Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"NORTH KOREA"

Statement from American Jewish Congress Regarding the Bundy School-Decentralization Plan

Wednesday, February 28, 1968
New York (NY), New York, NY

Murray A. Gordon, a New York lawyer and national vice president of the American Jewish Congress, endorses the Bundy School-Decentralization plan. Mr. Gordon believes that the reform is essential to good education and assures teachers that the plan will not violate their rights.

Letter from Louis Rome to MLK

Saturday, February 10, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Michigan (MI), Detroit, MI

Louis Rome, Executive Director of the Michigan Commission on Crime, extends an invitation for Dr. King to speak at the Governor's conference being held in Detroit.

A Born Again Christian writes MLK

The author of this letter, signed "Born Again Christian," urges Dr. King to set his ministry more on God rather than participating in civil rights demonstrations.

Robert L. Cope

Dr. King references Robert L. Cope’s article “Nature and/or Grace.”

Symbolic Mountains

New York, NY, New York (NY)

On the stationary of the Waldorf-Astoria hotel in New York, Dr. King outlines a sermon entitled "Symbolic Mountains." These include the mountains of ethical relations, practical materialism, indifference concerning poverty, and racial segregation.

Letter from MLK to Fredrik Schjander

Wednesday, October 6, 1965
Oslo, Norway, CHINA, VIETNAM, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, INDIA

Dr. King responds to a survey of five questions from Fredrik Schjander regarding the world's chances for peace. Dr. King believes the prospects for world peace have actually declined since he received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964, due to conflicts in areas such as Kashmir and Vietnam. Dr. King does write that the growing role of the United Nations as a global mediator is an encouraging sign.

Letter from Walter W. Windisch to MLK

Friday, April 21, 1967
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY

Walter W. Windisch writes to Dr. King to express his gratitude for the Peace March led by Dr. King in New York City. He also expresses his desire to be a part of any upcoming demonstrations.

Call to Survival

Sunday, November 5, 1967
New York, NY, New York (NY), VIETNAM, Washington, D.C.

This advertisement offers a "realistic appraisal" of the Vietnam situation and offers possible solutions.

Letter from Mary L. Powell to MLK

Monday, January 8, 1968
Georgia (GA), Montgomery, AL, Boston, MA

Mary L. Powell writes to Dr. King expressing how she has been following and considering his plans, but disproves of his methods.

Letter from A White Man to MLK

Saturday, February 5, 1966
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, ISRAEL

Writing under a pseudonym, "A White Man" lectures Dr. King about the race related conditions of the Chicago Park District. He or she calls this area "Heaven on Earth Surrounded by a Ghetto."

Immortality

Dr. King writes that the belief in immortality by scholars in different disciplines suggests that while immortality cannot be proved nor has it been disproved.

King to Visit Southside Virginia

Tuesday, March 12, 1968
Virginia (VA), Washington, D.C.

This article describes Dr. King's visit to Virginia on the "people-to-people" tour as a part of the Poor People's Campaign.

Letter from R. H. Edwin Espy to MLK

Monday, June 28, 1965
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

Mr. Espy acknowledges the contribution of Dr. King's congregation, Ebenezer Baptist Church, to the National Council of the Churches of Christ and seeks a renewal of that commitment to its work.

Letter From Ambassador Avraham Harman to MLK

Friday, January 27, 1967
ISRAEL, Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Ambassador Harman congratulates Dr. King for his aspirations concerning an "American Negro Pilgrimage" to Israel. He praises Dr. King for his receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize, and discusses the importance of his leadership in this proposed project for peace.

Material to Use Regarding Negro Leaders and Platform Committee

Missouri (MO), California (CA), Los Angeles, CA

Bayard Rustin sends Dr. King this pre-written answer to be used if the media ask why Dr. King and A. Philip Randolph are not together during the march before the 1960 Democratic National Convention in Los Angeles. The statement explains that Randolph will be in St. Louis to address the campaign to elect the first Negro Senator.

MLK's Funeral Procession Outline

Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

This document outlines the funeral procession of Dr. King and specifies how many people wide the procession will be.

Letter from George Graham to MLK

Thursday, September 1, 1966
North Carolina (NC)

Mr. Graham thanks Dr.King for replying to his letter, and expresses how much he enjoyed seeing him when he visited Raleigh.

Letter from Helga Gulbrandsen to MLK

Monday, December 7, 1964
Oslo, Norway

Helga Gulbrandsen responds to a previous letter from Dr. King and congratulates him on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. Gulbrandsen expresses regret concerning the Reverend's unavailability for a lecture in the Oslo Group.

To the Negroes of America

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, UNITED KINGDOM, FRANCE, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, JAPAN, INDIA, ALBANIA, BULGARIA, CZECH REPUBLIC, GERMANY, HUNGARY, POLAND, FORMER YUGOSLOVIA, NIGERIA, CHINA, CANADA, Georgia (GA)

Robert Welch compares the American Negro Population to Negro populations around the world in regards to ownership of various consumer items. He asserts that Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, Bayard Rustin and Walter Reuther are shameless liars working in league with communists.

Sin

Dr. King quotes theologian Reinhold Niebuhr on his perception of sin. Niebuhr discusses the creativity and uniqueness of man with his relation to God.

Letter from MLK to Shinichi Oshima

Monday, July 27, 1964
JAPAN

Dr. King writes Shinichi Oshima acknowledging his letter "of recent date." King thanks him for his encouraging words and ends the letter with an inspirational tone.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, August 3, 1964
New York, NY

Ms. Daves writes Dr. King to inform him of her conversation with Harper & Row concerning the advertisements for the book "Why We Can't Wait." She describes their negotiations and asks for further guidance.

Letter from Andre Katz to MLK

Wednesday, January 3, 1968
GHANA, Chicago, IL

Andrea Katz, editor of Quadrangle Books, informs Dr. King about a book titled, "Where to, Black Man?" It is a diary of an African American man, Ed Smith, who traveled to Africa to reaffirm his American identity.

Letter from Rev. Thomas S. Maloney to MLK

Wednesday, April 27, 1966
ITALY, Louisville, KY

Thomas Maloney asks for assistance in preparing his dissertation on Dr. King's philosophy of nonviolence for the Gregorian University in Rome. He requests clarification on Dr. King's definition of violence, nonviolence, agape and justice, as well as how the four principles relate.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Harris to MLK

Monday, March 25, 1968
Memphis, TN

Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Harris write Dr. King expressing their appreciation for his role as a Civil Rights leader. They were moved to write to him after hearing him speak at the Masonic Temple in Memphis, Tennessee and request to meet with him the next time he visits.

"They are Waiting for Godot in Mississippi, Too"

Sunday, January 31, 1965
Mississippi (MS), Illinois (IL), New York (NY), New York, NY, Florida (FL), New Orleans, LA, Cleveland, OH, New Jersey (NJ), Ohio (OH), Louisiana (LA)

This article, posted in the New York Times, discusses the play, "Waiting for Godot," held by the Free Southern Theatre in Mississippi. The play focuses on racial and social issues dealing with civil rights.

Statement by Floyd McKissick

VIETNAM

This is information sheet is about the National Director of CORE, Floyd McKissick's statement on the Vietnam's War. In addition to other topics, he is scheduled to discuss the immorality of the conflict by drawing "parallels between self determination for the people of Vietnam and the quest for equality for Black Americans."

Beyond the Los Angeles Riots

Saturday, November 13, 1965
Los Angeles, CA, Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA

Dr. King discusses the legacy of the Los Angeles riots in nonviolent protest. A decade after the Montgomery Civil Rights demonstrations, Dr. King speaks to the improvement of Southern African Americans' lives and the degradation of Northern African Americans' situations.

Man (His Need for God)

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr’s “The Nature and Destiny of Man.”

The Philosophy of Life

In "The Philosophy of Life Undergirding Christianity and the Christian Ministry," Dr. King references the abundance and reverence of a good life by noting the Biblical apostle John and the European theologian Albert Schweitzer. King notes that the minister plays an important role by providing leadership in experiencing the Kingdom on Earth.