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"Nashville, TN"

Letter from Dora McDonald to Marshall E. Bean

Thursday, July 8, 1965

Dora McDonald communicates to Marshall E. Bean that Dr. King is remembering him in his prayers and sends a photograph as a visual reminder. Miss McDonald also includes a scripture from the Book of Psalms.

Sin

Dr. King references Dewey and his view of evil.

Telegram from MLK to Honorable Daniel Evans

Dr. King writes to the Honorable Daniel Evans requesting that he intercede in the controversy resulting from Washington State's conservation law and a 111-year old treaty.

Man

Dr. King quotes Psalms 144:4 and comments briefly on this biblical passage.

Birmingham Desegregation Settlement Agreement

Friday, May 10, 1963

Dr. King reviews the settlement made between the City of Birmingham and civil rights protesters. This agreement includes the integration of lunch counters, sitting rooms, restrooms, and water fountains within ninety days.

Photographed Sculpture of Eleanor Roosevelt

This is a photographed sculpture of Eleanor Roosevelt 1884-1962.

Telegram from Dr. L. K. Jackson to President John F. Kennedy

Dr. L. K. Jackson of St. Paul Baptist Church writes to President Kennedy regarding "barbaric" demonstrations against Negroes in the South.

Letter from SNCC Chairman John Lewis to William Shawn

Thursday, April 22, 1965

John Lewis, Chairman of SNCC, responds to a recent article in "The New Yorker." He provides a number of corrections to the article and also explains who should be considered official spokespersons for SNCC.

MLK Sermon: Why I Am Opposed to the War in Vietnam

Sunday, April 30, 1967

Dr. King gives a sermon on why he does not support the war in Vietnam.

Letter from Clarence G. Petersen to MLK

Thursday, August 25, 1966

Clarence G. Petersen tells Dr. King that he should avoid marching in the city of Cicero. Petersen describes Cicero as a slum with old houses and an oppressive, industrial atmosphere. While Petersen supports Dr. King's campaign, he believes it'd be best if the city were avoided for Dr. King's safety.

Letter from Saul Miller to MLK

Tuesday, September 13, 1966

Saul Miller, Director of the Department of Publications for the AFL-CIO, writes Dr. King requesting him to write a description of the activities of the SCLC. This write-up will be featured in the November issue of the AFL-CIO magazine, which will be devoted entirely to the issue of civil rights.

MLK Statement at Peace Event in Geneva

Monday, May 29, 1967

Dr. King delivered this statement in Geneva at the Pacem In Terris ("Peace on Earth") II Convocation about the "costly, bloody and futile war in Vietnam."

Telegram from the Montgomery Improvement Association to Leaders of Birmingham

Thursday, May 9, 1963

The Montgomery Improvement Association office staff sends Dr. King, Rev. Shuttlesworth, Rev. Abernathy and other Birmingham civil rights leaders words of encouragement.

Letter from MLK to Knights of Peter Claver, Ladies' Auxiliary Members Expresing Thanks for Their Contribution

Monday, January 30, 1967

Dr. King thanks the Knights of Peter Claver, Ladies' Auxilary Members for their generous contribution to S.C.L.C. Dr. King acknowledges the impact of such support on improving race relations throughout the nation.

Letter from Congressman Paul H. Todd to MLK

Monday, October 11, 1965

Florida Democratic Congressman Paul Todd explains to Dr. King why he voted against seating five congressman of the Mississippi Freedonm Democratic Party. Todd based his decision on an earlier precedent, which dismissed a previous claim "because it was brought by a party not legally a candidate for the contested seat."

Letter from Eartha Kitt to MLK

Eartha Kitt expresses her admiration for Dr. King and his cause.

Letter from MLK to Johnnie McKinney

Thursday, May 13, 1965

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak in Cheyenne, Wyoming "under the auspices of the NAACP."

Letter from Dr. Alvaro Palmeira to MLK

Monday, November 16, 1964

Dr. Palmeira, Grand Master of the Grande Orient of Brazil, offers his congratulations to Dr. King for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Montanism

Dr. King records information about the second century Christian movement known as Montanism.

Letter from Clarence Jones to MLK

Friday, May 15, 1964

Clarence Jones writes Dr. King requesting commentary concerning "The World March Towards Human Rights: Luncheon on May 28, 1964."

Barth and Brunner

Dr. King notes the views of Swiss theologians Karl Barth and Emil Brunner on God, making reference to Soren Kierkegaard (SK).

Transformed Nonconformist

Sunday, January 16, 1966

Dr. King discusses the importance of not conforming in a sermon at Ebenezer Baptist Church. Dr. King thoroughly discusses the hardships and the benefits that come with being a transformed non-conformist.

Telegram from MLK to Dr. Gunnar Jahn

Monday, September 11, 1967

Dr. King authorizes Philip Noel-Baker and Pater George Dominique Pire to represent him in a delegation seeking Vietnam peace negotiations.

CORE List of Cities Where Lunch Counters Have Opened Since February 1st, 1960

Monday, February 20, 1961

This document is a list of locations where lunch counter sit-ins have occurred, provided by the Congress of Racial Equality

Sin

Dr. King summarizes and quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher's view of sin in Christian Faith.

Summer Session Banquet: The Role of Education in the Civil Rights Movement

Thursday, July 15, 1965

Dr. King gives an address on the role of education in the civil rights movement at Syracuse University's Fourteenth Annual Summer Session Banquet.

Notecard Containing MLK's Handwriting Regarding Christianity

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines Martin Luther's views on Christianity, accroding to the book, "Concerning Christian Liberty."

Man (A Fatalistic View)

Dr. King includes a quote from the Persian philosopher Omar Khayyam.

Memorandum on direct Action in Alabama Cities

Dr. King writes a Direct Action plan for the Alabama cities of Birmingham, Danville and Montgomery. He believes that these cities need to focus on the emergence of violence and recommends the integration of Negroes into the police force.

Letter from Myles Horton to Friends of Highlander

Friday, December 8, 1967

Myles Horton, the co-founder of the Highlander Research and Education Center, explains that he has been working on a program for the Appalachian area. He also mentions that the Center sponsors voter registration, political education programs and a series of workshops to help Negro candidates run for local and state offices.