The Archive

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"Montgomery, AL"

Letter from Sargent Shriver to MLK

Wednesday, June 14, 1967

In this letter, Sargent Shriver discusses the success of the Upward Bound program at Morehouse College. Upward Bound is a program as part of the national war against poverty.

Letter from Executive Director of Catholic Interracial Council to MLK

Friday, July 14, 1967

The following document is a cover letter of enclosed letters John A. McDermott sent seventeen Negro state legislators "congratulating them on their fight for fair housing".

SCLC's Interest in the Chicago Education System

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference initiates improvement for Chicago's education system by making recommendations. It is believed that the inadequacies of education are not only a southern issue, but a national occurrence.

Letter from MLK to Senator Abraham Ribicoff

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Senator Abraham Ribicoff's efforts in passing the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Thank You Letter from Dr. King to Eartha Kitt

Tuesday, December 18, 1962

In this letter, Dr. King is expressing his deep apprecitation to Eartha Kitt for her contribution to the Southern Chrisitan Leadership Conference.

The Plain Dealer: Dr. King Here Today to Gauge Tensions

Tuesday, April 25, 1967

This article, printed in "The Plain Dealer," provides a brief history of Dr. King and details the plans he had for Cleveland, OH.

Letter from MLK to Mr. and Mrs. Charles Evans

Tuesday, March 26, 1968

In this letter Dr. King offers his gratitude to Mr. and Mrs. Evans for their monetary contribution of $200. Dr. King references the work of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and explains how the Evans' contribution supports the efforts of the organization.

Memorandum from Opal C. Jones to MLK Regarding

Friday, April 7, 1967

In this letter, Opal Jones informs Dr. King of an address change for the Neighborhood Adult Participation Project.

March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom Agenda

Friday, August 16, 1963

This document is a strategic outline for the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.

Statement Regarding Chicago Movement

Friday, December 2, 1966

Dr. King speaks about the Chicago Freedom Movement that is mobilizing to "launch an intensive voter registration" campaign in Negro communities. Dr. King states, "the ultimate goal of this drive is to add substantially to the voter registration and motivate the entire Negro community to participate in the political process."

Southern Rural Action Project

Saturday, April 1, 1967

The Southern Rural Action Project, an initiative of the Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty, seeks to finance and support community development in low-income areas. This progress report highlights current field projects and objectives.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Gambbacinni

Dr. King acknowledges Mr. Gambaccini's request to the Pope for peace regarding the Vietnam War. Dr. King adds, "As the strength of our world's weapons increases and the war in Vietnam continues to escalate the crying need for world peace becomes greater and greater."


Dr. King provides several definitions of the word forgiveness according to several outside references.

Definition of Christianity

Dr. King records a definition of Christianity. He defines Christianity as the belief in the "potential good in human nature."

Telegram from Mrs. Frances Lucas to C. T. Vivian and Alvin Pitcher

Thursday, January 9, 1969

Mrs. Lucas informs Mr. Vivian and Mr. Pitcher of Mrs. King's unavailability to speak at the YMCA in Chicago. A memorial service in honor of Dr. King is scheduled on the same date in Atlanta.

Letter from Horace Sheffield to MLK

Saturday, September 23, 1961

Mr. Sheffield sends Dr. King a press release that discusses a Trade Union Leadership Council telegram to Dr. J.H. Jackson in response to his remarks regarding Dr. King and the Freedom Movement.

Letter from Mildred Maroney to MLK about a Donation

Thursday, May 11, 1967

In this letter Mildred Maroney of the Brookings Institute forwards a donation which was an honorarium due to Mr. Robinson Hollister. This was done because Mr. Hollister requested that the honorarium be donated to the SCLC on his behalf.

MLK's Address to the Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity

Monday, October 12, 1964

This address by Dr. King was delivered to the Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity the day before it was announced that he had been awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. In addressing the topic "Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution," Dr. King argues that the church must inspire it's members to be active and advocate against injustice, reaffirm the misconduct of racial segregation, and work towards social change in a nonviolent and peaceful manner.

Brochure: "Some Important Fiscal Facts about the SCLC"

This document contains information about SCLC's administration, role, duties, and actions that its staff fulfills with the money donated to the organization.

Letter from John R. Brescia to MLK

Saturday, March 16, 1968

John R. Brescia requests to be sent campaign materials and a schedule of Dr. King's speaking engagements.

Letter from Canary McKay to MLK

Friday, February 4, 1966

Canary McKay shows her appreciation to Dr. King for the progress made as a result of the Civil Rights Movement. She also extends an invitation for King to speak at her church.

Letter from Jerry Russell to Mrs. King

Thursday, April 11, 1968

Jerry Russell offers his sympathy to Coretta Scott King following the death of Dr. King. He describes Dr. King as an individual of greatest integrity.

Letter from Andrew Bell III and Fred Fechheimer to MLK

Wednesday, June 30, 1965

The "Americans in Ethiopia Who Support Civil Rights in the United States" committee sends its support and a monetary contribution to Dr. King and the Civil Rights Movement.

Address by MLK at the 30th Anniversary of District 65

Wednesday, October 23, 1963

This document, an address given by Dr. King on the 30th anniversary of District 65, includes handwritten notes. In the address, Dr. King talks about the importance of the Declaration of Independence and the Emancipation Proclamation to human rights.

Birthday Card from Mrs. King to MLK

Tuesday, January 15, 1963

Mrs. King sends birthday wishes to Dr. King.

Letter to MLK from Paul Anderson

Paul Anderson expressed concern about what he perceived as Dr. King's move toward the "new left." With a sense of immediacy he urged Dr. King to plan to meet with Robert Pickus on his next visit to northern California. Anderson posited that Pickus' plan concerning the Vietnam War is more worthy to be aligned with the non-violent tradition, "unlike the movement toward which Dr. King is leaning."

Telegram from MLK to Senator Robert Kennedy

Dr. King praises Senator Kennedy's efforts toward abolishing the poll tax in state elections.

Statement from the Commission on Civil Rights

Wednesday, March 27, 1968

Clarence H. Hunter issued this statement to share the news that the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights would be holding a public hearing in Montgomery, Alabama to collect information regarding the condition of African Americans in Alabama. Hunter states the purpose of the Commission's investigation and names the notable members of the investigation.

Review on "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community" 1967

Saturday, April 15, 1967

The Virginia Kirkus Review wrote this descriptive review on Dr. King's final book, Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community? The context of the review shows differences between the messages of Dr. King's earlier works and Where Do We Go From Here. Dr. King's earlier publications focused on the work of gaining decent treatment and basic civil rights for black Americans. However, this book heavily challenged the status quo in America.

Address by MLK at the Washington, DC Prayer Pilgrimage for Freedom

Friday, May 17, 1957

Dr. King gives an address at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D. C. regarding race relations and the struggle for justice and racial equality in America. King discusses the responsibility of the President, Congress, and federal courts to ensure all blacks the have the opportunity and the right to vote. King closes by asserting that everyone must stand firm in faith and act only in love and nonviolence in the fight for these rights.