Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"NIGERIA"

Letter From Vice President Johnson to MLK

Friday, April 27, 1962

Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson wrote this note to Dr. King to respectfully decline his invitation to a luncheon and to serve on the board of directors of the Gandhi Society for Human Rights. He states he enjoyed their last meeting and is looking forward to the next one.

Royalty Statement for MLK's "Why We Can't Wait"

Thursday, June 30, 1966

This royalty statement from Harper and Row, Publishers Incorporated, details royalty earnings for Dr. King's "Why We Can't Wait" for the six month period ending June 30, 1966.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Kelly Miller Smith

Monday, June 3, 1963

Dr. King sends a letter to Rev. Kelly Miller Smith about other correspondence written in preparation for a meeting.

Statement by Albert A. Raby

Tuesday, June 20, 1967

Albert A. Raby releases a statement denouncing the Illinois State Senate for rejecting an equal housing bill. Mr. Raby calls for a tent-in and rally at the construction site for the proposed Weston plant. Raby cites Illinois is in violation of Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and that federal funding for the Weston Project be terminated.

Christianity

Dr. King outlines Angus' interpretation of Hegel's views on Christianity in the book, "The Mystery Religion and Christianity."

A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart

"A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart" by Dr. King discusses the importance of creating a synthesis of opposites and characteristics of one engaged in shrewd thinking with a loving spirit.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, July 3, 1964

Joan Daves informs Dr. King that she has spoken to Harper & Row about advertising. She expects that advertisements in "Ebony" and in "The Amsterdam News" will run on July 2nd and 16th.

Letter from Mr. Cass Canfield to MLK

Wednesday, October 11, 1967

In this letter Mr. Canfield Of Harper & Row, Publishers, informs Dr. King that a certificate of recognition from the National Conference of Christians and Jews for "Where Do We Go From Here?" is being sent to him as an award. Mr. Canfield expresses his belief the book will continue to sell.

Anticipated Public School Desegregation in Southern and Border States

Thursday, August 22, 1957

This memorandum provides a list of schools and school systems expected to desegregate in September of 1957. The Southern Regional Council, Inc. also includes vital information concerning pending Negro applications for school admittance and schools actively involved in litigation.

Look Magazine: Can Johnson Win His Other War?

Tuesday, June 13, 1967

The Office of Economic Opportunity republished this spotlight on President Johnson's War on Poverty from Look Magazine in June 1967. The editors discuss the "poverty of opportunity" plaguing nearly 1 in every 6 Americans, saying that Johnson's War on Poverty makes an attempt to combat the economic conditions of America's most vulnerable, including Negro Americans. The articles also shed light on the numerous shortcomings the Johnson Administration-supported legislation has encountered amongst legislators and the American public.

Dr. Luther King Cause of U.S. Violence

Thursday, November 11, 1965

The articles mentions Dr. King and his supposed involvement with the Communist Party. The author is not convinced that Dr. King is the "good Samaritan" everyone believes him to be, and he is ensuring more violence with his cause.

Memorandum from the Urban Training Center for Christian Mission

Wednesday, March 22, 1967

The purpose of this memorandum from Rev. James Morton and James Twomey was to attempt to get funding for urban renewal. It was the goal of the Urban Training Center for Christian Mission to create low-income housing for those in need.

Letter from Jerome S. Ozer to MLK

Thursday, May 18, 1967

Mr. Ozer informs Dr. King that his organization will be publishing "Eyewitness: The Negro in American History" by William Loren Katz, which covers the Negro in every aspect of American life. He then requests that Dr. King write an introduction for the book.

Those Attending Breakfast with MLK

List of attendees for a breakfast meeting at Cornell University in Ithaca (NY) when Dr. King was on campus to deliver his sermon, "Three Dimensions of a Complete Life."

Handwritten Notecard Regarding "Power"

This index card written by Dr. King references quotations pertaining to the concept of "Power".

Letter from Ernest Shaefer to Dora McDonald

Saturday, March 18, 1967

Ernest Shaefer, Executive Secretary for the Hadley Executive Committee, writes Miss McDonald to finalize a date and place for Dr. King to give a lecture in support of the Hadley Memorial Fund.

Martin Luther King, Jr. Day

Tuesday, January 1, 1974

This document is regarding the celebration of the Birthday Anniversary of the late Dr. King. The author states, "While the national holiday legislation is pending in Congress, masses of people everywhere already personally declare the date to be their own to honor one of history's greatest leaders."

Letter from E.E.H. to Reverend Ralph Abernathy

The author of this letter speaks out against the efforts of Reverend Abernathy, calling the March on Washington a cheap show and calling for an end to civil rights demonstrations in general.

Letter from W. Russell Smith to MLK

Tuesday, September 26, 1967

On behalf of the Interfraternity Council of Lehigh University, W. Russell Smith invites Dr. King to present his views on civil rights.

Telegram from Charles McDew to MLK

Thursday, September 13, 1962

Charles McDew petitions the assistance of Dr. King in pursuing a federal investigation of the shootings of several civil rights activists in Mississippi and Southwest Georgia. Charles McDew issued this telegram as a representative of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee.

Newspaper Article on MLK

Sunday, August 9, 1964

In this article, written by Robert L. Powers, the author gives his assessment of the book "Why We Can't Wait." Powers provided poignant excerpts from the literature.

Letter from Stanley Becker to MLK

Wednesday, November 4, 1964

Stanley Becker, the principal at the Amsterdam School in New York, congratulates Dr. King for being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Barbara Austin to SCLC

Monday, June 26, 1967

Mrs. Austin writes the SCLC concerning Dr. King's views on Vietnam. She encloses a contribution to the organization because of Dr. King's courage to speak out against the war.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ernest Shaefer

Saturday, November 12, 1966

In this letter, Ms. McDonald encloses biographical sketches to accompany Dr. King's lecture, "The Future of Integration."

Telegram from MLK to Senator Aiken Regarding Housing

Dr. King urges Senator George Aiken and other members of the Republican Party to support an open housing bill to promote better living conditions in Negro communities.

Strength to Love

In this article, Dr. King's accomplishments are highly spoken upon. There is also information on his book "Strength to Love," and a form to order additional copies of his books.

Telegram from MLK to John F. Kennedy

Tuesday, June 11, 1963

Dr. King writes to President John F. Kennedy about the President's speech to the nation. Dr. King writes that he found the speech to be most eloquent and unequivocal.

Our Struggle

Dr. King discusses blacks' struggle for racial equality in America. King explores racist whites' views of "the inferior social, economic, and political position" of the Negro. However, when Negroes begin to reevaluate their position in society and tension in race relations arise, he argues that the Negro begins to "organize and act" against the status quo as evident in the boycotts and sit-in demonstrations occurring throughout the South.

War on Poverty

Dr. King calls for the end of poverty in the African American community through the mobilization of interracial coalitions. He states that the negative effects of discriminatory laws will not cease to end by the enforcement of the Civil Rights Bill, nor will it cease if the laws were immediately repealed, but only by the building of alliances among the black and white communities will these issues be eliminated.

Letter from MLK to Daniel Casten, M.D.

Tuesday, July 26, 1966

Dr. King took the opportunity to address this letter to Daniel Casten, M.D. thanking him for his financial donation to the Mississippi "James Meredith" March. He noted that the march allowed Negroes, in Mississippi, to resolve their fears and fight for justice. A key quotation, in this document, stated to Dr. Casten, "You are a part of that dedicated group of people standing as a beacon light of hope to all of the disinherited men and women of our nation."