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The Union Baptist Church Sunday Morning Worship Service

Sunday, September 11, 1966

The Union Baptist Church Sunday Morning Worship Service Program outlines the events for September 11, 1966. Dr. King is the guest speaker to commemorate "the retirement of Rev. D. C. Rice from the pastorship of The Union Baptist Church."

Telegram from Elizabeth J. Miller to MLK

Thursday, November 2, 1967

Elizabeth Miller, the Executive Director of the Christian Social Concern division of the American Baptist Convention, extends support to Dr. King while he is in the Jefferson County Jail in 1967. She expresses gratitude for Dr. King's leadership and commends him for his non-violent action.

Letter from MLK to Madame Bremond

Wednesday, April 20, 1966

Dr. King writes Madame Bremond to send his heartfelt thanks regarding his visit to Lyons, France. The Reverend follows with expressing his appreciation for Bremond's hospitality and wonderful reception.

Letter from J. T. Brooks to Dr. and Mrs. MLK

Monday, November 16, 1953

Dexter Avenue Baptist Church representative J. T. Brooks conveys the church's interest in considering Dr. King for the pastorate.

Conditions for Entering the Kingdom

Dr. King opens these sermon notes by discussing a child's behavior and actions. According to King, "a child has the inexhaustible capacity to forgive" and is inquisitive, honest, and open-minded. These are characteristics that adults should possess, which would help them gain entry into the Kingdom.

I Marched on Washington

Kelly E. Miller composed this poem for Dr. King as a tribute to the March on Washington.

Letter from C. R. Sanders to MLK

Monday, July 31, 1967

In this letter, Mr. Carl Sanders informs Dr. King that the WSPA station is extending him an opportunity to respond, to an adverse editorial that will be aired.

MLK Index Card

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines a definition of "Nature". This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Letter from Jonathan B. Bingham to MLK

Thursday, February 17, 1966

Congressman Bingham of New York replies to Dr. King's donation solicitation letter requesting a renewal of the previous year's fifty dollar contribution to SCLC. The congressman states that he would like to know whether contributions will be used to influence foreign policy before committing to a decision.

Letter from George W. Cooke to MLK Requesting Autograph

Mr. George Cooke of Great Falls, Montana requests Dr. King's autograph on a Time Magazine cover where his photo appeared. Mr. Cooke further states he has been collecting autographs for over 7 years and has more than 300 autographs.

Telegram from Tina McDonald to MLK

Tina McDonald wishes Dr. King a happy birthday and is pleased to send God's blessings of courage and strength.

A Thank You for Their Hospitality

Monday, August 13, 1962

Lawyer William Kunstler writes this thank you to Dr. and Mrs. King and discusses a few legal matters.

Program from the SCLC's Tenth Annual Convention

Monday, August 8, 1966

This is the Tentative Programme of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference's Tenth Annual Convention. The convention was held in Jackson, Mississippi at a Masonic Temple and hosted by the Reverend Allen Johnson. The four day convention was themed "Human Rights - The Continuing Struggle."

Letter from Jim E. Hansen to MLK Regarding Support for Presidency

Tuesday, April 2, 1968

Jim Hansen, Campus Coordinator for Choice '68, a Time-Life sponsored national presidential primary at the College of Southern Utah, wrote to MLK in support of Dr. King as a presidential candidate. He requested materials for the April 1968 event which took place on the college's campus.

Letter from John A. Race to MLK

Thursday, January 21, 1965

Congressman Race of Wisconsin thanks Dr. King for his letter concerning the seating of the Mississippi Delegates. Race seems to suggest that he was of the majority who "did authorize their formal acceptance" although he states that he was in the "minority."

Clement of Alexandria

Dr. King gives brief biographical information on Clement of Alexandria.

The Servant of Jehovah

Dr. King writes that Isaiah 41:1-6 seems to describe the servant of the Lord as the personification of Israel, whose task is to bring peace and prosperity to Israel and knowledge of Him to the entire world.

Speech in Jackson, Mississippi

Wednesday, March 20, 1968

Dr. King addresses supporters in Jackson, Mississippi during his statewide tour for the 1968 Poor People's Campaign. He speaks of his excitement about the number of blacks in Mississippi that participated in the last congressional election. He emphasizes that the Poor People's Campaign cannot be successful without a strong coalition of organizations that see the need to combat poverty. King would be assassinated in Memphis two weeks after making this speech.

Letter from Andrew Young to Dr. R. Schippers

Tuesday, October 5, 1965

Rev. Young informs Dr. Schippers of arrival details for an upcoming trip to Amsterdam, Holland.

Our Struggle

Dr. King discusses blacks' struggle for racial equality in America. King explores racist whites' views of "the inferior social, economic, and political position" of the Negro. However, when Negroes begin to reevaluate their position in society and tension in race relations arise, he argues that the Negro begins to "organize and act" against the status quo as evident in the boycotts and sit-in demonstrations occurring throughout the South.

The Chicago Plan

Friday, January 7, 1966

Dr. King laments over Chicago becoming so much like the South that many African Americans moved north to get away from. Dr. King lays out reasons why African Americans suffer more in Chicago than any other northern city and provides directions to correct the problem.

Letter to Dora McDonald from Fernando Arias-Salgado

Monday, May 22, 1967

Fernando Arias-Salgado acknowledges receipt of Ms. McDonald's letter on behalf of Dr. King and transmits it to Dr. Palasi in Madrid. He also encloses the initial letter of invitation to lecture at the University of Madrid under the signature of Dr. Villar, Director of Cultural Sociology.

A Background Paper for the Delaware Conference on Equal Opportunity in Housing

Friday, December 2, 1966

This paper is intended to catalyze discussion at the Delaware Conference on Equal Opportunity in Housing. By providing facts and analysis pertaining to Wilmington and surrounding areas, the paper is written to help familiarize attendees of the housing situation in Delaware. A key goal is to educate on the racial disparity and deterioration of urban areas. "The national housing objective is to provide decent, safe, and sanitary housing to all people" and this document encourages the execution of developed solutions.

Letter from MLK to Stewart Udall

Thursday, February 22, 1962

On behalf of the SCLC and affiliated organizations, Dr. King requests permission from Stewart Udall, United States Secretary of the Interior, to use the Lincoln Memorial for a Service of Dedication to celebrate the One Hundredth Anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation.

Letter From India to MLK

Friday, June 25, 1965

Ram Aurangabadkar and Dinkar Sakrikar of India write to Dr. King concerning his civil rights efforts in the United States. As a token of appreciation for Dr. King's work, they offer a bronze statue of Gandi on behalf of their society. Aurangabadkar and Sakrikar request that the statue be placed in a children's park.

Man (His Need for God)

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr’s “The Nature and Destiny of Man.”

Death

Dr. King records some notes on death.

Spirit

Dr. King records some thoughts on the meaning of "spirit."

Check from New York Times Company to MLK

Saturday, March 13, 1965

The New York Times company presents Dr. King with a $400 check for his article on civil rights.

Letter from L. H. R. Rasmussen to MLK

Friday, April 14, 1967

The author agrees with Dr. King's political stance in opposition to the Vietnam War. The "dignity of man" is highlighted as it serves a great importance to the principles of the Civil Rights Movement and the war. The author affirms Dr. King's support from other peace organizations and political parties.