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NAIRO Supports March for Freedom

Washington, D.C.

The National Association of Intergroup Relations Officials declares their support of the March for Freedom in Washington, D.C. NAIRO urges its members to support the march for the integration of over "20,000,000 Americans of minority identity."

Telegram from Robert L. Green, Floyd McKissack and Roy Wilkins to MLK

Atlanta, GA, Michigan (MI)

Mr. Wilkins, Mr. Kissack and Mr. Green express their viewpoint regarding restrictive racial policies towards the Negro, more specifically towards Negro women by members of the Women's City Club of Detroit. The author encourages a dismembership from the club based on their findings.

The Denver Post Reprint "Boy, 13, Ashamed of Shaby Clothes"

Thursday, January 25, 1962
Colorado (CO)

In this reprint, of the Denver Post article, entitled "Boy, 13, Ashamed of Shabby Clothes", the reader learns that a 13 year old boy did not go to school because he was ashamed by his clothes. The Colorado judge responded with an attempt to get the boy new clothes and reinstated in school.

Morehouse Board of Trustees Meeting

Tuesday, March 28, 1967
Atlanta, GA

The Secretary of Morehouse College Board of Trustees, J. H. Wheeler, inquires if Dr. King will be in attendance for the annual meeting.

MLK Announces End of Birmingham Campaign

Friday, May 10, 1963
Birmingham, AL

The Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights released these remarks by Dr. King marking the end of the Birmingham Nonviolent Direct Action Campaign. King describes the day as a climax in the long struggle for justice and freedom in Birmingham and gives credit to Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth, to the thousands who went to jail, to the whites who worked for just solutions and to God. He speaks of the need for continued progress toward equal job opportunities, equal access to public facilities, and equal rights and responsibilities.

Church Program of the Installation of Rev. A. D. Williams King

Sunday, March 18, 1962
Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Birmingham, AL

This program details the installation services of Reverend A. D. Williams King at The First Baptist Church of Ensley, Alabama. A number of community and church leaders, including his older brother, Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Rev. Ralph Abernathy, welcome the young pastor and his family to his new pastorate position.

Birmingham Manifesto

Birmingham, AL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This document boldly declares the stance of the oppressed Negro population of Birmingham, Alabama. Critiquing the validity of democracy, this manifesto speaks to the unjust treatment of the Negro as a second class citizen, including being "segregated racially, exploited economically, and dominated politically."

Letter from Ernest Evans to MLK about Help

Wednesday, February 23, 1966
Chicago, IL

Ernest Evans is writing to Dr. King asking him to come by his home while he is visiting Chicago. Evans discusses the problems of his living conditions and the increase in the cost of living. He hopes that Dr. King will be able to bring about positive change for the community.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Gates to MLK

Sunday, June 30, 1963
Missouri (MO), Chicago, IL

Bob and Betty Gates write Dr. King enclosing a contribution toward his work for freedom and better opportunities for African Americans. The Gates also ask Dr. King's opinion regarding the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund.

Letter from Eleanor S. Greve to MLK

Saturday, April 1, 1967
Pennsylvania (PA)

Eleanor Greve writes Dr. King to express the encouragement and inspiration she and her husband felt while reading a portion of Dr. King's speech in the Philadelphia Inquirer. The speech was given before the Chicago Area Committee for a Sane Nuclear policy.

Letter from Bishop P. Randolph Shy to MLK

Friday, August 11, 1967
Atlanta, GA, California (CA)

Presiding Bishop of The Christian Methodist Episcopal Church, P. Randolph Shy, declines Dr. King's invitation to attend an upcoming convention. Bishop Shy mentions that he will make a contribution "through our churches to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference."

Statement to Confront the Conflict in Harlem

Monday, July 27, 1964
New York, NY

Dr. Arthur C. Logan, Chairman of the Board of Directors for HARYOU-ACT, Inc., writes this statement addressing the conflict in Harlem. According to Logan, "the present conflict in the Harlem community is a consequence of a long-standing feeling of powerlessness and its resultant frustrations." Specifically, the unrest in Harlem is attributed to the unreasonable behavior and inadequate training of the Police Department. This statement includes a list of recommendations to help confront the crisis.

Invitation to Birthday Celebration for Haile Selassie

ETHIOPIA

This document invites Dr. and Mrs. Martin Luther King, Jr. to a reception to celebrate the birth of the Ethiopian Emperor.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

Monday, July 31, 1967
MALAYSIA, Atlanta, GA, SINGAPORE

This letter, signed "A Malaysian Citizen," expresses the author's hatred of African Americans. In addition to urging for their genocide, the author states that African Americans ought to be grateful that they are no longer enslaved. The author tasks the recipients of this letter, including Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, and President Johnson, to circulate it widely in order to express what he claims are the Malaysian views of the 20th century.

The State of SANE

Tuesday, November 28, 1967
Washington, D.C., Chicago, IL, New York (NY), VIETNAM, Detroit, MI, New Jersey (NJ), New York, NY

H. Stuart Hughes, Chairman of the National Committee for a SANE Nuclear Policy, writes this report to the board, sponsors and chapters of the organization. Hughes notifies his readers that SANE's policy making body is being renewed due to newly elected regional and national members. Also, the Board adopted a detailed statement of a strategy, which places top priority on promoting an alternative to President Johnson and his Vietnam War policy. Other events include the update of a successful Labor Leadership Assembly for Peace and guest speaker Norman Thomas.

Shriver Outlines Summer Program

Saturday, March 4, 1967
New York, NY, Washington, D.C., Pennsylvania (PA), South Dakota (SD), Rhode Island (RI), North Dakota (ND)

This New York Times article reports that if Congress approves the $75 million supplemental appropriation for antipoverty programs, Sargent Shriver, director of the Office of Equal Employment Opportunity, plans to use $47 million for the Neighborhood Youth Corps and $25 for community action agencies to help provide youth with employment and recreation. It also mentions efforts in the Senate to increase the supplemental appropriation.

Message from the President

Dr. King expounds on the importance of nonviolence and voter registration to the mission of the SCLC.

The Power of Nonviolence

Thursday, May 1, 1958
Montgomery, AL, Berkeley, CA

Dr. King delivers this address to the YMCA and YWCA in the Bay Area of California. The power of nonviolence is discussed being intertwined with the knowledge of agape, love and maladjustment. Agape can be defined as an understanding of the redemptive good will of all men. In relation to maladjustment, Dr. King explains how he never intended to adjust himself to segregation and discrimination. Dr. King expounds on how justice strengthened the Montgomery movement. He further explains how the powerful influence of love is a significant factor in the practice of nonviolence.

Holy Week Service

Wednesday, April 18, 1962
Denver, CO, Virginia (VA), Richmond, VA

This Holy Week Service program for Augustana Lutheran Church highlights Dr. King as a guest preacher where he delivers a sermon entitled "Remember Who You Are." The program goes on to detail Good Friday and Easter Sunday Services, as well as informing readers of Dr. King's television interview.

Gandhi Society for Human Rights Address by MLK

Thursday, May 17, 1962
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King speaks at a luncheon launching the Gandhi Society on May 17, 1962, citing the great significance of the day: the anniversary of the US Supreme Court decision declaring school segregation unconstitutional, the 100th anniversary of Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation and the centennial of the death of Henry David Thoreau, whose essay on civil disobedience influenced Gandhi. He announces that earlier that day he sent President Kennedy a document seeking an executive order proclaiming all forms of segregation to be a violation of the US Constitution.

Letter from MLK to Madame Bouwman

Wednesday, April 20, 1966
NETHERLANDS, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King expresses his gratitude to Madame Bouwman for the enjoyable interview conducted in Holland. Dr. King states he will be returning to Holland in July of 1966 and would be interested in meeting again.

Letter from Congressman Donald M. Fraser to MLK

Minnesota (MN), Washington, D.C., Boston, MA, Massachusetts (MA), Denver, CO, Colorado (CO)

Minnesota Democratic Congressman Donald Fraser asks Dr. King to serve on the advisory board of the National Committee on Tithing in Investment (NCTI). Fraser reports recent successes in the area of open occupancy housing, such as a project in Boston that rehabilitates homes for low-income families, and a project in Denver that raises seed capital for "integrated cooperatives and other housing ventures."

Stanford University Faculty and Staff Pledge of Civil Disobedience

Friday, May 26, 1967
California (CA), VIETNAM

The Faculty and Staff members of Stanford University make a pledge of civil disobedience to protest the Vietnam conflict. The individuals signing the pledge request members of the clergy and academic community with like sentiments to join them in this demonstration.

Angeology

Dr. King cites the reference in Isaiah 6:2 to a seraphim, likely "a winged human figure."

MLK on Brown versus Board of Education

Atlanta, GA

Dr. King writes notations regarding the Supreme Court's decision in 1954 of Brown versus Board of Education, listing the various positive and negative aspects of that decision. The Reverend closes by stating, "Let us go and unite and be inspired once more..."

Letter to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

This handwritten letter was written the day after Dr. King's assassination and is addressed to Mrs. King.

Telegram from Community Leaders to Dr. King

Sunday, October 22, 1967
Washington, D.C.

This telegram is requesting that Dr. King contact certain prominent politicians to urge their support for funding "rent supplements" and "model citizens" programs.

Letter from Eulah M. Eubank to MLK

Monday, February 19, 1968
Virginia (VA), Baltimore, MD

In this letter, Eulah Eubank writes Dr. King regarding the Washington, D.C. Camp-In. She states she is "not...opposed" to marches and sit-ins, but feels that the Camp-In would be counter-productive. She believes it "will ad [sic] fuel to fires the extremists are trying build."

Dr. King on Vietnam: Demagogic Tactics

VIETNAM

Brigadier General S. L. A. Marshall critiques Dr. King's Vietnam stance and asserts that Dr. King's position undermines his work and credibility as a civil rights leader.

Telegram from R. T. Blackwell to MLK

Wednesday, March 29, 1967

R. T. Blackwell informs Dr. King that he will be unable to attend an upcoming board meeting due to issues with a farmers cooperative proposal and a funding crisis.