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"NORTH KOREA"

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rev. Clyde L. Manschreck

Thursday, August 15, 1963

On behalf of Dr. King, Dora McDonald responds to a previous request made by Rev. Clyde Manschreck of the Methodist Theological School in Ohio. Miss McDonald informs Rev. Manschreck that the "Letter from Birmingham Jail" will be a part of Dr. King's newest publication that will be available in the fall of 1963.

SCLC Executive Board Approves Montgomery March

Dr. King’s handwritten notes report on SCLC Executive Board approval of four of his recommendations: a March on the State Capitol in Montgomery, a nationwide economic withdrawal from Christmas shopping to commemorate the tragic deaths of children in Birmingham, a massive direct action program in Danville, Virginia, and selective buying campaign in the South to get better jobs for Negroes

Introduction of Edward M. Kennedy

Dr. King introduces Robert Kennedy at a gathering in Jackson, Mississippi, calling him a "capable statesman" with a "great social vision."

Letter from MLK to Bert Onne

Wednesday, April 20, 1966

Dr. King takes an opportunity to thank Bert Onne of Stockholm for his assistance in supporting the SCLC's Freedom Movement in Chicago.

MSGR. Victor G. Moser's Statements Relating to Selma-Montgomery March

Monday, April 26, 1965

Victor G. Moser recounts the activities that took place during the march on Montgomery ,which was one of a serious, dedicated, even religious commitment to a project which would really bring out the serious injustice being perpetrated upon a persecuted and disadvantaged people.

Statement of the Committee for Emmett Doe

The Committee for Emmett Doe issues a statement both explaining Doe's situation and also asking for support. Doe, an Army paramedic, faced court-martial for allegedly cursing a white superior. He was later acquitted of the charges.

Machiavelli

Dr. King disagrees with Machiavelli's notion that political morality should be separated from social morality. Dr. King uses a quote from Heinrich von Treitschke to further analyze the issue.

Science

Dr. King quotes a statement from A.D. Ritchie's "Civilization, Science and Religion" regarding the limits of science. Ritchie contradicts the idea that science can do "anything and everything."

Essay Describing MLK as a Historical Leader

Dr. King is highlighted for his admirable leadership in Montgomery, Alabama. Dr. King's deep spiritual convictions and charter traits allowed him to lead the people in Montgomery. He is described as a man of deep humility, showman and a highly intelligent leader.

Letter from Prue Robertson to Ethel Minor

Friday, June 9, 1967

Prue Robertson, secretary to Mrs. King, writes Ethel Minor concerning students in Belgium that would like to correspond with S.N.C.C.

Letter to MLK from Eugene Exman of Harper & Brothers, Feb. 15, 1962

Thursday, February 15, 1962

Eugene Exman, of Harper & Brothers, addressed this letter to Dr. King informing him that his first book, "STRIDE TOWARD FREEDOM" was chosen as one of 500 books in President Kennedy's collection at the White House. The decision, regarding Dr. King's book was made by the American Booksellers Association. Mr. Exman, lastly, inquired about Dr. King's progress on a manuscript for his second book.

Letter from MLK to Robert McDougal, Jr.

Tuesday, December 14, 1965

Dr. King thanks Robert McDougal, Jr. for his contribution and support to SCLC and the NAACP Legal Defense Fund.

Letter from Benjamin Spock to MLK

Tuesday, September 15, 1964

Benjamin Spock, Co-Chairman for the National Committee for a Sane Nuclear Policy, solicits Dr. King as a sponsor for a testimonial dinner. The committee will honor Max Youngstein with its Eleanor Roosevelt Peace Award at the dinner.

Condolence Letter to Mrs. King from Charles Ocasio

Friday, April 5, 1968

This letter from a middle school student in New York City is a letter of condolence written to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King’s assassination.

Pelagianism

Dr. King defines Pelagianism as the belief that original sin did not taint human nature and that mortal will is still capable of choosing good or evil without divine aid.

Notecard Containing the Definition of Evil

In this notecard Dr. King details the reason for suffering. He references notes from "City of God" by St. Augustine.

Letter from P. Edward Haley to MLK

Tuesday, August 8, 1967

P. Haley writes to express appreciation for Dr. King's works. Haley encloses copy of letter he and his wife sent to their Congressmen commending Dr. King's ideas concerning Vietnam and the riots. The Haleys are making an effort to start a nationwide campaign by encouraging their friends to write their congressman as well.

Letter from Rembert Stokes to MLK

Monday, December 16, 1963

The President of Wilberforce University anticipates Dr. King's speech before a delegation of the African Methodist Episcopal Church. Rembert Stokes also notes that Dr. King would receive a donation following his address, to help support the civil rights movement. Stokes wishes that Dr. King's message would center around the AME church leadership's involvement in the freedom struggle.

Advice for Living

Dr. King addresses questions in the "Advice for Living" column published in Ebony Magazine on February 12, 1958.

Letter from US Citizen to MLK

"A citizen who loves the country God let him own," writes to Dr. and Mrs. King criticizing them on their views on Vietnam and their ministerial work in regards to Christianity.

Telegram from Beryl Sacks to Dora McDonald

Thursday, December 14, 1967

Ms. Beryl Sacks inquires about the availability of Dr. King to speak for the Speakers Bureau Adult Education Council.

Truth

Dr. King quotes Thomas Aquinas' "The Summa Theologica."

Philosophy of History

Dr. King quotes a statement regarding history from American theologian Reinhold Niebuhr's "The Children of Light and the Children of Darkness."

Newsletter from Rev. Ellis Vanderbilt

Wednesday, May 1, 1968

On April 14, 1968, a group of Black and White Christians met to form the first integrated Baptist Church in South Carolina. The congregation bought an abandoned church, however, the church members needed additional financial assistance, so the Reverend Vanderbilt solicited contributions of at least $100.00.

Letter from Audrey Mizer to MLK

Sunday, December 3, 1961

Audrey Mizer encourages Dr. King to continue his good works because "the world cannot be robbed of any good." Mizer then discusses her opposing views to a statement in a Christian Monitor Column regarding Red China's admission to the United Nations.

A Message from Jail

Saturday, July 21, 1962

After being arrested and charged with parading without a license, Dr. King wrote a column from jail. The column shared his and Ralph David Abernathy's decision to serve the jail sentence instead of paying a fine of $178.

Letter from Gene Young to Joan Daves

Monday, May 15, 1967

Gene Young of Harper and Row Publishing sends this letter to Joan Daves, Dr. King's literary agent. He explains that he is waiting to send out promotional copies of Dr. King's most recent book, "Where Do We Go From Here," until after he receives a list of who Dr. King and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference have already sent copies. He attaches a list of those sent copies of Dr. King's last book so that they might use it as a checklist, including President Johnson, Vice President Humphrey, Robert F. Kennedy, and Dr.

Letter from Dana McLean Greeley to MLK

Monday, April 4, 1966

Dana McLean Greeley, President of the Unitarian Universalist Association, asks Dr. King to lend his name to a letter addressed to President Lyndon Johnson. The letter, which was drafted at the request of the Inter-Religious Peace Conference, requests an interview with President Johnson. Dr. King's handwriting appears on the top right of this letter, saying that he would be happy to allow them to use his name in this context.

Invitation to MLK from London Methodist Youth Organization

Monday, May 15, 1967

Greater London Youth and Community Service invites Dr. King to participate in a London to Canterbury Pilgrimage by leading a study on human rights and the church and preaching a sermon.

Telegram from United States House of Representatives to MLK

Thursday, March 25, 1965

The United States House of Representatives congratulates Dr. King and other leaders on their march to Montgomery, Alabama. They believe that the march will be recognized as the "beginning of genuine democracy" in American history.