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People in Action: Segregation And The Church

Saturday, February 2, 1963

In this New York Amsterdam News article of February 2, 1963, Dr. King mentions writer James Baldwin’s scathing indictment of the Christian Church and states that the Church has been complicit in the system of racial segregation or remained silent on racial injustice, the nation’s most urgent social ill. The church should be the headlight, he states, not the taillight and be true to the prophetic call for justice. King takes hope, however, having just attended the National Conference on Religion and Race in Chicago, which brought together Catholic, Protestant, and Jewish leaders.

Letter from Ludovic Luke Barrie to MLK Regarding World Bible Society

In this letter, Ludovic Luke Barrie grants Dr. King the title “Honary President of The World Bible Society, Inc.” for all of his accomplishments.

Letter from MLK's Secretary to Wyatt Tee Walker

Friday, November 20, 1964

Dr. King's secretary sends Wyatt Tee Walker information regarding the upcoming trip to Oslo, Norway.

Letter From Andrew Young to Chris Folcker

Wednesday, June 1, 1966

In this letter, Andrew Young thanks Chris Folcker for his work with the Martin Luther King Fund, the Europe-wide fundraising campaign on behalf of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and Dr. King. Young praises the "tremendous success" of the fund.

Notes about Books

Dr. King opposes the existence of books that degrade the Negro image and falsely contribute to a "national brainwashing." He cites quotations from novelist John Steinbeck, which discourse on the "sacred" nature of a book.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rev. William Lawson

Wednesday, May 6, 1964

Dora McDonald writes in response to a request from Reverend William Lawson of Texas Southern University. McDonald encloses a biographical sketch and photograph of Dr. King, then relays a message from the Reverend to exclude a reception for him on May 17.

American Negro in the Field of Industrial Relations

This survey is an enclosure of a letter from Alfred L.J. Gunn to Dr. King. Entitled "The Negro in Personnel and Industrial Relations," the survey was conducted using interviews with American people involved in Industrial Relations. Through asking a series of questions to sixty participants, it is concluded that "the future of the American Negro in the field of Industrial Relations is expanding greatly."

Routing Slip

Wednesday, October 4, 1967

This document is an Office of Economic Opportunity routing slip from Maurice Dawkins. The slip has Dr. Kings signature on the first line.

Letter from Thomas S. Maloney to Dora McDonald

Thursday, June 24, 1965

Rev. Thomas S. Maloney informs Dora McDonald that he has yet to recieve previously requested materials regarding Dr. King's philosophy.

Facing Life's Inescapables

Dr. King uses an allegory regarding life to express that if an individual follows God's plan they will live an abundantly happy life.

House Resolution 12962

Monday, September 18, 1967

This is a copy of House Resolution 12962, passed by the Ninetieth United States Congress in 1967. This resolution called for the establishment of a Commission on Negro History and Culture.

New Wars For Old

Alfred Noyes writes a poem entitled, "New Wars For Old." Mr. Noyes focuses on various aspects of life and repeatedly asks, "when have we prayed for peace."

Letter from Maurice A. Dawkins to MLK concerning VISTA volunteer training

Tuesday, November 23, 1965

Maurice A. Dawkins, of the Office of Economic Opportunity, requests leadership training from the SCLC for the VISTA volunteers who were expected to work in the rural South.

Letter from Saskatchewan Teachers' Federation

Tuesday, April 19, 1966

Hector G. Trout, Assistant Secretary of the Saskatchewan Teachers' Federation, expresses interest in Dr. King speaking at their teachers' convention.

Review of "Why We Can't Wait"

A preview of Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait," appearing in TIPS, highlights specific reasons why the American Negro is so unwilling to accept the system of gradualism as a way of obtaining his rights.

Notice from Leadership Conference on Civil Rights

Wednesday, April 10, 1968

Here is a letter to stimulate local civil rights organizations to undertake visits to House and Senate members during Easter Recess. The visits were to push for legislative goals such as "at least a million jobs for the hardcore unemployed, decent low cost housing for all and repeal of punitive welfare restrictions." The Leadership Conference on Civil Rights issued this notice, in the days following Dr. King's assassination.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Thomas W. Johnson Declining an Invitation to Write an Article

Thursday, December 1, 1966

This letter from Dora McDonald to Thomas W. Johnson is in response to a request for Dr. King to write an article for the December 12, 1966 edition of The Forum. Dora McDonald informs Thomas W. Johnson that Dr. King regrets his inability to accept the invitation at this time.

Dr. King Sermon Outline - "Choose Life"

This handwritten document is an outline of a sermon entitled "Choose Life."

Out of Segregation's Long Night

Dr. King addresses the crisis of race relations in America by asserting that there would not be a crisis if blacks accepted inferiority and injustice. He also discusses the physical and spiritual harm that segregation and slavery has caused for blacks and the effect that violence has on the community. Dr. King closes with remarks regarding nonviolence and what it truly represents.

Letter from MLK to Senator Edward V. Long

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King expresses appreciation for Senator Long's support in the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

The Bible

Dr. King records notes regarding Protestant Orthodoxy and its great error in dealing with the Bible.

Memo to SCLC Contributors

This memo from the SCLC Staff highlights political activity taking place in Louisville, Kentucky, Blue Ridge, Georgia, and Cleveland, Ohio. The organization had used the energy from demonstrations to fuel voter registration campaigns. They share stories of collaborations and success that have resulted from their efforts.

Letter from Lymell Carter to MLK

Thursday, January 17, 1963

Reverend Lymell Carter, Minister of Wesley Chapel C.M.E. Church, informs Dr. King that the Clarksville community is in need of his appearance. Reverend Carter details the racial demographics of the Tennessee town and the minimal voting capacity of the African American population. He notes the urgency of Dr. King's appearance to assist with the issues of integration and necessary political influence of the black community.

Letter from Claudette Holston to MLK

Thursday, January 25, 1968

Claudette Holston writes Dr. King expressing the plight she has faced as a black woman in Michigan and Georgia. She asks Dr. King, "how would you feel if I was your daughter or wife?" and strongly urges him to write back.

Letter from Frank Meranda to President Johnson

Monday, October 17, 1966

Frank Meranda, chairman of the Boston chapter of CORE, writes President Johnson to point out that job tests for the federal government result in discrimination against minorities.

Letter from Gail Lamb to MLK

Monday, April 1, 1968

Gail Lamb requests information from Dr. King for her research on prejudice, especially on "manifestations, kinds, and objects of prejudice."

Royalty Statement for Casterman Published Edition of "Strength to Love"

Wednesday, January 31, 1968

This royalty statement references royalties earned for a French-language edition of "Strength to Love".

MLK's Remarks at the World March Toward Human Rights Luncheon

Thursday, May 28, 1964

This is a draft of remarks made by Dr. King to the World March Toward Human Rights Luncheon of the NAACP's Legal Education Defense Fund. The event took place at the Americana Hotel in Arlington, Virginia. Dr. King states that human rights involve two elements: recognition and opportunity. Dr. King proposes that the United States launch a Bill of Rights for the Disadvantaged.

Discerning the Signs of History

Dr. King's sermon "Discerning the Signs of History" asserts "evil carries the seeds of its own destruction." King gives examples throughout history, such as slavery, colonialism, and the rise and fall of King Louis XVI.

Notecard- Barth

In this notecard, Dr.King outlines his views on Barth.