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"Michigan (MI)"

Letter from Angela Reyes to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Angela Reyes offers her condolences to Mrs. King after the death of Dr. King.

Letter from Moe Foner to a Friend

Tuesday, January 23, 1968

Moe Foner is writing in regards to a new publication called, "Labor Voice For Peace." The issue mentioned covers the conference of labor leaders held in Chicago. Foner also asked for any comments concerning the publication.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK Regarding Book Royalties

Tuesday, December 6, 1966

In this letter, J. Campe, associate of literary agent Joan Daves, encloses royalties for Dr. King's French edition of "Strength to Love".

Newspaper Article on MLK

Sunday, August 9, 1964

In this article, written by Robert L. Powers, the author gives his assessment of the book "Why We Can't Wait." Powers provided poignant excerpts from the literature.

Letter from Nelson A. Rockefeller to MLK

Saturday, May 23, 1964

New York Governor Nelson Rockefeller thanks Dr. King for sending an advance copy, with inscription, of his new book.

Letter from MLK to Mr. & Mrs. Charles Digioia

Monday, October 24, 1966

Dr. King expresses his sincere gratitude for the sculpture of John Henry that was created and sent to him by Mr. & Mrs. Digioia. As intended by the artist, the art work embodies the magnificence of strength and courage held with in the oppressed. Honored to accept it, Dr. King sees John Henry as an inspirational symbol of will and spirit.

Psychology

This series of note cards addresses psychology through the means of human unity. The concept of human unity is indicated by the presence of the body and the soul working in conjunction to inform the human experience. Dr. King references the views of St. Augustine and St. Thomas as it pertains to "the close union between body and soul."

MLK Statement before Platform Committee of the RNC

Tuesday, July 7, 1964

Dr. King lists the steps towards equality that have taken place all over the nation and he addresses the passage of the Civil Rights Bill. Dr. King explains what still needs to be done in order to make America truly the land of the free.

Letter from Harry Walker to Dora McDonald

Monday, September 25, 1967

Harry Walker writes Dora McDonald regarding contracts for Dr. King's future speaking engagements.

God, Man, Sin, and Knowledge

Presented here is a series of notecards that defines an array of topics relating to philosophical and theological perspectives.

Letter from Ann & John Flynn

Wednesday, April 5, 1967

In this letter, Ann Flynn requests a copy of the text of Dr. King's speech made at Riverside Church.

Annual Address by MLK for the Montgomery Improvement Association

Thursday, December 3, 1959

This document outlines Dr. King's address for the Fourth Anniversary of the Montgomery Improvement Association, held at Bethel Baptist Church in Montgomery. In the address, Dr. King speaks about the history, achievements and current task of the Association.

Letter from Mercedes L. Johnson to Coretta Scott King

Nine year old Mercedes Lynne Johnson writes Mrs. King to offer her condolences and prayers following the assassination of Dr. King.

Letter from Calvin Kimbro to MLK

Monday, March 12, 1962

Calvin Kimbro expresses his interest in famous African Americans and asks for a summary of Dr. King's life. Kimbro also wishes Dr. King luck and success in the near future.

Statement by the President of the Montgomery Improvement Association

Thursday, December 20, 1956

As the President of Montgomery Improvement Association, Dr. King elaborates on the past twelve months and the city's efforts to fight against racial injustice through the bus boycott. Their journey concluded victoriously with the acknowledgment of the Supreme Court that invalidated segregated transportation. Dr. King informs the Montgomery community that they are to "return to the buses" on a "non-segregated basis."

SCLC Northern City Tour

SCLC provides an organizational manual that outlines details regarding their Northern city tour. They are traveling to cities in the northern United States in order to assess social conditions and build relationships amongst civil rights leadership. The manual also provides tour dates and suggestions for organizing the tour.

Letter to MLK from Ms. Eleanor Fischer

Monday, November 13, 1961

Ms. Fischer writes to confirm a conference meeting, for an interview with Dr. King. She requests his presence at an informal dinner to discuss details about the program, for which his interview will be taped. Finally, she concludes by extending formalities to Dr. King's family and conveys her interests in interviewing them as well.

SCLC Chicago Adult Education Project

Tuesday, September 12, 1967

In this progress report, Robert L. Green and Stoney Cooks outline the education and employment conditions facing African Americans in the Lawndale community of Chicago, Illinois. The two authors further outline the program objectives, procedures, organization, and funding of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference's Chicago Adult Education Project which seeks to address Lawndale's social issues.

Telegram from Harold Stassen to MLK

Thursday, October 15, 1964

Harold Stassen, President of the American Baptist Convention and former Minnesota Governor, congratulates Dr. King on being the recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize. He states that Dr. King is the most deserving because he tackles the race crisis through non-violent means.

Letter from Genevieve Young to Joan Daves Regarding MLK's Book Draft

Thursday, January 5, 1967

Genevieve Young, from Harper & Row Publishers, expresses concern regarding an outline for Dr. King's upcoming book. She suggests an alternative way to frame the outline, and advises Joan Daves to use her discretion as to whether or not the memorandum should be passed on to Dr. King.

Letter from MLK to R. B. Taylor

Wednesday, October 13, 1965

Dr. King thanks Dr. R. B. Taylor for his generous contribution to the SCLC. King discusses how the funds are allocated to assist with voter registration, education and finding jobs for blacks.

Letter from William E. Duncan to MLK

Wednesday, February 2, 1966

The branch director of a Chicago based youth center welcomes Dr. King to their neighborhood. William Duncan conveys his support to Dr. King's initiatives for community revitalization. His letter was written at the beginning of a major campaign undertaken by Dr. King and SCLC to campaign for open housing in Chicago.

Address by MLK to Southern Association of Political Scientist

Friday, November 13, 1964

Dr. King addresses the issues of poverty, unemployment, education, health, and housing disparities within the nation. Granted, many strides have been made but there is still more work to be done. Equality has still not come full circle in regards to these social issues. Dr. King urges the people to continue the fight of social justice in all aspects of inequality.

John of Damascus

This notecard contains historical information regarding John of Damascus and outlines some principles of his religious philosophy.

Evil, Forgiveness, God

Dr. King references the Old Testament Book of Psalms regarding the topics of evil, forgiveness and God. He asserts that we must always treat the poor with love because God loves them.

WBBM-TV: Ban Further Marches

Tuesday, August 16, 1966

This report by WBBM-TV of Chicago states that 60% of their feedback panelists would prefer the banning of further civil rights marches to reduce racial tension. Other questions posed include the perceived appropriate police response, the effect on neighborhoods, and Dr. King's influence in Chicago.

Homoionsios

Dr. King gives a definition of the Greek term "homoionsios."

Invitation to the 20th Anniversary World Conference Against Atom and Hydrogen Bombs

Saturday, June 26, 1965

Ichiro Mortaki, of the Japan Congress Against Atom & Hyrdrogen Bombs, invites Dr. King to their conference taking place 20 years after two atomic bombs were dropping on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan, in World War II. This leading Japanese disarmament organization was founded the same year they extended this invitation to Dr. King.

Problems of Esthetics

Dr. King writes class notes from his Problems of Esthetics course at the University of Pennsylvania around 1950-1951. He enrolled in the above class while attending Crozer Theological Seminary.

Letter from E. Paul Weaver to MLK

Tuesday, January 9, 1962

E. Paul Weaver writes to Dr. King enclosing a small contribution for the work of the SCLC. Weaver also requests that the Dr. King visit Camp Mack as a guest speaker. The Executive Secretary of Church of the Brethren, one of three historic peace churches in the U. S., informs Dr. King of the Brethren's strong stand against slavery long before the Civil War.