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Letter from Robert E. Harding, Thomas H. Weddington and Celestine B. Bailey to MLK

Saturday, May 20, 1967

Robert E. Harding Jr., Thomas H. Weddington, and Celestine B. Bailey detail the many allegations of racial discrimination involving employees from the National Labor Relations Board. These issues have conflicted with the Equal Employment Opportunity and the Civil Service Rules and Regulations. Harding, Weddington, and Bailey request Dr. King's assistance to correct this issue.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dick Smyth

Tuesday, March 26, 1963

Dora McDonald informs Dick Smyth that Dr. King is unable to accept the speaking engagement at the moment but they will contact him once Dr. King has an engagement in the area.

Letter from British High School Student to MLK

Margaret Blenkins, a fifteen year old student from Northumberland, England, writes Dr. King to ask how she can join the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Raphael Gould to Coretta Scott King

Mr. Gould of the Fellowship of Reconciliation sends Mrs. King a compilation of writings about and by Phan Thi Mai, a Vietnamese student who self-immolated on May 16, 1967 in an appeal to end the war in Vietnam. Mai "decided to burn herself to make her voice heard by the war."

Newspaper Clippings on Vietnam, January 1968

Wednesday, January 3, 1968

This document is a collage of newspaper clippings from the New York Time and the Washington Post on union leaders' positions on Vietnam. The boxed quotation is excerpted from a recent AFL-CIO convention.

Letter from Sonia Schechter to MLK

Wednesday, April 4, 1962

Sonia Schechter, President of Jewish Cultural Clubs and Societies, sends a financial contribution to the SCLC. Schechter also expresses great admiration to Dr. King for his "heroic leadership."

Letter from Rev. Lane Barton to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965

Rev. Lane Barton, on behalf of Rev. James Pike and the St. Barnabas Episcopal Mission, corresponds with Dr. King in relation to their recent journey to Selma. In this positive affirmation Rev. Barton states, "I pray that the spirit of the living God which is going to and fro in the land and walking up and down in it will grasp us all and refashion us into one truly free and united republic."

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Heardy

Dr. King writes to Mrs. Heardy offering his apologies for being unable to financially assist her. He asserts that the SCLC financial resources are aimed at changing the laws so that a welfare system can be developed to further provide for the less fortunate.

Letter from Vice President Hubert Humphrey to MLK Regarding Crisis in Detroit

Thursday, August 3, 1967

In this letter, Vice President of the United States of America, Hubert Humphrey, writes to Dr. King to thank him for his statements promoting nonviolence in the crisis situation in Detroit, Michigan.

Article in the Martin Luther King Column

Dr. King recognizes that the Committee for United Negro Relief will sponsor a luncheon to honor Mrs. Daisy Bates at the Waldorf-Astoria. Dr. King calls her the "heroine of the Battle for the Soul of Little Rock." He further describes contributions made by Mrs. Bates and her husband, along with the hardships they endured "in retaliation for their temerity in writing, speaking and fighting for freedom."

Letter from P. G. Harkins to MLK

Mrs. Harkins, program chairman of the Voice of Women, requests that Dr. King speak for the organization when his schedule permits.

Letter from William Mahoney to MLK

Tuesday, January 30, 1968

William Mahoney asks Dr. King for his input on a SCLC monthly publication in which he is attempting to create. The publication would seek to educate the public on social, economic, and political problems African Americans endure.

Letter from Richard L. Doerschuk to MLK

Thursday, October 22, 1964

Deputy director of the United States Information Agency, Richard Doerschuk requests that Dr. King participate in a television program to be broadcast in Africa on the topic of civil rights.


Dr. King quotes from Nietzsche's "The AntiChrist."


Dr. King cites Schopenhauer's book "The World as Will and Ideas" and records a passage on selfishness.

Prophecy (Micah)

Dr. King sketches notes on the prophet Micah, maintaining "...that the true prophet is one who draws his inspiration...from Jehovah his God."

The Sound of Freedom

Wednesday, October 7, 1964

The Greater Philadelphia Citizens Committee is having an event with Dr. King as their guest speaker and special musical performances by artist such as Mahalia Jackson.

Letter from Local 89 Members to Martin Luther King, Jr.

In this letter dated March 5, 1968, the Anti-Discrimination and Civil Rights Committee of Local 89 invites King to speak at their membership meeting on April 1, 1968. Albert Jenkins, Emil Ramirez, and Wendell are the members of Local 89 who sent this letter.

Letter of Support from Dorothy Hill to MLK

Saturday, July 1, 1967

Miss Dorothy P. Hill writes this letter to Dr. King thanking him for sending a copy of his book "Where do we go From Here: Chaos or Community?" As previous Director of the Summer Institute for Social Progress at Wellesley College, Hill learned that "skin color seems no bar to congeniality," and she knows of many others who have had similar positive experiences. Hill writes that she admires Dr. King for his principles and leadership ability.

Letter from Patrick V. McNamara to MLK

Wednesday, April 28, 1965

Pat McNamara, U.S. Senator from Michigan, writes Dr. King expressing gratitude for his letter of recent date regarding efforts to strip the poll tax prohibition from the voting rights bill.

Letter from Congressman John Conyers to MLK

Friday, October 8, 1965

Congressman Conyers thanks Dr. King for his telegram regarding the Mississippi Challenge and gives him details regarding the vote in Congress.

Letter from the University of Capetown to MLK

Friday, February 18, 1966

Monica Wilson asks if Dr. King can deliver the T. B. Davie Memorial Lecture at the University of Cape Town.

Appreciation Letter to MLK

Wednesday, August 21, 1963

President John F. Kennedy writes Dr. King expressing appreciation for his support during this difficult time. President Kennedy is referring to the death of his second son, Patrick Bouvier Kennedy, who died two days after his birth August 7, 1963.

Telegram from MLK to Jesse Hill

Wednesday, December 6, 1967

Dr. King sends condolences to Jesse Hill regarding the loss of his grandmother.

Letter from Maddy Tolud to MLK

Wednesday, November 3, 1965

Maddy Tolud, the President of A. R. K., thanks Dr. King for being an honorary member of their organization. Tolud assures him that their members will actively work towards equality until justice prevails.

Matter (Aristotelian Concept)

Here, Dr. King discusses the functional differences between matter and form.

Interview with MLK for Radio Norway

Dr. King shares the way that Americans celebrate Christmas.

Letter from Stuart E. Atkinson to the SCLC

Stuart E. Atkinson sends a donation to the SCLC and requests the address to which he should send donated clothing and toys.

Lorraine Motel (Now the Civil Rights Museum). Scene of Dr. King's Assassination

This photo comes from the Benedict J. Fernandez "Countdown to Eternity" portfolio.
(Copyright: Benedict J. Fernandez)

Letter from Amelia P. Boynton to the SCLC

Wednesday, June 2, 1965

Amelia Boynton writes the members of the SCLC seeking financial assistance to help purchase a particular piece of land to help start a new sewing machine factory and other projects in Selma, Alabama. Boynton provides details of the history of the struggle of people of color in Selma, and stresses that the land would be used to help teach the underprivileged in the area to help themselves.