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Letter from MLK to Gertrude Jimerson

Monday, February 25, 1963

Dr. King sends a biographical sketch of himself to Gertrude Jimerson and recommends she obtain a copy of Crusader Without Violence, a biography of Dr. King written by Dr. Lawrence D. Reddick and published by Harper and Row.

Religion

Dr. King cites Edward S. Ames' beliefs regarding religion.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald Regarding Quotes

Tuesday, June 16, 1964

In this letter, Joan Daves asks Dora McDonald to show Dr. King quotes attached to the document. Joan Daves also asks that comments and reviews be passed to her respectively.

Letter from David Goodwin to MLK

David Goodwin, a child 16 years of age, is outraged by the racial issues in the United States and hopes to be of assistance during the March on Washington despite his young age.

Letter from MLK to James Duckrey

Thursday, March 19, 1964

Dr. King responds to a request to serve as the speaker at Cheyney State College's 1964 Commencement ceremonies. He informs the college's president that he has another commitment on the same day that renders him ineligible to accept the invitation.

Letter from MLK to W. M. Jones

Monday, September 9, 1963

Dr. King writes Bishop W. M. Jones of Israel of God's Church expressing his gratitude for their generous contribution to the SCLC.

Letter from Robert Hilborn to MLK

Friday, January 15, 1965

Robert Hilborn, President of The Empire Club of Canada invites Dr. King to be honored as the guest speaker. Hillborn offers the option of two different dates.

Letter from Joseph L. Kapica to MLK

Wednesday, May 31, 1967

Joseph Kapica, a freelance writer from Connecticut, requests special commentary from Dr. King regarding the issue of interracial adoption. Kapica writes about interracial adoption based on findings from the Child Welfare League of America.

God

Dr. King references the Book of Amos regarding the ethics of God. According to the scriptures God is just and fair and demands "justice and sacrifice."

Ebenezer Church Bulletin and President Kennedy's Eulogy

Sunday, November 24, 1963

This is an Ebenezer Baptist Church bulletin expressing appreciation for the congregation's various acts of kindness toward one another. On the opposite side of the bulletin, an outline can be found for a memorial speech for the late President Kennedy.

Unsigned Letter of Support

Monday, December 25, 1967

The following document is a letter of support and encouragement written to Dr. King, the President of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from the United Nations Associations in Canada to MLK

Monday, August 9, 1965

The United Nations Association in Canada informs Dr. King of Human Rights Day that is celebrated and their hope to have him as a speaker. It is the association's interest to have Dr. King speak to bring a greater level of consciousness to the global community.

Letter from Burke Marshall to MLK

Thursday, April 9, 1964

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General, writes Dr. King acknowledging his previous telegram about racism in St. Augustine, Florida. In addition, Marshall refers a copy of the telegram to the attention of George B. Hartzog, Jr.

Letter to the Public of Montgomery, Alabama

The ministerial leaders of Montgomery address the problems of discrimination and segregation within the city's bus system. The ministers form a plan of action to eliminate such practices and attain a equal society for all.

Letter from MLK to Transportation Workers Union President Matthew Guinan

Tuesday, March 8, 1966

Dr. King thanks newly elected Transport Workers Union President Matthew Guinan for his contribution that will aid SCLC in their efforts. However, the contribution was made out to Dr. King, which causes him to inform Mr. Guinan to make the check payable to the SCLC. Dr. King congratulates Guinan on his recent position and wishes him much success.

End the War in Vietnam

The bumper sticker reflects the sentiments of many Americans during the Vietnam War. It states "End the War in Vietnam: BRING THE TROOPS HOME NOW!"

The Dimensions of a Complete Life

Dr. King begins this sermon with the story of John's first sight of the holy city of Jerusalem. He uses the story to emphasize "an eternal truth which we must forever recognize, and that is that life at its best and life as it should be is the life that is complete on all sides." This famous sermon had been drafted several times and also takes up the name "Three Dimensions of A Complete Life."

Telegram from Andrew Young to the Swedish Ecumenical Council

Andrew Young, Executive Assistant to Dr. King, writes the Swedish Ecumenical Council's Nils Sundholm, informing him that Dr. King can accept his invitation to host a worship service in Sweden in December as part of his trip to Europe.

Letter from MLK to President Johnson on Greenville Air Base

Wednesday, August 10, 1966

Dr. King writes to President Johnson proposing the conversion of the Greenville Air Base to a center for training and housing for poverty-stricken Negro citizens of the Mississippi Delta. He urges that the program be coordinated by federal officials and representatives, that action be taken to provide decent housing and nondiscriminatory training programs, and that clear-cut procedures for evaluation be established.

MLK Note Card - "Immortality"

On this handwritten notecard, entitled, simply, "Immortality," Dr. King quotes Tennyson on the subject.

Letter from Hubert Humphrey to MLK Regarding Regarding Wiley Branton

Thursday, April 29, 1965

In this letter the office of the Vice President informs Dr. King of the new role of Wiley Branton to serve as Executive Secretary of the President's Council on Equal Opportunity.

Letter from Carson Lyman to MLK

Tuesday, February 4, 1964

Carson Lyman, managing editor of U.S. News and World Report, encloses the transcript of an interview with Dr. King. Lyman asks Dr. King make any necessary changes to the transcript, but to make sure "to preserve the informality of the language."

Letter from Septima Clark to MLK

Friday, December 22, 1967

Ms. Clark writes Dr. King with excitement about her granddaughter's accomplishment as a tutor. After saving her earnings of $5.00 per week, Ms. Clark's granddaughter managed to purchase Dr. King a holiday gift complete with special wrapping.

Letter from E. P. and M. C. King to President Johnson

Saturday, July 29, 1967

The Kings write President Johnson to discuss their dissatisfaction that neither Dr. King nor Charles Evers was appointed a member of the Advisory Commission on Civil Disorder.

People in Action: Recognition and Opportunity

Dr. King states there are two basic elements to human rights: recognition and opportunity.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rabbi Joel Goor

Monday, August 17, 1964

Dora McDonald informs Rabbi Joel Goor of Dr. King's absence from the city due to an engagement to speak before the European Baptist Federation. She promises to have Dr. King signed a copy of his book for Goor to keep and appreciates Goor's support to the civil rights movement.

Letter from Assistant Attorney General Burke Marshall to MLK

Monday, June 17, 1963

Assisrtant US Attorney General Burk Marshall informs Dr. King that the allegations of police misconduct in Danville, Virginia are being investigated by the Department of Justice and assures him that the appropriate actions will take place "with respect to any violations of federal law."

Letter from Irene Bryson to MLK

Thursday, March 28, 1968

Mrs. Bryson introduces herself as a former neighbor of the King family on Auburn Avenue and recalls fond memories during those years. She compliments Dr. King "as a God sent preacher," and cites biblical scriptures for him to incorporate in his public speaking. Bryson states, teaching God's word "is what it is going to take to help this sin sick world we are living in."

Anonymous Letter to MLK

An anonymous author criticizes Dr. King's stance on the American economy and the current status of the Negro.

Education (Its Weakness in the Moral Realm)

Dr. King documents two quotes from St. Augustine's "Confessions." Both quotes address Augustine's view on education and how it affects one's relationship with God and other human beings.