Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Mississippi (MS)"

Address on Anti-Poverty by Jerome P. Cavanagh

Monday, August 22, 1966
Detroit, MI, New York (NY)

Jerome P. Cavanagh, Mayor of Detroit, delivers this speech before the Office of Economic Opportunity Urban Areas Conference, Great Lakes Region. The conference is dedicated to sharing experiences in the War on Poverty and taking a realistic assessment on the issues in urban areas. Inadequate education, food, housing, and disjointed welfare systems are major problems of concern. Cavanagh encourages the analysis of programs addressing these situations. He also advocates an understanding of federal aid cutbacks and connects insufficient funds to the Vietnam War and space exploration.

Letter from the McKeesport, Pennsylvania NAACP to MLK

Wednesday, March 21, 1962
Pennsylvania (PA)

The McKeesport Branch of the NAACP invites Dr. King to be the guest speaker at its upcoming Human Rights Dinner.

Dr. King's Response to Mrs. W. Bascom

Friday, October 17, 1958
Montgomery, AL

In this letter, Dr. King responded to the get well correspondence sent by Mrs. Willie Bascom. Dr. King took the opportunity to thank her for the kind donation sent to him, during his recovery from a nearly fatal stabbing in 1958. He also acknowledged his readiness to rejoin those fighting in the battle for civil rights, once his healing process was complete.

Letter from Irma Monsky to Mary McHugh

Tuesday, November 14, 1967
New York (NY)

In this letter, Irma Monsky informs Mary McHugh that their panel of judges selected "Christians and Jews: The Tragic Past and the Hopeful Future" and Dr. King's "Where Do We Go from Here", as winners for their National Mass Media Brotherhood Award Program.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Paul Kurtz

Friday, January 5, 1968
New York (NY)

Dora McDonald grants Kurtz permission to print Dr. King's unedited speech "as is," as long as Kurtz indicates on the speech that is taken from a tape and is un-edited.

Memorandum from Alfred Duckett to MLK

Monday, March 13, 1967

This memo addresses fundraising events that Mr. Duckett wishes to pursue.

Letter from Clara Sturges Johnson to MLK

Thursday, December 5, 1963
California (CA)

Ms. Johnson informs Dr. King of her efforts promoting the passing of the "Kennedy Civil Rights Memorial Act." The United States Congress would go on to pass this act in 1964.

MLK Speaks to People of Watts

Thursday, August 19, 1965
California (CA), Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Los Angeles, CA

Dr. King speaks on what it will take to make Los Angeles a better city.

Letter to MLK from Rose Spann

Wednesday, April 26, 1967
New Jersey (NJ), Montgomery, AL

Rosa Spann of West Kinney Jr. High School, expresses her appreciation to Dr. King by writing a poem called "The Undergrounders."

Canon L. John Collins Writes MLK Regarding Nuclear Disarmament

London, England, NETHERLANDS, GERMANY

Reverend Canon L. John Collins writes Dr. King inquiring if he would allow his name to be used as a sponsor for an international financial appeal of the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament.

Letter from Beverly A. Asbury and David W. Stroh to the S.C.L.C.

Thursday, January 4, 1968
Nashville, TN

In this letter, dated January 4, 1968, the chaplains at Benton Chapel of Vanderbilt University enclose a check of support to the S.C.L.C.

Telegram from Gordon Carey to MLK

Thursday, October 20, 1960
New York, NY, Georgia (GA), New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

Gordon Carey of CORE wishes Dr. King well during his imprisonment in the Fulton County Jail.

Letter from Sam Massell Jr. to MLK

Thursday, November 19, 1964
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Sam Massell Jr., President of the City of Atlanta Board of Aldermen, congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

A Look To The Future

Monday, September 2, 1957
Tennessee (TN), EGYPT, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

For the twenty-fifth anniversary of the Highlander Folk School, Dr. King delivers the speech "A Look To The Future." He uses a timeline to explain the adversities African Americans endured to gain recognition as American citizens. He also points out the efforts of the Ku Klux Klan and the White Citizens Councils to make African Americans second class citizens. Lastly, Dr. King points out that America should be more maladjusted in order to avoid failing to cope with the demands of the normal social environment.

MLK Norway Radio Interview

Monday, November 9, 1964
Oslo, Norway, NORWAY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, London, England, PAKISTAN, INDIA, CONGO / ZAIRE

Dr. King addresses the importance of the Chicago Adult Education Project and the impact it would have on the Lawndale community. Issues of discrimination, segregation, racism, and oppression have lead to constant riots and violence in this densely populated area. Dr. King submits the idea that, to cure the issue of the "ghetto", Americans and the government must work to eradicate the causes by offering better education, better housing, and fair wages instead of "anti-riot" legislation.

Letter from George W. Cooke to MLK Requesting Autograph

Montana (MT)

Mr. George Cooke of Great Falls, Montana requests Dr. King's autograph on a Time Magazine cover where his photo appeared. Mr. Cooke further states he has been collecting autographs for over 7 years and has more than 300 autographs.

Letter from A. Dolezalek to MLK

Friday, March 22, 1968
GERMANY

A. Dolezaler, director of a German library, requests a copy of a poster published by the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. He would like to add the poster to a collection about social, political movements.

Anaximenes

Dr. King writes notes about the views of philosopher Anaximenes on the universe, comparing them to those of Thales and Anaximander.

The Road to Freedom

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This draft of Dr. King's "The Road to Freedom" speech explains "there is nothing more powerful in all the world than an idea whose time has come." He further states that the time has indeed come for the ideas of human dignity and freedom.

Letter from Linda Witt to MLK

Thursday, November 30, 1967
San Francisco, CA, California (CA)

Linda Witt, who is conducting research for a school project, asks Dr. King questions about his involvement in the Civil Rights Movement.

Transcript of Press Conference on Hotel Restaurant Desegregation

Atlanta, GA

Dr. King states in this 1962 press conference that he sees integration of Atlanta hotels and restaurants as imminent. With the exception of Mississippi, Alabama, and South Carolina, civil rights are progressing throughout the South. The many groups working on the issue are working toward a common goal and using a variety of strategies, including direct action, litigation, legislation, and education.

Letter from K. B. M. Crooks, Jr. to MLK

Tuesday, November 7, 1967

K. B. M. Crooks, Jr., of the Southeast Regional Office of the National Urban League, writes to Dr. King about a letter of recommendation for Lonnie King, Jr.

Letter from Bob Abel to MLK

UNITED KINGDOM, New York, NY, VIETNAM

In this letter Bob Abel encloses a contribution from a friend in England to Dr. King while also commenting on Vietnam and the link to Civil Rights.

Santayana

Dr. King records George Santayana’s poem, “Oh World, Thou Choosest Not the Better Part!”

The Word of God

Dr. King references Karl Barth on the "word of God."

God

Here, Dr. King writes a theoretical view of the existence of God.

Letter from J.H. Wheeler to MLK

Wednesday, October 12, 1966
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY

J.H. Wheeler requests Dr. King's attendance at the Morehouse College Board of Trustees meeting in New York City.

Acceptance Letter from Rollan Henry of Tuskegee Institute to Scott B. Smith

Tuesday, January 11, 1966
Tuskegee, AL

In this letter, Mr.Henry informs Mr.Smith that he has been accepted to Tuskegee Institute.

Telegram from Governor Edmund Brown to MLK

Tuesday, March 9, 1965
Atlanta, GA, California (CA), Selma, AL

Governor Brown writes to Dr. King protesting the brutal treatment of Negro citizens in Selma, Alabama.

Negroes Suffer From Riots, King Writes In New Book

Sunday, June 25, 1967
Oregon (OR)

The Oregonian newspaper published this brief review of Dr. King's last publication, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?". The article highlights Dr. King's perspective on the negative impact of riots. According to Dr. King, riots were menacing for both black and white communities.