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Letter from Charles J. Benner to MLK

Monday, December 5, 1966

Dr. King is adversely described in this letter and accused of being a communist by Charles Benner. He further slanders the Negro race and objects to the current national movements lead by Dr. King.

Letter from Ora Belle Tamm to MLK

Tuesday, March 14, 1967

Ora Belle Tamm objects to the reaction of Negro leaders during the Adam Clayton Powell affair and expresses her disappointment to Dr. King.

Letter from Charles E. Waring to MLK

Wednesday, March 13, 1968

Calling himself "a pale face Christian," Charles E. Waring writes Dr. King to acknowledge that all Christians must aid African Americans in their fight for fair representation and respect as equal human beings. He denounces whites who condemn Dr. King and asks, "what can we white Christians do to help recover the leadership of the Negro cause to worthy men?"

Letter from MLK to Congressman Ogden R. Reid

Friday, February 19, 1965

Dr. King informs Congressman Reid (R-New York) of the positive impact he left on Negro citizens during his visit to Selma, Alabama.

MLK Notecard - "Revelation"

In this handwritten note card, entitled, simply, "Revelation," Dr. King quotes from Niebuhr's NDM, I, 127.

Philosophy of Life (Its Importance)

Dr. King quotes G. K. Chesterton’s “Heretics.”

Installation Program for Rev. Kelly Miller Smith

Sunday, September 29, 1963

This is the program for the installation of the Reverend Kelly Miller Smith as Pastor of the Antioch Baptist Church in Cleveland, Ohio. Reverend Smith is installed as the Eighth Minister of the historical church, which began in 1893.

Class Notes Psalms

Dr. King writes several scriptures from the Book of Psalms found in the Old Testament of the Bible.

Statement by MLK

Monday, March 4, 1968

Dr. King warns the United States about the possibility of downfall should the federal government fail to change its policies. He sets a date for the SCLC to go to Washington D.C. and lead nonviolent demonstrations with the purpose of eradicating racism and poverty in America.

The Philosophy Of Nonviolence And the Tactic Of Nonviolent Resistance

This document discusses the philosophy and tactic of nonviolence. The three nonviolent resisters discussed are Jesus, Gandhi, and Dr. King.

Adverse Message from Dr. Douglas of Sarasota, FL

Wednesday, February 16, 1966

This message from Dr. Douglas was given over the telephone #525-1717 in Springfield, Illinois. Douglas discusses his beliefs on racism and communism in regards to Dr. King. He discusses how communist are the followers of Dr. King, and also how the Nobel Peace Prize was awarded to King in order to cause a "communist world revolution." Bayard Rustin is described by Douglas as a "pervert, jail bird" close associate of Dr. King.

Letter from Louise M. Meriwether to MLK

Tuesday, March 19, 1968

Louise M. Meriwether requests an endorsement from Dr. King in protesting the filming of the book "The Confessions of Nat Turner" written by William Styron.

Letter from W. David Angus to MLK

Friday, October 25, 1963

W. David Angus extends an invitation for Dr. King to speak to the members of the Canadian Club of Montreal about the Civil Rights Movement.

Note to MLK

Thursday, March 5, 1964

In a brief note, Joan Daves informs Dr. King of an enclosed British publisher's catalogue for his review.

Letter from Henry Wagner to MLK

Thursday, July 27, 1967

Henry B. Wagner writes a letter to Dr. King regarding Congress' increased appropriation for the Federal Aviation Agency. Mr. Wagner would prefer that those funds be given to mass ground transportation to increase safety and convenience.

MLK Speech at SCLC Staff Retreat

Monday, November 14, 1966

Dr. King addresses the staff of the SCLC at a retreat in Frogmore, South Carolina. He divides his speech into three parts: "whence we have come, where we have come, and where do we go from here." Dr. King thoroughly discusses his thoughts on Communism, the practice of nonviolence, the belief that racism is an "ontological affirmation,"and the weaknesses of Black Power.

Letter to Eugene Exman from MLK

Monday, December 4, 1961

Dr. King responds to a previous correspondence from Mr. Eugene Exman of Harper and Brothers Publishing. The content of the letter references Dr. King's discussion with Mr. Mel Arnold, regarding his sermons being transcribed into a manuscript. The sermons would eventually be compiled into what would be Dr. King's second book, "Strength to Love."

Letter from MLK to Carmen Baptista

Dr. King writes Carmen Baptista expressing deep appreciation for his letter of encouragement and for sending a recording of his song, "Coming Down the Road."

Letter from Ralph Turnidge to MLK

Friday, January 24, 1964

The Reverend Ralph Turnidge, General Secretary of the Washington-Northern Idaho Council of Churches, invites Dr. King to be the featured leader at a conference on the Church and Human Rights.

Letter from Rev. L. K. Jackson to MLK

Tuesday, April 9, 1963

Reverend L. K. Jackson thanks Dr. King for his hospitality while he was in Atlanta. Jackson states that his only regret was not seeing more of Dr. King and his wife.

March for Peace Flyer

This flyer advertises the March for Peace. The event, which was organized in Atlanta and held on Hiroshima Day, focused on ending the war in Vietnam.

Letter From Bessie G. White to MLK

Bessie G. White writes to Dr. King, highlighting the strife that she feels Dr. King will continue to go through while fighting for civil rights in the south.

Letter from Henderson Travel Service, Inc. to Dora McDonald

Monday, November 30, 1964

Freddye Henderson of Henderson Travel Service, Inc. informs Miss McDonald of the total cost for the group's trip to Oslo, Norway.

Letter to the SCLC from The United Church Board for World Ministries

Wednesday, April 10, 1968

In this document, is a note to request acknowledgement of a $50 dollar contribution, from Andrew C. Mills of New Delhi, India.

Letter from Lorraine Hughes to MLK Regarding the March on Washington

Mrs. Hughes requests that Dr. King does not proceed with the march in Washington D.C., due to the inability of poor people to conduct a peaceful movement.

Letter from Edwina C. Johnson to MLK

Edwina C. Johnson claims that the racial problems in the United States are the result of "what is recorded as 'The American Heritage'" and its debasement of African Americans in media, particularly textbooks. Johnson suggests emphasizing the role that African Americans have played in American history. Johnson also provides a list of freedoms that should not be denied to African Americans.

Letter from Mount Olivet Tabernacle Baptist Church to MLK

Wednesday, November 1, 1967

Pastor Marshall L. Shepard invites Dr. King to the Dedication Service for the Mount Olivet Village Corporation in Philadelphia.

Telegram from Bea Stanley to MLK

Friday, November 3, 1967

Bea Stanley writes to Dr. King during his confinement at the Jefferson County Courthouse Jail. Stanley informs him that many of his supporters and friends are concerned regarding his health and safety, and also updates him on the progress of one of his publications.

Walter Reuther Remarks at the March on Washington

Wednesday, August 28, 1963

Walter P. Reuther, President of the International Union, UAW, expounds upon the cause of freedom and democracy in America from the perception of the external world. Reuther highlights the rights guaranteed by the United States Constitution and how they have been denied to African Americas living as "second-class" citizens. He further discusses the necessary duties of the United States Congress to recognize and initiate civil rights programs.

Letter from MLK to Mr. and Mrs. E. M. Schiltz

Tuesday, October 12, 1965

Dr. King thanks Mr. and Mrs. Schiltz for their financial contribution to the SCLC. He explains the current efforts of the organization and the significance of their contribution.