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"Mississippi (MS)"

Letter from Benjamin Singleteary to MLK

Thursday, December 16, 1965

Benjamin Singleteary, a student at Shortridge Junior High School in Indianapolis, requests Dr. King's autograph and other information for a class project on outstanding people.

Letter to the Federal Housing Commissioner from MLK

Tuesday, November 7, 1967

This document is a Federal Housing Administration application from Dr. King concerning one of his many housing programs.

Thoughts on Nobel Prize

Dr. King uses a statement by Mahalia Jackson and the philanthropy of Sir Alfred Nobel to encapsulate the purpose of the Civil Rights Movement. Jackson refers to the racial problems in America as "family business," but Dr. King believes that in order for man to become a brotherhood, society has to search for truth like Alfred Nobel.

Letter from Ann Lincoln to MLK

Thursday, June 24, 1965

The writer, who identifies herself as a "collateral descendent of Abraham Lincoln," relates a story involving a young colored girl to Dr. King. Ms. Lincoln explains that the incident disturbed her greatly and she feels it is time to educate Negros on white acceptance.

Letter from Sue M. Stiles to MLK

Sunday, May 24, 1964

Sue Stiles writes Dr. King to assert her viewpoints and beliefs according to her childhood and upbringing. In expressing these truths, Stiles affirms her support in Dr. King's practices in human rights and encloses a financial contribution.

Schleiermacher and Original Sin

This note card documents a passage from Friedrich Schleiermacher's "The Christian Faith" regarding original sin. Dr. King's note collection contains many cards that reference the theologian's work and ideas.

Telegram from Ted Aretha to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967

Ted Aretha sends words of encouragement to Dr. King during his time in the Birmingham City Jail.

Letter from Derrick Cameron to MLK

Thursday, January 20, 1966

Derrick Cameron, a seventh grade student, writes Dr. King expressing thanks for his fight in Civil Rights. In addition, Cameron offers to make copies on his ditto machine; a low-volume printing method used mainly by schools and churches.

MLK's Speech on Civil Rights and Vietnam

Wednesday, April 5, 1967

Dr. King speaks about his role as a leader of the Civil Rights Movement and his position on the Vietnam War.

Tillich's Philosophy of Religion

Dr. King quotes Paul Tillich's "The Protestant Era."

Letter from Lee Tishler to MLK

Sunday, May 21, 1967

Ms. Lee Tishler gives support and praise to Dr. King for speaking out against the conflict in Vietnam.

Letter from Saskatchewan Centennial Corporation to MLK

Tuesday, January 24, 1967

Pat Ettinger asks Dr. King to send a personal gift for an auction to raise money for Canada's centennial celebration.

SCLC Press Release: Civil Rights Leader Protests Antipoverty Cutbacks

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference issues a press release containing a telegram that Reverend Ralph David Abernathy sent to President Lyndon B. Johnson. Abernathy expresses his concern with President Johnson's proposed cuts to the Office of Economic Opportunity's funding.

Letter from Senator Charles Percy to MLK

Thursday, August 31, 1967

Charles H. Percy informs Dr. King that the Senate Housing and Urban Affairs Subcommittee is proceeding to report a bill to the Senate that could become the Housing and Urban Development Act of 1967. The bill would assist lower income families and shrink the gap between white and black America, while expanding the economic opportunities for all.

Letter from Sixth Grader to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965

Kathy Brewster, an African American sixth grade student from Lincoln School in California, writes Dr. King expressing gratitude towards Dr. King for helping the Negro race.

Statement by the President of the Montgomery Improvement Association

Thursday, December 20, 1956

As the President of Montgomery Improvement Association, Dr. King elaborates on the past twelve months and the city's efforts to fight against racial injustice through the bus boycott. Their journey concluded victoriously with the acknowledgment of the Supreme Court that invalidated segregated transportation. Dr. King informs the Montgomery community that they are to "return to the buses" on a "non-segregated basis."

Letter from Darnell Garner to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Darnell Garner offers condolences to Mrs. King following Dr. King's death, and he invites her to a mass at his church

MLK's Public Statement Regarding Court Hearings

Friday, December 3, 1965

Dr. King compares past discrimination to recent strides that have been made in the American justice system.

God (Isaiah)

Here Dr. King references Isaiah, Chapter 44 in discussing monotheism and the "utter folly of idol worship."

Template of Letter from MLK to SCLC Board Members

Thursday, February 1, 1968

In this letter, Dr. King writes to an undisclosed board member of the S.C.L.C. to discuss an upcoming demonstration against the Vietnam War.

Invitation from Frederick S. Wallin to MLK

Saturday, December 14, 1963

Frederick E. Wallin invites Dr. King to speak at the Alderson-Broaddus College's Civic Interest Week, a weeklong study and discussion on political and economic concerns. He explains that he is inviting the most controversy speakers would seriously appreciated Dr. King's attendance.

Letter from Polly G. to MLK

Sunday, March 4, 1962

Polly G. writes Dr. King informing him that her class is creating reports on famous people. She has chosen to write her report on Dr. King and asks him to assist her by sending some additional material along with a photograph.

Some Things We Can Do

In this series of note cards entitled "Some Things We Can Do," Dr. King provides several suggestions pertaining to the African American community.

MLK Address at Park Sheraton Hotel

Wednesday, September 12, 1962

Dr. King gives an address commemorating the one hundredth anniversary of the passage of the Emancipation Proclamation. In the celebratory speech, he calls all Americans to take action in applying the principles of the Emancipation Proclamation to society. Dr. King states that the commands of the Proclamation have fallen short in practice and that it will take a cumulative effort from every citizen to undo this process.

God (His Existence)

Dr. King quotes Alfred, Lord Tennyson's "The Ancient Sage" after posing the question, "Can we prove God's existence?"

Letter to Mrs. King from Mrs. Boulware

Wednesday, April 10, 1968

In this letter, Mrs. Boulware of Newark, New Jersey expresses her sympathy for Mrs. Coretta Scott King after the death of Dr. King. Boulware mentions that she was one of Dr. King's supporters and was a participant in the March on Washington. She closes by stating that Dr. King "is not dead, he is only resting."

Letter from P. G. Harkins to MLK

Mrs. Harkins, program chairman of the Voice of Women, requests that Dr. King speak for the organization when his schedule permits.

Ex-West Sider

The author discusses their experiences with living in substandard housing in a low socioeconomic environment. The author also questions the racial focus of Chicago's appeasement to the Negro.

Bayard Rustin: Right to Work Laws

Saturday, February 18, 1967

This booklet, written chiefly by Bayard Rustin, suggests that the "Right to Work" laws handicap minorities in the American workforce. The "Right to Work" law is a statute that bans union security agreements, which Rustin posits is undemocratic and assists in exploiting and perpetuating American poverty.

Letter from Harry Wachtel to Owen Hungerford Regarding Finances

Monday, December 12, 1966

Harry Wachtel informs Owen Hungerford that Dr. King has approved the enclosed financial statement. Relative tax exemption material is also forwarded.