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"NORWAY"

Power

Dr. King cites Karen Horney's "The Neurotic Personality of Our Time.

Building A New Mississippi

This series of photos represent a plan to help rebuild Mississippi. The photos provide a blueprint and outline for strategical efforts to eradicate poverty and voting concerns.

Evil (Natural)

Dr. King cites Albert Knudson on the topic of evil.

Sin

Dr. King quotes theologian Reinhold Niebuhr on his perception of sin. Niebuhr discusses the creativity and uniqueness of man with his relation to God.

Statement on CORE Supportive Action Against Variety Chain Store Discrimination in the South

Sunday, February 12, 1961

The Congress of Racial Equality issues a statement regarding economic boycotts of chain stores in the North that have segregated stores in the South. These boycotts are in support of desegregation efforts in the South.

Letter from Marian R. Johnson to MLK

Thursday, February 22, 1968

Mrs. Johnson expresses her concern regarding the potential threats to undermine Dr. King's Poor People's Campaign in Washington, D.C.

SCLC Booklet

This booklet describes the programs and actions of the SCLC. It explains why it is a movement organization as well as defining the King-Abernathy tradition.

Nobel Peace Prize Acceptance Speech Draft

Thursday, December 10, 1964

In 1964, Dr. King became the first African-American to receive the Nobel Peace Prize. At age 35, he was also the youngest recipient of the award to date. Emphasizing a philosophy of nonviolence, Dr. King writes this acceptance speech commemorating the courageous work of the Civil Rights Movement. He highlights the brutality faced throughout the United States and addresses the irony of accepting a peace prize on behalf of a movement that has yet to obtain peace.

Letter from MLK to Matthew Schoenwald

Thursday, August 20, 1964

Dr. King thanks Matthew Schoenwald and the members of the Undergarment and Negligee Workers Union for their contribution to SCLC.

Letter from Svend Erik Stybe to MLK

Friday, December 20, 1963

The president of the Danish Students' Association invites Dr. King to Denmark to give an address to Danish students.

Current Magazine

Thursday, August 1, 1963

This Current Magazine issue on racism in the U.S. features an article "Is Direct Action Necessary" by Dr. King, as well as pieces by James Meredith, James Reston, and others.

Speakers Bureau Contract for MLK

Tuesday, March 21, 1967

This contract outlines the details of a speaking engagement for Dr. King on May 12, 1967 at the University of Wisconsin, Marathon County Center.

Letter from L. H. R. Rasmussen to MLK

Friday, April 14, 1967

The author agrees with Dr. King's political stance in opposition to the Vietnam War. The "dignity of man" is highlighted as it serves a great importance to the principles of the Civil Rights Movement and the war. The author affirms Dr. King's support from other peace organizations and political parties.

Letter from Ann Raynolds to MLK

Monday, February 19, 1968

Ann Raynolds writes Dr. King informing him of her support for the upcoming Poor People's March to Washington. She also encloses a contribution.

Letter from Rev. Harvey H. Batos, Jr. to MLK

Thursday, April 13, 1967

Rev. Batos Jr. expresses his support of Dr. King's political involvement despite the critisim by the New York Times.

Letter from Marilyn Sauer to MLK

Wednesday, May 31, 1967

Marilyn Sauer, Administrative Assistant to Dr. L. M. McCoy, provides Dr. King with the address of the Archbishop of Recife. Sauer also informs Dr. King of the proper way to address the Archbishop.

Telegram from Rev T R Albert to MLK

Rev. T.R. Albert, Pastor of Weslay Methodist Church, in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, sent Dr. King words of encouragment while he recovered in the Harlem hospital.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding Education Heritage

Friday, March 13, 1964

In this letter, Joan Daves informs Dr. King that the Educational Heritage Company has come to an arrangement about distributing "Stride Toward Freedom" and "Strength to Love." The letter goes on to say that Educational Heritage will pay a guarantee of $2500 against a royalty of 42 cent per copy sold.

Autograph Request

Friday, August 19, 1966

James McInerney requests that Dr. King add to his autograph collection of "the most prominent leaders in the nation."

Fellowship of Reconciliation Campaign Proposal

Thursday, October 27, 1966

The Fellowship of Reconciliation announces its "Thanksgiving-To-Tet" campaign and includes details of the types of aid that will be given to the people of Vietnam.

March on Washington Address by Eugene Carson Blake

Wednesday, August 28, 1963

Rev Dr. Eugene Carson Blake, Vice Chairman of the Commission on Religion and Race of the National Council of Churches, addresses the March on Washington. He states that if all the clergy and church members he represents and all of the Roman Catholics and Jews in America were marching for jobs and freedom for Negroes, the battle for civil rights would be won. Despite the pronouncements of the religious community, the churches and society are still segregated. “Late, late we come,” he says, and in a repentant and reconciling spirit.

Letter from W. Maxfield Garrott

Friday, October 16, 1964

W. Maxfield Garrott, president of the Seinen Jo Gakuin Baptist School in Japan, invites Dr. King to make an appearance if he ever visits Japan. Garrot also congratulates Dr. King on being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from MLK to Earl T. Jefferson

Monday, January 15, 1968

Dr. King expresses his gratitude for Jefferson's contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and briefly describes the organization's principles and efforts.

Letter from William L. Hudson to MLK

Thursday, May 18, 1967

William Hudson of the Commonwealth Club of California extends his gratitude to Dr. King for an address given to the Club.

Invitation from J.E.L Graham to MLK

Wednesday, July 13, 1966

J.E.L. Graham, President of the Hamilton Branch of the United Nations Association in Canada, invites Dr. King to speak on the theme of Human Rights during one of the organizations quarterly meetings.

Food & Allied World Crises: Is There A Solution?

This document is a composition of several articles addressing the global state of food consumption and production.

Letter from T. Z. Riggins to MLK

Sunday, July 26, 1964

T. Z. Riggins writes Dr. King a thoughtful letter commending his leadership and the influence he brings to America. Aside from Abraham Lincoln, Riggins views Dr. King as the only leader who can bring people together. Riggins believes that Dr. King's job was assigned to him by God and expresses his pride that Dr. King was chosen to "lay the foundation" for the US.

Wilkins Praises Darien Teacher Exchange Setup

Friday, December 11, 1964

Roy Wilkins, Executive Secretary of the NAACP, applauds Darien's efforts to integrate minority and suburban communities through its exchange program with New York City. The program "sought Negro teachers, business and professional people to live and work in their community."

Statement by the Leadership Conference Executive Committee on the Kerner Commission Report

Tuesday, April 2, 1968

This statement put forth by the Leadership Conference Executive Committee addresses the results of the Kerner Commission Report, in which the author stresses that without creating viable and integrated communities in our cities "we shall have no cities".

Letter from Harriet Davis to Dr. King Regarding Eugene Peterson's editorial

Sunday, July 30, 1967

In this letter, Harriet Davis informs Dr. King that she is a white women who has decided to teach at a Fairmont High School, which was formerly completely Negro. Although she has received criticism for her decision she proclaims that her motivations are right. She then informs Dr. King that she fears not being able to understand her co-workers and students.