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Letter From Rabbi Robert E. Goldburg to MLK

Tuesday, March 6, 1962

Mr. Goldburg congratulates Dr. King on a recent article about civil rights that Dr. King wrote for "The Nation."

Letter from the Poor People's Committee in Grenada, Mississippi

Friday, January 19, 1968

The Poor People's Committee of the Grenada Freedom Movement writes to Dr. King requesting help in securing jobs and adequate education.

Letter from Victor Seidel to MLK

Sunday, March 4, 1962

Victor M. Seidel requests a copy of Dr. King's lecture that was delivered at the University of Texas entitled "Civil Liberties and Social Action."

Response Letter to Mr. Frank Abrams from Dr. King

Friday, October 24, 1958

Dr. King addressed this letter to Mr. Frank Abrams, as an expression of thanks, in response for his well wishes. As a another gesture of thanks, Dr. King indicated that he also enclosed a copy of his first book "Stride Toward Freedom."

Statement by MLK

Dr. King discusses the backlash received during the protests and demonstrations for civil rights. He asserts that nonviolence is the most successful weapon, and that in order to participate the individual must be bold, brave, and disciplined.

Newspaper Clippings on Vietnam, January 1968

Wednesday, January 3, 1968

This document is a collage of newspaper clippings from the New York Time and the Washington Post on union leaders' positions on Vietnam. The boxed quotation is excerpted from a recent AFL-CIO convention.

Letter from Howard Moore, Jr. to MLK

Tuesday, February 20, 1968

Howard Moore, a partner in the Law Offices of Ward, Moore and Alexander, informs Dr. King of the establishment of the Southern Legal Assistance Project (SLAP). Mr. Moore describes how SLAP has already achieved a victory in representing a soldier who was accused of cursing his white officers. He also asks Dr. King to consider being named as an adviser for the project.

Letter from Ralph J. Bunche to MLK

Monday, March 18, 1968

Ralph J. Bunche sends an invitation to Dr. King, asking him to join the International Sponsors Committee at the New School for Social Research in New York City. This committee was developed in honor of Norman Thomas, an advocate for human rights.

Letter from a Tenant to MLK

Saturday, January 29, 1966

Dr. King received many unsigned letters from tenants in sub-standard housing in urban areas. Chicago was one of the main cities because Dr. King actually lived and conducted SCLC business there for a time. A tenant from a Chicago apartment complex writes to Dr. King suggesting that he discreetly visit the building to learn first hand of the unacceptable living conditions.

Letter from Jesse Thomas to MLK

Saturday, April 1, 1967

Jessie Thomas is writing to Dr. King to promote the development of a new urban community in the Rockdale area of Atlanta. Mr. Thomas states that the development would be revolutionary and a model for other cities if it were to be approved by the housing authorities. He urges Dr. King to support the project and help in the planning of producing this new area.

Invitation to Dr. King from the Japan Council Against Atomic and Hydrogen Bombs

Tuesday, June 6, 1967

Dr. King is invited to take part in the 1967 13th Annual World Conference of the Japan Council against Atomic and Hydrogen Bombs.

Waste in Foreign Aid

Sunday, February 19, 1967

Irene M. Kashmer suggests Dr. King address the issue of wasted foreign aid in his march on Washington. She encloses a New York Times article from February 15, 1967 to emphasize her point.

The Eternal Significance of Christ

Dr. King outlines a sermon and references the Book of 2 Corinthians. The passage states "It is impossible to understand the significance of Christ without understanding the whole history of Biblical religion."

Letter from H. Rogosin to MLK

Tuesday, August 8, 1967

H. Rogosin writes to Dr. King encouraging him to read the enclosed material on "The Role of Psychologists in Helping Solve Problems of Intergroup and Racial Tensions."

MLK Press Conference and Speech Notes

Dr. King stresses that his appearance to Cleveland is not in the interest of the candidates but to urge the people to exercise their political and moral responsibility.

Statement by MLK

Friday, December 11, 1964

This document contains Dr. King's remarks on injustices in the state of Mississippi. He suggests a complete boycott if the federal or state government is unable to perform the proper means of justice.

Letter from MLK to Roosevelt Zanders

Thursday, May 17, 1962

Dr. King thanks Roosevelt Zanders for his hospitality and generosity during his stay in New York. Dr. King expresses his hopes for their paths to cross in the near future and states that he will be sending Mr. Zanders an autographed copy of his book, "Stride Toward Freedom."

Letter from Martin J. McNamara to MLK

Monday, August 7, 1967

Martin McNamara, Special Counsel to the Vice President, informs Dr. King that the Vice President regrets that he is unable to accept an invitation to address the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from MLK to South African Embassy

Wednesday, February 9, 1966

Having been invited to South Africa by the National Union of South African Students and the Students' Visiting Lecturers Organization of the University of Cape Town, Dr. King writes the South African Embassy initiating the process of apply for a visa.

Schleiermacher

Dr. King outlines Friedrich Schleiermacher's concept of religion.

Committee to Adopt a Freedom Rider

Saturday, August 5, 1961

This is a brochure to an event entitled the Card Party. This event is catered to raising funds to adopt a freedom rider.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

This note, signed "A white citizen who likes good Negroes," warns that President Johnson is no friend to the Civil Rights Movement, only supporting African American voting rights to earn more votes for his reelection. It is unclear if both sides of this note were written by the same author. Both discuss how they are conscientious objectors, although they object to an integrated society, writing that "[No] high-class, intelligent persons (politicians excepted) will accept the Negro when he has an axe to grind."

Letter from Michael George to MLK

Thursday, December 5, 1968

Mr. George expresses his views on Dr. King's response to the riots Dr. King assisted in ending.

Letter from Dr. Lionel Newsom to Georgia Council on Human Relations Members

In the aftermath of the failure in attacking segregation in Albany, Georgia, the Chairman of the Georgia Council on Human Relations issues an appeal to its members to help support their continued fight. Dr. Lionel outlines the organization's past accomplishments and encourages members to learn from their mistakes in Albany to yield better results in the future.

Letter from Cranor F. Graves to MLK

Monday, May 1, 1967

Cranor F. Graves expresses his gratitude to Dr. King for greeting him on the plane. He encloses a copy of Pope Paul 's Easter encyclical. He also extends his best wishes to Mrs. King.

Letter from a Lithuanian American to MLK

In this letter to Dr. King, a Lithuanian immigrant to the United States writes that he agrees with the campaign for Negro rights and believes that all U.S. citizens should be treated equally.

Letter from MLK to Office of Inspector of Foreign Dividends

Saturday, January 18, 1964

In this letter, Dr. King states that he is the beneficial owner of the Copyright Royalties paid by Laurence Pollinger, Ltd. and that he is still receiving income from them.

Farewell Statement by MLK

Monday, March 9, 1959

Dr. King writes a farewell statement to the people of India thanking them for their hospitality towards him, Mrs. King and Dr. Reddick. Dr. King pleas for world peace and asserts that India should take the lead in the call for universal disarmament.

Letter from John C. Hall to MLK about a March

Thursday, February 8, 1968

In this letter John C. Hall informs Dr. King of his desire to participate in the upcoming march to Washington D.C. and requests any information regarding such.