Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"NETHERLANDS"

Press Release on School Integration of Taliaferro County, Georgia

Thursday, October 14, 1965

This press release by Dr. King commends the decision of the three-judge panel on the decision of school integration.

Letter from Mary Mikutel to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Young Mary Mikutel offers her condolences to Mrs. King in the wake of Dr. King's assassination.

Letter from Joan Daves to Emanuel Schreiber Regarding Distribution of Speech

Wednesday, July 5, 1967

Joan Daves explains to Emanuel Schreiber the terms and conditions surrounding permission rights to the distribution of King's speech, published by "Ramparts".

Letter from Bernard Holliday to MLK

Monday, September 23, 1963

President of Ministers Alliance, Mr. Holliday writes to Dr. King to show his support for the tragic incident that took place September 15, 1963. They enclosed a check to the families that lost someone during this terrible event.

Miracles

Dr. King paraphrases the Old Testament scripture of Exodus chapter 13, verse 22, in which God leads the Israelites with a cloud by day and a a pillar of fire by night.

Letter to SCLC from Lisa Goldiamond about Volunteer Service

Monday, April 15, 1968

Goldiamond, a student at Royal Victoria College, requests that the SCLC. Putting words to action, she offers to keep Dr. King's work alive by volunteering in local civil rights organizations over summer break.

Letter from Annis Pratt to MLK

Saturday, January 13, 1968

Professor Annis Pratt of Spelman College writes about her support for the proposed Poor People's Campaign. She suggests that the problems traditionally associated with race may be more economic in nature, and encloses a check from her husband and herself for the march.

Letter from MLK to Society of Brothers

Tuesday, October 5, 1965

Dr. King thanks the Society of Brothers for its recent donation to the SCLC and explains why the donation is important to the work and needs of the SCLC.

Letter from Homer Jack to MLK

Wednesday, April 26, 1967

Homer Jack, Director of the Unitarian Universalist Association's Department of Social Responsibility, communicates his support for Dr. King's stance against the Vietnam War. Jack, co-founder of CORE and active participant in the civil rights movement, encloses a report that includes a statement made to the US Inter-Religious Committee on Peace and discusses the courage of Buddhist monks in South Vietnam. He also congratulates Dr. King for his public address made at the United Nations regarding his opposition to the war.

Pride of Achievement

Dr. King quotes II Chronicles 26:15 regarding King Uzziah and cites Ralph Sockman’s “The Higher Happiness.”

Letter from MLK to Ruth Ellington

Wednesday, July 28, 1965

Dr. King writes Ruth Ellington of New York to thank her for her financial contribution to the SCLC. He describes the current efforts of the SCLC and explains the importance of supporters for the continuation of the SCLC.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Hassell

Dr. King addresses Mrs. Hassell's questions regarding Pope Paul's quest for peace.

Letter from Eleanor Hicks Johnson to MLK

Thursday, August 4, 1966

Ms. Hicks informs Dr. King of land available for sale in Randolph County, Alabama. Ms. Hicks and her family desire to keep the land's ownership and rehabilitate it for families to live.

America's Chief Moral Dilemma

Wednesday, May 10, 1967

In this 1967 speech to the Hungry Club, Dr. King addresses America’s chief moral dilemma by focusing on three major evils: racism, poverty, and war.

Letter from Robert L. Green to Dora McDonald

Thursday, February 9, 1967

In this letter, Robert L. Green, Professor at Michigan State University, requests a signature of approval from Dr. King. This signature would grant permission for Social Scientists to have involvement with the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Telegram from Thomas Kilgore to MLK

Thomas Kilgore, on behalf of Friendship Baptist Church, offers support to Dr. King concerning the downfall of discrimination and segregation.

SCLC Newsletter: March 1964

Sunday, March 1, 1964

The March, 1964 SCLC newsletter reports many news items, including a voter registration drive in Alabama, the results of several legal cases, the Civil Rights Act of 1964, an article criticizing Judge Durwood T. Pye and the use of interracial primers in Detroit's public schools.

MLK Interview with Glenn E. Smiley

Thursday, March 1, 1956

This early (1956) interview with Dr. King has as its center the Montgomery Bus Boycott, a seminal event in Dr. King's career and the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from H. W. Brown to MLK

Wednesday, October 24, 1962

H. W. Brown, a pastor at Bethel Baptist Church and proponent of Bahamas' Progressive Liberal Party, writes to Dr. King, asking him to be their honored speaker at a pre-election rally. Brown asks if Dr. King would also deliver the sermon at his church the morning of the rally.

Proposed Program: Lincoln Memorial

This program entails several male and female speakers who are deeply rooted and connected in the Civil Rights Movement. These speakers were expected to speak at the Lincoln Memorial.

Letter from Ronald V. Wells to Crozer Theological Seminary Alumnus

Wednesday, March 1, 1967

Ronald V. Wells, President of Crozer Theological Seminary sends an invitation to the alumni of Crozer Theological Seminary, requesting their presence at the annual Centennial Celebration. Enclosed with the letter is a list of several conveniently located hotels in the area as well as a voting sheet.

The Ben Bella Conversation

Dr. King summarizes his recent two-hour meeting with Premier Ahmed Ben Bella of the newly-formed Algerian Republic. He mentions that Ben Bella was intimately familiar with the details of the civil rights movement and repeatedly said or inferred that “we are brothers.” King states that “the battle of the Algerians against colonialism and the battle of the Negro against segregation is a common struggle.” There are international implications for the US if it doesn’t solve its human rights problem: the nation will become a second-rate power in the world.

Elmer Evans Advocates for Black Power

Sunday, July 16, 1967

"A white caucasian" advocates for black power, claiming that it is synonymous with sovereign power. Responding to a televised discussion on the subject of black power, Elmer Evans aims to challenge what he felt was inaccurately presented on the show.

A Request for a Yearbook Statement

Monday, December 12, 1966

Carolyn Olson, the co-editor of the South Kitsap High School year book staff, requests a statement from Dr. King to include in the school's year book. Olson informs Dr. King that the yearbook's "Stand Up and Be Counted" theme is intended to encourage "independence and individualism" among the student body by implanting new ideas in students' minds and challenging old stereotypes. The sender asks that Dr. King join other public figures in writing a statement regarding how young people can "Stand Up and Be Counted."

Letter from Elisabeth Leonard to MLK

Monday, April 3, 1967

Elisabeth Leonard expresses her support and gratitude for Dr. King's work, which includes his speeches about the Vietnam War as well as an upcoming speech on the Spring Mobilization.

Full Opportunity Act Summary

This summary outlines and provides the provisions of each section of the proposed Full Opportunity Act.

Self-World

Dr. King paraphrases Paul Tillich's view on the "self world polarity." Being a self, Dr. King writes, means being "both subject and object." This subject matter later appeared in Dr. King's dissertation "A Comparison of the Conceptions of God in the Thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman."

Religion

Dr. King quotes Robert Flint’s “The Philosophy of History.”

Letter from Benjamin Mays to MLK

Friday, October 29, 1965

Dr. Mays writes to Dr. King regarding the new statement of purpose for Morehouse College.

The Nobel Couple

Thursday, December 10, 1964

The cover photo of the December 1964 issue of The American Chronicle captures Dr. and Mrs. King after they discover he was named the winner of the year's Nobel Peace Prize.