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"Nashville, TN"

Letter from Mercedes L. Johnson to Coretta Scott King

Pennsylvania (PA)

Nine year old Mercedes Lynne Johnson writes Mrs. King to offer her condolences and prayers following the assassination of Dr. King.

Letter from Esther Davey to MLK

Friday, April 23, 1965
Selma, AL

Esther Davey writes Dr. King in support of his crusade. She expresses her dismay in some of Dr. King's speeches made after the march from Selma, Alabama and stresses the importance of Christianity in his crusade.

Letter from Levi Eshkol to MLK

Tuesday, February 7, 1967
ISRAEL, JORDAN

Levi Eshkol, the Prime Minster of Jerusalem, welcomes Dr. King to lead a pilgrimage to the Holy Land.

SCLC and The American Foundation on Nonviolence: Proposal for Housing

Alabama (AL)

The American Foundation on Nonviolence and the SCLC set forth a proposal for low cost self-help housing in Greene County, Alabama.

God

Dr. King cites the Old Testament biblical book of Deuteronomy expressing that there is only one God.

Letter to MLK from Angry Citizen of Detroit

Friday, July 14, 1967
Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI)

A bothered citizen of Detroit writes Dr. King, who is referred to as the "negro champion," to express personal views on the status of the Negroes in the city.

Telegram from President Kennedy to MLK

Washington, D.C., Birmingham, AL

President John F. Kennedy applauds the work of Dr. King and the SCLC on the occasion of the organization’s Sixth Annual Convention.

National Citizens' Commission Report to Congress

Tuesday, September 19, 1967
Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C.

Urban Development Coordinator Shelby Southard, of the Cooperative League of the USA, sends Dr. King a copy of this report to Congress recommending improved foreign aid for urban development. Southard helped author the report, entitled the "National Citizens' Commission on Urban Development." It emphasizes unrest caused by "deplorable social conditions" in cities around the world, and seeks to improve urban development planning.

Letter to Rev. Ralph Abernathy

Monday, April 29, 1968
Illinois (IL), Los Angeles, CA

Rev. Abernathy received this correspondence from an individual disgruntled with a California politician. The document calls for reform and amnesty for poor people in America. The author's name, in this letter, is not clearly legible.

Letter from Theodore Brown to MLK

Friday, April 21, 1967
New York, NY, New York (NY), GERMANY

Theodore Brown writes Dr. King requesting his signature on a telegram to President Johnson from the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa expressing disapproval of South Africa's rule over South West Africa and requesting U.S. support for turning over administration to the United Nations.

Letter from Helga Gulbrandsen to MLK

Thursday, February 13, 1964
Oslo, Norway, Atlanta, GA, London, England

Helga Gulbrandsen invites Dr. King to speak for the Norwegian Fellowship in Oslo, Norway.

Theology

Dr. King quotes William Ernest Hocking's "The Meaning of God in Human Experience."

Letter from Congressman Ralph J. Rivers to MLK

Tuesday, August 24, 1965
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C., Alaska (AK), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Representative Rivers of Alaska informs Dr. King that he intends to sign the District of Columbia Home Rule Bill.

Press Release and Interview from Radio Norway

Wednesday, December 9, 1964
Oslo, Norway

Dr. King addresses the press the day before receiving the Nobel Peace Prize in a statement from Radio Norway.

Notes on a Letter from Birmingham Jail

Dr. King records notes on three different topics. First, he examines the concept of extremism and individual responses in their respective environments. Next, he expresses disappointment with the white church and its leadership. The final note describes the challenges and hardships of early Christians.

Old Testament History Notes

ISRAEL, EGYPT

Dr. King records notes from the Old Testament of the Bible. Much of the focus is on Isaiah and the downfall of Jerusalem.

SCLC Citizenship Education Program

Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

This pamphlet outlines the mission and objectives of SCLC's Citizenship Education Program. The program was designed to inform citizens about how to become full citizens in America. SCLC also addresses the recruitment of potential teachers to assist with the curriculum.

Letter from MLK to Willie Faust

Saturday, March 31, 1962
Atlanta, GA

Dr. King responds to a letter from Willie Gate Faust regarding an inquiry pertaining to legal advice and his release from jail. Reverend King refers the inmate to Attorney Donald Lee Hollowell, counsel for the NAACP.

Statement on Selma-Montgomery March of March 21-26

Monday, April 26, 1965
Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Iowa (IA), Kansas (KS), Detroit, MI, San Francisco, CA

Sister Mary Leoline reflects upon her participation in the Selma-Montgomery March as a positive experience.

Statement for Immediate Release from Harper & Row, Publishers

Monday, May 29, 1967
New York, NY

Harper & Row Publishers issued this press release to announce the arrival of Dr. King's final publication. The book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?", was his first written narrative, since he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. The release also noted that the book would address Dr. King's perspective on racism, poverty and militarism. The tentative date of publishing, according to the document, was June 19, 1967.

Letter From Octavia Wynbush Strong to MLK

Saturday, February 13, 1965
Missouri (MO)

Mrs. Strong offers Dr. King a copy of her play "Listen, America," with hopes that he might use it in his "wonderful work."

Letter from Dudley P. Babcock to MLK

Thursday, April 27, 1967
Virginia (VA), New York, NY, VIETNAM

Dudley Babcock writes Dr. King to express his views on race relations and Dr. King's leadership role in America. Babcock also discusses the march Dr. King is planning to lead in New York to promote peace in Vietnam.

Letter Starlet Roberts to MLK

Thursday, February 15, 1968

In this letter, Starlet Roberts, a fifth grade student, asks Dr. King for a picture for her class book of Famous Negroes.

Statement from MLK Returning from Receiving Nobel Prize

Friday, December 18, 1964
New York, NY

Upon returning from receiving the Nobel Peace Prize, Dr. King issued this statement on segregation, calling it "nothing but a new form of slavery."

A Minority of One

Thursday, June 1, 1967

In an attempt to enhance positive intergroup relations, Mrs. Porter was interviewed during "inservice education sessions" at a school of nursing. Because Mrs. Porter was "the first and only Negro who had been graduated from" the school, the faculty wanted insight into her experience of integration. Gloria M. Francis wrote this article covering the interview.

Letter from James Bevel on the Spring Mobilization Committee

Cleveland, OH, Ohio (OH), New York, NY, New York (NY), VIETNAM, San Francisco, CA, California (CA), Missouri (MO), Baltimore, MD, Philadelphia, PA, Maryland (MD), Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), CANADA, Washington (WA)

James Bevel, national director of the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam, offers insight into the purpose of the committee. The committee focuses on launching two mass demonstrations to stop the war, with the goal of "seeking to stimulate increased activity everywhere."

Letter from Mary T. Heathcote to MLK

Tuesday, November 12, 1963
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA, New York (NY)

Mary Heathcote of MacMillan Publishing Company asks Dr. King and the SCLC to help promote a book being written by Henrietta Buckmaster. Buckmaster, whom Dr. King quoted in "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community," chronicles the events of Reconstruction.

An Invitation to the Honoring of Rabbi Israel Dresner and Reverend Richard Wilson

New Jersey (NJ)

This document serves as an invitation to a event honoring Rabbi Dresner and Rev. Wilson for their outstanding spiritual leadership.

Letter from MLK to Benjamin E. Mays

Tuesday, February 11, 1964
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Honolulu, HI, Hawaii (HI)

Dr. King sends Dr. Mays a check for $200 and informs him that he will not be able to attend the Founders' Day celebration.

Letter of Condolences on the death of MLK

Tuesday, April 9, 1968

This letter of condolence was written less than week after the assassination of Dr. King. In this letter the writer states,"We shall work toward his dream".