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Leaders' Itinerary for August 28 March

Wednesday, August 28, 1963
Washington, D.C.

This document contains a detailed leaders' itinerary for the March on Washington for Freedom and Jobs. Throughout the day leaders will meet with government officials, including, the Speaker of the United States House of Representatives John McCormack and President John F. Kennedy.

Letter from MLK to Dr. and Mrs. J.R. Arnold about a Contribution

Monday, January 30, 1967
California (CA)

In this letter Dr. King offers his belated gratitude to Dr. and Mrs. J.R. Arnold for their financial contribution to the SCLC while also explaining why such contributions are important.

Statement from the Eisenhower Administration to the NAACP

Sunday, June 26, 1955
New Jersey (NJ), Atlantic City, NJ, Washington, D.C.

In an address to the NAACP, Vice President Richard Nixon discusses the reasons that progress has been made in the Eisenhower Administration and the goals that the organization needs to continue working toward.

Letter from Beth Arnold to MLK

Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), New York, NY

Ms. Arnold writes to inform Dr. King that she is head of his campaign committee for a campus movement for the upcoming election. She asks for any campaign material Dr. King can provide.

Entering 1964: Toward Full Emancipation

Tuesday, December 17, 1963
Birmingham, AL, Philadelphia, PA

In this draft of an article for the NY Amsterdam News, Dr. King asserts that the thrust of the Negro will increase toward full emancipation as they began the year 1964. Dr. King highlights the March on Washington where both Negroes and whites collectively demonstrated the need for self-respect and human dignity in the United States. He also elaborates on the technique of "selective patronage" to broaden the economic and employment opportunities for the African American community.

SCLC Supporter Paul Anderson Scolds MLK

San Francisco, CA, Washington, D.C.

Mr. Anderson expresses his concerns about Dr. King's upcoming Washington D.C. demonstration. He believes that, if the demonstration is successful, lower income citizens will have to pay higher taxes.

Letter to MLK Regarding the Draft Law

Sunday, July 30, 1967
Illinois (IL), Atlanta, GA

Dr. King receives an anonymous letter regarding the revision of Draft Law. The author states that the July 1, 1967 revision of the law allows regulations that further burden the military service to lower income groups, specifically Negroes, instead of requiring that Military service be spread more equally. The author encloses the State Memorandum No. 6-21, which was issued by the Illinois State Director of Selective Service on July 19, 1967.

Letter from John A. Blatnik to MLK

Thursday, February 27, 1964
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

John A. Blatnik, Chair of the Democratic Study Group, writes Dr. King thanking him for his recent letter indicating his support for Blatnik's position on civil rights.

History and Human Nature

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr's "The Nature and Destiny of Man: A Christian Interpretation" on the rebellion against rationalism's interpretation of human nature.

Letter from D. G. Witt to MLK

Monday, April 3, 1967
Iowa (IA), Atlanta, GA, Des Moines, IA, Georgia (GA)

D. G. Witt notifies Dr. King that Preferred Risk Mutual Insurance Company has reconsidered canceling Dr. King's automobile insurance. Due to the number of accidents Dr. King has had, continued coverage will require payment of a higher surcharge.

Letter from W. David Angus to MLK

Friday, October 25, 1963
CANADA

W. David Angus extends an invitation for Dr. King to speak to the members of the Canadian Club of Montreal about the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from MLK to Hal Lenke

Alabama (AL)

Dr. King thanks Hal Lenke for investigating the situation in Huntsville, Alabama and reporting his findings to SCLC. He is currently considering Lenke's suggestions. Lenke later coordinated press relations for Resurrection City, the Poor People’s Campaign encampment in Washington, DC.

Letter from Ralph Saylor to MLK

VIETNAM

Mr. Saylor assures Dr. King that he still has the support of the white community regardless of his stance on the Vietnam War.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Tuesday, September 8, 1964
London, England, New York, NY, New York (NY)

This letter from Ms. Daves to Dr. King features requests regarding his itinerary for his trip to England.

Letter from W. Maxfield Garrott

Friday, October 16, 1964
Tennessee (TN), JAPAN, Virginia (VA), Atlanta, GA, Richmond, VA

W. Maxfield Garrott, president of the Seinen Jo Gakuin Baptist School in Japan, invites Dr. King to make an appearance if he ever visits Japan. Garrot also congratulates Dr. King on being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Coronet Magazine: After Desegregation-What

Sunday, January 1, 1961
Washington, D.C., Texas (TX), Louisiana (LA), Georgia (GA)

In this draft of an article for Coronet Magazine, Dr. King outlines the challenges that Negro college students will face after desegregation and the impact of the student movement as a whole. He argues that desegregation is not the same as integration, but that the former must happen in order for the latter to exist. Dr. King also explains that Negro students are gaining a much richer education by participating in sit-ins and other civil rights demonstrations, which will prepare them for society once desegregation is a reality.

Exodus

EGYPT

Dr. King wrote these note cards, marked "Class Notes," on Exodus. He focuses on the topics of knowledge, the doctrine of God, sin, ethics, social ethics, and the covenant.

Coretta Scott King - Soprano

Friday, July 10, 1959
Ohio (OH), Alabama (AL)

This 1959 program features Mrs. King in concert. One section of the performance is entitled "Portrait of the Non-Violent Integration Movement in Montgomery."

Suffering

Dr. King records J. S. Mill’s view of suffering.

Jesus

This note card seems to reflect some of Dr. King's personal insights on Jesus. It belongs to a series of note cards devoted to the topic of Jesus.

Speech to the American Psychological Association

Friday, September 1, 1967
Washington, D.C.

In this speech on the 75th anniversary of the American Psychological Association, Dr. King acknowledges the help that social science can have in the quest of Negroes for equality. He identifies three areas for study: Negro leadership, the efficacy of political action, and the psychological and ideological changes taking place in Negroes as a result of a decade of struggle.

Letter Withdrawing Support From Gordon Delsemer to Dr. King

Thursday, October 19, 1967
Baltimore, MD

This letter dated October 20, 1967, was sent to Dr. King from Gordon H. Delsemer. Mr. Delsemer is withdrawing his support from the SCLC because of the "anti-Semitic" statements he believes were made by certain black leaders.

Listings of scholarship applicants of March 1967

Chicago, IL

Document titled Russell Bull Scholarship Applications March 1967. The list reads of applicants who are eligible for scholarships .

Letter from MLK to James Farmer

Thursday, April 30, 1964
New York, NY

Dr. King sends James Farmer a complimentary copy of a journal on the works of the SCLC.

Advertisement for "Why We Can't Wait"

Monday, May 25, 1964
Birmingham, AL

Under the Additional Listings section of this magazine is a review about Dr. King's "Why We Can't Wait."

Letter from Carl E. Farris to William Rutherford

Wednesday, December 27, 1967

Mr. Farris strongly rejects Mr. Rutherford's offered position to answer Dr. King's mail and to act as Deputy Director of CEP at board meetings.

Letter from MLK to the McKeesport, Pennsylvania NAACP

Tuesday, March 27, 1962
Pennsylvania (PA)

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak from the McKeesport, Pennsylvania Branch of the NAACP.

Is Nonviolence Effective

FRANCE, New York (NY), ALGERIA, INDIA, SOUTH AFRICA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Rev. P. R. Regamey writes a paper that discusses whether or not nonviolence is effective. He uses Gandhi's methods as a basis for the paper. Rev. Regamey also addresses the broader theory and practice of nonviolence.

Letter from MLK to Dr. Raphael Demos

Friday, July 19, 1963
Cambridge, MA

Dr. King writes Harvard University professor Dr. Demos confirming his enrollment in the professor's Philosophy of Plato course. He also thanks Dr. Demos for his "kind words" regarding an article he wrote for "Christianity and Crisis." In addition, Dr. King further extends his regards to Mrs. Demos, whom Mrs. King studied with at the New England Conservatory of Music.

Bernard of Clairvaux

Dr. King writes about Bernard of Clairvaux and his idea of the character of the ideal Christian.