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Letter from MLK to Rabbi Philip Hiat

Friday, February 8, 1963

Dr. King responds to Rabbi Hiat's suggestion to provide an "opportunity for dialogue between Jewish and Negro religious leadership." In addition to confirming his participation in the dialogue, Dr. King commits to sending an additional letter with the names of "men who have much to contribute" along with some potential subject headings for the agenda.

Essay - MLK Entitled "The Bravest Man I Ever Met"

Dr. King's essay, entitled "The Bravest Man I Ever Met," profiles Norman Thomas, a prominent Socialist.

Letter from Paul Shields to MLK

Wednesday, June 16, 1965

Paul Shields, the News Director of CBS Television in Atlanta, writes to Dr. King to lodge a complaint against the Southern Christian Leadership Conference's press department. He states that press conferences convened by the SCLC rarely begin on time.

Broadside Regarding Julia Brown's Speech on MLK's Communist Connections

This broadside advertises a speech to be given by former FBI agent Julia Brown. Brown was to speak on the alleged communist connections of Dr. King.

"One Solitary Life"

The document, shown here, contains a narrative describing Jesus, entitled "One Solitary Life." Dr. King would use this narrative, in one of his last and most famous sermons "The Drum Major Instinct." The sermon was delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church, February 4, 1968, exactly two months before his untimely assassination.

Reading, Writing, and Race Relations

Thursday, June 1, 1967

Dorothy Singer wrote this piece,"Reading, Writing and Race Relations", regarding the racial integration in schools. Singer discusses several studies and their findings regarding integration.

Proposed Nobel Speech

This is a draft for an optional version of Dr. King's Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech. He notes the importance of viewing the world as a family and with such perception, understands race issues as an international concern. King also speaks of Sir Alfred Bernhard Nobel, the originator of the Nobel Peace Prize. He accepts the award on behalf of those who came before him and those who continue to fight for freedom.

Telegram from Mrs. King to David Rogers

Tuesday, January 14, 1969

Mrs. King sends Mr. Rogers her appreciation for his effort in turning Dr. King's birthday into a federal holiday.

Telegram from Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights to MLK

Thursday, August 9, 1962

The Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights and its executives offer support to Dr. King, who is imprisoned in the Albany jail.

Charles Renouvier

Dr. King outlines the philosophical career of Charles Renouvier.

Letter from MLK to James Foreman

Thursday, March 14, 1963

Dr. King informs James Forman of SNCC that the SCLC will not be able to "defray the cost of the litigation" concerning Bob Zellner. He explains that a recent benefit event did not raise as much money as expected.

Letter from MLK to Sargent Shriver

Monday, June 28, 1965

This letter to Sargent Shriver provides details about the SCLC's 1965 Annual Convention in Birmingham, Alabama. Dr. King also extends an invitation for Mr. Shriver to open the conference with an address about poverty, unemployment, and urban migration.

Letter from the European Baptist Federation to Dora McDonald

Thursday, May 7, 1964

P.M. Smith, Dr. Ruden's secretary, writes to Miss McDonald to express gratitude for Dr. King's consideration in attending the European Baptist Federation Conference in Amsterdam.

Social Ethics

Dr. King writes notes on social ethics from the Book of Nahum.

Legal Petition Made by Karl Von Key Against Selective Service System

Wednesday, June 15, 1966

Karl Von Key petitions the United States District Court of California about his draft into the armed forces. He contends that, as a person of color, he is a colonial subject, not a citizen of the United States. As a colonial subject, he should not be forced to serve in the military. He also writes that he is a conscientious objector and that he believes he was targeted by the local induction station because of his social and political views.

SCLC Policy-Making Board to Meet in Washington, D.C. February 6-7

Thursday, February 1, 1968

The SCLC Executive Board of Directors will hold its semi-annual meeting in Washington, D.C. They intend to discuss future projects as well as continuing projects.

Letter from Reverend Casper Glenn to MLK

Friday, August 30, 1963

Rev. Casper Glenn, president of the NAACP chapter in Tucson, Arizona, writes to Dr. King regarding rights to a recording of the "I Have a Dream" speech.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mrs. Edward Greaves

Wednesday, August 14, 1963

Miss Dora McDonald informs Mrs. Edward Greaves that additional copies of Dr. King's sermon entitled "Paul's Letter to American Christians" are unavailable. She refers Mrs. Greaves to locate the sermon in Dr. King's newly released book "Strength to Love."

Message from James Farmer About March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

Wednesday, August 28, 1963

James Farmer issues a message from the Donaldsonville Jail regarding the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. He regrets that he is unable to attend the event, but he supports the goals of the March.

Letter from Cheryl Chambers to MLK

Thursday, November 28, 1963

Cheryl Chambers asks Dr. King to send an autographed picture and a copy of his Letter from Birmingham Jail. She is doing a paper on civil rights for her government project and requests any available literature. Ms. Chambers, who is also a member of the NAACP Youth Council, informs Dr. King that the Council is getting ready to begin their membership drive and inquires if he has any helpful suggestions.

Preview of the "Dream" at Detroit March

Sunday, June 23, 1963

Two months before the famous "I Have a Dream" speech at the March on Washington, King used many of the same words, rhetorical techniques, and themes. King expresses gratitude and inspiration and warns against hatred and separatism at what he thinks is the largest US demonstration to date, a march in Detroit June 23, 1963. The legacy of slavery and segregation induced a false sense of inferiority in Negroes.

Social Ethics

Dr. King writes about social ethics as discussed in the Old Testament book, Amos.

Promotional Article for Why We Can't Wait

This Harper released publication contains a preview of the religious books to be published in the summer and fall of 1964. Dr. King's "Why We Can't Wait" is featured with the byline "The 'Man of the Year' writes the 'Book of the Year'."

Walk in Sympathy and Brotherhood

Monday, April 8, 1968

This is the itinerary for the Walk in Sympathy and Brotherhood to Dr. King's funeral site. A group of bereaved citizens from Northeast Atlanta organized this walk to express human solidarity.

Letter from MLK to Bernard Fixler

Friday, December 8, 1967

In this correspondence to Mr. Bernard Fixler, from Dr. King, he thanks Mr. Fixler for the contribution made to the SCLC.

Ritschl (Christology)

Dr. King quotes Albrecht Ritschl's "The Christian Doctrine of Justification and Reconciliation."

Mysticism

Dr. King quotes William Ernest Hocking’s “The Meaning of God in Human Experience.”

God

This scripture, deriving from the Old Testament biblical book of Isaiah, illustrates God as holy.

An Evening of Music

Sunday, April 15, 1962

The English family provides Ebenezer Baptist Church with "An Evening of Music" in the spring of 1962.

Note Card on Hugo of St. Victor

This note card concerns Hugo of St. Victor's dealings with theology and mysticism.