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New York Post: A Poor Show

Thursday, October 27, 1966

The Child Development Group in Mississippi (CDGM) was a head start project created in 1965 with the help of a federally funded grant. The program not only specialized in child development, but sought to increase community involvement. In late 1966, Mississippi Senator Stennis "opened fire" on the program, charging those involved with malpractice. Consequently, Sargent Shiver, Director of the Office of Economic Opportunity, formed a "more respectable anti-poverty unity" called Mississippi Action for Progress to takeover CDGM.

Telegram from Rodney Clurman to MLK

Saturday, March 25, 1967

This telegram forwarded by Rodney Clurman to Dr. King sends word regarding the need for transportation, food, medical supplies and water. Clurman also makes mention of a smallpox epidemic, stating that fifty million may die from the disease. He closes by encouraging the Reverend to wire him if interested in accompanying him to Scotland.

Letter from John T. Walker to MLK

Wednesday, February 21, 1968

On behalf of the Washington Cathedral. John Walker extends an invitation for Dr. King to preach at the Cathedral and articulate the true premise of the Poor People's Campaign to their congregation. Walker believes that Dr. King's physical presence will help eliminate doubts that this civil disobedience campaign will turn to violence. Dr. King is would eventually preach the final sermon of his life on March 31 at the Washington Cathedral under the subject "Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution."

Letter from Richard Bennett to MLK

Wednesday, April 12, 1967

Richard Bennett requests a letter of greeting from Dr. King to be read at the Minnesota Federation of Teachers Educational Conference.

Francis A. O'Connell Letter to Mr. Steve Klein and MLK

Monday, September 25, 1978

Francis A. O' Connell provides Steve Klein with the requested copies of the speech delivered at the Transport Workers Union 11th Constitutional Convention.

Telegram from MLK to Robert Kennedy

Dr. King sends this telegram to Attorney General Robert Kennedy regarding Saint Augustine's refusal to desegregate its public facilities.

City Council Kills Hopes for Low Rental Apartment Complex

Sunday, September 3, 1967

This article, located in The Independent, covers a housing conflict in San Diego, California. The housing project would provide clean, modern apartments for the Negro population, using the extra land of Mt. Hope Cemetery. The goal of the project is to alleviate an area with over 4,000 substandard housing units. Approved by federal agencies, the project would also offer supplemented rent to those unable to afford the full amount. Despite approval, city council members rejected the idea due to opposition from white property owners and residents.

Letter from Everett C. McKeage to MLK

Thursday, July 15, 1965

Mr. McKeage writes to Dr. King expressing his satisfaction and appreciation for his position on Vietnam relations. He encloses a monetary donation to assist Dr. King's work.

Battle of Economic Opportunity

Friday, November 17, 1967

In this New York Post article, the author provides a perspective of the events leading to the Economic Opportunity Act as it pertains to both opposing sides; Democratic and Republican.

Letter from Robert L. Hartley to MLK

In this letter, SCLC member Robert Hartley asks Dr. King for assistance in getting released from jail.

Letter from W.T. Durr to MLK

Wednesday, February 7, 1968

Pastor Durr donates funds to help Dr. King and his efforts of nonviolence.

Letter to MLK

Tuesday, October 4, 1966

Here Mrs. L. Schmidt, acting through the office of Joan Daves, requests that Dr. King write an inscription in his book "Why We Can't Wait" for her son, Joachim.

Miracles

Dr. King paraphrases the Old Testament scripture of Exodus chapter 13, verse 22, in which God leads the Israelites with a cloud by day and a a pillar of fire by night.

Address by MLK at the 30th Anniversary of District 65

Wednesday, October 23, 1963

This document, an address given by Dr. King on the 30th anniversary of District 65, includes handwritten notes. In the address, Dr. King talks about the importance of the Declaration of Independence and the Emancipation Proclamation to human rights.

Letter from MLK to E. Weidner

Monday, February 26, 1962

Dr. King informs Mrs. E. Weidner that Negroes have enjoyed positions of respect and prestige in non-Negro nations. He cites several examples in history to this statement.

Seventh Biennial Religious Conference

This is a program for the seventh Biennial Religious Conference at Princeton University. Initially conceived shortly after World War II, the conference continues to confront important issues of human life. Under the leadership of the Student Christian Association, "Integration: Conscience in Crisis" will take place over a span of four days. Topics of the conference include "the historical and social as well as the judicial, international, and theological" implications of segregation and integration.

Scientific Method (Its Importance)

Dr. King quotes Henry P. Van Dusen’s article “How Do We Know?” from The Christian Century on the scientific method as central to Henry Nelson Wieman’s thinking. He used this quote in his doctoral dissertation, “A Comparison of the Conceptions of God in the Thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman.”

Letter from John W. McCormack to MLK

Wednesday, February 19, 1964

John McCormack writes Dr. King expressing thanks for his telegram of commendation "in relation to the passage of the Civil Rights Bill in the House of Representatives." McCormack expresses that he hopes he will have the pleasure of seeing Dr. King again.

MLK Royalty Statement from Joan Daves

This royalty statement from Joan Daves references a French publication of Dr. King's "Strength To Love".

MLK Memorial Service Program in Seattle, Washington

Sunday, April 7, 1968

Three days after the death of Dr. King this memorial service, conducted by Reverend Theodore Kennedy, took place at the First Unitarian Universalist Church of Seattle.

Philadelphia Inquirer: Balance of Payments 'Cure' Was Devised in Near-Panic

Thursday, January 11, 1968

This article by Rowland Evans and Robert Novak criticizes a proposed 2% border tax on imported goods. They argue that President Johnson's support of such a measure is reckless and will cause economic repercussions around the world.

Flyer for SCLC Mass Meeting

This flyer advertises a 1958 Norfolk, VA SCLC mass meeting.

Knowledge of God

Dr. King quotes a segment of Professor John Baille's work regarding self-consciousness and God.

Letter from Miss McDonald to Mr. Virginia M. Burke

Tuesday, May 10, 1966

Miss McDonald writes to Mr. Burke of the University of Wisconsin granting permission to quote Dr. King's historical "I Have a Dream" speech.

Letter from MLK to Ruth Huston

Wednesday, July 17, 1963

Dr. King sends a copy of "Strength to Love" and "Letter from Birmingham City Jail" to his friend Ruth Huston of New York City. Jokingly, Dr. King characterizes what Huston's reaction might be to "Strength to Love," due to Huston's own personal beliefs about religion. He emphasized that she may be disinterested in reading the book of sermons, but "on the other hand they may give you some religion."

Letter from Mrs. Carrie Fillmore to MLK

Mrs. Fillmore requests help from Dr. King as she informs him that she has six children and cannot afford to get them into schools. She also lets Dr. King know that she has gone to the NAACP without results.

Great Neck Declaration of Rededication

The citizens of Great Neck, New York rededicate themselves to the "struggle for equality and justice."

Royalty Statement from Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, October 9, 1964

Joan Daves sends Dr. King a royalty statement for "Stride Toward Freedom" and "Strength To Love."

Schleiermacher (Religion as a Social Experience)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “Speeches on Religion.” The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”

Letter from Stacey McCloud to MLK

Stacey McCloud writes to Dr. King suggesting that he, Stokley Carmichael and others relocate to Africa and march.