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Letter to Ms. Hoover from Joan Daves

Wednesday, March 25, 1964
New York (NY), New York, NY

Joan Daves writes Miss Carol Hoover of the SCLC to coordinate efforts to market and promote Dr. King's "Why We Can't Wait."

Where Do We Go From Here Book Mailing

The people listed here received an advance copy of Dr. King's "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community," which was published in 1967.

Letter from Illustrated World Encyclopedia to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, November 28, 1967
New York (NY)

Bobley asks Ms. McDonald if Dr. King will allow a reprint of one of his articles to be published in the Illustrated World Encyclopedia in lieu of King writing a new piece.

Letter of Condolence from Jerry K. Bolton

Thursday, April 4, 1968
Alaska (AK)

Mr. Bolton expresses his heartfelt sympathy for the "unjust loss" of Dr. King.

Letter from MLK to Third Grader Debbie Bass

Thursday, June 3, 1965
New York (NY)

Dr. King thanks Debbie Bass of New York for her thoughtful letter. Debbie Bass is a third grade student from the Birch Lane School of Massapequa Park. Dr. King expresses that her letter encourages everyone to hasten their efforts in the fight for freedom.

Letter from MLK to Joan Daves

Saturday, August 29, 1964
New York, NY

In this response letter, Dr. King encloses a revised copy of a manuscript from an article of which the reverend planned to make additional changes to.

MLK Requests Contributions

Monday, April 1, 1968
Washington, D.C., Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL

Dr. King writes this fundraising letter on behalf of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. He explains the campaigns taking place in Washington for the poor and urges immediate financial support for the struggle.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ivor M. Liss

Friday, April 19, 1963
New Jersey (NJ), Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Dora McDonald thanks Ivor M. Liss for his contribution, and informs him that Dr. King will be in contact upon his return from Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter from Dinkar Sakrikar to MLK

Friday, September 23, 1966
INDIA

D.Sakrikar writes to solidify the plans for the donation of a bronze statue of Mahatma Gandhi.

Love and Forgiveness

Tuesday, May 5, 1964
New York, NY, Illinois (IL), Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), INDIA, St. Augustine, FL, Florida (FL), New Jersey (NJ)

This is a speech entitled "Love and Forgiveness" that Dr. King delivered at the American Baptist Convention meeting in Atlantic City, New Jersey. Jesus Christ and segregation serve as the major topics for this speech. Dr. King makes the compelling statements that "Jesus decided to meet hate with love," and that "segregation is still the Negro's burden and America's shame."

Letter from Beryl Bugatch to MLK

Sunday, July 25, 1965
Philadelphia, PA, Baltimore, MD

Beryl Bugatch of the University of Pennsylvania asks Dr. King to speak on "the governments role in enforcing racial morality."

Letter from James M. Nielsen to MLK

Tuesday, January 14, 1964
Washington (WA), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Rhode Island (RI)

James M. Nielson congratulates Dr. King on receiving Time Magazine's Man-of-the-Year Award. Mr. Nielson invites Dr. King to the Sixth Annual Trade Fair sponsored by the Anacortes Jaycees.

Letter to MLK from Charles Weaver

Wednesday, May 3, 1967
Pennsylvania (PA), Atlanta, GA, VIETNAM

Charles Weaver sends a letter of support to Dr. King for all of his contributions to peace and describes him as the ideal Christian prophet.

Letter to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

This handwritten letter was written the day after Dr. King's assassination and is addressed to Mrs. King.

Letter from Monica Wilson to Dora McDonald

Friday, March 11, 1966
SOUTH AFRICA, Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Monica Wilson, from the School of African studies at the University of Cape Town, writes Dora McDonald expressing joy and excitement that Dr. King accepted the invitation to deliver the Davie Memorial Lecture. Wilson states that while King's accommodations are taken care of, the school cannot possibly pay for his aide.

Letter from the Poor People's Committee in Grenada, Mississippi

Friday, January 19, 1968
Mississippi (MS)

The Poor People's Committee of the Grenada Freedom Movement writes to Dr. King requesting help in securing jobs and adequate education.

What Is Man?

This is one of several documents where Dr. King explores the nature of "man." He considers the question "what is man?" to be a timeless concept that "confronts any generation." Dr. King's analysis incorporates Biblical and Shakespearean texts, among other notable references.

Letter from MLK to Hal Lenke

Alabama (AL)

Dr. King thanks Hal Lenke for investigating the situation in Huntsville, Alabama and reporting his findings to SCLC. He is currently considering Lenke's suggestions. Lenke later coordinated press relations for Resurrection City, the Poor People’s Campaign encampment in Washington, DC.

Letter Regarding the Emergency Convocation of the Urban Coalition

Washington, D.C., New York (NY), New York, NY, Pennsylvania (PA), Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI), New Jersey (NJ), Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Philadelphia, PA, Oklahoma (OK), Massachusetts (MA), Louisiana (LA), Ohio (OH), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Arizona (AZ), Minnesota (MN), Pittsburgh, PA, GREECE

A letter drafted by Andrew Heiskell and A. Philip Randolph, co-Chairmen of the Urban Coalition. includes article clippings from various newspapers discussing the dire need for public service employment, private employment, educational disparities, reconstruction and urban development, and equal housing opportunities.

Descartes

Dr. King quotes the French philosopher Rene Descartes on the concept of "doubt."

Latitudinarianism

Dr. King defines latitudinarianism, a term "applied to a liberal opinion which allows the diversity of opinion."

Worship (Definition)

Dr. King quotes Henry Nelson Wieman's "Methods of Private Religious Living."

Letter from Bent Ostergaard to MLK

Thursday, February 3, 1966
Atlanta, GA, DENMARK

Mr. Ostergaard, a representative of the Danish section of Amnesty International, invites Dr. King to speak publically at a Copenhagen Cathedral. He also invites Dr. King to participate in a local tour to bear witness schools and various social institutions. The document concludes with an additional letter addressed to Dr. King's assistant Miss D. McDonald.

MLK's Notes On the Influence of Radio

Dr. King records information regarding religious broadcasting. He list percentages of public influence, prize giveaways and other relevant historical details.

Notecard on the Definition of Time

On this notecard, Dr. King explores the meaning of "Time" according to modern physics and philosophy. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books, and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Letter from MLK to David Brandyberry

Friday, August 9, 1963
Ohio (OH), Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Dr. King thanks Mr. Brandyberry for his recent letter and explains why the current time is "a wonderful and challenging age." He also expresses his hope that the work done in Birmingham, Alabama will bring about better race relations.

The Conditions for Progress in Africa

Thursday, September 6, 1962
SOUTH AFRICA

In a speech at the University of Cape Town, H.F. Oppenheimer argues that Africa was a backwards content with few achievements prior to European colonization. He also says that the struggle against colonialism is thought of exclusively in political terms, but that it should also be considered in social and economic terms. He provides possible solutions for future progress in Africa, and he charges the African nationalist to complete the work that the colonialist began.

Letter from Robert L. Green to Dora McDonald

Friday, November 3, 1967
Michigan (MI)

Mr. Green encloses a foreword to Dr. Neal Sullivan's book by Dr. King.

Handwritten Notes on Science and Religion

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines Brightman's views on Science and Religion.

A Knock At Midnight

Sunday, August 9, 1964
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), New York, NY, New Jersey (NJ), Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

In a tape-recorded address to the Riverside Church in New York City, Dr. King compares the civil rights struggle to a parable from St. Luke. His sermon specifically tackles contemporary social issues such as segregation, discrimination, and the philosophy of nonviolence. In addition, Dr. King explores the role of the church in dealing with such problems.