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Letter from Carey B. Joynt to Rev. Carroll D. Payne

Tuesday, June 20, 1967
Georgia (GA), VIETNAM, CHINA, INDIA, JAPAN, THAILAND, London, England, Washington, D.C.

In this letter, dated June 20, 1967, Carey Joynt asks Rev. Carroll Payne to review her rough draft regarding the Vietnam War and Ramsey's ideas. She has simplified the arguments to the best of her abilities and hopes that Payne can offer suggestions for her draft.

Telegram to Alan Reitman from MLK

Friday, March 1, 1968
New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King informs Alan Reitman of the American Civil Liberties Union that he will sign a statement opposing the House Un-American Activities Committee and the Senate Internal Securities Committee.

Letter from John M. Thornton to MLK

Wednesday, October 16, 1963
Washington, D.C., Birmingham, AL, Cleveland, OH, Richmond, VA, Ohio (OH), Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Alabama (AL), BRAZIL

John M. Thorton invites Dr. King to speak at the Citizenship Award Banquet hosted by the National Capital Voters Association, in order to encourage the 425,000 Negro citizens of Washington, DC to vote in the upcoming presidential election.

Star: "An Analysis of Black Power" 1967

Monday, June 26, 1967
Washington, D.C.

Paul Hathaway, of the Washington, D.C. Star newspaper, crafted a review of Dr. King's final publication, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" This extensive review of Dr. King's book focused, primarily, on his stance regarding the black power movement. According, to Dr. King, in the book, black power was something that was needed to achieve tangible goals such as: economic and political power. However, the use of the slogan carried a very volatile meaning that would alienate many allies in the movement, not of African American descent.

Meet the Press Interview with Roy Wilkins and MLK

Sunday, August 25, 1963
Washington, D.C., New York (NY), New York, NY, POLAND, CUBA, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

This document is a transcript of NBC’s “Meet the Press” televised press conference with Dr. King and Roy Wilkins. The program is moderated by Ned Brooks. Frank Van Der Linden, Robert MacNeil, Richard Wilson, and Lawrence Spivak are panelists. Some of the topics covered are the goals of the March on Washington, a concern about whether the Civil Rights Movement is pushing too hard, and past political affiliations of Bayard Rustin.

Letter from Cass Canfield to MLK

Thursday, May 4, 1967
New York, NY

Cass Canfield, of Harper & Row, informs Dr. King about the enclosure of the first copy of "Where Do We Go From Here?"

Bread at Midnight

Tuesday, December 13, 1966
Georgia (GA), SOUTH AFRICA, RUSSIAN FEDERATION

"The Mennonite," issued by The Board of Education and Publication of the General Conference Mennonite Church, features an article by Dr. King entitled "Bread at Night." Dr. King begins with a parable that demonstrates not only the power of prayer, but provides metaphors for the state of America and thinking material for the role of the church during that time period.

Mastering Our Fears

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR

Dr. King discusses fear, the healthy and unhealthy fears humanity has, the need to overcome fear, and steps in mastering fear.

Letter from R. Abraham to MLK

Saturday, September 20, 1958
New York, NY

R. Abraham sends this get-well letter to Dr. King wishing a full recovery during his stay at Harlem Hospital. Also enclosed is a gift in appreciation for Dr. King's work for humanity.

Letter from Lucy Amerson to MLK

Tuesday, June 28, 1966
California (CA), Atlanta, GA

Lucy Amerson corresponds with Dr. King in reference to a $150 donation made by Delta Sigma Theta Sorority Inc. to SCLC. The donation was a portion of the funds raised through the Ebony Fashion Fair project.

Primer For Delegates to the Democratic National Convention

Mississippi (MS), Atlantic City, NJ

The Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party informs citizens of the mistreatment incurred by African Americans attempting to register to vote and participate in election process. The Party also outlines its journey to sending 64 delegates to the Democratic Convention of 1964 and how President Johnson denied them seats at the Convention.

Letter from A Republican to MLK

Monday, January 22, 1968
Iowa (IA)

Signing as "A Republican," the writer informs Dr. King that the draft for the war is the Democrats' method of using blacks for involuntary servitude. This information is to serve as support of the writer's belief that the Democrats will "return the negroes to slavery."

Letter from Rev. L. K. Jackson to MLK

Tuesday, April 9, 1963
Indiana (IN), New Jersey (NJ), Washington, D.C., Baltimore, MD, Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA

Reverend L. K. Jackson thanks Dr. King for his hospitality while he was in Atlanta. Jackson states that his only regret was not seeing more of Dr. King and his wife.

Letter to MLK from the Daughters of Zion

Indiana (IN)

H.B. Williams, the Shepherdess of the Daughters of Zion, sent this letter to Dr. King saying that they had taken notice to his actions in the fight for civil equality. Williams writes that they do not participate in demonstrations, because that has caused their organization "downfall in ancient times." She further explains that this has "turned into a Holy war, and it is no longer a fight for equality and rights to vote."

Address by Rabbi Joachim Prinz

Wednesday, August 28, 1963
Washington, D.C., GERMANY

Rabbi Joachim Prinz's address at the March on Washington focuses on the importance of freedom. He relates the struggle that blacks are currently enduring to the Nazism Jews faced during the reign of Hitler.

Letter from Wayne Blanks to MLK

New York (NY)

Wayne Blanks writes Dr. King in hopes that he will answer a question about the specific goals and standards he sets for Negroes in the US. Blanks is requesting this information for his advanced placement history assignment.

Kierkegaard

Dr. King cites a page in "The Personalist" on the existentialism in Kierkegaard's philosophy.

The Witness: MLK Writes from Birmingham Jail

Thursday, June 27, 1963
Pennsylvania (PA), Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Texas (TX), Mississippi (MS), Montgomery, AL, Albany, GA

"The Witness" publishes the second part of Dr. King's "Letter from Birmingham City Jail." In this pivotal document, Dr. King expresses dissatisfaction with the white moderate and the white church regarding their silent stance on segregation and discrimination. He urges individuals to understand the delays, broken promises, and intimidation Negroes face to secure their freedom.

Southern Conference Educational Fund Endorsement of MLK Vietnam Stance

Wednesday, April 12, 1967
Tennessee (TN), Nashville, TN, VIETNAM, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Mississippi (MS), Kentucky (KY), Louisville, KY, Virginia (VA), Norfolk, VA

The Southern Conference Educational Fund issues this article in the Patriot News Service. This statement supports Dr. King's sentiments regarding the Vietnam War and also details issues of race, injustice, and inequality in various places throughout the world.

Worship

Dr. King notes some attributes and results of worship.

Letter from Stuart Nelson to Dora McDonald

Thursday, December 29, 1966
Washington, D.C.

The Vice President of Howard University writes to Dora McDonald, inviting Dr. King to visit the school while he is in town for the presentation of the Gandhi statue.

Letter from Mrs. Ernest Erber to MLK

Wednesday, July 14, 1965
New Jersey (NJ), Selma, AL

Mrs. Erber tells Dr. King that she is sending the newspaper clipping featuring her daughter Elena. Elena raised eighty cents to fight the injustices of racism.

Notecard Written by MLK Regarding "The Bible"

This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Religious Leadership

Dr. King cites Henry Nelson Wieman's "Normative Psychology of Religion."

Anonymous Letter to Charles C. Diggs Jr.

Alabama (AL), New Orleans, LA, Louisiana (LA), Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), JAPAN

This anonymous letter to Congressman Charles Diggs, Jr. of Michigan details the grievances suffered by Negro and Caucasian females in the U.S. Army. The authors assert that they routinely are subjected to segregation in public accommodations and are denied equal opportunity for promotion and reenlistment.

Telegram from Ike Knight to MLK

Georgia (GA)

Ike Knight notifies Dr. King about civil rights issues concerning steel workers going on strike.

The Dimensions of a Complete Life

Sunday, November 13, 1960
New York, NY, Iowa (IA), INDIA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Cambridge, MA

Dr. King's speech at Cornell University cites the new and complete city of God described in the Book of Revelation to propose that life at its best is complete in three dimensions. He states that a complete or three-dimensional life includes an inward concern for one's personal ends, an outward commitment to the welfare of others, and an upward connection with God.

Letter from Leon Forer to Dr.King

Wednesday, March 6, 1968
New York (NY)

Leon Forer expresses that Dr. King's book "Where Do We Go From Here" is a "sobering testament to our times." In this letter he also makes a suggestion to change the appendix.

Receipt for Sigrid L. Sharp

Thursday, August 20, 1964
California (CA)

Acknowledging receipt of a letter and a $100 contribution to the SCLC, Dr. King sends his appreciation to Mary Sarvis. Dr. King makes reference to an enclosed receipt of the contribution.

Letter from Dinkar Sakrikar to MLK

Friday, September 23, 1966
INDIA

D.Sakrikar writes to solidify the plans for the donation of a bronze statue of Mahatma Gandhi.