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The Dilemma of Negro Americans

In this draft of a chapter for his book Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community?, Dr. King offers an in-depth description of the plight of African Americans over the past few hundred years and how it will never be fully understood by their white counterparts. He recounts the issues associated with American slavery – the dehumanization of slaves and the destruction of the family unit. He ties what happened in the past to what is occurring in the present, explaining that because of these layers of oppression African Americans have to play catch up to be seen as equals in America.

MLK's Statement on Church Destruction in Leesburg, Georgia

Thursday, August 16, 1962

In this statement following the destruction of a church in Leesburg, Georgia, Dr. King argues that it was the action of somebody with the "strange illusion" that it would somehow stop African-Americans from seeking freedom and justice.

Letter from Hunn Guelde to MLK

Saturday, October 1, 1966

Hunn Guelde inquires about a claim made by the FBI in regards to Dr. King.

Letter from Coretta Scott King to Velma B. Hall

Wednesday, October 12, 1960

Mrs. King addressed this correspondence to Velma Hall, in 1960. In this document, Mrs. King extended apologies for the delay in sending her biographical information.

Letter from Wallace Terry to MLK

Monday, April 8, 1963

The Washington Post anticipates Dr. King's presence as their speaker for the Public Lecture Series "One Hundred Years of Freedom." However, the coordinator of the event, Wallace Terry, understands that Dr. King's imprisonment in the Birmingham jail might prevent Dr. King from appearing. Terry suggests that the Reverends Fred Shuttlesworth, Ralph Abernathy or Wyatt Walker could serve as a substitute. Lastly, Terry pledges to collect an offering for the SCLC.

Statement on Morality in Selma Crisis

Wednesday, April 28, 1965

The undersigned individuals present at the Selma to Montgomery March write a statement regarding the conduct of participants. Accusations have been made stating marchers committed "acts of sexual immortality," which the undersigned aim to prove are absolutely untrue. Also included is a section on fiction and facts about the march, and a "Concluding Page Regarding Clergy for Alabama Truth."

Letter from Theodore Brown to MLK

Friday, April 21, 1967

In a letter to Dr. King, Mr. Brown encloses an article pertaining to Nigeria being on the brink of disintegration and civil war.

Letter to Ms. Dora McDonald from Solomon Mendelson

Wednesday, January 17, 1968

Mr. Solomon Mendelson informs the SCLC and Ms. Dora McDonald that CBS will not be televising Dr. King's "I have a Dream Speech."

Letter from Jesse Jackson to Negro Businessmen

Saturday, February 11, 1967

Reverend Jesse L. Jackson informs Negro Businessmen on the requirements for attending the Businessmen's Workshop sponsored by Operation Breadbasket.

MLK Reflections on the Selma March, Bloody Sunday, SNCC and Communism

Dr. King discusses the Selma to Montgomery march, calling it the "most powerful and dramatic civil rights protest ever held in the south." Dr. King also addresses criticism of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee's tactics. He concludes these notes by responding to claims that he has communist ties, denying any foreign or left-wing influence on his actions. Of Bayard Rustin and C. T.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, August 3, 1964

Ms. Daves writes Dr. King to inform him of her conversation with Harper & Row concerning the advertisements for the book "Why We Can't Wait." She describes their negotiations and asks for further guidance.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Dick Smyth

Tuesday, March 26, 1963

Dora McDonald informs Dick Smyth that Dr. King is unable to accept the speaking engagement at the moment but they will contact him once Dr. King has an engagement in the area.

Declaration of "Nobel Peace Prize Day" Desired

This press release announces the Virginia State Unit of the SCLC's appeal to Governor Albertis Harrison in hopes that he will establish a "Nobel Peace Prize Day" in honor of Dr. King. The proposed day will possibly be held in conjunction with a speech Dr. King will deliver at Virginia State College and the Virginia SCLC State Convention.

Letter from W. A. F. Braem to MLK

Monday, December 4, 1967

Mr. Braem writes Dr. King emphasizing the importance of self-reliance. Braem list some issues that Civil Rights leaders should pay attention to such as education.

Letter from R. Elliot to Dora McDonald

Thursday, March 14, 1968

In this response letter, R. Elliot thanks Dora McDonald for her response to his inquiry regarding the redevelopment of Ebenezer Baptist Church.

Operation Breadbasket Cost Breakdown

Operation Breadbasket was a division of the SCLC founded in 1962 and operated by Reverend Fred C. Bennett. The project was dedicated to improving the economic conditions of black communities across the United States. This is an estimated cost breakdown for the operation. It includes expected wages, salaries, transportation, insurance, and office supplies for running the project for one year.

Gift from James Allen to MLK

Thursday, January 4, 1968

In this letter, James Allen, of International Publishers, presents to Dr. King a copy of "The Autobiography of W.E.B. DuBois."

Letter from R. Lennox to MLK

Wednesday, November 25, 1964

Dr. King is invited to deliver the main address for The Presbyterian College of Montreal's Annual Convocation in April of 1965. The institution will be preparing to celebrate its 100th Anniversary.

The Mastery of Fear

This outline explains the direction of Dr. King's sermon entitled "The Mastery of Fear." In it, Dr. King explores the challenges and necessity of confronting fear.

God (Dewey)

According to Dr. King's understanding of Dewey's interpretation, God is the connection between the ideal and the actual.

Birthday Card to MLK

Thursday, January 15, 1959

Elaine Stears and Family wish Dr. King a Happy Birthday.

American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa: Advance Registration

Monday, January 9, 1967

Theodore E. Brown, the Director of the American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa, sends a letter with attached registration forms for the Third Biennial National Conference.

Letter from Ivor Liss to MLK

Monday, April 15, 1963

Ivor M. Liss writes Dr. King and explains his support for the movement that Dr. King is leading. He talks about how being silent would actually hurt Dr. King and the Civil Rights Movement. Liss explains that as a Jew he understands the fight for equality as it is something that Jewish people are still fighting for. He encloses a check for $100.00.

Ritschl (God)

Dr. King quotes Albrecht Ritschl’s “The Christian Doctrine of Justification and Reconciliation.”

Annihilationism

Dr. King defines annihilationism as a belief regarding the death of the wicked.

The False God of Science

Sunday, July 5, 1953

In this manuscript the author addresses their belief on the validity of modern man making a god of science.

Immortality

Dr. King quotes German philosopher Dr. Oswald Spengler regarding his ideology of immortality. According to Spengler, history holds no permanent value. King states "If such a philosophy of history is right there would be no reason to desire continued existence...immortality would have no meaning."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Geraldine Fones

Friday, January 12, 1968

Ms. McDonald informs Ms. Fones that Dr. King will not be able to speak to the Oxford Union Society in London due to commitments in the United States around the same time frame.

Poetry

Dr. King quotes Shelley's views on poetry from the book "Defiance of Poetry."

Letter From George Patton Jr. to MLK

George Patton expresses his disdain to Dr. King about the names that whites call "Black Americans" and offers a list of names that blacks should be "referred to as."