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"Michigan (MI)"

Letter to Ralph David Abernathy from the Church Women United in Atlanta

Friday, April 26, 1968

President Nancy Elliott Fowler of Church Women United in Atlanta writes to express her appreciation for the "magnificent job Rev. Abernathy did in the handling of Dr. King's funeral." Fowler also conveys the organization's unanimous approval to an enclosed resolution honoring Dr. King.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Harry Belafonte

Tuesday, May 2, 1967

Here, Dr. King's secretary, Dora McDonald, forwards a list of proposed touring cities to Mr. Harry Belafonte. She also comments on a recent special he did entitled, "Laughter."

Miracle

Dr. King references the Old Testament Biblical Book of Numbers regarding the topic of miracles.

God

Dr. King expounds on "the eternality of God" by using the Book of Psalms.

Letter from Edris Head to MLK about Mormans and the Presidential Election

Saturday, May 20, 1967

In this letter, Mrs. Head conveys to Dr. King her opinion of potential presidential candidate George Romney while criticizing the Mormon clergy and their road to priesthood. Additionally, Mrs. Head compares Dr. King to Gandhi and Jesus.

Letter from Eunice Gentry to MLK

Friday, March 12, 1965

Eunice Gentry writes to Dr. King expressing gratitude for his bravery and encouraging words. In closing Gentry states, "I am glad you are marching for us."

NAACP Presents to the City Commission

This list was presented by the St. Augustine branch of the NAACP to the City Commission.

My Dream: The Violence of Poverty

In this draft of an article that appeared in the New York Amsterdam News January 1, 1966, Dr. King points out that although the Negro in America is freer, he is “an impoverished alien in an affluent society.” He cautions that the Administration will fail in its War on Poverty if it substitutes welfare programs for the creation of new jobs. He says the Negro’s nonviolent movement directed at the violence of poverty as well as the violence of segregation.

Letter from Chauncey Eskridge to David Acton

Tuesday, November 21, 1967

This letter from Chauncey Eskridge to David Acton request the Leeds & Northrup Foundation provide a grant to the Southern Christian Leadership Foundation. Chauncey Eskridge includes a tax exempt letter and a copy of the trust instrument outlining the creation of the Southern Christian Leadership Foundation. Both Dr. King and Mr. Bernard Jackson received a copy of this letter.

Letter from Kerry Clayton to MLK 11/20/66

Sunday, November 20, 1966

Kerry Clayton informs Dr. King that she was asked to do a third grade report about his life. She also requested for Dr. King to send a picture to include in the report. Kerry Clayton was a resident of China Lake, California.

Contradiction and the Power of God

Dr. King reflects on man's understanding of God and salvation.

Letter from Senora Springfied to MLK

Tuesday, September 6, 1966

Mrs. Senora Springfied requests that Dr. King send Leon Hall, an SCLC employee, back to Grenada, Mississippi. She praises Hall and mentions that the town needs leaders like him.

Telegram from MLK to John F. Kennedy

Dr. King requests that President Kennedy give full consideration to judges William Hastie and Thurgood Marshall for appointment to the US Supreme Court.

Unfair to Put Blame on Mississippi Poor

This editorial in the Tupelo (MS) Daily Journal claims it is unfair to attribute the proposed Poor People's Campaign in Washington, D.C. to poor Mississippians, who are uneducated and have no knowledge of Congress or how to mount a massive protest. The piece takes both Dr. King and Stokely Carmichael to task for suggesting that the wheels of government be ground to a stop until their demands are met.

Remarks at the University of Wisconsin Law School

Tuesday, March 8, 1960

Harris Wofford, Jr. gives these remarks at the University of Wisconsin Law School on March 8, 1960. Wofford has several ties with Dr. King in cases such as arranging a trip to India, helping to write "Stride Toward Freedom," and negotiating with Senator Kennedy and Vice-President Nixon during the 1960 presidential campaign. In addition, Wofford was the Special Assistant for Civil Rights under U. S. Attorney General Robert Kennedy.

Telegram from MLK to Mrs. H. H. Hubbard

Friday, September 15, 1967

Dr. King sends his condolences to Mrs. H. H. Hubbard following the death of her husband. Dr. King also mentions the importance of Dr. Hubbard's contributions to the Montgomery bus boycott.

God

Dr. King discusses the inevitability of God being an object. Dr. King quotes a theologian's perception that God's ability to be an object would cease his capacity to be one being among others.

1964 Election

Dr. King explains "a sizable number of Negro voters" will register for the 1964 presidential election, recognizing the significance of political participation.

Religion (Definition)

Dr. King quotes John M. E. McTaggart's "Some Dogmas of Religion."

Letter from Anonymous Critic to MLK

A critic sends Dr. King a series of newspaper clippings in order to communicate an adverse view about "negro people." The author brings special attention to an enclosed article about Stokely Carmichael and asks for his view. After accusing Dr. King of receiving money from the Communist Party, the writer states "I will never know why you was given the noble award."

Telegram from CEP & SCLC to Essie Bizzell

Tuesday, August 17, 1965

Staff from the CEP and SCLC inform Essie Bizzell that a chartered bus will be leaving from the SCLC office for McIntosh, Georgia and they are taking care of all the expenses.

Letter from Ralph D. Abernathy to Dr. Carlyle Marney

Tuesday, May 4, 1965

Ralph David Abernathy writes to Reverend Carlyle to confirm his attendance to a conference held on May 6, 1965.

Letter from MLK to Al Capp

Tuesday, June 30, 1964

Dr. King writes Al Capp, formally known as the Cartoonist Alfred Gerald Caplin, acknowledging his previous correspondence. King asserts that his organization deplores violence regardless of race and hopes that Caplin's "current hostility will be overcome, and that he will exercise a deep concern for the welfare of all people of this country."

Letter from Eleanor Roosevelt to MLK

Friday, September 21, 1962

Eleanor Roosevelt invites Dr. King to appear in the first installment of a series of televised discussions entitled "The American Experience."

Letter from MLK to Bernard Goldstein

Monday, September 9, 1963

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Bernard Goldstein for her contribution to the SCLC. Dr. King explains the importance of her contribution and how it helps in their fight for equality.

Sin (Definition)

Dr. King quotes Henry Nelson Wieman’s “Normative Psychology of Religion.”

Coretta Scott King's SCLC Contributors Card

This card reminds Mrs. King of her previous year's contribution and solicits her support for another year.

A Note with no Addressee from the Desk of Joan Daves

A note on Joan Daves, literary agent to Dr. King, letterhead to an unaddressed recipient about Japanese annotations of "Strength to Love."

Pragmatism

Dr. King documents a J.B. Pratt quote from "What is Pragmatism."

Address on Anti-Poverty by Jerome P. Cavanagh

Monday, August 22, 1966

Jerome P. Cavanagh, Mayor of Detroit, delivers this speech before the Office of Economic Opportunity Urban Areas Conference, Great Lakes Region. The conference is dedicated to sharing experiences in the War on Poverty and taking a realistic assessment on the issues in urban areas. Inadequate education, food, housing, and disjointed welfare systems are major problems of concern. Cavanagh encourages the analysis of programs addressing these situations. He also advocates an understanding of federal aid cutbacks and connects insufficient funds to the Vietnam War and space exploration.