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Letter from Edna R. McKinnon to MLK

Thursday, December 14, 1967

Edna McKinnon praises Dr. King for his wonderful work with the SCLC and its effect on the "entire world." She agrees with Dr. King's nonviolent philosophy and approach to American military intervention in Vietnam. Ms. McKinnon is the sister of Jeanette Rankin, the first woman of Congress, and the only member to vote against U.S. entry into both world wars.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Crawford Johnson

Tuesday, April 5, 1966

Dr. King expresses thanks to Mr. Johnson for the international support as demonstrated by the success of the recent Palais des Sports benefit. MLK goes on to elaborate on the impact of "friends of the Movement" in far away places such as Europe.

Letter from Mike Van Ryan to Reverend Ralph Abernathy

Monday, April 8, 1968

Mike Van Ryn addresses this correspondence to Rev. Ralph Abernathy with an enclosure of $20 for the work of SCLC.

SCLC Newsletter: October-November 1965

Friday, October 1, 1965

This SCLC newsletter depicts the courage of SCLC workers putting their lives on the line while fighting for civil rights. The newsletter also highlights pictures from SCLC's ninth annual convention in Birmingham Alabama and a children's book about Dr. King.

Telegram from Nicolas Nabokov to MLK

Friday, May 29, 1964

The mayor of Florence, Italy telegrams Dr. King with hopes that he will accept an invitation to speak at the Mediterranean Colloquium Florence on racial issues occurring in the United States.

Royalty Statement for MLK

Tuesday, December 6, 1966

This royalties statement from Joan Daves to Dr. King details the earnings and number of copies sold for the French edition of "The Strength to Love" during the given time period.

Martin Luther King Does It Again

Sunday, April 23, 1967

Ralph C. Bailey, a marcher in the New York City demonstration against the War in Vietnam, describes the demonstration as an "impressive spectacle" of people of all ages and races. He praises Dr. King for combining revolution with nonviolence in hopes of a peaceful demonstration.

March on Washington to End the War in Vietnam

The Women's Strike For Peace organizes a demonstration in Washington, D.C. to bring awareness to the opposition to the Vietnam War. This letter is particular dedicated to the means and cost of transportation to Washington, D.C.

Letter from Mildred Scott Olmsted to MLK

Friday, June 19, 1964

The Women's International League for Peace and Freedom would like Dr. King to send his greetings for their 50th Anniversary celebration.

Letter from Dora McDonald to T. M. Benson

Wednesday, August 14, 1963

Dr. King's secretary responds to a request from Peak Publications to use a portion of Dr. King's "Letter from Birmingham Jail" in a tract. Ms. Dora explains to the company's representative that the letter will be published in an upcoming book, hence Dr. King has made a commitment to the publisher to refuse permission for reprints.

Letter from Julia Keller to MLK

Thursday, January 26, 1967

Julia Keller, a student at Geneva Kent Elementary School, requests that Dr. King change the date of a scheduled demonstration that conflicts with her class trip to Washington, D.C.

Letter from Paul H. Douglas to MLK

Wednesday, April 28, 1965

Senator Paul Douglas informs Dr. King that he agrees with him about keeping the poll tax amendment and defeating the 60 percent amendment in the 1965 Voting Rights Act.

Letter from Fernando DeEquidazu to MLK

Tuesday, February 16, 1965

Students from Spain write Dr. King, showing their appreciation for his leadership to the Civil Rights Movement, and asks if Dr. King can supply them with articles for magazines in Spain.

Letter from Richard Boone Regarding Child Development Program in Mississippi

Thursday, February 2, 1967

Richard Boone, Executive Director of Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty, encloses a news release regarding the upcoming opening of the Child Development Group of Mississippi.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Lucile Giles

Tuesday, December 10, 1963

Dora McDonald informs Lucile Giles that Dr. King will be notified of her books upon his return to the office.

Letter from David W. Letts to the S.C.L.C.

Wednesday, April 10, 1968

This letter, coupled with a donation, was sent from Baldwin-Wallace College to the S.C.L.C following Dr. King's assassination. The writer discusses the initiation of student activism that was taking place at the college in response to Dr. King's tragic death.

Letter from James A. Farmer to MLK

Wednesday, August 11, 1965

Mr. Farmer thanks Dr. King on behalf of the Riverside Church for being their guest speaker. He tells Dr. King of the positive reaction that he received on his sermon.


Dr. King notes and comments on a quote from James H. Robinson's "The New History" on the eternal law of progress.

Article Written by the Spring Mobilization Committee To End the War in Vietnam

The following article written by the Spring Mobilization Committee illustrates the growing international support for ending the Vietnam War. It specifically highlights the Union of Vietnamese Students in France, an organization seeking to cooperate with American students in order to promote peace in Vietnam.

Letter from Edwin H. Tuller to MLK

Monday, November 23, 1964

Edwin Tuller, General Secretary of the American Baptist Convention, encourages Dr. King to accept an invitation to address sessions of the Massachusetts Baptist Convention sent earlier by Dr. Paul L. Sturges.

Royalty Statement from Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, October 9, 1964

Joan Daves sends Dr. King a royalty statement for "Stride Toward Freedom" and "Strength To Love."

The Pulpit: A Journal of Contemporary Preaching

As a "journal of contemporary preaching," The Pulpit includes numerous sermons and various religious teachings including Dr. King's "A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart."

Letter from Bo Wirmark to MLK

Wednesday, February 28, 1968

Bo Wirmark writes Dr. King to clarify the misconception behind Vilgot Sjoman's film "I Am Curious (Yellow)," and explain how his interview is being used in the film. Wirmark also extends an invitation for Dr. King to visit Uppsala, Sweden.

MLK's Acceptance Sermon, Dexter Avenue Baptist Church

Dr. King accepts his appointment as the new pastor of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church. His first time serving as head of a ministry, Dr. King admits that he has no pretense to being an extraordinary preacher and comes only with the claim of "being a servant of Christ."

Letter from Norman Edward & Katherine Kowal to SCLC

Sunday, May 14, 1967

Impressed by a sermon delivered by Dr. King, Norman Edward and Katherine Ann Kowal contributes to the SCLC.

Appeal to Billy Graham Regarding Religion

Matakichi Saito questions Billy Graham about his views on religion as it relates to discrimination.

Letter from Mrs. Flossie Dedmond to MLK

Monday, July 6, 1964

A representative of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority invites Dr. King to speak at the Public Meeting of the Forty-first National Convention held in Philadelphia, PA. For publicity purposes she requests several glossy photographs for distribution.

Letter from MLK to David Brandyberry

Friday, August 9, 1963

Dr. King thanks Mr. Brandyberry for his recent letter and explains why the current time is "a wonderful and challenging age." He also expresses his hope that the work done in Birmingham, Alabama will bring about better race relations.

Letter to Dora McDonald from Harper & Row, Publishers

Wednesday, October 24, 1962

The secretary of Mr. Mel Arnold of Harper and Row Publishers, sent this correspondence to Dr. King secretary, Miss. Dora McDonald. The content of the letter thanked Miss. McDonald, for sending a previous letter and requested additional chapters for Dr. King's second book. The book was entitled "Strength to Love."