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"Mississippi (MS)"

Letter from Gloria Kenny to MLK

Thursday, October 20, 1966
New York (NY)

Mrs. Kenny encloses her monthly contribution of $50 to the SCLC and reports that a recent recruitment letter has resulted in 18 potential new members.

Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty Members List

New York, NY, New York (NY), Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, California (CA), Wisconsin (WI), Ohio (OH), Cleveland, OH

This document lists members of the Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty, Commission on National Programs and Policies as of December 1965.

A Statement to the South and Nation

Mississippi (MS), Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Georgia (GA), HUNGARY, South Africa

This seemingly unexceptional document signifies the birth of the SCLC. Dr. King, Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth and Rev. C. K. Steele assembled a consortium of leaders in Atlanta following the end of the Montgomery Bus Boycott. The Southern Leaders Conference on Transportation and Non-Violent Integration issued this statement that addresses the intimidation, discrimination and economic disparity Negroes face in the South. The statement appeals to the federal government to intervene against assaults that block basic civil rights.

Justice Harlan Concurring

Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA), South Carolina (SC)

This newspaper article discusses John Marshall Harlan's dissent with the case of "Plessy vs. Ferguson," and how Harlan was not acknowledged when the case was overturned.

American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa: Advance Registration

Monday, January 9, 1967
Washington, D.C., New York, NY, California (CA)

Theodore E. Brown, the Director of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa, sends a letter with attached registration forms for the Third Biennial National Conference.

Pantheism Versus Living God

Here Dr. King sketches out his views on "...the Biblical idea of the 'Living God,'" and the substitution of Christ for God "as far as piety is concerned."

Darien Integration

Friday, April 17, 1964
Connecticut (CT)

This article is a summary of the integration of the Negro population into high-income residential suburbs. The Superintendent of schools and the Darien Board of Education has created a program to exchange schoolteachers and encourage students to attend schools with integrated classes.

Bill of Complaint: City Board of Education of Birmingham, Alabama

Friday, May 10, 1963
Birmingham, AL, Atlanta, GA, Chicago, IL, Mississippi (MS)

The City Board of Education of Birmingham, Alabama accuses several civil rights leaders and organizations of discouraging Negro students from attending public schools.

Telegram from Duncan Wood to MLK

Thursday, September 28, 1967
FRANCE, RUSSIAN FEDERATION

Dr. King receives a telegram from Duncan Wood in Geneva, Switzerland concerning upcoming international trips.

Letter from Edinbugh University to MLK

Sunday, July 31, 1966

Malcom L. Rigkind, the President of Debates at Edinburgh University, renews an invitation for Dr. King to speak in Scotland.

Telegram from Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights to MLK

Thursday, August 9, 1962
Albany, GA, Birmingham, AL, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL)

The Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights and its executives offer support to Dr. King, who is imprisoned in the Albany jail.

MLK Norway Radio Interview

Monday, November 9, 1964
Oslo, Norway, NORWAY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, London, England, PAKISTAN, INDIA, CONGO / ZAIRE

Dr. King addresses the importance of the Chicago Adult Education Project and the impact it would have on the Lawndale community. Issues of discrimination, segregation, racism, and oppression have lead to constant riots and violence in this densely populated area. Dr. King submits the idea that, to cure the issue of the "ghetto", Americans and the government must work to eradicate the causes by offering better education, better housing, and fair wages instead of "anti-riot" legislation.

Letter from Rev. Camilo A. Boasso to MLK

Wednesday, December 30, 1964
New Jersey (NJ), ARGENTINA

In this document, a Catholic priest from Argentina writes to Dr. King and congratulates him for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. The priest also inquires about obtaining permission to translate into Spanish Dr. King's recent book "Why We Cant Wait." Requests like this increased significantly as Dr. King's prominence grew.

SCLC Newsletter: October-November 1965

Friday, October 1, 1965
Alabama (AL), Atlanta, GA, Baltimore, MD, Birmingham, AL, Chicago, IL, Connecticut (CT), Detroit, MI, FRANCE, Florida (FL), Georgia (GA), Iowa (IA), Los Angeles, CA, Louisiana (LA), Michigan (MI), Mississippi (MS), Montgomery, AL, Nashville, TN, New Jersey (NJ), New York (NY), New York, NY, North Carolina (NC), Oklahoma (OK), San Francisco, CA, Selma, AL, South Carolina (SC), Tennessee (TN), Texas (TX), VIETNAM, Virginia (VA), Washington, D.C.

This SCLC newsletter depicts the courage of SCLC workers putting their lives on the line while fighting for civil rights. The newsletter also highlights pictures from SCLC's ninth annual convention in Birmingham Alabama and a children's book about Dr. King.

Statement on The Negro's Political and Economic Power

Friday, October 14, 1966
Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Dr. King discusses the inferior political and economic power of the American Negro against the backdrop of emerging Black Power organizations. He reveals several new non-violent programs the SCLC targeted at economic and social justice: youth training and political reformation in the South. It is in accordance with the philosophy of non-violence that Dr. King believes the vast majority of Negroes will birth a "community in which neither power nor dignity will be black or white."

Letter from David W. Letts to the S.C.L.C.

Wednesday, April 10, 1968
Cleveland, OH

This letter, coupled with a donation, was sent from Baldwin-Wallace College to the S.C.L.C following Dr. King's assassination. The writer discusses the initiation of student activism that was taking place at the college in response to Dr. King's tragic death.

Letter from Everett McKinley Dirksen to MLK

Monday, July 6, 1964
Illinois (IL), Atlanta, GA

Everett M. Dirksen expresses gratitude for Dr. King's letter and informs him of the satisfaction he received in being an asset in solidifying the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from Dr. Benjamin E. Mays to MLK

Tuesday, December 12, 1961
Atlanta, GA

In this letter, President of Morehouse College, Benjamin E. Mays writes Dr. King with an enclosed check to assist with the work of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

1963 Income Statement for the SCLC

This document is a financial balance sheet for the SCLC for the fiscal period 9/1/63 to 8/31/64. The statement gives a breakdown of revenues and expenses and lists a net deficit of $50,622.59.

Letter from MLK to Hazel Gregory

Wednesday, July 24, 1963
Montgomery, AL, Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL)

Dr. King responds to Hazel Gregory's previous correspondence about transportation to the March on Washington. He informs Mrs. Gregory that he is attending a meeting regarding the logistics of the march the next day and will communicate further about a bus from Montgomery to attend the event.

Letter from Milton A. Reid to Mahalia Jackson

Sunday, October 20, 1963
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C., Virginia (VA)

Milton A. Reid, candidate for the Eighth Senatorial District, invites Mahalia Jackson to come and sing at the oldest Negro Baptist Church in America.

Annual Address Delivered at the First Annual Institute on Nonviolence and Social Change

Monday, December 3, 1956
Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, EGYPT, HUNGARY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, CHINA, UNITED KINGDOM, NETHERLANDS, FRANCE, INDONESIA, INDIA, PAKISTAN, Massachusetts (MA), New York (NY), New York, NY, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, JAPAN, Tokyo, Japan, Washington (WA), CANADA, Colorado (CO), New Hampshire (NH), Pennsylvania (PA), Mississippi (MS), Georgia (GA), Tennessee (TN)

Dr. King's speech at the First Annual Institute of Non-Violence and Social Change addresses many issues regarding the African American. The most recurring issues are of obtaining and maintaining freedom, equality and personal dignity.

"I, Too" by Jerry Peace

Alabama (AL)

This document displays the poem "I, Too" by Jerry Peace

People In Action: Nothing Changing Unless

Sunday, January 28, 1962
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

In his regular column in the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King writes in support of a 435 million dollar job training bill that would "salvage a segment of the unemployed and potentially employable."

Telegram from George Field to MLK

Wednesday, September 25, 1963
New York, NY

In this telegram, George Field, Executive Director of Freedom House, was willing to set a new date for their civil rights dinner, so that Dr. King would be able to attend.

Request from Virgil Jones to MLK

Wednesday, March 6, 1968
Chicago, IL

Virgil Jones requests photocopies of letters sent to him on Nov. 9, 1967, as well as some other materials.

Telegram from MLK to Eartha Kitt

California (CA)

Dr. King requests a telephone conversation with Miss Kitt.

Draft Letter from MLK to Mr. Hasselvander

Dr. King writes Mr. Hasselvander hoping to resolve some issues from recent events of injustice and inequality that occurred in Hasselvander's life.

Letter from MLK to Geraldine Fothergill

Monday, February 25, 1963
Connecticut (CT), Hartford, CT

Dr. King informs Mrs. Fothergill that her idea to house African American students through a coordinated church effort has merit. He suggests that she contact Reverend Richard Battles of the Mount Olives Baptist Church in Hartford, Connecticut, who is a representative of the SCLC and gauge his reaction to the idea.

Economic and Social Bill of Rights

Tuesday, February 6, 1968
VIETNAM

The SCLC calls for an economic and social bill of rights to demand the inalienable rights to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness for African Americans. It would include the right of every employable citizen to a decent job, the right of every citizen to a minimum income, the right to a decent house in a neighborhood of choice, the right to an adequate education, the right to health care, and the right to full participation in decision-making.