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Letter from MLK to Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King describes Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy's efforts as "courageous" and "effective" in guiding Congress to establish the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from US Ambassador Findley Burns, Jr. to MLK

Monday, January 23, 1967

United States Ambassador Findley Burns writes Dr. King expressing his joy regarding King's upcoming pilgrimage to the Holy Land. Despite warnings due to Middle East conflict, Burns hopes that Dr. King will not cancel the trip. He sees the visit as an opportunity to strengthen the bonds between the US and Jordan.

Letter from Mildred Scott Olmsted to MLK

Friday, June 19, 1964

The Women's International League for Peace and Freedom would like Dr. King to send his greetings for their 50th Anniversary celebration.

Abelard on Universals and theMethod of Descartes

Dr. King references Peter Abelard, medieval French philosopher and theologian. He discerns that universals cannot be things or words. Rather, the universal is a concept. King maintains that this quandary is relevant to "Schoolmen" and particularly the dogma of the Church. He continues by also noting philosopher Rene Descartes, and that "he was at fault in overemphasizing mathematical method."

Letter from Norman Baugher, Galen Ogden and W. Harold Row to MLK

Monday, July 29, 1963

Prominent officials from the Church of the Brethren's Committee on Race Relations writes Dr. King informing him of the power of television in promoting nonviolence. Since many individuals around the nation are unfamiliar with the practices of nonviolence, Norman Baugher, Galen Oden and W. Harold Row recommend that Dr. King call upon various associates to appear on television and educate the public on the nonviolent philosophy.

Telegram from Mrs. King to Canon L. John Collins

Friday, January 3, 1969

Mrs. King confirms with Canon L. John Collins the dates of her visit to England.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK about Speaking Out Article

Friday, September 11, 1964

Joan Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, communicates with Mr. Hunt of Speaking Out regarding payment and schedule of a feature article to be written by Dr. King.

Letter from Roger Threats to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Roger Threats, a student from New York City, offers his condolences to Mrs. King following Dr. King death. In the letter, Threats describes his own dream, which is an end to fighting.

Apocalyptic Religion

Dr. King quotes John Oman's "the Natural and The Supernatural."

Royalty Statement from Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, October 9, 1964

Joan Daves sends Dr. King a royalty statement for "Stride Toward Freedom" and "Strength To Love."

Negro Church Finest Hope for Christianity

Thursday, January 18, 1962

Ruth Haefner forwards a publication from The Pittsburgh Courier which states, "the newly militant Negro theologians in America, may perform the miracle of raising the dead (Western Christendom) to life." She further expresses her hopes that Dr. King may do the work of reviving the Christian spirit with a weekly letter featured in London press.

Letter From India to MLK

Friday, June 25, 1965

Ram Aurangabadkar and Dinkar Sakrikar of India write to Dr. King concerning his civil rights efforts in the United States. As a token of appreciation for Dr. King's work, they offer a bronze statue of Gandi on behalf of their society. Aurangabadkar and Sakrikar request that the statue be placed in a children's park.

Letter from Tony Schrader to MLK

Tuesday, April 2, 1968

Tony Schrader informs Dr. King that his college is sponsoring a primary on campus for Choice '68. Schrader requests "any free campaign materials or statements of policies of Dr. King."

I Have A Dream

In the most famous of his speeches, given from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial at the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, Dr. King drew on themes from previous sermons and speeches, including an address he called The American Dream. Citing Lincoln and the Emancipation Proclamation, the US Constitution, and the Declaration of Independence, King calls upon the nation to fulfill its promise of freedom and justice for all of its citizens. Although he began by reading from a manuscript, he later abandoned it and spoke directly to the crowd of more than 200,000.

Notes Regarding Civil Rights Act of 1965

This handwritten note describes the positive effects of the Civil Rights Act for Negroes. According to the notes, "What we have won in blood, toil and sacrifice we will not squander in apathetic complacency."

Letter from Dana McLean Greeley to MLK

Monday, April 4, 1966

Dana McLean Greeley, President of the Unitarian Universalist Association, asks Dr. King to lend his name to a letter addressed to President Lyndon Johnson. The letter, which was drafted at the request of the Inter-Religious Peace Conference, requests an interview with President Johnson. Dr. King's handwriting appears on the top right of this letter, saying that he would be happy to allow them to use his name in this context.

Royalty Statement

Friday, June 30, 1967

This statement provides figures of terms and earned royalties for the German-language edition "Strength to Love."

Letter from Guy Heinemann to MLK

Wednesday, June 12, 1963

Guy Heinemann states that several copies of the Civil Rights issue of the Yale Political have been sent to Dr. King.

Daniel

Dr. King discusses the meaning of the Book of Daniel, namely to reinforce the idea of the kingdom of God.

Letter from O. O. Rabb to MLK

Monday, March 27, 1967

This note and newspaper clipping from O.O. Robb was addressed to "The Right Reverend Martin Luther King, Pastor & Civil Rights Agitator." Robb assures Dr. King that he would, in fact, find supporters, "for there are many soft-headed wild-eyed people who have a soft heart and no brains who will follow." Robb contines that President Johnson's Great Society and War on Poverty must go on and ends that Dr. King and his supporters will get their reward - a prison cell.

Beyond Condemnation

Dr. King outlines a sermon entitled "Beyond Condemnation." He references the biblical story about a woman condemned to death by the Pharisees for adultery. Jesus commands "the person without sin to cast the first stone" as a lesson that all sins are equal and that no one should judge the flaws of others.

Letter from Marsh Clark to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, December 18, 1963

Acting Bureau Chief of Time Magazine, Marsh Clark encloses a Christmas gift for Dr. King's secretary Dora McDonald. Clark jokingly requests that Dr. King not have plane layovers in small towns with weird names.

Press Release from the Southern Conference Educational Fund, Inc.

Wednesday, November 24, 1965

The Southern Conference Educational Fund, Inc. informs supporters about the recent attacks on civil rights groups located in Knoxville, Tennessee.

God

Dr. King cites "Totem and Tabu" and "The Future of an Illusion" for Sigmund Freud's view on the origin of the idea of God.

Draft of Where Do We Go From Here?

This document is a selection of a draft from Chapter VI of "Where Do We Go From Here," which is featured in the book "The World House."

Letter from Weston E. Vivian to MLK

Monday, January 11, 1965

Congressman Weston Vivian responds to Dr. King's letter regarding the seating of the Mississippi Congressman. He tells Dr. King that he not only supported the "Ryan fairness resolution" to prevent the seating, but also voted against the motion to swear in the Congressman. Although he mentions that he was in the minority regarding this matter, he assures Dr. King that he will continue to "work for the opening of the Mississippi registration and election procedures."

Letter from the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament to MLK

Canon L. John Collins, a founder of the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament, invites Dr. King to speak at a rally in Trafalgar Square in London, England. The proposed rally will be based on the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, and Collins would like to provide a direct link between the rally and the Washington March through the participation of both Bayard Rustin and Dr. King.

Dr. Luther King Cause of U.S. Violence

Thursday, November 11, 1965

The articles mentions Dr. King and his supposed involvement with the Communist Party. The author is not convinced that Dr. King is the "good Samaritan" everyone believes him to be, and he is ensuring more violence with his cause.

A First Step Toward School Integration

This article on the first steps toward school integration includes a foreword by Dr. King. The article goes into some detail about the events regarding the integration of schools in Nashville, Tennessee.

Address by MLK at Golden Anniversary Conference of National Urban League

Tuesday, September 6, 1960

Dr. King gives an address at the National Urban Leagues's Golden Anniversary Conference in New York City. He speaks on the subject, "The Rising Tide of Racial Consciousness" and discusses the Negroes new sense of "somebodiness." The factors that contribute to this new sense of dignity include a population shift from rural to urban life, rapid educational advance, gradual improvement of economic status, Supreme Court decisions outlawing segregation in the public schools, and awareness that freedom is a part of a world-wide struggle.