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Request for Autographed Photo of MLK

Georgia (GA)

Paul Garrison is requesting that Dr. King send an autographed photo so that he may add it to his collection.

Letter from MLK to First Prebysterian Church Regarding Contribution

Monday, January 30, 1967
Illinois (IL)

In this letter, Dr. King personally thanks Jordan and First Presbyterian Church for their contribution to SCLC. Dr. King states, "I know that you cannot enjoy the experience of change as we who see it first hand everyday, but I trust that these fews words will convey our appreciation and gratitude."

The Civil Rights Struggle in the United States Today

Saturday, May 1, 1965
New York (NY), Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C., Chicago, IL, Arkansas (AR), Alabama (AL), Florida (FL), St. Augustine, FL, Mississippi (MS), Louisiana (LA)

This pamphlet, published by the Association of the Bar of the City of New York, is a transcript of an address delivered by Dr. King titled "The Civil Rights Struggle in the United States Today." In his first speech before the organization, Dr. King recounts the history of the global civil rights movement.

Letters from Jeanette Allen Behre to MLKCharles. H. Behre to MLK

Thursday, June 1, 1967
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, VIETNAM, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), New Jersey (NJ), CHINA

Two professors of Columbia University, Dr. Jeanette Allen Behre and Chas. H. Behre Jr., express their dissent with Dr. King taking a public stand on the war in Vietnam. The professors feel Dr. King is jeopardizing his support for the civil rights.

Don B. Pratt's Position Statement

Friday, January 26, 1968
VIETNAM

Don Pratt expresses concerns about his induction into the US Army during the Vietnam War. Mr. Pratt questions the morality of this "aggressive" war, which would enable him to inflict violence against his "neighbors" of Vietnam.

Telegram from John Barber and Rev. L. C. Filer to MLK

Albany, GA, Connecticut (CT)

John Barber, President of the New Haven Branch of the NAACP, sends his support to Dr. King while he serves time in Albany County Jail. Barber expresses sympathetic concern and promises to register financial support soon.

Tidewater Youth Association Invites MLK to Speak

Saturday, March 30, 1963
Montgomery, AL, Virginia (VA)

Edwin Crocker, president of the Tidewater Youth Association, Inc. in Portsmouth, Virginia informs Dr. King of an interest to present him as their forum speaker. A student initiative, the organization strives to improve social, economic, and spiritual conditions of the Negro. The group hopes Dr. King will consider helping the youth fight for racial justice and equality.

Jesse Jackson Gets New SCLC Assignment

Monday, November 21, 1966
Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL, South Carolina (SC), Illinois (IL), Georgia (GA)

The Chicago Daily Defender highlights Dr. King's appointment of Rev. Jesse Jackson as head of the Special Projects and Economic Development Department of the SCLC.

Letter from Mary Blount to MLK

Sunday, March 6, 1966
Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

Mrs. Blount urges Dr. King to come to Philadelphia. She acknowledges Dr. King as a "man of God" and herself as a "sinner saved by grace."

Song of Solomon

Dr. King discusses the biblical book Song of Solomon and asserts that it contains minimal significance and little, if any, religious value.

Letter from Mark Cohen to MLK

Saturday, September 25, 1965
Philadelphia, PA

Mark Cohen, of the Political Union of Central High School, requests for Dr. King to speak at the school regarding peace and civil rights on the same day he's addressing the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom in Philadelphia.

Newspaper Clippings from New York and New Jersey

New York (NY), New Jersey (NJ), New York, NY

These newspaper clippings represent the views of several individuals who are critical of the Black Power Movement, the work ethics of African Americans and the government's policies.

American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa Memorandum

Wednesday, May 17, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, NIGERIA, Washington, D.C., UNITED KINGDOM, SOUTH AFRICA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, MALAWI, ZIMBABWE, NAMIBIA

Theodore Brown, Executive Director of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa, provides a progress report on ANLCA's work on Nigeria, Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe) and Southwest Africa (now Namibia). He mentions that the group offered to help the Nigerian federal government and the four regions mediate the conflict that resulted in the Nigeria-Biafra Civil War (1967-1970).

Letter from Haakon Knudsen to MLK

Thursday, March 5, 1964
Pennsylvania (PA), Minnesota (MN), Atlanta, GA

The Director of Field Activities from American Baptist Convention writes Dr. King to invite him to speak at the upcoming conference for their department.

Letter from Paul Noe to MLK

Wednesday, December 6, 1967
Illinois (IL), New York (NY), New York, NY

Mr. Noe shares his ideas and comments with Dr. King regarding the Civil Rights Movement. Mr. Noe describes the Civil Rights Movement as the "exclusive domain of the black man" and discusses how he has felt very left out of the movement due to his race. He hopes that the Civil Rights Movement will become the "domain of all Americans" and will change its appeal from racism to decency.

Telegram from Dr. and Mrs. King to Uvee Arbouin

Cincinnati, OH, Ohio (OH)

Dr. and Mrs. King write Uvee Arbouin to commend her Christian leadership and devotion to Jesus Christ.

Letter from John Lewis to MLK

Friday, May 15, 1964
Atlanta, GA

John Lewis relays his appreciation for the advanced copy of Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait."

Letter from William L. Hungate to MLK

Tuesday, January 5, 1965
Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C.

Congressman Hungate challenges allegations made by Dr. King in a recent telegram regarding the Mississippi Delegation. Dr. King states, "A vote to seat the Mississippi delegation is a vote for organized violence, murder, and oppression." However, Congressman Hungate implies that Dr. King's claim is dubious unless he has sufficient evidence to support it. In closing, Congressman Hungate assures Dr. King of his allegiance to "real progress" while disapproving of "headline-hunting tactics."

Letter from Betty Doocy to MLK

Monday, April 17, 1967
Chicago, IL, Arkansas (AR), Mississippi (MS)

Betty Doocy of Chicago, Illinois mildly criticizes Dr. King for leading marches in an effort to integrate neighborhoods in Chicago. She tells Dr. King of her experiences living in poverty as a non-Negro, and how her family has been able to survive and endure hardships. Doocy encourages Dr. King to instruct Negroes to properly take care of their living quarters and to be respectable in their job professions.

Draft Letter from MLK to Donald DuMont

This draft by Dr. King addresses the goals and similarities of the SCLC with Christian principles. He asserts that the aims of the SCLC "...are [to] work to provide those same basic needs for all men."

A Realistic Look at Race Relations

Thursday, May 17, 1956
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL)

Dr. King gives the three views one can take regarding the state of race relations: optimism, pessimism, and realistic. Dr. King argues for a realistic stance because America has accomplished much in race relations, but still has a long way to go. He further explains that he thinks segregation is in its last days.

Letter from David E. McGuire to All Members of First Westminster Presbyterian Church

Wednesday, April 10, 1968
New York (NY)

The Session of the First Westminster Presbyterian Church, Yonkers, NY urges a "write-in" campaign to federal, state, or municipal legislators requesting action in the areas of open housing, equal employment opportunities and civil rights.

Opportunity, Fidelity, and Reward

Friday, January 1, 1954
Alabama (AL)

This handwritten outline reflects a sermon delivered by Dr. King at Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in January of 1954. The sermon is structured around "The Parable of the Talents" taken from Matthew 25:14-30. Dr. King highlights how the passage assures a "reward for faithfulness."

Letter from Charles Crawford to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967
Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Charles S. Crawford expresses his dissent with Dr. King on a variety of subjects, one specifically his stance towards President Johnson and the concept of civil disobedience.

Speech at NAACP World March Toward Human Rights Luncheon

Thursday, May 28, 1964
GREECE, GERMANY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, KENYA

Dr. King links the quest for individual civil rights to the global struggle for human rights and states that the nation that will achieve preeminence in the world is the one that both guarantees human rights for all and provides for basic needs.

Peace

Dr. King writes on the topic of peace.

Memo on Strategy of the Integration Movement

Birmingham, AL

An anonymous writer pens a comprehensive strategy that focuses on achieving racial integration. Within the text of the document, the writer identifies various political, social and economical developments that are needed in order to end racially stemmed inequalities for African Americans.

Letter from Paul Madsen to MLK

Tuesday, November 5, 1963
Pennsylvania (PA)

Paul Madsen, Associate Executive Secretary of the American Baptist Home Mission Societies, offers Dr. King a consulting position with the organization. The organization needs someone to provide guidance on critical decisions, appear at a limited number of speaking engagements, and to make suggestions to the organization as needed. He mentions that the consulting arrangement could be used to help Ebenezer Baptist Church's budget.

Letter from Governor Philip H. Hoff to MLK

Wednesday, April 3, 1968
New York, NY, Vermont (VT)

In this letter, Vermont Governor Philip H. Hoff expresses his gratitude for the autographed book that Dr. King sent to him.

Telephone Log: January 22

Connecticut (CT), Massachusetts (MA), Washington, D.C., Virginia (VA), Atlanta, GA

This memo from the desk of Dr. King includes several missed telephone calls noted for his later response.