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Memorandum

Wednesday, September 7, 1960

This memorandum, sent to Dr. King, expresses the need for a convocation between Negro and white Southern leaders. Recent developments, such as peaceful integration of lunch counters and schools, show that whites are respecting equal rights of Negro citizens more.

Today's Hero - The Negro Child

The "Southern Patriot" newsletter of the Southern Conference Educational Fund published this advertisement featuring the photo of two small children. The advertisement includes a heartfelt thank you to those many Negro students (trailblazers) brave enough to endure racial harassment and physical danger in the struggle to integrate schools in the South.

Letter From India to MLK

Friday, June 25, 1965

Ram Aurangabadkar and Dinkar Sakrikar of India write to Dr. King concerning his civil rights efforts in the United States. As a token of appreciation for Dr. King's work, they offer a bronze statue of Gandi on behalf of their society. Aurangabadkar and Sakrikar request that the statue be placed in a children's park.

Telegram from Harry Van Arsdale, Jr. to MLK

Harry Van Arsdale, President of the New York City Central Labor Council AFL-CIO, informs Dr. King, who is in the Fulton County Jail, that ten thousand unionists in New York voted to support Dr. King's fight for "decency and democracy." The organization contributes $1000 to aid Dr. King in his efforts.

Letter from MLK to Madame Bremond

Wednesday, April 20, 1966

Dr. King writes Madame Bremond to send his heartfelt thanks regarding his visit to Lyons, France. The Reverend follows with expressing his appreciation for Bremond's hospitality and wonderful reception.

Memorandum from Lillie Hunter to MLK

Lillie Hunter sends Dr. King a memorandum that breaks down the office conditions and decorum as well as recommendations for the SCLC.

Letter from MLK to Dr. A.S. Markham

Thursday, January 21, 1965

Dr. King apologetically informs Dr. Markham that he will be unable to attend an event held in his honor to receive the Brotherhood Society of Beth Shalom 1965 award.

SCLC Audit Notice

Tuesday, December 19, 1967

Mr. Rutherford writes to inform Citizens Trust Company that there will be an audit of the SCLC. Rutherford requests that the bank send a list of any and all accounts associated with SCLC.

Letter from Philip M. Segelin to MLK

Wednesday, July 29, 1964

Philip M. Segelin, Member of the Cleveland Heights-University Heights School Board, informs Dr. King that he has read Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait" and that said publication has provided enlightenment on the issue of civil rights. He recommends that Dr. King look into having a paperback edition published to widen distribution.

Letter from MLK to Art Simmons

Tuesday, April 5, 1966

Dr. King extends his gratitude to Mr. Simmons for the evening at the Palais des Sports.

God

Here, Dr. King writes a theoretical view of the existence of God.

Letter from Imogene Cashmore to President Johnson

Wednesday, August 16, 1967

Imogene Cashmore responds to Senator Dodd's recent statement in Congress about Moise Tshombe, a Congo politician who had recently been jailed on charges of treason. Cashmore condemns Senators Robert and Ted Kennedy for not trying to help Tshombe, questioning why there has been no negative response to the current government of Congo, which Cashmore charges is rampant with "mass murder and violation of civil rights."

Notecard Written by MLK Regarding "Bernard of Clairvaux"

This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Letter from Karen Ladin to God

In her letter to God, Karen Ladin expresses concern for the plight of the Negro.

Mass Meeting Featuring MLK

Saturday, April 16, 1960

This document is a program for a mass meeting sponsored by the SCLC and the Raleigh Citizens Association. Dr. King is the principal speaker of this meeting.

Worship Must Have Three Things

Dr. King states that "worship" must have three things: unity, movement, and rhythm.

Letter from Milton A. Reid to Senator Leroy Johnson

Thursday, October 10, 1963

Milton A. Reid, a candidate for State Senate, invites Georgia Senator Leroy Johnson to a banquet at Virginia State College. The event will benefit the campaign expenses and feature guest speaker Wyatt Tee Walker, Dr. King's assistant.

Letter from S. Leiss to Dr. King about Payment from Simon and Schuster, Inc.

Thursday, April 29, 1965

Here in this notation, Leiss references a check enclosure as a permission fee to reprint "I Have a Dream" in the "Treasure of the World's Greatest Speeches" literature.

Notecard Containing the Definition of Thinking

This notecard quotes Dr. Brightman's definition of thinking, taken from "An Intro to Philosophy".

Letter from Esther Thompson to MLK

Wednesday, November 10, 1965

Esther Thompson inquires if Dr. King and his church could be of assistance with helping her blind husband see again.

Lawyer Fined $50 in Inquiry Ouster

Saturday, August 20, 1966

New York lawyer, Arthur Kinoy, was carried out of the courtroom by authorities for disorderly conduct. Mr. Kinoy made history as this had never happened before in the legal system.

Letter from W. Ivan Hoy to MLK

Sunday, January 20, 1963

W. Ivan Hoy, on behalf of the University of Miami, invites Dr. King to be a guest lecturer for their Miami Religion Lecture Series.

Letter from MLK to Abby Seldes

Friday, January 31, 1964

Dr. King dictates a response letter to Miss Abby Seldes expressing his heartwarming appreciation to the young lady. He also expresses gratitude towards Abby's parents for attending the March On Washington demonstration.

Permission form sent via Joan Daves to Mr.Gilford to Reprint Material Pertaining to Dr.King

Thursday, October 1, 1964

This form serves as a way to grant Mr.Gilford permission to reprint the "Letter from Birmingham City Jail" in the "Free Government in the Making, 3rd ed."

The Black Revolution

This pamphlet produced by the SCLC is an excerpt from Thomas Merton's "The Black Revolution: Letters to a White Liberal." Merton seeks to awaken the conscience of white America by presenting the Negro perspective in the struggle for civil rights. He discusses how Dr. King utilizes the philosophy of nonviolence as a tool of progress and the contrasting reaction of Negros based upon their religious association as either Christian or Muslim. The concluding message is a call for the complete reform of America's social system which permits and breeds injustice.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, April 13, 1964

In this letter, Joan Daves informs Dr. King about Protestant Publishing Co. Ltd, lacking the ability to offer better figures, for the Japanese rights to "Strength to Love."

Letter from Howard Schomer to Robert Kennedy

Saturday, October 26, 1963

Howard Schomer asks the US Attorney General several questions about the legality of a police raid that occurred at a Southern Conference Educational Fund (SCEF) office in New Orleans, Louisiana. Schomer wants to know if the statute under which the raid was carried out has legal force and does the Department of Justice have an obligation to make its evidence public?

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, December 12, 1966

Here Joan Daves informs Dr. King on the availability of Hermine Popper, who will be working on a manuscript with Dr. King.

MLK Fights For Peace

Saturday, April 1, 1967

Included on page four of this Bedding, Curtain and Drapery Workers Union newsletter is an article regarding Dr. King's courageous efforts in helping Negros achieve equality, and the support he has received from the trade union. The union also supports Dr. King's stand against the Vietnam war, and agrees that the war is harming America's domestic programs against poverty.

Bread at Midnight

Tuesday, December 13, 1966

"The Mennonite," issued by The Board of Education and Publication of the General Conference Mennonite Church, features an article by Dr. King entitled "Bread at Night." Dr. King begins with a parable that demonstrates not only the power of prayer, but provides metaphors for the state of America and thinking material for the role of the church during that time period.