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"NETHERLANDS"

Letter from Senator Charles H. Percy to MLK

Tuesday, November 28, 1967
Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

United States Senator, Charles H. Percy informs Dr. King that he would like him to read the enclosed speech, "Toward Responsible Freedom", given before the Community Renewal Society of Chicago. The senator also provides an update on the housing proposal and gives Dr.King a copy of the committee report.

Letter from Irene M. Koch to MLK

Tuesday, August 9, 1966
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL)

Irene M. Koch uses a Native American legend of a man walking in the moccasins of his enemy to gain understanding of his enemy. She relates this legend to the current civil rights movement and specifically the civil rights movement in Chicago, Illinois.

Letter from Dorothy Gaines to Jacob Broertjes

Wednesday, September 2, 1964
NETHERLANDS

Dorothy Gaines encloses a copy of all of Dr. King and Rev. Andrew Young's expenses while in Amsterdam for the Baptist Federation Convention.

Knowing God (Wieman)

Dr. King notes Henry Nelson Wieman's ideas on how man comes to know God.

Letter from Hermine I. Popper to MLK

Wednesday, January 25, 1967
New York (NY), JAMAICA

Hermine Popper writes Dr. King regarding his manuscript on "Black Power" for his upcoming book.

Letter From Andrew Young to Chris Folcker

Wednesday, June 1, 1966
Stockholm, Sweden, Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), SWEDEN, VIETNAM

In this letter, Andrew Young thanks Chris Folcker for his work with the Martin Luther King Fund, the Europe-wide fundraising campaign on behalf of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and Dr. King. Young praises the "tremendous success" of the fund.

The Answer to a Perplexing Question

ISRAEL

"Why Could Not We Cast Him Out?" is a chapter in Dr. King's book "Strength to Love." In this chapter, Dr. King discusses the methods in which man attempts to deal with evil in the world. Two methodologies are distinguished. The first concerns man's independent attempt to remove evil and the second stems from man's ideology of making God solely responsible for eliminating evil. Dr. King concludes that neither method is successful and that man has to find a medium between the two.

My Dream: Julian Bond and the Constitution by MLK

Saturday, January 22, 1966
New York, NY, Georgia (GA), MEXICO, VIETNAM

Dr. King elaborates on the "hypocritical" and "high-handed injustice" executed by the United States and their refusal to seat Julian Bond for the Georgia State Legislature. Abraham Lincoln is highlighted for his exercise of the democratic right in his stance against Congress involving the United States war with Mexico. Dr. King asserts the irony in the method of Mr. Bond's colleagues and critics whom either indirectly or directly supported racial segregation. Dr.

Letter from Rev. Robert Harrison and R. H. White

Monday, February 5, 1968
Washington, D.C.

In this letter, Rev. Robert Harrison and R. H. White of the New Samaritan Baptist Church inform Dr. King that they are unable to send a donation immediately, but will take up a special donation to be sent as soon as possible.

MLK on Christian Love

In this statement, Dr. King corrects "what may be a false impression." King states that while he does discuss the Christian way of love and non-violence as a tool to unify blacks in the Movement, integration is still necessary in order to truly obtain change.

Telegram from Theodore Brown to MLK

Tuesday, January 23, 1968
NIGERIA, New York, NY, New York (NY)

Mr. Brown confirms the departure date for the Nigeria Peace Mission with Dr. King.

Letter from MLK to Zelma George

Wednesday, November 6, 1963
Ohio (OH), Cleveland, OH

Dr. King thanks Zelma George and her husband for their hospitality while he visited Cleveland.

Letter from Paul P. Martin to MLK

Monday, March 26, 1962
Pennsylvania (PA)

The Erie Branch of the NAACP invites Dr. King to be the principal speaker at its Freedom Rally.

Letter from Jimmie Barnett to MLK

Wednesday, March 9, 1966
Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C., Illinois (IL)

A Negro owner of "so-called slum property" takes offense at Dr. King's stance on the subject. He argues that the owners of the properties are primarily Negroes who are not at fault. Dr. King undertook an extensive "End to Slums" campaign in Chicago in 1966 under the sponsorship of the SCLC and various community organizations.

Letter from John Moorman to MLK

Friday, June 9, 1967
North Carolina (NC), Washington (WA)

John Moorman, President of the Student Christian Association at Guilford College, invites Dr. King to be the speaker for their Religious Emphasis Week in April of 1968. Moorman discusses details of the arrangement, including Dr. King's honorarium and travel expenses.

1965 Human Rights Day Flyer

South Africa

This flyer advertises a rally to benefit South African victims of apartheid.

SCLC Six-Month Report

Tuesday, February 6, 1968
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Thomas Offenburger, Director of Information for the SCLC Department of Information, composes a semi-annual report detailing the work of the department for Dr. King and Reverend Abernathy.

Index Card Containing MLK's Handwriting Regarding Metaphysics

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines Bishop McConnell's views on Metaphysics, according to the book, "Is God Limited."

Knowledge

Dr. King refers to Ecclesiastes 1:18 which says that increased knowledge brings increased sorrow.

Letter from Isac Anderson to MLK

Sunday, August 20, 1967
Brooklyn, NY

Isac Anderson is requesting help from Dr. King in regards to obtaining a higher education. Anderson was forced to withdraw from school due to interfernece and his inability to concentrate. He hopes that with Dr. King's help he will be able to resolve this issue.

Letter from Harper & Row to Joan Daves regarding "Why We Can't Wait"

Monday, May 11, 1964

Harper & Row informs Joan Daves about the receipt of the quote on Dr. King from Harry Golden, Editor of the Carolina Israelite.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Thursday, September 10, 1964
New York, NY

Joan Daves sends Dr. King an advertisement for "Why We Can't Wait", which will appear in the Washington Afro-American. The advertisement has also been published in Ebony magazine.

Letter from Victor J. Schoenbach to MLK

Monday, May 22, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, VIETNAM, Atlanta, GA

Victor Schoenbach writes Dr. King expressing his support for Dr. King's views on the Vietnam War in the midst of dissenters.

Letter from Dorothy Height to Dr. and Mrs. King

Thursday, December 8, 1966
New York, NY, Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Noted civil rights leader and women's activist Dorothy Height invites Dr. and Mrs. King to be special guests at the National Council of Negro Women's Life Membership Dinner. The event is also set to honor union leaders A. Philip Randolph, Walter Reuther and Mrs. Arthur Goldberg. Singer Lena Horne serves as a co-host to the dinner.

Letter from MLK to Dr. E.F.S. Davies

Tuesday, July 20, 1965
Virginia (VA)

Dr. King recognizes the significant work of fellow activist A.J. Muste and the Fellowship of Reconciliation. He states that he is a diligent member of the organization and pledges his full fledged support to Muste's leadership.

Contribution Letter from Dr. and Mrs. Bacon to Dr. King

Friday, February 23, 1968
North Carolina (NC)

Dr. and Mrs. Bacon are writing to express their support and concern for the "last chance" SCLC project. Enclosed in the letter is $200 contribution to help further support the initiative.

Bacon

Dr. King notes Alexander Pope's characterization of Francis Bacon.

Letter from Donald Lincoln Cook to MLK

Monday, January 24, 1966
New York, NY, VIETNAM, Washington, D.C., New York (NY), Alaska (AK), FRANCE

Donald Cook lauds Dr. King's efforts to persuade military forces to leave Vietnam. In response to a speech on Vietnam given by Dr. King, Cook agrees that "the Negro should have special interest in the plight of the Vietnamese." He further encourages Dr. King to stand firm in his position to bring a moral conscience to the nation.

Letter from Charles S. Spivey, Jr. to the Racial Justice Committee

Wednesday, March 6, 1968
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C., Jackson, MS, Chicago, IL, Boston, MA

Charles S. Spivey, Jr. outlines the events to take place during the SCLC Poor Peoples Campaign under the leadership of Dr. King. The main events all transpired after Dr. King's assassination on April 4th, 1968.

Statement by Floyd McKissick

VIETNAM

This is information sheet is about the National Director of CORE, Floyd McKissick's statement on the Vietnam's War. In addition to other topics, he is scheduled to discuss the immorality of the conflict by drawing "parallels between self determination for the people of Vietnam and the quest for equality for Black Americans."