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Operation Freedom Helps In Selma

This document provides details about three specific individuals from Selma who were fired from their jobs after their employers learned of their participation in the Civil Rights Movement. Unemployed and on the verge of disaster, Operation Freedom stepped in and provided financial aid to the three individuals, to cover the cost of food, housing, transportation and medical care.

Theological Seminary (Its Function)

Dr. King cites an article by Ernest Cadman Colwell, "Toward Better Theological Education," published in the Journal of Religion.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Geiser

Dr. King offers praise and support to Mrs. Geiser for her efforts to teach her children tolerance in the face of bigotry and racial hatred.

Western Union Telegram Sent to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. from Richard Charles Boone 1965

Friday, November 5, 1965

Richard Charles Boone sent Dr. King this 1965 telegram informing him of possible racial hostility in Miami between the black community and Cuban immigrants moving into the city.

Memo From Dora McDonald to MLK

Thursday, November 16, 1967

Miss Dora Mcdonald provides a brief summary of phone calls to Dr. King and the context of each.

Background Information on March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom

This passage provides a reason as to why the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom had to occur. The Brown vs. Board Supreme Court decision, the Prayer Pilgrimage, and other peaceful demonstrations all resulted in the march.

Wieman's Empirician

Dr. King records a quote from religious philosopher Henry Nelson Wieman's book, "The Source of Human Good" on the impossibility of knowing final outcomes.

Letter from Walter Ducey of the Illinois Fair Employment Practices Commission to MLK

Friday, June 26, 1964

In an effort to reduce the number of school dropouts, Walter Ducey of the Illinois Fair Employment Practices Commission requests to include Dr. King in their upcoming brochure. Ducey asks to include Dr. King's photograph and a quotation from a speech he delivered at Chicago's Soldier Field which highlighted academic achievement as a necessity.

Letter to MLK from Norman Thomas

Monday, February 19, 1968

Norman Thomas sends Dr. King an enclosure, which supports Senator Fulbright's statements concerning the use of nuclear weapons in Vietnam. He asks Dr. King to stand in solidarity with him on this issue by adding his name to the statement.

Memo from Clarence Jones to MLK

Clarence Jones sends Dr. King an article regarding the increasing number of blacks being elected into local governments in the Deep South. Also included is in article informing readers that Jones has been named partner in a member firm of the New York Stock Exchange.

Letter to MLK Regarding Nobel Peace Prize

Thursday, October 15, 1964

Dr. King receives a letter confirming the telephone call that informed him that he won the 1964 Nobel Peace Prize. The author then invites Dr. King to come to Oslo to receive the prize.

Beyond Vietnam

Tuesday, April 4, 1967

In Dr. Kings Beyond Vietnam address, he discusses seven major reasons for bringing Vietnam into "a field of moral vision," five things that the government should do to remove itself from conflict with Vietnam, the National Liberation Front of South Vietnam, and Premier Diem. Dr. King also encourages those in the churches and the synagogues to speak out against the war in Vietnam.

Letter from Glenn Greenwood to MLK

Tuesday, August 20, 1963

Glenn Greenwood informs Dr. King of a directive the United States Army issued that forbids all US Army personnel from participating in civil rights demonstrations. Greenwood expresses that this is a huge "infringement on freedom of assembly" and should be brought to the public's attention immediately.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK Regarding British Edition of Book

Thursday, May 11, 1967

In this letter, Joan Daves relays details regarding the British edition of "Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community?" to Dr. King.

People in Action: Recognition and Opportunity

Dr. King states there are two basic elements to human rights: recognition and opportunity.

Letter Regarding Politics

The author discusses political issues regrading the president and political parties. In addition, the author suggests that Black Power leaders should obtain positions within the "nut house" and the NAACP should support these appointments.

MLK Announces End of Birmingham Campaign

Friday, May 10, 1963

The Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights released these remarks by Dr. King marking the end of the Birmingham Nonviolent Direct Action Campaign. King describes the day as a climax in the long struggle for justice and freedom in Birmingham and gives credit to Rev. Fred Shuttlesworth, to the thousands who went to jail, to the whites who worked for just solutions and to God. He speaks of the need for continued progress toward equal job opportunities, equal access to public facilities, and equal rights and responsibilities.

Letter from Kenneth B. Keating to MLK

Friday, July 23, 1965

Kenneth B. Keating, the Chairman of the Population Crisis Committee, invited Dr. King to join the committee. The organization seeks to help deal with the growing population and ever scarcer resources.

MLK Mail Log: February 19

Monday, February 19, 1968

This mail log for February 19, 1968 lists incoming mail for Dr. King. Correspondences include invitations, reports, financial and article requests, contributions, offers of service, and general unread letters.

Abstract of "The Role of the Behavioral Scientist in the Civil Rights Movement"

This document is an abstract entitled "The Role of the Behavioral Scientist in the Civil Rights Movement," with references to Dr. King's viewpoint.

MLK Note Card - "Immortality"

On this handwritten notecard, entitled, simply, "Immortality," Dr. King quotes Tennyson on the subject.

Nobel Lecture Itinerary

This is an itinerary for the King family for the Nobel Peace Prize luncheon and lecture.

Crozer Theological Seminary Telethon

Crozer Theological Seminary, Dr. Kings alma mater, issues a solicitation for contributions to its almnus. The letter states that alumni receiving the letter were not able to be reached during the "Crozer Alumni Telethon." Dr. King attended the religious institution from 1948-1951 after receiving his Bachelor of Arts in Sociology from Morehouse College.

Letter from Leon Martin to MLK

Educator Leon Martin expresses his dissatisfaction with individuals that are silent about civil rights for Negroes. He states that a lot of people do not care about civil right until it affects them personally. He also discusses the Christian church's continual support of the "status quo". He encloses a contribution on behalf of he and his wife and sends Dr. King his prayers and support.

Letter from Peare E. Hardney to MLK

Peare E. Hardney, a postal employee in Chicago, reports to Dr. King that her supervisor assaulted her and that African-Americans do not get fair treatment in Chicago. Furthermore, she would like to share her story with someone on Dr. King's staff.

Letter from Mrs. Carrie Fillmore to MLK

Mrs. Fillmore requests help from Dr. King as she informs him that she has six children and cannot afford to get them into schools. She also lets Dr. King know that she has gone to the NAACP without results.

1966 Notes on the War

Dr. King annotates a speech to address his concerns about the war in Vietnam and his duties as a civil rights leader.

Letter from Thomas Baker to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Thomas Baker, a student in New York City, sends his condolences to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King's assassination.

Letter from Elisabeth Leonard to MLK

Monday, April 3, 1967

Elisabeth Leonard expresses her support and gratitude for Dr. King's work, which includes his speeches about the Vietnam War as well as an upcoming speech on the Spring Mobilization.

Letter from Ram Bagai to MLK

Thursday, March 18, 1965

Ram Bagai, President of Films of India, writes Dr. King to support him and his affiliation with the Civil Rights Movement. He also seeks to become a financial donor to assist Dr. King. Bagai discusses a film entitled "Two Eyes, Twelve Hands," which is set to premiere in New York, and offers the proceeds to Dr. King to assist in his endeavors.