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Handwritten Notes on Sacramentalism

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines his views on sacramentalism. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definition, and bible verses.

Along This Way: The Violence of Poverty

Saturday, January 1, 1966
California (CA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

In his regular column of the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King discusses the rate of unemployment among Negroes. He states that 2/3 of all Negro families live in poverty. Dr. King argues that the administration needs to carry out the mandate of the Unemployment Act of 1945 and stimulate employment.

Letter to Mrs. Coretta Scott King from Mrs. Jena Hobbs

Monday, April 8, 1968
Brooklyn, NY

Mrs. Coretta Scott King received many kind and heartfelt letters of condolence, following the assassination of her husband. This document, in particular, came from Mrs. Lena Hobbs of Brooklyn, NY, who wanted to express the empathy she felt for Mrs. King and her four children. According to Mrs. Hobbs, Dr. King was a great leader that would be dearly missed.

Memorandum from MLK

Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), Boston, MA

Dr. King regrets his absence at the Unity Council meeting and apologizes for his inability to sign a statement because it disagreed with his methods of civil disobedience.

Letter from MLK to Frank Church

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Frank Church, a United States Senator from Idaho, for supporting the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

SCLC Resolution "To Fulfill These Rights"

Thursday, June 2, 1966
Alabama (AL), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C.

The SCLC releases a copy of the resolution, "To Fulfill These Rights," created by the SCLC's Alabama staff and sent to the White House Conference. Hosea Williams states in the resolution that Negroes who voted in the primary were intimidated by white segregationist to not vote in the run-off.

Letter Requesting a Meeting, to MLK from Harper & Brothers

Wednesday, November 7, 1962
New York, NY

In this correspondence to Dr. King, Mr. Mel Arnold of Harper and Row Publishers, referenced that he received notice that Dr. King would be preaching at Riverside Church, in New York City. Mr. Arnold asked whether or not Dr. King would be available for a meal, after his sermon at Riverside. He also thanked him for the additional sermons that had been received, for the preparation of Dr. King's second book.

New Wine in Old Bottles

Sunday, January 2, 1966
Atlanta, GA

In a New Year's sermon at Ebenezer Baptist Church, Dr. King addresses Matthew 9:17. His explains that new ideas or inspiration cannot thrive in closed minds or old structures, such as the idea of equality in a segregated society. While Victor Hugo's "idea whose time has come" may be here, Dr. King says, we need to "help time" and overcome the initial resistance to new ideas with persistence and a transformation of the old structures.

Letter from Congressman Marvin Esch to MLK

Monday, November 27, 1967
Washington, D.C.

Congressman Esch expresses appreciation to Dr. King for supporting the anti-poverty program. Attached is a copy of the Congressman's statement regarding the "Economic Opportunity Amendments of 1967."

Letter of Resignation Rachel Davis DuBois to MLK

Wednesday, November 2, 1966
New York (NY)

Rachel Davis DuBois resigns from the staff of SCLC to help the organization during a time of financial difficulties. Dr. DuBois offers her services in the future whenever needed without compensation.

More and Faster

Sunday, January 5, 1964
Birmingham, AL, Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Philadelphia, PA, Detroit, MI

Dr. King writes on the topic of "The Negro Goal: More and Faster." King highlights the black political and social climate in 1964 and discusses how the act of nonviolence gave blacks hope.

The Forbidden Book of the Century

California (CA)

J. Partyka's book, "Never Come Early" is announced as the "Forbidden Book" of the century. This announcement claims that the book wil "quake the hallowed halls of psychiatry, education and religion."

Letter from MLK to Rev. Johann R. Goelz

Friday, August 16, 1963
Milwaukee, WI, Wisconsin (WI), Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

Dr. King writes Johann Goelz expressing his appreciation for the kind remarks shared in a previous correspondence. King hopes that the current work in Birmingham will yield a success that sets the tone for better race relations in the South.

Elmer Evans Advocates for Black Power

Sunday, July 16, 1967
New Jersey (NJ), Los Angeles, CA, London, England, SPAIN

"A white caucasian" advocates for black power, claiming that it is synonymous with sovereign power. Responding to a televised discussion on the subject of black power, Elmer Evans aims to challenge what he felt was inaccurately presented on the show.

Letter from Dora McDonald to H. D. Bollinger

Thursday, September 24, 1964
Nashville, TN

Dora McDonald writes Dr. Bollinger accepting an invitation on Dr. King's behalf. Ms. McDonald explains that Dr. King will be able to attend the conference in Lincoln, Nebraska, but he will not be traveling alone, so they will need to prepare travel expenses for two.

A Look to the Future

Monday, September 2, 1957
Tennessee (TN), Montgomery, AL

Dr. King addresses the Highlander Folk School during the organization's twenty-fifth anniversary. He discusses the many accomplishments and hurdles of the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from A. S. Young to MLK

Monday, May 1, 1967
VIETNAM, Georgia (GA), New York (NY), New York, NY, MEXICO

Mr. Young criticizes Dr. King and the black community for their support of heavyweight champion Cassius Clay's refusal to be drafted into the military. He also expresses worry about the quality of black leadership and urges a move from a selfish focus on Negroes only to concern for all people.

Letter from E.E.H. to Reverend Ralph Abernathy

California (CA)

The author of this letter speaks out against the efforts of Reverend Abernathy, calling the March on Washington a cheap show and calling for an end to civil rights demonstrations in general.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Martin Peretz

Wednesday, October 11, 1967
Massachusetts (MA)

In this letter, Ms. McDonald informs Dr. Peretz that Dr. King will be able to have lunch with him and that he will be accompanied by Reverend Andrew Young, Reverend Bernard Lee and herself.

Telegram from John Moore to MLK

Monday, April 10, 1967
Boston, MA

John Moore questions Dr. King's Vietnam stance by suggesting that it harms the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Daniel L. Eckert to MLK

Monday, January 9, 1967

This letter was written to Dr.King to express disapproval for Dr.King's support of Adam Clayton Powell. Mr. Eckert states that Mr.Powell should be treated as white leaders are treated.

Letter from Karen Goldberg to MLK

Tuesday, December 3, 1963
Massachusetts (MA)

Karen Goldberg, a twelve-year-old in a religious school, requests some biographical information about Dr. King for a group project.

Letter from Calvary Presbyterian Church to MLK

Tuesday, May 16, 1967
Ohio (OH)

Enclosed in this letter from Dr. John Bruere, of Calvary Baptist Church, is a magazine entitled "Faith at Work - The Magazine of Christian Experience." The featured article, "The Church That Stayed," highlights a church that has endured the deterioration, violence, and looting of the neighborhood surrounding it. The author goes on to discuss the increase in membership and their attempt to represent Christ in every situation.

Letter from Coretta Scott King to Judy Richardson

Atlanta, GA

Mrs. King expresses her support for the SNCC's Negro History Primer program. She also provides Miss Richardson with her contact information so that a later meeting can be arranged.

Women's International League for Peace and Freedom Newsletter

Washington, D.C., California (CA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York (NY), New York, NY, Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA, Indiana (IN), Missouri (MO), Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Minnesota (MN), Washington (WA), San Francisco, CA, VIETNAM, CUBA, CHINA, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, Alabama (AL), Selma, AL, Mississippi (MS), Michigan (MI), Detroit, MI, Maryland (MD), New Jersey (NJ), Connecticut (CT), Massachusetts (MA), Ohio (OH), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

This issue of the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom newsletter, Four Lights, was sent to Coretta Scott King. It features an article about the current state of their demonstrations against Vietnam, including a quote by Dr. Benjamin Spock calling on President Johnson to end the attack on the Vietnam War.

Theory of Perception in the Light of the Fallacy of Misplaced Concreteness

Dr. King examines Alfred North Whitehead's "fallacy of misplaced concreteness" as described in "Science and the Modern World."

Letter from Shirley Gilchrist of the Dunbar Alumni Association to MLK

Wednesday, March 11, 1964
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Atlanta, GA

Chicago's Dunbar Alumni Association Vice President Shirley Gilchrist requests a copy of Dr. King's speech "Facing the Challenge of a New Age." The speech was delivered at Illinois Wesleyan University in February of 1961. Gilchrist hopes the speech may be added to the alumni association's reading list.

Telegram from Margaret Saunders to MLK

Friday, October 21, 1960
Columbus, OH, Atlanta, GA

Margaret Saunders sends a telegram to encourage Dr. King while he is in jail.

Walk for Freedom

Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL)

In this article, Dr. King address the issue of racism occurring in Montgomery. It was here that African Americans, including Dr. King, were victims to humiliation and violent acts because of their race. Dr. King further promote nonviolent protest to combat this civil injustice.