Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Nashville, TN"

Memorandum from Carole to Dora McDonald

Thursday, June 22, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C., Detroit, MI, Chicago, IL, New York, NY, New York (NY), Cleveland, OH

Carole requests that Ms. McDonald channels several correspondence to Dr. King from those who will participate in a Convention.

Letter from MLK to Reverend George W. Goth

Sunday, October 27, 1963

Dr. King writes Reverend George Goth of Metropolitan United Church declining his invitation to make an appearance at his church. Dr. King has engagements for the remainder of the year that hinder him from committing to any further appearances.

Letter from Juanita Kurtza to MLK

Wednesday, November 20, 1963
Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI)

Juanita Kurtza sends Dr. King a list of scriptures to encourage him in his work. She also apologizes for her inability to send money.

Letter from MLK to The Honorable John Sherman Cooper

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King writes Kentucky Senator John Sherman Cooper to commend his role in facilitating the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from Curtis Harris to MLK

Monday, February 1, 1965
Virginia (VA)

Curtis W. Harris, of the Virginia State Unit of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, wrote to Dr. King to alert him that the Smithfield Packing Company has a labor situation very similar to that of Scripto in Atlanta. Harris explains that none of the senior Negro employees are in the appropriate income bracket and could use Dr. King's assistance.

MLK Address at the 53rd National Convention of the NAACP

Thursday, July 5, 1962
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Chattanooga, TN, Tennessee (TN), Mississippi (MS)

This document is Dr. King's address to the 53rd Annual Convention of the NAACP in Atlanta, Georgia. Dr. King discusses the following myths in this address: time will solve all problems, education can only solve problems of racial conflict, the Negro vote can do little to alter present conditions, and the practice of nonviolence is ineffective. Dr. King also speaks on "disunity," and states "the law may not make a man love me, but it may keep him from lynching me."

The New York Times: New Way Sought to Teach Rights

Sunday, February 20, 1966
New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Columbia University and its Teachers College plan to begin a nationwide initiative to improve the teaching of civil rights. The plan will not only apply to elementary and secondary schools but also to college, universities and adult education forums. Instead of using textbooks, teachers will utilize case studies and films to keep information up to date.

"Drop Dead"

This letter, sent to Dr. King, emphasizes a clear disgust with Dr. King's tactics. The author insists that the best thing he could do for his people is "drop dead."

Morehouse College Centennial Program

Atlanta, GA

This program highlights week-long events for Morehouse College's first 100 year anniversary in 1967. One of the many notable attendees is Howard Thurman, who at that point was a close friend and mentor to Dr. King.

National Citizens' Commission Report to Congress

Tuesday, September 19, 1967
Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C.

Urban Development Coordinator Shelby Southard, of the Cooperative League of the USA, sends Dr. King a copy of this report to Congress recommending improved foreign aid for urban development. Southard helped author the report, entitled the "National Citizens' Commission on Urban Development." It emphasizes unrest caused by "deplorable social conditions" in cities around the world, and seeks to improve urban development planning.

MLK on the New York Riots

Monday, July 27, 1964
New York (NY), Mississippi (MS), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King discusses the recent riots that occurred in New York. While some people would like to place the blame on violent blacks, King asserts that one should examine the real issues behind the violence and riots. King states that many blacks feel they will never gain equality in housing, employment, or education, which is why they react violently.

Letter from Robert A. Jackson to MLK

Tuesday, November 17, 1964
CANADA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Robert A. Jackson, Minister for Knox's Church, congratulates Dr. King for receiving the many honors bestowed upon him. Minister Jackson invites Dr. King to come speak at either the Polio Dinner or the 100th Anniversary of the Church Home.

Letter from Joseph T. Beaver to MLK

Wednesday, October 1, 1958
MEXICO, Cincinnati, OH, Ohio (OH), San Francisco, CA, LIBERIA, Oslo, Norway, New York (NY), Illinois (IL)

Joseph Beaver, Jr. sends his sympathy to Dr. King following the attempt on Dr. King's life. He had originally included a biography of Wendell Phillips Dabney.

A Contentious Telephone Message

Wednesday, February 16, 1966
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

William Harold Johnson contacts Dr. King to inform him of a telephone message publicizing controversial information from a number listed in Springfield, Illinois. Mr. Johnson asks Dr. King for advice on how the Council of Churches could contend the information while also mentioning that he and his associates are interested in becoming more familiar with the approach being taken in Chicago.

Draft of MLK Response to the Establishment of a Bi-Racial Commission in Saint Augustine, Florida

Florida (FL), St. Augustine, FL

This is a draft of a response for Dr. King to make regarding the establishment of a bi-racial commission in St. Augustine, Florida to address the issues of equality, human dignity and racial justice.

Materialism

Dr. King records a definition of materialism.

Letter from H.A. Gilliam to MLK about a Donation

Tuesday, February 28, 1967
Memphis, TN

H.A. Gilliam, Sr. writes to Dr. King enclosing a check for the advancement of the cause represented by the SCLC.

Marx

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr’s “The Nature and Destiny of Man.”

Essay Outline by John Mates on Helmut Richard Niebuhr

Friday, April 20, 1951
New York (NY)

John Mates contests the influence of Helmut Richard Niebuhr written contributions to the church through his congruent philosophy with Jesus Christ's message. Mr. Mates further discusses the churches relations to the societal influences of politics and economics.

Social Ethics

Dr. King writes about social ethics as discussed in the Old Testament book, Amos.

Letter from M. R. Cherry to MLK

Friday, September 16, 1966
CANADA, Atlanta, GA

M. R. Cherry, Dean of the School of Theology of Acadia University, writes Dr. King on behalf of the University inviting him to deliver the Hayward Lectures.

America's Chief Moral Dilemma

Wednesday, May 10, 1967
Atlanta, GA

In this 1967 speech to the Hungry Club, Dr. King addresses America’s chief moral dilemma by focusing on three major evils: racism, poverty, and war.

Letter from Howard Moore Jr. to MLK

Tuesday, November 3, 1964

Mr. Moore, of the Atlanta law firm Hollowell, Ward, Moore & Alexander, congratulates Dr. King on receiving of the Nobel Peace Prize. He goes on to encourage Dr. King and the SCLC to "establish a full fledge non-sectarian four year college and graduate school."

MLK Note Card - "Immortality"

On this handwritten notecard, entitled, simply, "Immortality," Dr. King quotes Tennyson on the subject.

The Negro Past and It's Challenge for the Future

Boston, MA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

In honor of Negro History Week, Dr. King offers this speech on the black community's past and future in America.

Letter from Philip Harnden to MLK

Friday, February 16, 1968
Detroit, MI, Illinois (IL)

After reading Dr. King's book, "Why We Can't Wait," Philip Harnden, a sophomore at Wheaton College, writes Dr. King expressing his newly changed insight on the Negro struggle. Mr. Harnden inquires about Dr. King's nonviolent approach and the black community beginning to abandon nonviolence by adopting more aggressive means to achieve their goals.

Letter from W. Harding Kneedler to MLK

Wednesday, July 6, 1966
North Carolina (NC)

Dr. W. Harding Kneedler states that "marches are outdated" and believes that a solution is to have quiet organized action.

Itinerary-Group 1

Tuesday, November 7, 1967
New York, NY, FRANCE, GREECE

The itinerary for group #1 entails numerous international travels involving Paris, Athens, Jerusalem and more. The itinerary is very detailed beginning with breakfast locations, daily travel and site seeing, and concludes with dinner. This trip includes the visit to the Jordan River, the Dome of the Rock, the Sea of Galilee, and many more historical locations.

Letter from Samuel W. Williams to MLK

Wednesday, February 15, 1956
Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA

In this letter, Rev. Samuel W. Williams, Pastor of Friendship Baptist Church, offers encouraging words to Dr. King.

Pamphlet About the Black Panther Party

Wednesday, June 1, 1966
Alabama (AL), New York, NY, Birmingham, AL, Chicago, IL, Boston, MA, Selma, AL, Los Angeles, CA

This pamphlet contains historical and contextual references to the Black Panther Party. It also includes a speech by John Hulett and an interview of Stokely Carmichael highlighting the political and social movements occurring in Lowndes County, Alabama.