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Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, April 13, 1964

This letter serves to inform Dr.King of the offers being made from a Japanese publisher, to purchase the rights to "Strength to Love."

Press Statement by MLK About President Johnson's Address on Selma

Tuesday, March 16, 1965

Dr. King lauds President Johnson's speech to a joint session of Congress, which he describes as an eloquent, unequivocal and passionate plea for human rights. This statement and the President's address occurred during the height of the Selma voting rights campaign.

Condolence Letter to Coretta Scott King from Lyman G. Farrar

In this letter Mr. Farrar writes, "Dr. King symbolized for me the celebrant of the century in terms of newness of life in Jesus Christ." With a deep sense of gratitude he reveals the indelible affect Dr. King had on his life and his ministry, as a white middle class male.

Letter from Arvid Svard to MLK

Friday, December 20, 1963

Arvid Svard asks Dr. King to provide an introduction for an article Svard is writing for the Swedish Baptist Press, which will highlight Dr. King's work. Svard also requests pictures for use in the Swedish edition of "Strength to Love."

Letter from Mrs. G. E. Finch to Mr. M. Nance, Jr.

Friday, February 16, 1968

This letter, dated February 16, 1968, was written to Mr. M. Nance, Jr. from Mrs. Finch. In this letter, she states that while the situation in Orangeburg is "regrettable" it can be fixed. She says that other ethnic groups would not lead demonstrations as blacks have. She says black people lack "imagination and energy''. Finch states that while she believes blacks have suffered "grievances, she has contempt for so-called "free loaders".

Letter from Seventh Graders to Rev. Ralph Abernathy

Thursday, April 25, 1968

Five seventh grade boys wrote to Reverend Abernathy asking for information about the SCLC and the life of Dr. King.

Letter from Frank Sullivan to MLK

Friday, March 24, 1967

In this letter, the president of the Philadelphia Federation of Teachers, Mr. Sullivan, informs Dr. King that the organization will look to donate to the S.C.L.C.

Letter from Ann Lincoln to MLK

Thursday, June 24, 1965

The writer, who identifies herself as a "collateral descendent of Abraham Lincoln," relates a story involving a young colored girl to Dr. King. Ms. Lincoln explains that the incident disturbed her greatly and she feels it is time to educate Negros on white acceptance.

Telegram to MLK from John Jacobs

John Jacobs accuses Dr. King of being associated with Communists. He proclaims that Negroes learned raping, robbing and relief with Dr. King's training.

Letter from Charles S. Spivey, Jr. to the Racial Justice Committee

Wednesday, March 6, 1968

Charles S. Spivey, Jr. outlines the events to take place during the SCLC Poor Peoples Campaign under the leadership of Dr. King. The main events all transpired after Dr. King's assassination on April 4th, 1968.

Letter from Vernon R. Byrd to MLK

Wednesday, April 4, 1962

Vernon R. Byrd invites Dr. King to be the speaker at the Annual Men's Day Service at St. Paul African Methodist Episcopal Church in Bermuda.

Postcard to MLK on Dallas Police

Monday, March 18, 1968

This newspaper clipping makes reference to an article about the Dallas Police Department's effort to recruit Negro police officers.

Dexter Echo: March 2, 1960

Wednesday, March 2, 1960

This edition of the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church newsletter, The Dexter Echo, reports information about upcoming events and the latest news, including a recent gift made to Dr. King and his family. A key article speaks to the power and necessity of worship.

Letter from Students of Southern Africa to MLK

Thursday, July 15, 1965

Students from South Africa write Dr. King to express their concerns regarding the United States' diplomatic relations with the Republic of South Africa.

Telegram from Sargent Shriver to MLK

During the year of 1967, Sargent Shriver served as Director of the Office of Economic Opportunity and created several community oriented programs. Shriver sends this telegram to Dr. King informing his support. Shriver appreciates King's ability to be forthright on the condemnation of lawless behavior and causes of social unrest. He agrees that "America must quickly develop and support adequate programs to remove these causes."

I Wish...

Dr. King writes a nursery rhyme on wishes.

The U.S. Negro, 1953

Monday, May 11, 1953

This Time Magazine article discusses socioeconomic components for the Negro in 1953. Topics range from the Mason-Dixon Line and Cadillacs, to the difference between Southern and Northern Negroes.

Letter from Irv Kupcinet to MLK

Monday, January 28, 1963

Irv Kupcinet, columnist for the Chicago Sun-Times, offers Dr. King recognition for his appearance his TV show. He thanks Dr. King for his significant contribution to the overall success of the program.

To Set Our People Free

This poem by Mrs. Eudora V. Savage is dedicated to the African American veterans of World War Two.

Letter to Jesse Jackson from Dora McDonald

Wednesday, November 30, 1966

Dr. King request the attendance of Rev. Jesse Jackson at a meeting that will discuss the distribution of grant funds for a program regarding nonviolence and social change.

Toynbee

Dr. King highlights a quote from Arnold J. Toynbee's twelve-volume analysis of the rise and fall of civilizations, "A Study of History."

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Jaggart to MLK

Friday, July 14, 1967

Mr and Mrs. C. Jaggart express how much they enjoyed one of Dr. King's messages.

SCLC Agenda's

Monday, June 26, 1967

This is the agenda set out to specific people within the SCLC.

Telegram from MLK to President Johnson on State of the Union Address

Wednesday, January 12, 1966

Dr. King praises President Johnson for his State of the Union address. King expresses appreciation for Johnson's continued commitment to the Great Society, his call for legislation to protect those pursuing their constitutional rights and his pledge to work diligently to end the Vietnam War.

Operation Breadbasket Sends Telegram Regarding Employment Discrimination

Friday, November 10, 1967

Representatives of SCLC's Operation Breadbasket address the discriminatory employment practices of the Atlanta Metropolitan Area Civil Defense Council.

Letter from Jean and Hildegard Goss-Mayr to MLK

Thursday, October 22, 1964

Jean and Hildegard Goss-Mayr, of the International Fellowship of Reconciliation, invite Dr. King to speak at a meeting in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. They also congratulate him on winning the Nobel Peace Prize.

People In Action: The Complete Life

Saturday, April 27, 1963

Dr. King was in jail in Birmingham and unable to contribute his regular column to the New York Amsterdam News. The editors published these excerpts from a sermon he had recently given at Riverside Church on "The Dimensions of a Complete Life."

Christianity

Dr. King references Emil Brunner's argument on Christianity.

Suggestions for SCLC Mobilization of Jobs and Income

Friday, February 9, 1968

This document outlines suggestions given by The North City Congress, a federation of independent groups concerned with North Central Philadelphia. The Congress seeks to enable the community to exercise a strong voice in government and social welfare operations pertaining to the improvement of surrounding ghettos. Included is a summary of recommendations and detailed points of consideration.

Letter from Pastor R. L. Crady to MLK

Wednesday, February 3, 1965

Pastor Crady expresses concern to Dr. King that the civil rights movement mayl be in vain, because segregationist organizations can use the umbrella of religious protection, along with taxpayer funds, to back up their convictions.