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Program from Community Salute to MLK: Nobel Peace Prize Winner

Thursday, December 17, 1964
New York, NY

This program is from the Community Salute to Dr. King that occured in New York City following his being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Report of A Participant

VIETNAM, Washington, D.C.

This report illustrates the authors concern and outlook on the Vietnam war.

The Drum Major Instinct Sermon Outline

Monday, February 5, 1968

Dr. King outlines on scraps of paper his great sermon based on Mark 10:37. Everyone wants to be first, to get attention, he says, starting with our first cry as a baby. Adults want to do good and be praised. If the drum major instinct is not harnessed, the personality is distorted and we become boastful, gossip, put others down. On a societal level, this leads to exclusive social groups, racial prejudice and war. King states that Jesus’ answer is to dedicate this great force to worthy ends – goodness, moral excellence, generosity, kindness and service. .

Message from James Farmer About March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

Wednesday, August 28, 1963
New York (NY), New York, NY, Alabama (AL), Louisiana (LA), Mississippi (MS), California (CA), Chicago, IL, Birmingham, AL, Washington, D.C.

James Farmer issues a message from the Donaldsonville Jail regarding the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom. He regrets that he is unable to attend the event, but he supports the goals of the March.

Letter from Staughton Lynd to MLK

Wednesday, March 27, 1963
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Straughton Lynd, Chairman of the Greater Atlanta Peace Fellowship, informs Dr. King of his organization and asks to meet regarding "the nuclear test ban negotiation." Lynd also encloses the organization's purpose statement.

Letter from the Frink Family to MLK

Monday, December 25, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Florida (FL)

Father and husband John Frink, sends a $200 donation to Dr. King and the SCLC. The donation was made possible by not getting anyone any Christmas gifts. The author writes of a future intent to contribute physical aid to the organization in their hometown of Florida. In closing, Frink requests information regarding sponsorship of a needy family for the purpose of teaching his children how to be of service to others.

Justice

Dr. King provides his views regarding the concept of justice.

Letter from Kerry Clayton to MLK 11/20/66

Sunday, November 20, 1966
California (CA)

Kerry Clayton informs Dr. King that she was asked to do a third grade report about his life. She also requested for Dr. King to send a picture to include in the report. Kerry Clayton was a resident of China Lake, California.

American Nurses' Association Names Judges for Integration Award

Friday, September 1, 1967
New York, NY, PUERTO RICO, Washington, D.C., New York (NY), Dallas, TX, Texas (TX)

The American Nurses' Association announces its panel of judges for the 1968 Mary Mahoney Award, which honors progress in integration and nursing.

Letter from Southern Conference Educational Fund

Friday, November 22, 1963
New Orleans, LA

The executive director of the Southern Conference Educational Fund, Inc. communicates to the recipient that despite the raids by the state and city police, the organization is attempting to continue operations. The police stripped the SCEF of numerous documentation and correspondence information. The director is certain they would be able to obtain success with the moral support in New Orleans and a possible contribution from the recipient. Of significance is the letter's date: the day of President John F. Kennedy's assassination.

Star: "An Analysis of Black Power" 1967

Monday, June 26, 1967
Washington, D.C.

Paul Hathaway, of the Washington, D.C. Star newspaper, crafted a review of Dr. King's final publication, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" This extensive review of Dr. King's book focused, primarily, on his stance regarding the black power movement. According, to Dr. King, in the book, black power was something that was needed to achieve tangible goals such as: economic and political power. However, the use of the slogan carried a very volatile meaning that would alienate many allies in the movement, not of African American descent.

Letter from Edna Patricia Mildred Smith to MLK

Indiana (IN)

Edna Smith, a high school senior, expresses her admiration to Dr. King and his works. She informs of the low ranking she received at a speech contest and asks him to prepare a ten-minute speech for their state contest. She also seeks his advice regarding her academic plans after high school.

Thank you letter from George R. Metcalf to MLK

Thursday, October 5, 1967
New York, NY

Mr. Metcalf, president of the National Committee Against Discrimination in Housing, thanks Dr. King for joining the Advisory Council. Mr. Metcalf expresses his belief that Dr. King's participation on the council "will greatly strengthen the National Committee in its efforts to attain equal opportunity in housing."

Letter from George Graham to MLK

Thursday, September 1, 1966
North Carolina (NC)

Mr. Graham thanks Dr.King for replying to his letter, and expresses how much he enjoyed seeing him when he visited Raleigh.

Negroes Are Not Moving Too Fast

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

In this article, Dr. King attempts to refute allegations that Negroes are moving too fast and expect special favors. He states, "the Negro is not going nearly fast enough."

Annual Report Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Friday, October 1, 1965
Alabama (AL), New York (NY), Montgomery, AL, Birmingham, AL, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Operation Breadbasket, unemployment, poverty, nonviolence, Negro voter registration, and a financial report are just several of the topics covered in this informational pamphlet detailing the ways in which monies were divided amongst the many functions of the SCLC.

Telegram from Artis Abrham to MLK

Friday, March 11, 1966
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

Artis Abrham asks Dr. King's assistance regarding the Freedom Festival. Abrham reports that he has delivered posters and sold tickets to the festival, but the financial secretary still wants him to purchase his own ticket to attend the event.

Telegram Plea to Dr. King

Friday, March 29, 1968
California (CA)

An American citizen writes Dr. King pleading for him not to blame whites for all of the misunderstandings in the US.

Letter from M.J. McGrayle to MLK

Friday, December 30, 1966
Chicago, IL, Birmingham, AL, Florida (FL)

M.J. McGrayle from Chicago expresses his or her concerns to Dr. King. McGrayle does not understand some of the actions of African Americans and disagrees with Dr. King's marches. The author believes that many of the events taking place within the Civil Rights Movement are further separating the races, as "black people are afraid of" whites. As a white person, McGrayle states, "I lived in Birmingham, Ala[bama] and took the colored peoples part," though now in disagreement, will "do nothing more for the colored people."

MLK Writes on Miracles

Dr. King outlines Dr. James Moffatt's views on students understanding of new testament.

Letter from Mrs. G. E. Finch to Mr. M. Nance, Jr.

Friday, February 16, 1968
Florida (FL), Orangeburg, SC

This letter, dated February 16, 1968, was written to Mr. M. Nance, Jr. from Mrs. Finch. In this letter, she states that while the situation in Orangeburg is "regrettable" it can be fixed. She says that other ethnic groups would not lead demonstrations as blacks have. She says black people lack "imagination and energy''. Finch states that while she believes blacks have suffered "grievances, she has contempt for so-called "free loaders".

Telegram from Edward Daniels to MLK

Tuesday, February 6, 1968
New York, NY

Edward Daniels extends an invitation for Dr. King to be the keynote speaker at the National Conference of Anti-Poverty Agencies.

Telegram from L. V. Booth and Otis Moss to MLK

Cincinnati, OH, Ohio (OH)

Dr. L. V. Booth and Reverend Otis Moss thank Dr. King and the SCLC for their efforts during the last ten years.

Faith in Man

Dr. King discusses people's general lack of faith in man. He asserts that because of Christianity one can have faith in man because "man's plight is never so low that he can't do better."

Vietnam; Whitey: I Will Not Serve!

VIETNAM, NORTH KOREA, SOUTH KOREA, Brooklyn, NY, Philadelphia, PA, New York (NY), New York, NY, New Jersey (NJ), Chicago, IL, Los Angeles, CA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Rolland Snellings, later known as Askia M. Toure, wrote this article discussing Vietnam and racial inequality. Snellings claims that African Americans are proportionately overrepresented in Vietnam, and he argues that the "black establishment," including the NAACP and the black middle class, is partly responsible for the plight of Negroes.

Letter from the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam

Sunday, March 12, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY

The Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam outlines a list of requests for its members, including weekly communications and completed bus questionnaires.

The Importance of Voting

Thursday, September 6, 1962
New York (NY), New York, NY

This transcript documents Dr. King's recorded statement intended to raise awareness of voting and voter registration.

1967 Geneva Convocation

Monday, May 29, 1967
VIETNAM, Geneva, Switzerland, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King provides introductory remarks to participants of the Pacem In Terris II Convocation held in Geneva, Switzerland. He addresses several moral and political concerns as it relates war and Vietnam.

Letter from Dr. King to Rev. & Mrs. Sargent

Monday, November 8, 1965
FRANCE

In this letter, Dr. King thanks Rev. & Mrs. Sargent for their efforts in getting him to visit Paris and for their support of funding SCLC.

Letter from MLK to Sarah Harvey

Tuesday, January 9, 1962
UNITED KINGDOM

Dr. King expresses gratitude for the financial and moral support provided by Sarah Harvey. Dr. King states he is sending a copy of "Stride Toward Freedom" as a token of his appreciation.