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"Montgomery, AL"

Letter from Florida Congressman Dante B. Fascell to MLK

Friday, July 9, 1965
Washington, D.C., Florida (FL)

Representative Fascell informs Dr. King that he will vote against the McCulloch Amendment to the Voting Rights Bill of 1965, but he will vote for the bill itself.

Who Are We?

Saturday, February 5, 1966
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), New York, NY, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C., Florida (FL), Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, VIETNAM

In this sermon Dr. King contemplates "who are we?" and "what is man?". He differentiates between the pessimistic attitudes of the materialistic understandings of man and the optimistic attitudes of humanistic definitions of man. King also states that man is neither all good nor all bad, but a combination. Man is both an everlasting miracle and mystery.

The Power of Silence

Dr. King provides an account of several passages from the Bible, outlining his notes and interpretation.

Philosophy of History

Dr. King writes about the philosophy of history according to Isaiah 41: 1-7.

The Danger of A Little Progress

Monday, February 3, 1964
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY)

This focuses on the issue of short term progress within the Civil Rights Movement because it does not offer long term lasting solutions.

Letter from MLK to James Marley

Tuesday, October 15, 1963
New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King thanks James Marley for his contribution to the SCLC and gives a brief summary of how the funds benefit the Negro communities.

Memorandum Regarding California Fund Raising Meeting for SCLC

Monday, March 7, 1960
California (CA), Los Angeles, CA

Dr. King addresses Rev. Ralph D. Abernathy informing him of the transportation cost and hotel expenses for his trip to California.

Telegram from Joseph Anderson to MLK

Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

Joseph Anderson urges Dr. King to "call forth a day of prayer" to ease the uproar, most notably overshadowing such U.S. cities as Detroit and Newark during the long, hot summer of 1967.

Joshua and Judges

Dr. King cites Biblical scriptures from the books of Joshua, Judges, and 1 Samuel.

Letter from Doris Everett to MLK

Virginia (VA), Montgomery, AL

Ms. Everett expresses appreciation to Dr. King for leading a successful boycott in Montgomery, Alabama and for his contributions to help Negros obtain equality.

Letter from Frank R. Romano to MLK

Monday, May 1, 1967
Pennsylvania (PA), Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL

Frank R. Romano expresses his support for Dr. Martin Luther King Jr by explaining his run as a peace candidate in the 1966 primary.

Telegram from President Kennedy to MLK

Monday, September 24, 1962
Washington, D.C., UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

President Kennedy compliments Dr. King and his organization for their persistent push for equal rights in America.

History

Dr. King references a quote from philosopher Hegel regarding the philosophy of history.

Letter from Irma Monsky to Mary McHugh

Tuesday, November 14, 1967
New York (NY)

In this letter, Irma Monsky informs Mary McHugh that their panel of judges selected "Christians and Jews: The Tragic Past and the Hopeful Future" and Dr. King's "Where Do We Go from Here", as winners for their National Mass Media Brotherhood Award Program.

Auguste Comte

Dr. King writes of Comte's views of the relationship between the theological, the metaphysical and the scientific worlds.

MLK's Statement on Church Destruction in Leesburg, Georgia

Thursday, August 16, 1962
Georgia (GA)

In this statement following the destruction of a church in Leesburg, Georgia, Dr. King argues that it was the action of somebody with the "strange illusion" that it would somehow stop African-Americans from seeking freedom and justice.

Letter to MLK from Paul Feldman

Friday, January 26, 1968
New York, NY, Washington, D.C.

Paul Feldman is writing Dr. King about the new release of Michael Harrington's pamphlet "American Power in the Twentieth Century."

If I Can Help Somebody

These are the words to a song written in 1945 by Alma Bazel Androzzo that was made famous by gospel singer Mahalia Jackson. Dr. King quotes this song in his Drum Major Instinct sermon delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church on February 4, 1968.

Letter from W. Maxfield Garrott

Friday, October 16, 1964
Tennessee (TN), JAPAN, Virginia (VA), Atlanta, GA, Richmond, VA

W. Maxfield Garrott, president of the Seinen Jo Gakuin Baptist School in Japan, invites Dr. King to make an appearance if he ever visits Japan. Garrot also congratulates Dr. King on being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter and Questionnaire from Ronald B. Lee to MLK

Washington, D.C., Maryland (MD)

Ronald B. Lee, a student of American University, requests that Dr. King complete a questionnaire concerning the SCLC's involvement in the June White House Conference "To Fulfill These Rights." The questions include how the SCLC was informed of this meeting, the conference, contributions, and more.

Pamphlet from the Child Development Group of Mississippi

Mississippi (MS), Philadelphia, PA, Chicago, IL, Tennessee (TN)

This pamphlet is entitled "Histories Of: Children, Employees, Centers, Community Support." The organization, sponsored by the Child Development Center of Mississippi, is a statewide Head Start program that was organized in the summer of 1965.

Revolution and Redemption

Sunday, August 16, 1964
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Montgomery, AL, NETHERLANDS

This document contains the address, "Revolution and Redemption," given by Dr. King in Amsterdam. Dr. King discusses the concerns of the "Gospel of Jesus Christ." He states there are two aspects of the world that must never be forgotten: "this is God's world," and that Jesus Christ gave his life for redemption.

Handwritten Notes Individuality and Participation

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines his views on individuality and participation. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definition, and bible verses.

Letter from Ozro T. Jones to the SCLC's C. T. Vivian

Friday, May 28, 1965
Philadelphia, PA

Ozro Jones, President of the International Youth Congress, writes C. T. Vivian stating that he sincerely appreciates Dr. King for accepting the invitation to speak at the International Youth Congress in Chicago.

Letter from MLK to Aubrey T. Edwards

Wednesday, July 12, 1967
CANADA

Dr. King regretfully informs Aubrey Edwards that his schedule will not allow him to visit Canada.

Letter from Roland de Corneille to MLK

Friday, September 10, 1965
CANADA, VIETNAM, Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Rev. Roland de Corneille informs Dr. King that he has been invited by the International Teach-In Committee at the University of Toronto to participate in a program featuring representatives from Vietnam.

Notecard Containing the Definition of Thinking

This notecard quotes Dr. Brightman's definition of thinking, taken from "An Intro to Philosophy".

Christianity and Crisis: April 3, 1967

Monday, April 3, 1967
New York, NY

Roger L. Shinn wrote this article for Christianity and Crisis: A Christian Journal of Opinion. Shinn defines a "conscientious objector" as one who believes a war morally unjustifiable, and chooses, therefore, not to serve in it. Several Christian organizations attempted to introduce legislation banning forced participation. The American Civil Liberties Union has encouraged the selective service system to recognize a policy "under which no person shall be compelled to participate in armed conflict when he believes it to be in violation of his conscience."

MLK Speech at SCLC Staff Retreat

Monday, November 14, 1966
Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, SWEDEN, INDIA, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, VIETNAM, South Carolina (SC)

Dr. King addresses the staff of the SCLC at a retreat in Frogmore, South Carolina. He divides his speech into three parts: "whence we have come, where we have come, and where do we go from here." Dr. King thoroughly discusses his thoughts on Communism, the practice of nonviolence, the belief that racism is an "ontological affirmation,"and the weaknesses of Black Power.

Letter from Ali Beno Veidt to MLK

Saturday, February 26, 1966
Chicago, IL

Comparing Black Muslims to Nazis, Veidt speaks against Dr. King's practices in the movement, as well as his involvement with Elijah Muhammad. Veidt's correspondence includes a photograph of the two men together.