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Letter to Coretta Scott King from Fern McQuesten at the United Nations Assn of Hawaii

Monday, April 8, 1968

Ms. McQuesten extends condolences to Mrs. King and recalls fond memories of a meeting with Dr. King. She writes, "I met Mr. King many years ago...he will always be beckoning us on to greater achievements for mankind."

Telegram from Roy Wilkins to MLK

Friday, October 21, 1960

Roy Wilkins sends a message of warm wishes on behalf of the NAACP to Dr. King while he is serving a sentence at the Fulton County Jail in Atlanta.

SCLC Commemorative Booklet Support Letter from MLK

Dr. King requests financial support for the development of SCLC's 10th Anniversary Commemorative Booklet.

SCLC Newsletter: September 1962

Saturday, September 1, 1962

Dr. King discusses the terrible cost of securing voting rights for blacks, especially in Leesburg, Georgia, where the Shady Grove Baptist Church was bombed and burned following the SNCC's use of the space to register voters.

Letter from MLK To W. H. Jackson

Tuesday, April 24, 1962

Dr. King responds to a letter from W. H. Jackson, regarding the Chicago Sunday Evening club. Mr. Jackson receives information on the possible effects his previous letter may have on Dr. King's white friends.

Notes for U.F.T. Address

On March 14, 1964, Dr. King was presented with the John Dewey Award by the United Teachers Federation. The address he delivered that day is outlined in this type-written draft along with his handwritten notes. In the draft, Dr. King emphasizes the importance of education, especially as a tool for African American advancement. He cites how the deprivation of education has been used as a way to systematically oppress African Americans and he asserts that this inequality is a reality that must be confronted. Dr.

Letter from Eleanor Martin to MLK

Wednesday, August 14, 1963

Eleanor Martin, a Sunday school teacher at Triedstone Baptist Church, praises Dr. King's book, "Strength to Love." She also invites Dr. King to visit her Sunday school class when he visits Cleveland again.

Letter from Nancy Childs to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965

Nancy Childs, a junior in high school, writes Dr. King to convey support in the fight for equality and civil rights in America. Childs is a student at an integrated high school in Detroit, Michigan and expresses her delight that Dr. King has the ability to stand up for his beliefs. This letter was drafted following the bloody assault against demonstrators during the first attempt to march from Selma to Montgomery on March 7, 1965.

Letter from Nippon Television Corporation

Wednesday, March 13, 1968

Producer Yasuo Yamanaka acknowledges Dr. King's consideration of an invitation to appear on his television program in Tokyo, Japan.

Letter to MLK

Tuesday, October 4, 1966

Here Mrs. L. Schmidt, acting through the office of Joan Daves, requests that Dr. King write an inscription in his book "Why We Can't Wait" for her son, Joachim.

Letter from Richard Clemence to MLK

Thursday, January 27, 1966

Richard Clemence, a white Air Force officer, thanks Dr. King for his service to the nation in bringing people together. Clemence wrtes that "your steady guiding hand and spirit have led many to see the light of moral right."

Telegram from Dr. Roland Smith to MLK

Friday, June 2, 1967

Dr. Roland Smith congratulates Dr. King on being honored with a Doctor of Divinity Degree from Morehouse College.

Letter from Clifford Alexander to MLK

Monday, January 29, 1968

Clifford Alexander, Chair of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, sends Dr. King a report involving discrimination against Jews in the workplace. According to the report, numerous members of the Jewish community face prejudice from receiving management level jobs in the white collar sector.

Letter from MLK to Sharon Brealer

Tuesday, July 27, 1965

Dr. King expresses his gratitude to Sharon Brealer for her contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Condolence Letter to Mrs. King from Maria Diaz

Friday, April 5, 1968

This letter from a middle school student is one of condolence written to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King’s assassination.

Letter from Ann Lincoln to MLK

Thursday, June 24, 1965

The writer, who identifies herself as a "collateral descendent of Abraham Lincoln," relates a story involving a young colored girl to Dr. King. Ms. Lincoln explains that the incident disturbed her greatly and she feels it is time to educate Negros on white acceptance.

MLK Remarks on Negro Press Week

Monday, February 10, 1958

In this transcribed radio address, Dr. King describes how future generations will remember the 20th century as a time where righteous people fought for social, economic, and political freedom. Dr. King also states that the African-American fight for true citizenship is not only a part of American heritage, but also the story of people everywhere who struggle for dignity and freedom. Dr. King made this radio address for Negro Press week a the request of Louisville Defender Editor and National Newspaper Publishers Association board member Frank Stanley.

Letter from A.C. Spectorsky to MLK

Friday, March 15, 1968

Editorial Director, A.C. Spectorsky, requests comments from Dr. King regarding an interview with Senator Charles Percy from the April issue of PLAYBOY Magazine. The Illinois Republican
discusses a range of subjects including American military presence in Vietnam, President Lyndon B. Johnson's leadership style, and Negro-white relations.

Spencer

Dr. King records a quote from Herbert Spencer’s “First Principles.”

Letter from L. K. Jackson to President Kennedy

Dr. Jackson produces a copy of this telegram sent to President John F. Kennedy, in which he requests the president use his executive power to suppress violent racial tensions in the South. This telegram was prompted by the bombing of a church in Birmingham, Alabama that killed four little girls.

Letter from Robert Kennedy to MLK

Wednesday, January 22, 1964

Robert Kennedy writes Dr. King requesting to interview him for an oral history program on the Kennedy Administration. Kennedy asserts, "You are obviously one of the persons who ought to be interviewed in order to get a full record of the Administration."

Royalty Statement for MLK's "Why We Can't Wait"

Tuesday, January 17, 1967

This statement from Joan Daves details royalty earnings for the German edition of Dr. King's "Why We Can't Wait", published by Econ Verlag, for the period 1/1/65 to 12/31/65.

Letter from MLK

Dr. King thanks the supporters of the "Martin Luther King Fund" for their integral role in the effort to end poverty and discrimination.

Letter from Wiley Bell to MLK

Friday, June 28, 1963

Inspired by Dr. King's "Letter from Birmingham City Jail," Wiley Bell thanks Dr. King for the "heart warming and heart rending article." Bell tells Dr. King that his letter has inspired his studies as a fellow clergyman.

Telegram from Al C. Hastings to MLK

Tuesday, October 31, 1967

Al Hastings expresses his concern during Dr. King's incarceration in the Jefferson County Jail.

Letter From Don Rothenberg of Ramparts to MLK

Don Rothenberg, the Assistant to the Publisher of Ramparts Magazine, sent this letter to Dr. and Mrs. King with an advance copy of the January issue. The magazine, which was associated with the New Left, reported on the napalming of Vietnamese children in the war. Upon reading this, Dr. King was moved to become more vocal against the Vietnam War, which he later did, starting in April of 1967 with his "Beyond Vietnam" speech.

Telegram To Dr. King Awarding A Grant

Thursday, June 29, 1967

In this telegram to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Mr. Roberts of the Contracts Branch US Office of Education informs Dr. King that his proposal entitled, "A Demonstration - Basic Adult Education Project for Urban Negroes," has been approved.

Letter from MLK to Ray Stewart

Dr. King thanks Ray Stewart for a song written in tribute to the Freedom Movement, but states that neither he nor the SCLC can underwrite the requested fee for use of the song.

Press Release: MLK Demands US Action Against Killers of Negroes in Orangeburg, S.C.

Tuesday, February 13, 1968

Dr. King's telegram to United States Attorney General Ramsey Carlk was reprinted in this press release from the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. In it, Dr. King urges the Justice department to take proper legal action against the perpetrators of violence against Negroes following the wounding and killing of 37 to 50 students in Orangeburg, South Carolina.

Letter from Harry Wunsch to MLK

Harry Wunsch encloses a contribution to support Dr. King's stance on the war in Vietnam.