October 23, 1958
Connecticut (CT)

Dr. King, in this letter, thanked Mr. George Ball, of the Yale University Christian Association, for the kind outpouring of support during his recovery from a nearly fatal stabbing in 1958. He acknowledges his readiness to rejoin those fighting in the battle for civil rights, once his healing process is complete.

Letter from Rosalind Rhines to MLK

Thursday, March 28, 1968
New Jersey (NJ), Atlanta, GA

Ms. Rhines, a student at Drake College of Business, requests Dr. King's opinion regarding the Civil Rights Bill proposed to Congress, and which candidate in the coming election has the best understanding of the American Negro struggle.

Letter from Robert Finarelli to MLK

Wednesday, October 30, 1963
Philadelphia, PA, Birmingham, AL

The staff of Edwin H. Vare Junior High School contributes to the SCLC "in remembrance of the Birmingham children who were victims of hate."

Letter from Ann Lincoln to MLK

Thursday, June 24, 1965
Connecticut (CT)

The writer, who identifies herself as a "collateral descendent of Abraham Lincoln," relates a story involving a young colored girl to Dr. King. Ms. Lincoln explains that the incident disturbed her greatly and she feels it is time to educate Negros on white acceptance.

John A. McDermott to MLK

Saturday, December 2, 1967
Chicago, IL, Indiana (IN)

Mr. MacDermott informs Dr. King of the John F. Kennedy Award Dinner and requests that he wire his "greetings" to those who will be honoring him.

Clarence Jordan's Open letter to to the First Baptist Church of Atlanta

Tuesday, September 24, 1963
Atlanta, GA

Clarence Jordan writes to the First Baptist Church of Atlanta to voice his opinion on the Ashton Jones affair. Ashton Jones, a white Methodist minister, was jailed for "disturbing divine worship" when he and two African American associates attempted to take part in a segregated church service. Jordan attempts to parallel this event to biblical accounts where Judeo-Christian leaders disrupted services involved with idol worship. Jordan further asserts that while the state of Georgia may permit the worshipping of a "segregated god," "God himself does not."

Letter from Gloria Cantor to Dora McDonald

Monday, April 17, 1967
New York, NY

Gloria Cantor, of Belafonte Enterprises, wrote to Dora McDonald requesting copies of Dr. King's speech at the Spring Mobilization.

The New Covenant

Dr. King writes about the New Covenant, according to Jeremiah 31:33.

SCLC Affiliates

Tuesday, October 17, 1967
Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), Atlanta, GA, Mississippi (MS)

Tom O. writes Mrs. King attaching an example of a brochure which entails a description SCLC's affiliate program. Tom O. also insures Mrs. King that the color in which the brochure is printed is not final.

Letter to MLK from A Friend of Justice and Democracy

Tuesday, February 14, 1967
California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., Florida (FL)

An anonymous individual writes Dr. King to declare that the Jewish people are responsible for the oppression of Negroes.

Black is Beautiful, and It's So Beautiful To Be Black

Sunday, October 1, 1967
Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C., Cleveland, OH, Atlanta, GA, Virginia (VA)

This staff newsletter "Black Is Beautiful, and It's So Beautiful," published by the SCLC, explains the upcoming events that the organization has in store. The newsletter communicates as to who acquired new positions within the SCLC and speaks to how the SCLC wishes to continue with projects based in Chicago, Cleveland, and Washington through Operation Breadbasket.

Letter from Robert Carter and D. John Heyman to MLK

Friday, March 8, 1968
New York, NY, New York (NY)

The National Committee Against Discrimination in Housing (NCDH) sends Dr. King a report, which examined "where the jobs are and where those who need them most now live." According to the NCDH, the study shows that jobs are not in the same geographic area where Negroes and other minorities live.

Letter from MLK to William Proxmire

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King thanks William Proxmire for his support in passing the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

MLK Requests Federal Protection from US Attorney General

Friday, February 19, 1965
Alabama (AL)

Dr. King sends this urgent request for protection to US Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach. Negro citizens were brutalized while protesting the arrest of James Orange. Alabama State Troopers prevented protestors from seeking medical attention by refusing to allow them to leave Zion Methodist Church.

Letter from Bernard Holliday to MLK

Monday, September 23, 1963
Rhode Island (RI), Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

President of Ministers Alliance, Mr. Holliday writes to Dr. King to show his support for the tragic incident that took place September 15, 1963. They enclosed a check to the families that lost someone during this terrible event.

We Return to Birmingham Jail to Bear Witness

Birmingham, AL

On his way to turn themselves in to Birmingham jail again in 1967, Dr. King writes this article in longhand, asserting the purposes of the civil rights activists' civil disobedience. Their unjust incarceration, he states, will allow them to bear witness to an unjust justice system, from Bull Connor's dogs to the US Supreme Court. The Court had just issued a decision supporting Connor's injunction forbidding the protests of the Birmingham campaign, which had led to his first incarceration there in 1963.

Letter from Grandison Cherry-El to MLK

Thursday, October 21, 1965
Washington, D.C., UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Michigan (MI), Maryland (MD), Baltimore, MD, Detroit, MI, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Grandison Cherry-El, Minister with The Moorish Science Temple of America, contacts US Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbak in reference to discrimination in citizenship in American public schools.

Letter from Annon M. Card to Robert L. Green

Monday, November 14, 1966
New York, NY, New York (NY), Michigan (MI), Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Annon Card, vice president of Texaco, assures Robert L. Green that an investigation is being conducted regarding the circumstances stated in Green's previous letter.

Letter of Inquiry from Carol Hess to MLK

Friday, March 8, 1968
New York (NY), Birmingham, AL

In this letter Carol Hess of New York requests an audience with Dr. King. She is writing a paper pertaining to the Birmingham March.

Letter from Rev. Allen Clark to MLK

Texas (TX)

Rev. Allen Clark sends Dr. King words of encouragement and requests a copy of a book regarding Dr. King's faith.

People In Action: Literacy Bill Dies

Saturday, May 26, 1962
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King shares his disappointment with the Senate vote that stopped the 1962 Voting Rights Bill, then known as the Literacy Bill. The bill would have eliminated the literacy tests that Dr. King believed were used to keep African-Americans of all education levels from qualifying to vote.

Report on Workshop for the Huntsville Movement

Friday, March 9, 1962
Alabama (AL)

This is a report about the civil rights movement in Huntsville, Alabama in the early 1960's. Hank Thomas, a CORE Field Representative, cultivated a group of students from Alabama A & M to conduct sit-ins and non-violent demonstrations at local businesses.

Anonymous letter to MLK

Sunday, June 26, 1966
Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), Memphis, TN, Tennessee (TN)

An anonymous individual expresses their concern with the methods and efforts Dr. King is using to achieve his goals through the Civil Rights Movement.

Postcard from J. Mason

Mason requests that Dr. King focus more on black youth crime rates, orphan children and other charitable activities within the black community.