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What Will You Be When You Grow Up

This pamphlet is one of the early equal employment opportunity publications by the US government. The President's committee on government contracts was established by President Dwight D. Eisenhower in 1953.

Letter from Lorraine Small to MLK

Wednesday, November 17, 1965

Lorraine Small, a student at Margaret Washington High School, writes Dr. King and the SCLC requesting information on the organizational structure of the SCLC, as well as its leaders, goals, and purpose.

Letter from Catherine Aller to MLK

Wednesday, July 26, 1967

Catherine Aller took the time to write Dr. King and encourage him to keep pursuing his goals in spite of criticism.

Receipt from the SCLC to Mr. John Henry Kelly IV

Monday, July 10, 1967

This document is a receipt to John Henry Kelly IV for his $1.00 contribution to the SCLC.

Letter From MLK to Pastor Charles Westphal

Monday, November 8, 1965

Dr. King thanks Pastor Westphal for the opportunity to address the French Protestant Federation.

Letter from Claudette Holston to MLK

Thursday, January 25, 1968

Claudette Holston writes Dr. King expressing the plight she has faced as a black woman in Michigan and Georgia. She asks Dr. King, "how would you feel if I was your daughter or wife?" and strongly urges him to write back.

Letter From Philip S. Riggs to MLK

Friday, March 24, 1967

In this letter, Philip Riggs writes to express his difference of opinion with Dr. King regarding the treatment of House Representative Adam Clayton Powell.

Letter from Rev. A. A. Ackerman to MLK

Saturday, January 27, 1962

Reverend A. A. Ackerman, Pastor of Bethel AME Church, writes Dr. King in hopes that he can make an appearance and speak at his church.

Isaiah

Dr. King references the Old Testament biblical Book of Isaiah regarding topics like ritual sacrifice, knowledge, social ethics, and the doctrine of man.

Letter from Paul Good to MLK

In this letter, Paul Good repeats his first attempt to volunteer as a "press liaison" for the SCLC, and presents Dr. King with his support for the Poor Peoples Campaign.

Letter from Dinkar Sakrikar to MLK

Monday, October 18, 1965

Dinkar Sakrikar writes Dr. King in reference to a proposed statue of Gandhi for a children's park. The statue seeks to reflect friendly relations between India and the United States. They ask Dr. King for his consideration along with a swift response.

Letter from Barbara Patterson to MLK

Friday, March 15, 1968

Barbara Patterson writes Dr. King thanking him for the lecture at Grosse Pointe High School in Michigan. She also encloses a letter that was sent to the Michigan Chronicle. The letter pointed out how great of a lecture Dr. King gave which ended in a standing ovation and how it inspired those that listened.

Letter from Helen F. Gallagher to MLK

Tuesday, February 13, 1968

Helen Gallagher is addressing the national issues in the United States as it relates to the war. She suggests to Dr. King a personal tax that could possibly go toward initiatives that Americans feel are important. Gallagher feels that this is a way to for Americans to represent themselves when they are unsatisfied with their congressional representatives.

Letter from MLK to Richard C. Ernst

Wednesday, August 23, 1961

Dr. King writes Richard Ernst and thanks him for his generous contribution which "has tangibly resolved a part of the difficulty we face in the legal defense of Rev. Abernathy." Dr. King highlights some the programs the SCLC has been able to implement due to contributions, such as the Citizenship School Training Center and voter registration drives.

McGraw-Hill Requests MLK Comment for New Author

Wednesday, November 8, 1967

An editor from McGraw-Hill Book Company writes Dr. King to introduce the work of young African-American author Audrey Lee. The company sends him a galley copy of "The Clarion People", in the hope that he will add a positive remark to help promote the book.

Letter from Jean L. Bennett to Dora McDonald

Friday, May 20, 1966

Ms. Jean L. Bennett writes to Ms. McDonald regarding the Platters recording of the song "We Ain't What We Was." She believes that the SCLC should adopt this song as an actual theme song for it was inspired by Dr. King. The Platters were a successful vocal group during this time.

Letter from Edwin Tuller to MLK

Wednesday, June 22, 1966

Edwin Tuller, General Secretary of the American Baptist Convention, discusses an invitation for Dr. King to speak for the Buffalo Baptist Association. He suggests that Dr. King consider accepting the invitation because the association has good attendance from both Negroes and whites.

Letter from Morton S. Grossman to MLK

Thursday, January 5, 1967

In this correspondence, Morton S. Grossman, expressed his joy, over Dr. King's New Year's card, and enclosed a check, in support of the Civil Rights Movement. In addition, Mr. Grossman requested a note, signed by Dr. King, to add to his autograph collection.

Telegram from MLK to Chris Folker

Dr. King expresses enthusiasm regarding his upcoming trip to Sweden.

Letter from MLK to Gordon R. Pollard

Thursday, January 6, 1966

Dr. King expresses his embarrassment in his late response to Mr. Pollard's letter regarding a speaking engagement at the University of Victoria. Dr. King shares his gratitude for the invitation but regretfully declines due to the fact that he has accepted his maximum number of engagements for the time period.

Letter from Mel Koch to MLK

Monday, August 20, 1956

Mel Koch responds to Dr. King's request about purchasing Volkswagen Microbuses for the Montgomery Improvement Association. Koch includes reasons as to why he opposes the idea and cannot recommend the vehicles for King's purposes.

Letter from MLK to Alice Sargent

Tuesday, November 26, 1963

Dr. King responds to an invitation to speak at Temple University from the Assistant Director of Student Activities. He states that he enjoys speaking with college and university students, he gracefully declines the invitation due to his civil rights commitments in the South. He also addresses Mrs. Sargent's question presented in her letter regarding the role Temple University can play in the Civil Rights Movement. He tells her that Rev. C.T. Vivian, Dr.

Forgiveness

Dr. King writes on the topic of "forgiveness," as mentioned in Nehemiah 9:17.

Seventh Annual Gandhi Memorial Lecture

Sunday, November 6, 1966

Howard University presents Dr. King as its primary speaker for their seventh annual Gandhi Memorial Lecture in 1966. Dr. King traces the slow but meaningful progress society has made from slavery to the current civil rights movement. However, he notes that the present challenges in achieving equality involve not only the silence of individuals of good will but also the conditons that keep the Negro inferior.

The Nobel Committee of the Norwegian Storthing

Thursday, January 30, 1964

The members of the Swedish Parliament honors Dr. King for the Nobel Peace Prize Award. The Parliament expounds on the prosperous and revolutionary efforts of Dr. King and encourages him to continue the methodology of nonviolence introduced by Mahatma Gandhi. Dr. King is further highlighted for his works in the United States and his contributions to eradicate racial discrimination.

Letter from Victor J. Schoenbach to MLK

Monday, May 22, 1967

Victor Schoenbach writes Dr. King expressing his support for Dr. King's views on the Vietnam War in the midst of dissenters.

Philosophy

Dr. King describes philosophy as being the "wholes of which sciences describe the parts." He states that the answers to questions will differ depending on the school of philosophy one references.

Letter from David L. Clark and Charles E. Young to MLK

Tuesday, March 23, 1965

David Clark and Charles E. Young of the University of California Los Angeles write to Dr. King to ask him to speak to the UCLA student body. They express that their students are very interested in the Civil Rights Movement and have planned an entire "Selma Week" to correspond with his speech and raise money for the Selma Movement.

Letter from Govenor Nelson A. Rockefeller to MLK

Wednesday, September 5, 1962

New York Governor Nelson A. Rockefeller encloses a copy of "The Future of Federalism." His book "traces the development of the federal idea in the United States."

Letter from Robert Lee King to MLK

Sunday, April 14, 1963

A member of Ebenezer Baptist Church expresses concern over Dr. King's imprisonment in the Birmingham Jail. Robert Lee King also shares his wish that he could physically be in jail as well to aid in the "freedom of all Americans." Though nothing in the letter has been blocked out, the letter does contain a stamp of the word "censored."