Themes

The Archive

Search results for:
"Missouri (MO)"

Mass Letter from Mr. Maurice A. Dawkins, OOEE

Tuesday, February 20, 1968

This letter from Maurice A. Dawkins, a representative from the Office of Economic Opportunity, accompanies materials that encourage the reader to take action "in pledging to beat swords into plowshares," namely transferring funds spent in the Vietnam conflict to domestic endeavors.

Man

Dr. King notes the subject of man, quoting Algernon Charles Swinburne's "The Hymn of Man."

Card From Marjorie Baker

Marjorie Baker sends a card expressing wishes to maintain courage until things are better.

Letter from Harry Walker to Dora McDonald

Monday, September 25, 1967

Harry Walker writes Dora McDonald regarding contracts for Dr. King's future speaking engagements.

Letter from Nancy Childs to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965

Nancy Childs, a junior in high school, writes Dr. King to convey support in the fight for equality and civil rights in America. Childs is a student at an integrated high school in Detroit, Michigan and expresses her delight that Dr. King has the ability to stand up for his beliefs. This letter was drafted following the bloody assault against demonstrators during the first attempt to march from Selma to Montgomery on March 7, 1965.

Letter from Mrs. William Wenger to MLK

Mrs. Wenger pleads with Dr. King to never give up the fight for civil rights.

Letter from Anton Marguleas to MLK

Tuesday, August 30, 1966

Anton Marguleas, of the Paramount Export Company, writes Dr. King to express his views on democracy and human rights.

God, Man, Sin, and Knowledge

Presented here is a series of notecards that defines an array of topics relating to philosophical and theological perspectives.

New York Amsterdam News: Our New President

Friday, December 27, 1963

Dr. King opens his statement on Lyndon B. Johnson, the new president of the United States, and how the tenure of his presidency began with adversity. Due to the elected southern president, the nation questions the possible improvement of the Negro community. Dr. King asserts that President Johnson's record on civil rights is astounding and his "southern-ness" will provide him with a better understanding of the Negro's plight. Dr. King further details the perceptions, actions, and works of President Johnson's efforts in the civil rights movement.

Temple Sholom Concert Forum Committee Announces MLK as Guest Lecturer

Chicago's Temple Sholom encourages interested parties to reserve their tickets soon, given the widespread enthusiasm for Dr. King's upcoming speaking engagement.

Address by Rabbi Joachim Prinz

Wednesday, August 28, 1963

Rabbi Joachim Prinz's address at the March on Washington focuses on the importance of freedom. He relates the struggle that blacks are currently enduring to the Nazism Jews faced during the reign of Hitler.

Birthday Card from The Men's Usher Board to MLK

Friday, January 1, 1965

The Men's Usher Board of Ebenezer Baptist Church wishes Dr. King a happy birthday.

Letter from Robert D. Heslep to MLK

Tuesday, February 6, 1968

The Philosophy of Education Society, Southeastern Region writes Dr. King giving full moral support in the development of "The Poor People's Washington Campaign."

Letter from Thomas G. Carson to MLK

Thursday, August 24, 1967

Thomas G. Carson writes Dr. King as a white supporter of civil rights legislation, but fed-up with what he feels are the changing views of Dr. King and the riots "committed by Negroes in the name of civil rights."

Telegram from Uppsala Student to MLK

Monday, November 9, 1964

Student organizations in Sweden invite Dr. King to Uppsala during his visit to Scandinavia.

Telegram from Artis Abrham to MLK

Friday, March 11, 1966

Artis Abrham asks Dr. King's assistance regarding the Freedom Festival. Abrham reports that he has delivered posters and sold tickets to the festival, but the financial secretary still wants him to purchase his own ticket to attend the event.

Note from Harry Belafonte to MLK

Harry and Julie Belafonte congratulate Dr. King on receiving the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize. Harry Belafonte is an American entertainer and social activist.

Letter from the Committee To Secure Justice for Morton Sobell to MLK

Tuesday, April 10, 1962

Helen Sobell, wife of Morton Sobell and co-chair of the committee trying to free him, requests that Dr. King write a letter supporting the approval of his parole. She includes an attachment explaining the parole process and contact information for the US Board of Parole.

Letter from Henry Wagner to MLK

Thursday, July 27, 1967

Henry B. Wagner writes a letter to Dr. King regarding Congress' increased appropriation for the Federal Aviation Agency. Mr. Wagner would prefer that those funds be given to mass ground transportation to increase safety and convenience.

Letter from Philip Isely to MLK

Thursday, April 6, 1967

Philip Isely, Secretary General for the World Constitutional Convention, asks Dr. King to publicly declare himself as an election candidate as delegate to the Peoples World Parliament and World Constitutional Convention. He states that Dr. King endorsed the idea in the past and encourages him to pursue the candidacy.

James H. Halsey Writes MLK About Alumni Solicitation

Friday, March 15, 1963

James H. Halsey writes Dr. King about financial support for the University of Bridgeport and its program.

Telegram from Andrew Allen to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967

Pastor Andrew J. Allen offers to serve Dr. King's jail term for him.

Letter from Audrey Mingo to MLK

Tuesday, May 16, 1967

Mrs. Mingo asks for detailed information regarding Dr. King's trips to the Holy Land and Africa.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Katherine McBride

Tuesday, February 22, 1966

Dora McDonald responds to the President of Bryn Mawr College expressing that Dr. King has committed to being the key note speaker for the upcoming graduation. Following the letter is the official commencement invitation.

Letter from Melis Nicolaides to MLK

Friday, April 30, 1965

Melis Nicolaides invites Dr. King to participate in the Third Marathon Peace March in Athens, Greece. At the first Peace March, only one person completed the march and that person was killed the following year. The next year "thousands of Greek people marched in the footsteps" of the murdered individual. Nicolaides explains that Dr. King's participation will be "an important contribution to the cause of peace."

Letter From MLK Concerning the Sustainability of SCLC

Addressing the recipients of this letter as "Friends", Dr. King shares the triumphs and struggles of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference while on its continuous quest for civil rights. He concludes the message by encouraging readers to contribute support to this "urgent moral crusade".

Memo from Edwin Berry and Melville Hosch to Freedom Government Conference Members

Wednesday, March 8, 1967

The United States Department of Health, Education, and Welfare details the purpose of the Freedom-Government Conference and outlines the objectives for the scheduled meetings in the spring.

Letter to MLK from F.D. Patterson regarding Differences of Opinion

Monday, April 17, 1967

The president of Phelps-Stokes Fund writes to encourage Dr. King to meet annually with other Negro leaders for a discussion on their differences of opinion.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Sylvester Webb

Monday, January 17, 1966

Dora McDonald writes Sylvester Webb of Edward Gideon Public School on behalf of Dr. King. McDonald states that Dr. King is honored that an oil portrait of himself is being presented at the school, but he regrets that he cannot be present during the ceremony. Dr. King is sending the Director of the Washington bureau of the SCLC, Reverend Walter Fauntroy, to represent him in his absence.

Chicago Nonviolent Action Proposal

SCLC's proposal for a nonviolent action campaign in Chicago identifies the city as the prototype for the northern urban race problem. The proposal includes a snapshot of the situation in Chicago, past approaches, SCLC?s philosophy of social change, a description of twelve different aspects of the problem of economic exploitation, and a plan and timetable for mobilizing forces. Objectives are stated for the federal, state, and local levels. SCLC proposes to work in collaboration with the Coordinating Council of Community Organizations.