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Letters To Mrs. Fillmore from MLK

Thursday, April 19, 1962

Dr. King responds to Mrs. Fillmore's previous letter, offering some suggestions to help her. He apologizes that he cannot use SCLC funds because that money is currently in use for the civil rights struggle. Dr. King suggests alternative organizations and programs that may offer her assistance.

Philadelphia Chapter of CORE Flyer

This flyer encourages participation in the reformation of the Philadelphia School System.

Letter from the Hadley Executive Committee to Dora McDonald

Saturday, April 8, 1967

Ernest Shaefer communicates with Dora McDonald to solidify the details surrounding Dr. King's lecture in Pennsylvania. Mr. Shaefer informs Miss McDonald of the written confirmation and formal contract that must be signed in advance.

Letter from Prince Johannes of Bohemia to MLK

Sunday, December 17, 1967

Prince Johannes, claimant to the throne of Bohemia, requests Dr. King's participation in the Presidium of the World Government.

Letter from Gloria Glissmeyer Regarding the State of the Nation

Thursday, February 29, 1968

The following document is a letter written by Gloria Glissmeyer discussing the state of the nation during the Spring of 1968. The letter summarizes a series of events ranging from the Presidential Commission on Civil Disorder to the number of Americans killed in Vietnam.

MLK's Address at the University of the West Indies

Sunday, June 20, 1965

Dr. King spoke at the Valedictory Service of the University of the West Indies in Mona, Jamaica in 1965. On his topic "Facing the Challenge of a New Age," Dr. King addresses the international movement towards peace and equality, stating that "the wind of change is blowing all over the world."

Letter from Jack Stern to Romanelli Studios

Monday, May 17, 1965

Jack Stern discusses the details with Romanelli Studios regarding the portrait plaque of Dr. King.

Letter from J. Campe to MLK Regarding Book Royalties

Friday, November 4, 1966

In this letter, J. Campe encloses British royalties for Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom."

Letter from the American Committee on Africa Regarding South Africa's Participation in the Olympics

Thursday, January 11, 1968

George M. Houser, Executive Director of the American Committee on Africa, informs readers of the International Olympic Committee's upcoming meeting that will discuss the 1968 Olympics. Mr. Houser encloses a paper regarding the history of South Africa and the Olympics to help urge the committee to reconsider granting South Africa permission to participate in the Olympics.

Letter from the Legislative Director to Senator Gaylord Nelson to MLK

Friday, January 28, 1966

William J. Springs writes Dr. King to send him the enclosed document entitled, "A Brief Account of Historic Connections Between Negro Americans and African in South Africa" by Mary Benson. The material is to be used in correlation with the hearing on American policy toward South Africa that will be held by Congressman Barratt O' Harra, Chairman of the Africa subcommittee.

Letter from Dorothy Gaines to Josephine Davis

Monday, April 19, 1965

Dorothy Gaines thanks Josephine Davis and her friends for their generous donation to the SCLC. Gaines explains the current efforts of the SCLC as well as the monthly budget of the organization. She expresses the importance of financial contributions and encloses receipts from the donation.

Letter from Cadet Jim Sutherland to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967

This letter from Cadet Jim Sutherland to Dr. King request Dr. King send and autograph for the St. John's Military Academy autograph collection.

Telegram to MLK

Friday, November 20, 1964

The sender of this telegram is requesting to know if Dr. King intends to travel to Sweden.

Raphael Gould Thanks MLK For Support

Thursday, July 8, 1965

Gould thanks Dr. King for his letter of support to the Clergymen's Emergency Committee in Vietnam. Gould further approves of King's dialogue printed in Playboy Magazine and encourages him to go on late night TV interview shows to reach a larger population of Americans.

MLK in his Study

This is a photograph of Dr. King in his study in Atlanta.

Statement Upon Return to Montgomery

Dr. King reflects on his near death experience after Izola Ware Curry stabbed him with a letter opener at a book signing in New York City on September 20, 1958. Although Dr. King refers to Curry as a "deranged woman," he has "no bitterness towards her" and sees her actions only as a "reflection on the moral climate." Dr. King further states what he will remember most is the "vast outpouring of sympathy" that was received from all races and creeds.

Lorene Doss Request for MLK Assistance with a Class Project

Monday, February 19, 1968

Lorene Doss, a high school senior at Sadie V. Thompson, requests the assistance of Dr. King on a project for her government class. The topic of her project is "What are the Main Causes of Poverty".

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Thursday, September 10, 1964

Joan Daves sends Dr. King an advertisement for "Why We Can't Wait", which will appear in the Washington Afro-American. The advertisement has also been published in Ebony magazine.

MLK's 36th Birthday Celebration

Monday, February 1, 1965

Friends and family celebrate with Dr. King at his 36th birthday party.

Statement on Selma-Montgomery March of March 21-26

Sunday, April 25, 1965

This statement by Father Dom T. Orsini expounds on the details of the March 21-26, 1965 Selma-Montgomery March. Orsini expresses that he is proud of the youth and their enthusiasm in participating in the march and suggests that insisting improper relations took place would be ridiculous.

Letter from Dorothy Cotton to Mrs. E.A. Johnson

Thursday, April 5, 1962

Educational Consultant Dorothy Cotton writes workshop attendee Mrs. E.A. Johnson concerning the importance of citizenship education, particularly in getting Negroes to vote. She addresses a concern of Mrs. Johnson's involving a young man invited to attend a citizenship workshop. Ms. Cotton informs Mrs. Johnson that Dr. King will speak with Attorney General Robert Kennedy in addressing the young man's situation.

News from the SCEF

Monday, February 19, 1962

The Southern Conference Educational Fund writes a statement regarding "two young leaders of integration" who visited a fellow leader in jail and also got arrested. Charles McDew, a Negro and Chairman of the SNCC, and Robert Zellner, a white man and staff member of the SNCC, were charged with criminal anarchy just for bringing books and fruit to a friend who was arrested for participating in demonstrations.

Letter from W. C. Akers to MLK

W. C. Akers expresses his concern about Dr. King's support of Adam Clayton Powell.

Letter from Phyllis Light to the NAACP

Monday, June 17, 1963

Mrs. Light argues that the goals of the NAACP are too low. She compares the efforts of the movement to those of Hitler, Mussolini, Napoleon, and Caesar. Because of these comparisons, Mrs. Light promotes segregation amongst the races and accuses educated African Americans of abandoning their culture.

Draft of Statement to TIME Magazine from MLK

Friday, January 12, 1962

In this statement, Dr. King is pleased to know that the President is calling for new civil rights legislation. Unfortunately, the President did not express anything new nor directly address the issue. Dr. King emphasizes the urgent need for the President to demand vigorous civil rights legislation in order to expedite school integration and the right to vote.

Letter from Rev. Charles William Butler to MLK

Wednesday, September 20, 1961

Dr. King writes to Rev. Charles William Butler of the Metropolitan Baptist Church to acknowledge receipt of his kind letter concerning moral support. Dr. King references his shock of reading about a vicious attack made by Dr. Jackson accusing him of conspiracy. Stating that numerous friends have suggested that the Reverend sue Jackson, Dr. King expresses his decision to be adherent to his basic philosophy of non-violence.

Letter from Hubert Humphrey to MLK

Tuesday, December 20, 1966

In this letter, Vice President Humphrey extends a holiday greeting to Dr. King and his associates.

Economic and Social Bill of Rights

Tuesday, February 6, 1968

The SCLC calls for an economic and social bill of rights to demand the inalienable rights to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness for African Americans. It would include the right of every employable citizen to a decent job, the right of every citizen to a minimum income, the right to a decent house in a neighborhood of choice, the right to an adequate education, the right to health care, and the right to full participation in decision-making.

Commencement Ceremony at Boston University

This photograph shows a commencement ceremony at Boston University in June of 1959.

Letter from L. Hayne To Whom it May Concern

L. Hayne requires Dr. King, and only Dr. King, to endorse a check before he will accept it.