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Letter from William M. Gray to Ralph Abernathy

Monday, April 8, 1968

William Gray offers his prayers and support as Rev. Abernathy takes over command of the SCLC following Dr. King's death.

Letter from MLK to A.S. Grant

Dr. King thanks Elder Grant for the kind remarks from his previous letter and lets him know that due to the business of his schedule as the President of the SCLC, he is unable to devote attention to Grant's proposal.

Freedom

Dr. King summarizes theologian Reinhold Niebuhr and his conceptualization of "Freedom."

Anonymous Letter to MLK

An anonymous individual sends Dr. King newspaper clippings showing African-Americans participating in looting and violence. Dr. King is asked to review the articles and offer comments via television.

Letter from MLK to Dr. M. R. Cherry

Tuesday, September 27, 1966

Dr. King informs Dr. M. R. Cherry that he will be unable to accept his invitation to speak at Acadia University in Nova Scotia. King states that his schedule is busy as he is trying to spread social justice in America.

Letter from Jean Tisdale to MLK

Friday, March 30, 1962

Jean Tisdale, a student at Mills College in Oakland, California, writes Dr. King and requests an account of his personal experiences concerning problems in the South and the Negro's stride toward equality.

Financial Report of the SCLC

Monday, March 4, 1968

This is the SCLC financial report for the week of March 4 through March 8, 1968. Income, disbursements, and bank balances from several banks are included in this document. Expenses from organizational projects, such as Voter Registration, the Washington Project and Operation Breadbasket, are also documented. A list of priorities and outstanding debts conclude the report.

Letter from Daniel A. Jezer to MLK

Thursday, March 7, 1968

Rabbi Daniel Jezer, of Temple Beth Shalom in Satellite Beach, Florida, responds to Dr. King's request for contributions to the SCLC. Rabbi Jezer, a past contributor to the SCLC, now feels in a quandary because of ?an anti-Israel, anti-Zionist platform? approved at the Conference of New Politics, which included delegates from the SCLC.

Letter from M. L. Teer Regarding Housing Conditions

M. L. Teer writes a letter to Senator Robert F. Kennedy on behalf of her nephew, Robert Williams of Chicago, IL.

Institute of Non-Violence and Social Change: Reformation for Freedom

Friday, May 31, 1957

This 1957 program with the theme "Dignity with Humility, Love with Courage and Justice without Violence" details an event of the Institute of Non-Violence and Social Change, in which Dr. King is featured as a guest speaker. Though his affiliation is listed as President of Montgomery's Improvement Association, Dr. King appeared as leader of the nascent Southern Christian Leadership Conference, formed January 10, 1957.

Letter from Clarence E. Pickett, Dorothy M. Steere, and George C. Hardin

The Religious Society of Friends, which consists of 17,000 Quakers, decides to send its members to spread a message of "love and goodwill" to both whites and Negroes of Philadelphia.

Injunction Requested by the City of Birmingham against Protests

The City of Birmingham submitted this "bill of injunction" to the Circuit Court of Alabama to try to stop the sit ins, boycott pickets, and marches led by Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights, SCLC, and others in April of 1963. After the injunction was granted and served April 10th, they continued their civil disobedience and many more were arrested. From solitary confinement, Dr. King then wrote "Letter from a Birmingham Jail."

Letter from MLK to Dwight Campbelll

Friday, September 11, 1964

Dr. King declines an invitation from the Methodist Youth Fellowship to speak in Philadelphia.

Telegram from MLK to Mrs. H. H. Hubbard

Friday, September 15, 1967

Dr. King sends his condolences to Mrs. H. H. Hubbard following the death of her husband. Dr. King also mentions the importance of Dr. Hubbard's contributions to the Montgomery bus boycott.

Letter from Paul P. Martin to MLK

Monday, March 26, 1962

The Erie Branch of the NAACP invites Dr. King to be the principal speaker at its Freedom Rally.

Letter from MLK to James Hoffa

Monday, December 19, 1966

Dr. King offers support to James Hoffa, President of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters, several months prior to the start of Mr. Hoffa's prison term at Lewisburg Federal Penitentiary in Pennsylvania.

Letter from Mary Whiteside to MLK

Monday, May 7, 1962

Ms. Whiteside, treasurer of the Democratic Club of Paseo, Washington, encloses a check to help Dr. King with "organizing and tutoring." The club decided to send the funds after reading a letter one of its members received from Dr. King.

Fumbling on the New Frontier

Saturday, March 3, 1962

This article critiques the Kennedy Administration's civil rights agenda. Additionally, it outlines Dr. King's view that all presidents should play a pivotal role in the Civil Rights Movement.

SCLC 10th Anniversary Flyer

Wednesday, August 16, 1967

The flyer highlights the 10th anniversary of the SCLC and outlines the speakers and events which will take place.

Teacher Exchange

Thursday, December 17, 1964

The Darien Board of Education exchange program is under scrutiny, given claims that African American teachers integrating into the majority Caucasian Connecticut school district will be unqualified to teach.

Office of Economic Opportunity Community Action Program

This document details a budget for the Anti-Poverty Coordinating Committee's Project Administration component.

More and Faster

Sunday, January 5, 1964

Dr. King writes on the topic of "The Negro Goal: More and Faster." King highlights the black political and social climate in 1964 and discusses how the act of nonviolence gave blacks hope.

SCLC National Executive Board Meeting

Thursday, March 30, 1967

The SCLC conducts a mass meeting with the national executive board in Kentucky. Both members from the SCLC and Kentucky Christian Leadership Conference direct the meeting. The schedule includes an invocation, greetings from various members, an address by Dr. King, and more.

Knowledge of God

Dr. King references religious philosopher Henry Nelson Wieman regarding his views on science and knowing God. In part of this eight card series, Dr. King records Wieman's belief that "It is probable he can never be known completely; but we can increase our knowledge of Him by contemplation... and form scientific methods on the other."

Telegram from Irving Block to MLK

Sunday, January 28, 1968

Rabbi Irving J. Block of the Brotherhood Synagogue in New York requests to meet with Dr. King regarding the Negro Jewish community.

Letter from Wallace Best to MLK

Sunday, April 25, 1965

Wallace Best encloses a donation to the SCLC but advises against purusing economic boycotts. According to Best, an economic boycott will "greatly demean the conduct of your noble cause....."

Letter from Charles Szolyvai to MLK

Sunday, June 14, 1964

Charles Szolyvai writes Dr. King requesting a meeting in an "effort to help you in your great fight for justice for all." Dr. King handwrites a response at the corner of the document stating his uncertainty of when he will be in New York.

Letter from MLK to Jan Helge Jansen

Tuesday, April 7, 1964

Dr. King responds to an invitation to speak in Oslo, Norway in the fall of 1964. He informs the requester that the "present temper of events in this section of the country" has influenced him to adopt a policy of not accepting invitations more than two months in advance. He states, however, that he will keep the invitation on file and communicate with the sender in September regarding his eligibility to accept the invitation.

Membership Director's Report to CORE Convention

In this report to the members of CORE, Mr. Robinson outlines the goals for acquiring new contributing associate members and keeping the members they have. It is also concerned with increasing the amount of the donations. The report specifically focuses on membership maintenance, recruitment, growth and the impact of holiday cards.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

Saturday, March 30, 1968

An unknown author questions Dr. King about his leadership and involvement in the Civil Rights Movement. He references various racial, political, and social events, and stresses that Dr. King is responsible for all the riots, violence and looting.