Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Missouri (MO)"

Letter to Hermine Popper from MLK

Friday, January 12, 1968

Dr. King expresses his appreciation to Hermine Popper and her husband Bob for their generous contributions. He also requests a copy of Hermine's book to read for his enjoyment.

Immortality

Dr. King discusses the relationship between the physical and spiritual elements of man. He notes four theories that describe the nature of soul and body.

Mass Letter from Mr. Maurice A. Dawkins, OOEE

Tuesday, February 20, 1968

This letter from Maurice A. Dawkins, a representative from the Office of Economic Opportunity, accompanies materials that encourage the reader to take action "in pledging to beat swords into plowshares," namely transferring funds spent in the Vietnam conflict to domestic endeavors.

Facing Life's Inescapables

Dr. King uses an allegory regarding life to express that if an individual follows God's plan they will live an abundantly happy life.

Letter from Mr. Cass Canfield to MLK

Wednesday, October 11, 1967

In this letter Mr. Canfield Of Harper & Row, Publishers, informs Dr. King that a certificate of recognition from the National Conference of Christians and Jews for "Where Do We Go From Here?" is being sent to him as an award. Mr. Canfield expresses his belief the book will continue to sell.

Letter from MLK to Rev. J. M. Lawson Jr.

Friday, October 25, 1963

Dr. King writes Rev. Lawson to express his appreciation for the financial contribution to the SCLC from Protestant missionaries. Dr. King states that they will seek to make sure that a student involved in a recent tragedy in Birmingham, Alabama benefits from the contribution.

Memo from Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding Schedule

Monday, August 3, 1964

In this memo, Joan Daves informs Dr. King that Victor Weybright will telephone his London organization. Joan then suggests that Dr. King make himself available in London on August 17.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mr. Arrignton

Monday, May 16, 1966

Miss McDonald writes on behalf of Dr. King concerning a photograph request. She informs Mr. Arrington that Dr. King will be unable to honor his request due to his apprehension surrounding for profit merchandise.

Letter from Uvee Mdodana Arbouin to MLK

Monday, April 19, 1965

Uvee Arbouin thanks Dr. King for a past letter and encloses a financial contribution. She expresses that he has never received a donation that is "backed with" so much gratitude for his leadership.

A New South A-Coming

This pamphlet discusses the courageous stand of African American high school students against racial discrimination in the South. The efforts demonstrated by these young people to bring about change of many undemocratic practices were significantly noted in Negro history.

MLK on the Seating of Julian Bond

Wednesday, January 12, 1966

Georgia State Legislature has refused to seat Representative-Elect Julian Bond. Dr. King expresses his disdain for the social injustice. His plan of action is to combat this prejudice by rallying members of the white and black community to engage in protest.

Ritschl and Schleiermacher

Dr. King compares the thoughts of German theologian's Friedrich Schleiermacher and Albrecht Ritschl.

Telegram from Mr. and Mrs. B. E. Mays to MLK

Wednesday, October 26, 1960

This telegram was sent from Benjamin Elijah Mays and his wife to Dr. King at the State Prison in Reidsville, Georgia.

A Tough Mind and A Tender Heart

This outline to Dr. King's sermon "A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart" focuses on the premise that being a tough minded individual involves making critical decisions. The sermon emphasizes that those who possess a soft mind tend to be gullible and strictly follow the status quo. According to Dr. King, "We must come to the realization that life demands a tough mind."

Invitation from the Government of Barbados to MLK

The Government of Barbados invite Dr. King and Coretta Scott King to the Celebrations to Mark the Independence of Barbados. This event held high historical importance due Barbados' inquiry for independence for many years.

MLK Itinerary

This is Dr. King's itinerary for the period December 28 thru January 1 for an unknown year.

Letter from John A. McDermott Copied to Al Raby and MLK

Thursday, July 13, 1967

John A. McDermott, Executive Director of the Catholic Interracial Council, writes to Al Raby and Dr. King. Mr. McDermott describes the Council's involvement with the Chicago Freedom Movement. Mr. McDermott also expresses his appreciation for Mr. Raby and Dr. King's support in the fight for fair housing legislation in Chicago. McDermott goes on to describe the Movement struggle with the controversial Atomic Energy Commission project in Weston, Illinois.

Letter from Curtis Harris to Wayne Duncan

Friday, January 1, 1965

Mr. Harris writes to Mr. Duncan informing him that the SCLC has received a petition from the employees at their firm. The SCLC accepted
the petition in order to remove segregation and racial discrimination from society.

Telegram from President Johnson to Bernard Lee

Sunday, May 29, 1966

Dr. King's special assistant, Bernard Lee, was the recipient of this telegram requesting his presence at a White House conference called by President Johnson. The theme of the conference was "To Fulfill These Rights."

10th Annual SCLC Convention Program

This document is a flyer for the 10th annual convention of the SCLC.

Immortality

"Immortality" is the title of this handwritten note card by Dr. King, who documents a story of Socrates and the harp as an analogy to man.

American Negro in the Field of Industrial Relations

This survey is an enclosure of a letter from Alfred L.J. Gunn to Dr. King. Entitled "The Negro in Personnel and Industrial Relations," the survey was conducted using interviews with American people involved in Industrial Relations. Through asking a series of questions to sixty participants, it is concluded that "the future of the American Negro in the field of Industrial Relations is expanding greatly."

Letter from Harry Belafonte to MLK

Tuesday, May 2, 1967

Harry Belafonte outlines the details of the African Program to Dr. King. The document references King's future delegation to several African countries and emphasizes the "Afro-American Banking Proposal" as a topic of interest.

Letter from Toni Harris to Mrs. King 4/5/68

Friday, April 5, 1968

Young Toni Harris, a student in NYC, wrote this letter to Mrs. King sharing her hope that Dr. King's killer would be caught. This letter is an example of the many levels of support shown towards the King family, from schoolchildren who loved Dr. King.

Essay Outline by John Mates on Helmut Richard Niebuhr

Friday, April 20, 1951

John Mates contests the influence of Helmut Richard Niebuhr written contributions to the church through his congruent philosophy with Jesus Christ's message. Mr. Mates further discusses the churches relations to the societal influences of politics and economics.

Letter from Dora McDonald to MLK

Dora McDonald updates Dr. King regarding the numerous letters, invitations, phone calls and other pending business matters while he has been away from the office. During this period of absence, Dr. King had been imprisoned and was now recovering at home.

Letter from James K. Mbuguah from MLK

Wednesday, January 17, 1962

James Mbuguah is a young boy from Kenya who has been accepted into John Hopkins University. James is contacting Dr. King because he does not have the finances to attend the school and would like to receive assistance.

Voting in Negro Majority Counties

This document contains percentages of registered Negro voters and registered white voters in Negro majority counties in the Southern United States.

Freedom

Dr. King quotes Tillich in sketching his views on man's freedom in relation to destiny.

Letter from E.B. Putnam to MLK

Mrs. E.B. Putnam writes Dr. King regarding her concerns with the Communist Party's presence in America. She believes they are using race issues to gain power. The author also tells Dr. King that he should focus on leading people to Christ and not on race relations.