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Letter from Joseph T. Beaver to MLK

Wednesday, October 1, 1958

Joseph Beaver, Jr. sends his sympathy to Dr. King following the attempt on Dr. King's life. He had originally included a biography of Wendell Phillips Dabney.

Negro Leaders Urge Force Against Rhodesia

Tuesday, April 4, 1967

The American Negro Leadership Conference on Africa calls for all news media and wireless services to broadcast the release of "Negro Leaders Urge Force Against Rhodesia." This call to action was prompted by racial rebellions led by Ian Smith. It was the hope of civil rights leaders to strengthen "Negro" and African relations by increasing support of peace in Africa.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Gus Efroymson

Thursday, January 28, 1965

Dr. King expresses his deep appreciation to Mr. Gus Efroymson for the contribution of $100.00 to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Why I Am Opposed to the War in Vietnam

Sunday, April 30, 1967

"Why I Am Opposed to the War in Vietnam" is a sermon Dr. King delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church on April 30, 1967 in Atlanta. In this draft of the sermon, Dr. King references a previous speech, "Beyond Vietnam," that he delivered to the group "Clergy and Laymen Concerned about Vietnam" at Riverside Baptist Church in New York City.

Draft of a Letter from MLK to Dr. Lawrence Alex Whitfield

This is a draft of a letter written by Dr. King to Dr. Lawrence Alex Whitfield. Dr. King indicates that he recieved a letter from Barbara Payne which suggested that Dr. Whitfield had expressed a desire to support the Freedom Movement and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from William O. Miller to MLK

Sunday, February 18, 1968

Mr. Miller expresses gratitude to Dr. King for his recent endorsement of "Teachers Concerned," a local initiative in Philadelphia. He concludes by expressing wishes that Dr. King continues to be blessed in his efforts to "remove all racial lines of demarcation."

Give Decency A Chance in the South...

The Southern Conference Educational Fund (SCEF) is working toward eliminating "all forms of racial segregation in the Southern and border States." This brochure highlights SCEF's accomplishments, supporters, programs and future.

Letter from MLK to Arthur B. Jestice

Thursday, December 21, 1967

Dr. King declines a speaking engagement at the St. Andrew's Street Baptist Church due to some "programmatic plans." Dr. King asks if it is possible to meet in the future.

MLK's Letter Addressing Poverty

Dr. King addresses poverty, unemployment and other issues relevant to Americans and the mission of the SCLC before requesting funds to counter these issues.

Letter from Congressman Marvin Esch to MLK

Monday, November 27, 1967

Congressman Esch expresses appreciation to Dr. King for supporting the anti-poverty program. Attached is a copy of the Congressman's statement regarding the "Economic Opportunity Amendments of 1967."

Pelagianism

Dr. King defines Pelagianism as the belief that original sin did not taint human nature and that mortal will is still capable of choosing good or evil without divine aid.

Royalty Statement-MLK

Sunday, April 30, 1967

Dr. King receives a royalty statement for the sale of the Norwegian edition of "Stength to Love." The Norwegian edition was published by De Unge Forlag and sold 6963 copies. The total for the statement amounts to $1139.15.

Notecard- Barth

In this notecard, Dr.King outlines his views on Barth.

Letter from Randolph T. Blackwell to MLK

Randolph T. Blackwell notifies Dr. King about the Office of Economic Opportunity grant to Crawfordville Enterprises in Taliaferro County, Georgia. The program will provide economic expansion for rural areas and education development.

Letter from Fred Sondermann to MLK

Tuesday, June 6, 1967

Mr. Sondermann invites Dr. King on behalf of Colorado College to speak at their annual symposium. Mr. Sondermann discusses this important tradition and explains the upcoming topic.

Letter from Arthur Welch and J.A. Middleton to MLK

Thursday, December 3, 1964

The congregation of Allen Temple A.M.E. Church in Atlanta writes Dr. King to congratulate him for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964.

Letter from Jacob Broertjes to Dora McDonald

Friday, August 7, 1964

Jacob Broertjes informs Dora McDonald that Dr. King will speak at two sessions for the European Baptist Federations. The services will be brought to various European countries via television. Mr. Broertjes details the intricacies of Dr. King's visit.

Views of Senator Barry Goldwater

This document depicts brief summaries of Senator Goldwater's sentiments regarding civil rights, social welfare, education, right-wing extremism, disarmament and peace.

Guidelines for a Constructive Church

Sunday, June 5, 1966

In this sermon delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Dr. King spells out guidelines for the church: healing the broken-hearted, preaching deliverance to the captive (freeing people from everything that enslaves), and preaching the acceptable year of the Lord. The acceptable year of the Lord, he says, is every year the time is right to do right, stop lying and cheating, do justice, learn to live as brothers and beat swords into plowshares.

Letter from MLK to Rev. James A. Shiflett

Tuesday, October 9, 1962

Dr. King conveys his appreciation to Reverend Shiflett of Chicago for his involvement in and support of the Albany Movement.

The Bible

Dr. King records his views of Scott regarding "The Bible." Scott believes that beyond being an "anthology of the noblest religions," the Bible is also an account of history. Even though there is the ambiguity that comes with history, there is also an unambiguous message of the purpose of God and the destiny of man.

Humanism (15th Century)

Dr. King reflects on a classical approach to learning.

Letter from Tyrone Little to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Tyrone Little expresses his sympathy to Mrs. King after the death of Dr. King, and he explains that his school plans to hold a mass.

Letter from Laura Taylor to MLK

Sunday, May 21, 1967

A supporter writes Dr. King to commend his work in the anti-war movement. The author also tells Dr. King that she writes President Johnson and other legislators regularly on the topic, and references a series of letters she sent on the recent Mother's Day holiday.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Heussenstamm to MLK about a Humanity Button

Friday, March 1, 1968

In this letter Mr. and Mrs. Heussenstamm enclose a button called the "Pentagon of Humanity," which the Heussenstamm's also sent to the President and the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Accordingly the symbol represents “love, unity and wisdom—the community of man.”

MLK Statement to Time Magazine

Friday, January 12, 1962

In this statement to Time Magazine, Dr. King responds to President John F. Kennedy's call for new civil rights legislation.

January Program of the Emancipation Celebration

Monday, January 2, 1961

This program of the Emancipation Celebration in Savannah, Georgia features Dr. King as the guest speaker.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. D. E. Walters to MLK

Tuesday, February 2, 1965

Mr. and Mrs. D. E. Walters of Stone Mountain, Georgia congratulate Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter to Harry J. Cargas from Dora McDonald

Monday, December 9, 1963

Ms. McDonald responds to Mr. Cargas' letter which included an enclosure of the December issue of "The Queen's Work,"a publication of The Sodality of Our Lady society. Ms. McDonald tells the sender that Dr. King is out of town, and the package will be brought to his attention upon his return to Atlanta.

Telegram from Ambassador Ade Martins to MLK

This telegram was sent to Dr. King and Theodore Brown by N. Ade Martins, the Ambassador of Nigeria. He explains the reaction of Lt. Col. Yakubu Gowon, the commander in chief of the armed forces, to Dr. King's letter concerning the violence in Nigeria.