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"Mississippi (MS)"

Letter from Joan Daves to Andrew Young

Friday, April 21, 1967

In this letter, Ms. Daves focuses on Dr. King's speeches and discusses copyrighting issues.

Telegram from Dr. Albert Davis to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967

Dr. Albert Davis and the Atlanta Chapter of the NAACP praise Dr. King for his "continued leadership and revolutionary ideas."

Pilgrimage for Democracy

Sunday, December 15, 1963

Dr. King makes an address at the "Pilgrimage for Democracy" in Atlanta during the winter of 1963. He opens with the Supreme Courts ruling to cease segregation in schools and how Atlanta served as the "epitome of social progress." He continues to elaborate on how the city needs to continue its desegregation efforts to achieve justice. Dr. King numerically highlights the inadequacies of the integrated schools in Atlanta and expresses the reality of the continuing segregation in the city's public accommodations.

Letter from Rayphil Clark to MLK

Wednesday, September 29, 1965

Michigan inmate Rayphil Clark urges Dr. King to assist him with receiving fair treatment during his incarceration. Clark lists multiple situations where Negro employees and inmates are intimidated by white prison officials. Most importantly, Clark feels that he is constantly being singled out and subjected to horrible treatment. According to Clark's description of prison officials, "they are more concerned with racial vengenaude then they are re-habiliation."

Letter from Mary B. Courtney to MLK

Sunday, October 24, 1965

Mary B. Courtney requests Dr. King's help to sell her property. She explains to him that the house has been on the market for three years in St. Petersburg, Florida, and while "several colored people" have contacted the real estate agency with interest, they are dissuaded by the lack of African Americans in the neighborhood. The author suggests that Dr. King contact some of his associates in St. Petersburg to assist in the matter.

Letter from M. A. Cross to Marie Goldner

Tuesday, October 1, 1963

M. A. Cross, Director of Public and Industrial Relations at Dan River Mills, Inc., informs Mrs. Goldner that Dan River Mills, Inc. does not discriminate against Negroes.

Letter of Resignation Rachel Davis DuBois to MLK

Wednesday, November 2, 1966

Rachel Davis DuBois resigns from the staff of SCLC to help the organization during a time of financial difficulties. Dr. DuBois offers her services in the future whenever needed without compensation.

Letter from Rabbi A. Aaron Segal to MLK

Tuesday, October 20, 1964

Rabbi A. Aaron Segal of Springfield, Illinois writes Dr. King a poem honoring him for winning the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Hildegard Goss-Mayr to MLK

Thursday, October 29, 1964

Hildegard Goss-Mayr, Secretary for the International Fellowship of Reconciliation, invites Dr. King to speak at a conference in Brazil.

Telegram From the National Committee For Free Elections to MLK Regarding 1967 Sunflower County, Mississippi Elections

Dr. King requests a meeting with Attorney General William Ramsey Clark, to discuss the need for federal voting registrars to oversee upcoming elections in rural Mississippi counties. In these elections, Negroes will run as candidates for the first time in American history.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Carey B. Preston

Wednesday, July 1, 1964

Dora McDonald sends a reply to the Mrs. Carey B. Preston accepting an invitation on behalf of Dr. King.

Telegram from MLK to Senator Aiken Regarding Housing

Dr. King urges Senator George Aiken and other members of the Republican Party to support an open housing bill to promote better living conditions in Negro communities.

Nomination Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to Dr. King

Tuesday, September 10, 1963

In this letter, Benjamin E. Mays notifies Dr. King that he has nominated him for the Florina Lasker Civil Liberties Award.

Salute to Martin Luther King, Jr.

Tuesday, December 11, 1962

This program for "Salute to Martin Luther King Jr." features a performance by the entertainer Sammy Davis, Jr. and an address by Dr. King.

Stride Towards Freedom Royalties

Sunday, July 25, 1965

This document serves as a financial receipt from Laurence Pollinger Ltd. Royalties for Dr. King's book Stride Towards Freedom are included in the statement.

Letter from Ruth Olsen to Dora McDonald

Monday, July 6, 1964

Ruth Olsen of St. Ansgar's Lutheran Church writes Dora McDonald requesting 30 copies of Dr. King's "Why We Can't Wait."

People in Action: The South -- A Hostile Nation

Saturday, May 11, 1963

In his regular column for the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King discusses the unfair economic conditions of Negroes in America. He further explains how the employment rate of Negroes in America contribute to economic hardships.

War

Dr. King cites a quote concerning "war" from Oswald Spengler's "The Return of the Caesars," an article featured in The American Mercury.

Letter from Congressman Augustus F. Hawkins to MLK

Friday, June 11, 1965

Augustus Hawkins, the first black Congressman from California, asks Dr. King to offer suggestions and comments about how to further the aims of the Economic Opportunity Act of 1964. Hawkins reports that the act has garnered resistance from local political leadership because many fear it will undermine their power.

Letter from Aileen B. Armstrong to MLK

Saturday, May 18, 1963

Mrs. Armstrong writes Dr. King to express her regard and deep appreciation for his work.

Letter from Clyde Rembert to MLK

Friday, June 2, 1967

Clyde Rembert, a broadcaster from KRLD-Radio and KRLD-TV, writes Dr. King inviting him to the radio show. Rembert seeks a response from Dr. King regarding a derogatory statement made by Dr. Criswell concerning King's anti-Vietnam war stance.

Letter from Miles W. Jackson to MLK

Saturday, November 11, 1967

The Board of Christian Social Concerns of the Pacific Northwest Conference invites Dr. King to speak at the 1968 conference dinner. The conference will be held at the Methodist Church and will present civil rights spokesman Bishop Everett W. Palmer.

Letter from Dorothy Hunt to MLK Regarding "The Critic"

Monday, March 2, 1964

Dorothy Hunt of The Thomas More Association begins this letter by thanking Dr. King for his prompt reply to their request about contributing to "The Critic." She then asks Dr. King if he would be able to do a piece for "The Critic," and if they could purchase the first American newspaper and magazine rights to a chapter from his book. This letter includes Dora McDonald's holograph shorthand in red ink.

Letter from Joan Daves Requesting the Table of Contents for "Where Do We Go From Here"

Monday, December 19, 1966

Here Joan Daves requests a table of contents for Dr. King's "Where Do We Go From Here" in order to write a description for the catalog.

Letter from Lewis W. Jones to MLK

Tuesday, November 1, 1960

Lewis W. Jones worries about Dr. King because of the recent turmoil he has faced. He hopes that the struggles King has faced recently does not undermine his position in the movement.

Program - SCLC Presentation of Mahalia Jackson

Sunday, December 1, 1963

This SCLC program is for Miss Mahalia Jackson's concert benefitting the organization.

Letter from Mildred Lynch to MLK

Saturday, November 25, 1967

Secretary of the Canadian Anti-Apartheid Committee Mrs. Mildred Lynch inquires about Dr. King's availability to join group members for an upcoming 1968 public meeting to be held in Toronto.

Patripassianism

Dr. King gives a definition of patripassianism.

Anonymous Letter to Mrs. King following MLK's Assassination

Tuesday, April 9, 1968

This letter was written anonymously to Mrs. Coretta Scott King following the televised funeral of Dr. King. The author questions the nerve of Mrs. King to be in mourning, stating that she is no Jackie Kennedy and calling the entire thing a farce. In addition to accusing "The Black King," presumably Dr. King, of planning to burn D.C. and then swoop in to save the city, the author states their desire for African American leaders to receive "a belly full of lead."

Progressive National Baptist Convention Sixth Annual Session

Monday, July 31, 1967

This news release outlines the events and participants for the Sixth Annual Session of the Progressive National Baptist Convention to be held in Cincinnati, Ohio. The theme of the conference is Spiritual Renewal in a Decaying Society.