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Letter from Dora McDonald to Michael J.. Gerstley

Friday, March 29, 1963
Illinois (IL)

Miss McDonald sends Michael Gerstley an autographed card per Dr. King's instructions.

Telegram from Alfred Duckett to Mrs. King

Friday, October 30, 1964
New York, NY

Alfred Duckett asks Mrs. King to airmail her "program breakdown" to meet a printing deadline.

Teleological Argument

Dr. King quotes Immanuel Kant’s view of the teleological argument from “Critique of Pure Reason.”

Shriver Outlines Summer Program

Saturday, March 4, 1967
New York, NY, Washington, D.C., Pennsylvania (PA), South Dakota (SD), Rhode Island (RI), North Dakota (ND)

This New York Times article reports that if Congress approves the $75 million supplemental appropriation for antipoverty programs, Sargent Shriver, director of the Office of Equal Employment Opportunity, plans to use $47 million for the Neighborhood Youth Corps and $25 for community action agencies to help provide youth with employment and recreation. It also mentions efforts in the Senate to increase the supplemental appropriation.

Notecard Containing the Definition of Thinking

This notecard quotes Dr. Brightman's definition of thinking, taken from "An Intro to Philosophy".

Letter from MLK to Abby Seldes

Friday, January 31, 1964
Pennsylvania (PA), Washington, D.C.

Dr. King dictates a response letter to Miss Abby Seldes expressing his heartwarming appreciation to the young lady. He also expresses gratitude towards Abby's parents for attending the March On Washington demonstration.

Letter from MLK to Robert Weaver

Monday, August 21, 1967
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King writes HUD Secretary Robert Weaver to discuss issues regarding urban conditions and economic development.

Letter from MLK to Clair Engle

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Senator Clair Engle's support in passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Advertisement for Ku Klux Klan Segregation Meeting

Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

This advertisement invites every white person who supports segregation to attend an upcoming meeting sponsored by the Ku Klux Klan.

Malcolm X Statement by MLK

Monday, March 16, 1964

Dr. King responds to Malcolm X's break with Elijah Muhammad of the Nation of Islam by calling Malcolm’s program of “reciprocal bleeding” regrettable. This is more an indictment of a society whose racial ills produce a Malcolm X than of the man himself. The national community is now challenged to support full citizenship for Negroes while they still accept nonviolent leadership.

Telegram from Mr. and Mrs. B. E. Mays to MLK

Wednesday, October 26, 1960
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

This telegram was sent from Benjamin Elijah Mays and his wife to Dr. King at the State Prison in Reidsville, Georgia.

Letter from Jay Kennedy to MLK

Saturday, October 24, 1964
New York, NY

Jay Richard Kennedy congratulates Dr. King on being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. He also comments on the importance of international recognition for the current struggle for equality.

God's Existence

Dr. King cites Paul Tillich's perception of God's existence. This ideology is a Christological paradox for God "is being-itself" and beyond the essence of existence.

Non-Violent Procedures to Inter-Racial Harmony


Dr. King proclaims that race relations is a crisis that has existed for many years in America. As a result of unjust race relations, Negroes have embarked upon the current fight for equal rights.

Letter from Donald G. Brownlow to MLK

Thursday, December 9, 1965
Georgia (GA), Pennsylvania (PA), Atlanta, GA

After hearing Dr. King's speech at Billanova University, Mr. Brownlow requests that the Reverend speak at the Haverford School located in Pennsylvania. Secondarily, Brownlow requests that Dr. King send a few words of congratulations to a student attending the college.

Metropolitan Youth Commission of St. Louis

Missouri (MO)

The following document recounts a three-year survey conducted by the Metropolitan Youth Commission in regards to the "Distribution of juvenile apprehensions by age, sex, and from the year 1960 to July 25, 1963."

Modern Day Samson

Wednesday, August 2, 1967
South Carolina (SC), Orangeburg, SC

Radio Station WDIX in South Carolina broadcasts an editorial answering the question, "Why does the Negro attack his white neighbor?" Dr. King's book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community" serves as the primary reference, alluding to the discrimination reflected in the proportion of whites who would not support interracial relationship and any efforts of integration.

Educational Conference Program 1967

Tuesday, May 2, 1967
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Dr. King serves as a guest speaker at a conference sponsored by The Allied Educational Foundation. This program outlines the itinerary for the event including the presentations of other speakers namely Max Lerner, Harrison E. Salisbury, Senator Gale W. McGee, and Stanley Levey.


Dr. King records some notes on death.

Letter from MLK to Vice President Nixon

Friday, August 30, 1957
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King thanks Vice President Richard Nixon for an earlier meeting. He supports the limited Civil Rights Bill (the Civil Rights Act of 1957) finally passed by the Senate and hopes the President will not veto it. He believes that a sustained mass movement is needed for the bill to be effective and is calling for a “Crusade for Citizenship” in the South to get at least 2 million Negroes registered to vote for the 1960 elections. King lauds the Vice President for his vigorous efforts in support of the Civil Rights Bill.

To Fulfill These Rights

Friday, June 1, 2012

The White House Conference on Civil Rights printed this program in preparation for their June 1966 conference. The theme of this agenda is entitled To Fulfill These Rights.

Telegram from Tuskegee Students and Teachers to the SCLC

Wednesday, April 12, 1967
Tuskegee, AL

Teachers and students from Tuskegee write members of the SCLC to express their support for the upcoming mobilization and Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War.

Religion (Definition)

Dr. King quotes Leslie Dixon Weatherhead’s “Why Do Men Suffer?”

Myths and Facts About OEO

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York (NY), Washington, D.C.

This document lists myths and facts regarding the Office of Economic Opportunity.

Letter from Mary L. Powell to MLK

Monday, January 8, 1968
Georgia (GA), Montgomery, AL, Boston, MA

Mary L. Powell writes to Dr. King expressing how she has been following and considering his plans, but disproves of his methods.


Dr. King quotes Herbert Spencer regarding the inevitability of progress.

Telegram from MLK to the University of Newcastle Upon Tyne

Monday, February 27, 1967

Dr. Kings sends a telegram notifying the University of Newcastle Upon Tyne in England of his acceptance of their honorary degree.

MLK's Itinerary October-November 1958

California (CA), Michigan (MI), Iowa (IA), Nebraska (NE), West Virginia (WV), Washington, D.C., Connecticut (CT), Oklahoma (OK), Indiana (IN), Alabama (AL), New Jersey (NJ), Arizona (AZ), Chicago, IL, Maryland (MD), Ohio (OH), Los Angeles, CA, Detroit, MI, Des Moines, IA, Tuskegee, AL

Dated 1958, this calendar lists a number of speaking engagements throughout the country scheduled for Dr. King.

Letter from R. William Johnson to MLK

Monday, December 5, 1966
Tennessee (TN), Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL

Bill Johnson writes Dr. King with an interest in starting a chapter of the SCLC in Oak Ridge. Johnson also invites Dr. King to visit Oak Ridge and speak with members of its community.

The Dilemma of The Negro

Saturday, January 29, 1966
Tuskegee, AL, Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), Philadelphia, PA

Dr. King provides an outlook on the social and political plight of the contemporary Negro. He claims "The challenge is the fact that society expects, indeed demands, that the Negro be as productive, as resourceful, as skillful and as responsible as his white brother who is not handicapped by oppression". He urges Negro citizens to capitalize on current opportunities for advancement. "The negro must not wait until the dawn of absolute emancipation...".