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Letter from Maddy Tolud to MLK

Wednesday, November 3, 1965

Maddy Tolud, the President of A. R. K., thanks Dr. King for being an honorary member of their organization. Tolud assures him that their members will actively work towards equality until justice prevails.

Letter from Edwin Berry to Jane Lee J. Eddy

Friday, November 18, 1966

Edwin Berry, Executive Director of the Chicago Urban League, writes Jane Lee Eddy, Secretary of the Taconic Foundation, to request funding for a "get-out-the-vote campaign" in Chicago.

Statement for Immediate Release from Harper & Row, Publishers

Monday, May 29, 1967

Harper & Row Publishers issued this press release to announce the arrival of Dr. King's final publication. The book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?", was his first written narrative, since he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. The release also noted that the book would address Dr. King's perspective on racism, poverty and militarism. The tentative date of publishing, according to the document, was June 19, 1967.

Negative Letters to the Editor about MLK

In these newspaper clippings, four people criticize Dr. King and the SCLC Chicago Campaign of 1966.

MLK on Christian Love

In this statement, Dr. King corrects "what may be a false impression." King states that while he does discuss the Christian way of love and non-violence as a tool to unify blacks in the Movement, integration is still necessary in order to truly obtain change.

Letter from Morton M. Brooks to MLK

Wednesday, November 4, 1964

Morton Brooks writes Dr. King to check his availability for April, May, or June of 1965 to speak at Mt. Zion's Sunday morning church service. Brooks expresses that he is aware of Dr. King's busy schedule, but would appreciate his consideration.

Letter from Sue M. Stiles to MLK

Sunday, May 24, 1964

Sue Stiles writes Dr. King to assert her viewpoints and beliefs according to her childhood and upbringing. In expressing these truths, Stiles affirms her support in Dr. King's practices in human rights and encloses a financial contribution.

Letter from Lawrence G. Holt to MLK Regarding Civil Rights

Saturday, September 30, 1967

In this Letter, Lawrence Holt writes to Dr. King urging him to limit his public comments to those regarding civil rights and not the war in Vietnam. Holt states, "You are in a unique position to help the civil rights movement which you are endangering by your public comments on the war."

Letter from MLK to Leonard Smalls

Wednesday, July 24, 1963

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak at The Fifty-Ninth Street Baptist Church due to preaching responsibilities at his own church. He also thanks Rev. Smalls for the offer to fundraise for the SCLC.

Letter from Vivian C. Kelley to MLK and President Kennedy

Vivian C. Kelley offers her support to Dr. King in his continued efforts in the Civil Rights Movement. Mrs. Kelley shares with Dr. King a letter in which she asks President John F. Kennedy to address issues of discrimination in the United States. In response to Mrs. Kelly, Lee C. White, Assistant Special Counsel to the President, expresses thanks on the behalf of President John F. Kennedy and assures Mrs. Kelley the President and the Administration are dedicated to ending discrimination and securing the Constitutional Rights of all Americans.

Letter from Irene Bryson to MLK

Thursday, March 28, 1968

Mrs. Bryson introduces herself as a former neighbor of the King family on Auburn Avenue and recalls fond memories during those years. She compliments Dr. King "as a God sent preacher," and cites biblical scriptures for him to incorporate in his public speaking. Bryson states, teaching God's word "is what it is going to take to help this sin sick world we are living in."

MLK Announces a New SCLC March in Washington, DC

Monday, December 4, 1967

Dr. King announces the SCLC's decision to lead a non-violent march on Washington protesting the government's lack of support in providing jobs and income for impoverished Americans.

Letter from Lee Wood to MLK

Tuesday, May 23, 1967

Lee Wood writes to Dr. King concerning civil and human rights. Mr. Wood seeks to create a third political party and asks Dr. King for any information that will help him meet his goal.

Letter from Seabury Press to MLK

Wednesday, August 30, 1967

Alda Lee Boyd, publicity director for the Seabury Press, asks Dr. King if he would write a statement that can be used to promote "The Jon Daniels Story." The book is about an Episcopal seminary student, Jonathan Daniels, who was killed while working in Mississippi following the Selma to Montgomery March.

Letter from William T. Murphy to MLK

Friday, July 9, 1965

Mr. Murphy, a representative of the United States Congress, writes to Dr. King to convey his intentions to support the House of Judiciary Committee Voting Rights bill.

Letter from Milton S. Eisenhower to MLK

Wednesday, January 26, 1966

This letter from former President Eisenhower's brother Milton, on behalf of Planned Parenthood World Population, requests that Dr. King serve the organization in order to "lend important moral support."

SCLC Board Members

This document lists the SCLC's executive board of 53 members.

Dr. King Announces Appointments in SCLC Operation Breadbasket

Monday, January 29, 1968

Dr. King announces two major appointments to the SCLC Operation Breadbasket staff. Reverend Jesse Jackson is named National Director and Reverend Calvin Morris is named Associate Director in Chicago. Operation Breadbasket was formed in 1962 to improve economic conditions in black communities throughout the US.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, November 11, 1963

Joan Daves references an enclosed check for royalties received for the Harper edition of "Stride Toward Freedom" and "Strength to Love." She also inquires about several charges on one of the book's statement and requests permission to check their validity.

Man The Christian View

Dr. King outlines Reinhold Niebuhr’s three ways in which the Christian view of man differs from all others, citing “The Nature and Destiny of Man.”

Letter from Marie Williams and Rev. Harvey Spivey to MLK

Monday, February 7, 1966

Marie Williams and Rev. Harvey write to Dr. King expressing gratitude for the work of SCLC. They further request a donation for their church's building fund.

Seminar in Social Philosophy Notes

Dr. King records notes for his Seminar in Social Philosophy course. These notes consist of readings by and related to ancient Greek philosophers Plato and Aristotle.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Peggy Duff

Thursday, May 4, 1967

Dr. King's secretary Dora McDonald communicates with Peggy Duff of London. Miss McDonald informs Miss Duff of Dr. King's travels outside of Atlanta. The particular matter, unkown and referenced in this letter, will be conveyed to him once he arrives back to SCLC.

Letter from Edward Boland to MLK

Tuesday, August 24, 1965

Representative Edward P. Boland informs Dr. King of his signing of the Discharge Petition for Home Rule in the District of Columbia.

Attitude, Knowledge and Apperception of the Civil Rights in the Puerto Rican Public

E. Seda Bonilla, Ph. D. writes about the acts of discrimination that occur in Puerto Rico. Backed by data, it is said that colored groups are being kept from achieving higher levels of education. In addition, Bonilla observes a correlation between individual occupational rate and individual degree of intolerance.

Letter from Frank Sullivan to MLK

Friday, March 24, 1967

In this letter, the president of the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers, Mr. Sullivan, informs Dr. King that the organization will look to donate to the S.C.L.C.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Bodo Charles Ohly

Monday, July 17, 1967

Dr. King writes Mr. Bodo Ohly regarding the new stanza he wrote to the National Anthem.

Telegram to MLK from John Jacobs

John Jacobs accuses Dr. King of being associated with Communists. He proclaims that Negroes learned raping, robbing and relief with Dr. King's training.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Hassell

Dr. King addresses Mrs. Hassell's questions regarding Pope Paul's quest for peace.

Abelard

Dr. King quotes 12th century French philosopher Peter Abelard on the relationship between doubt, inquiry and truth.