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"NIGERIA"

Birthday Card from Belle and Cleveland to MLK

Dr. King receives a birthday card from Belle and Cleveland entitled, "North, South, East or West."

Draft of Dedication Page for "Why We Can't Wait"

This document is a rough draft of the dedication page of Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait;" the draft reveals Dr. King's wish for his children.

Letter from Dorothy Gaines to Josephine Davis

Monday, April 19, 1965

Dorothy Gaines thanks Josephine Davis and her friends for their generous donation to the SCLC. Gaines explains the current efforts of the SCLC as well as the monthly budget of the organization. She expresses the importance of financial contributions and encloses receipts from the donation.

Telegram from Charles Webber to MLK

Charles Webber, the AFL-CIO's representative for religious relations, sends this telegram of support to Dr. King during his incarceration.

Letter from MLK

This is a partial letter from Dr. King in an effort to raise funds for SCLC.

Telegram From the National Committee For Free Elections to MLK Regarding 1967 Sunflower County, Mississippi Elections

Dr. King requests a meeting with Attorney General William Ramsey Clark, to discuss the need for federal voting registrars to oversee upcoming elections in rural Mississippi counties. In these elections, Negroes will run as candidates for the first time in American history.

United States National Student Association Scope Questionnaire

Tuesday, February 15, 1966

The United States National Student Association prepares to publish the second edition of SCOPE, a directory of community service projects in which students can become involved during the summer months. A questionnaire is enclosed for organizations interested in listing their program.

Letter from Andrew Young to Reverend B. J. Cameron

Wednesday, June 14, 1967

Andrew Young, acting as Executive Assistant to Dr. King, responds to Rev. Cameron's letter regarding SCLC's involvement in Grenada, Mississippi. He assures Rev. Cameron that the SCLC has not forgotten about Grenada and discusses plans to see him in the future.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dr. Richard C. Gilman

Wednesday, October 19, 1966

Dora McDonald informs Dr. Gilman that Dr. King will be able to speak at Occidental College on November 17, 1966.

"Lost Sheep" or "The God of the Lost"

Sunday, September 18, 1966

Dr. King delivers a sermon about the parable of the lost sheep from the book of Luke. In this sermon, Dr. King poses the question that has pondered mankind for ages, "What is God Like?" He declares, "God is like a good shepherd" caring for his sheep. Dr. King commends the good done in America, but compares the nation to "a lost sheep" for failing to maintain equality for all men. He summarizes by describing good as a process, that everyone is significant and God is seeking to find the lost.

Letter from Emmi Kuhnlein to MLK

Tuesday, December 26, 1967

Mrs. Kuhnlein expresses admiration for Dr. King and shares her experiences as a member of the German Union movement. She equates the German working class living conditions as being similar to the slums in the US. She also suggests employing a tactic used by Israel of putting young people to work as a way to resolve slum conditions. A news clipping is attached to further support her suggestion.

The World of Books

Saturday, June 17, 1967

This is a broad review of Dr. King's publication, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" The article also notes that this was the first book Dr. King has released since his acceptance of the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Carey Preston

Friday, June 12, 1964

Ms. McDonald informs Mrs. Preston that two of Dr. King's friends have encouraged him to reconsider accepting an invitation to speak at her sorority's convention. Hopefully, rearrangement of Dr. King's schedule will permit his acceptance.

Interview with MLK for Radio Norway

Dr. King shares the way that Americans celebrate Christmas.

Letter to MLK from The Adult Education Council of Greater Chicago

Thursday, March 31, 1966

Emma Kramer, the Secretary of the Speakers Bureau, writes to Dr. King to negotiate the details of his presentation at the University of Illinois.

Marx

Dr. King references German philosopher Karl Marx regarding his teachings. King states, "Marx teaching resolves into three principal elements: a philosophy of history, and economic theory, and a practical program for the realization of a new social order."

Letter from Martha Kennedy to MLK

Thursday, July 13, 1967

Martha Kennedy thanks Dr. King for sending her a copy of "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" Kennedy feels that Dr. King's leadership is well emphasized in the context of the book. Particularly, she finds the chapter on Black Power to be "valuable." Mrs. Kennedy hopes for much success to Dr. King and his great work.

"Leaders of 'Socialist Scholars' Talk Guerrilla War in Cities Next Year"

Saturday, December 30, 1967

Alice Widener argues that the Black Power movement will result in domestic guerilla warfare. The writer's stance originates from a Black Power workshop she attended. Widener argues that the U.S. government must "round up and imprison" the "Red-Black power criminals."

Letter from Josephine Davis to Dr. King

Friday, June 24, 1966

In this letter, Josephine Davis tells Dr. King that they enjoyed the evening he spent with them. She then informs him that their prayers are with him and that he can look forward to financial help from "THOSE".

The World of the Patriarchs

Dr. King records historical and geographical data regarding several countries, such as Egypt, Greece, and Palestine. King places a special emphasis on the "World of the Patriarch," the title of this document, and writes notes on the "age of the Patriarch," which takes place after 2000 B. C.

Letter from George Richard to MLK

George Richard asks Dr. King for books on demonstrations, and he also asks Dr. King to visit his town.

The Modern Negro Activist

Dr. King profiles the emergent young Negro civil rights activist who is college-educated, creative, brave and committed to the discipline of non-violence. He attributes the activist's diligence to a keen awareness that they inhabit a world on the cusp of positive social change and that they will have the privilege to direct that change. They are no longer to be an imitator of his white counterpart, but rather an initiator and leader in this new age.

Letter from Jeanne Whitaker to MLK

Jeanne Whitaker does not oppose the slogan "Black Power", however she identifies the distinction between power and violence. Mrs. Whitaker elaborates on the influence of non-violence that was rooted from Mahatma Gandhi's methodology and practice.

Letter from C. Sumner Stone Jr. to Wyatt Tee Walker

Wednesday, August 8, 1962

"Washington Afro-American" Editor Chuck Stone forwards Rev. Wyatt Walker the resumes of individuals that might be suitable to work as a public relations specialist for the SCLC. He urges that Walker and Dr. King carefully examine the resumes and respond to "the more outstanding candidates."

Letter from MLK to Dr. Milnor Alexander

Friday, November 6, 1964

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak at the kick-off celebration for the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom 50th Anniversary. A previous engagement in another section of the country prevents Dr. King from accepting. However, Dr. King would later speak for the organization in Philadelphia. Coretta Scott King was a key member and sponsor of the league.

Contribution Letter from Dr. and Mrs. Bacon to Dr. King

Friday, February 23, 1968

Dr. and Mrs. Bacon are writing to express their support and concern for the "last chance" SCLC project. Enclosed in the letter is $200 contribution to help further support the initiative.

Letter from Clarence G. Petersen to MLK

Thursday, August 25, 1966

Clarence G. Petersen tells Dr. King that he should avoid marching in the city of Cicero. Petersen describes Cicero as a slum with old houses and an oppressive, industrial atmosphere. While Petersen supports Dr. King's campaign, he believes it'd be best if the city were avoided for Dr. King's safety.

Letter from Marry Gottesfeld to MLK

Wednesday, August 7, 1963

Mary Gottesfeld, president of the Community and Social Agency Employees Union, writes Dr. King expressing pleasure in contributing more to Dr. King's organization. She also reminds him of the thousands that are behind his cause.

The Sound of Freedom

Wednesday, October 7, 1964

The Greater Philadelphia Citizens Committee is having an event with Dr. King as their guest speaker and special musical performances by artist such as Mahalia Jackson.

The Christian Sense of Individuality

Dr. King quotes from "The Nature and Destiny of Man: A Christian Interpretation" by Reinhold Niebuhr, on the Christian sense of individuality.