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Joint Statement on Violence in the Cities

Wednesday, July 26, 1967

Dr. King, A. Philip Randolph, Whitney M. Young Jr., and Roy Wilkins issue a joint statement urging Negro Americans in cities such as Newark and Detroit to end the public disorder and rioting. The civil rights leaders emphasize the potential damage the urban riots pose to "the Negro population, to the civil rights cause, and to the entire nation."

Anonymous Letter to MLK

The anonymous author details some of the hardships of his life and expresses his desire to incarcerate Dr. King permanently.

Letter from MLK to E. C. Smith

Wednesday, December 19, 1962

Dr. King acknowledges the receipt of Rev. Smith's invitation to speak at Metropolitan Baptist Church and apologizes for his tardy response. Dr. King discusses the "People-To-People" tour of the south and declines the invitation due to his busy schedule.

Letter from Wyatt Tee Walker to Eugene Cook

Friday, August 16, 1963

Wyatt Tee Walker, executive assistant to Dr. King writes a response letter to Eugene Cook, the Attorney General of Georgia. Walker asks the Attorney General to provide his office with a list of questions that he would like answered. He also informs Cook that he will release the contents of this letter to the news media to make sure their is a level of transparency.

Draft Letter from MLK to Mrs. Smock

Dr. King apologizes for responding to Mrs. Smock's letter over a year late, but extends gratitude for the invitation to her art exhibition. Dr. King affirms that if he is in Atlanta during the time of her exhibition he and Coretta will attend.

Letter From Chas D. Wherry to MLK

Thursday, January 18, 1968

Chas Wherry advises Dr. King to consult with Dr. H. H. Brookins about accumulating more funds for the March on Washington. Wherry also inquires about Dr. King sending a letter to the Los Angeles Times regarding Mrs. Bain's newly appointed position.

Young Americans Newsletter

This Young Americans newsletter covers topics such as: The Vietnam War, Young Americans for Freedom, and the usage of violence for a good cause.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK Regarding British Edition of Book

Thursday, May 11, 1967

In this letter, Joan Daves relays details regarding the British edition of "Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community?" to Dr. King.

Letter to Dr. King

Tuesday, February 6, 1968

The author of this letter writes to oppose Dr. King's view of the government being the greatest infuser of violence. The author attributes Communism as the root of violence, and asks Dr. King to consider the consequences of unfavorable criticism during such times.

Letter from Charles Crawford to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967

Charles S. Crawford expresses his dissent with Dr. King on a variety of subjects, one specifically his stance towards President Johnson and the concept of civil disobedience.

Letter from MLK to Wesley A. Hotchkiss

Tuesday, March 1, 1966

Dr. King thanks Dr. Wesley A. Hotchkiss from the United Church of Christ for his generous contribution of $11,000 to the SCLC. King includes a list of how they money will be spent to assist with voter registration.

Letter from Edmund Gordon to MLK

Friday, March 15, 1968

Edmund W. Gordon expresses his gratitude for Dr. King's agreement to use his name in connection with the development of a Memorial Park honoring W.E.B Dubois. Mr. Gordon also informs Dr. King of the other participants of the project along with a brief description of his professional background.

Letter from Warren Hamilton to MLK

Wednesday, June 14, 1967

Warren Hamilton, president of the Student Government Association of the Tuskegee Institute, invites Dr. King to participate in their upcoming lecture series entitled "Viewpoint '68."

MLK Examination Blue Book

Friday, May 23, 1947

Dr. King used this "Blue Book" to record answers for a Bible exam taken on May 23, 1947.

Letter from MLK to Herman Strase

Dr. King writes to Mr. Herman Strase expressing his appreciation for an earlier letter that including sentiments to extend justice to all people regardless of race. The Reverend states that he agrees with Strase regarding the demand of Christianity in the expression of compassion and love for all people, no matter their race.

Letter from Dora McDonald to H. D. Bollinger

Thursday, September 24, 1964

Dora McDonald writes Dr. Bollinger accepting an invitation on Dr. King's behalf. Ms. McDonald explains that Dr. King will be able to attend the conference in Lincoln, Nebraska, but he will not be traveling alone, so they will need to prepare travel expenses for two.

MLK Statement at Pacem In Terris II Convocation

Monday, May 29, 1967

Dr. King's introductory remarks at the Pacem In Terris II Convocation critiques the United States' involvement in Vietnam.

Neighborhood Stabilization: A Program

Sunday, May 1, 1966

The Southern Regional Council issues a special report regarding neighborhood stabilization. The report investigates minority housing in majority white communities. The report states that realtors victimize Negro residents and lead white residents to believe that Negroes cause property decline. The report also features a step-by-step self-help plan for a more organized, unified and stabilized community.

Letter from Mae Martin to MLK

Thursday, August 3, 1967

Mae Martin of Little Rock, Arkansas, writes to Dr. King in response to one of his public statements. She speaks about race relations in her city and points out that there is good and bad within both the white and black communities.

Letter from MLK to Esther Thompson

Monday, November 29, 1965

Dr. King informs Mrs. Thompson that the SCLC does not have the resources to help aid her husband's sight. Dr. King recommends that she contact churches in her area for help.

March for Peace Flyer

This flyer advertises the March for Peace. The event, which was organized in Atlanta and held on Hiroshima Day, focused on ending the war in Vietnam.

Get Well Letter from Albert Adams to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Saturday, September 20, 1958

Out of the many well wishes sent to Dr. King, he received one in particular from this New York inmate, Albert Adams. Mr. Adams wished Dr. King a full recovery and prayed that he would not, again, endure the same hardship.

Letter from Dr. Benjamin E. Mays to MLK

Thursday, January 4, 1962

In this letter to Dr. King, Benjamin E. Mays, president of Morehouse College informs Dr. King about the meeting with Robert Troutman on matters that involve input from President Kennedy.

Telegram from MLK and Wyatt Walker to Burke Marshall

Monday, July 2, 1962

Dr. King and Rev. Wyatt Tee Walker send a urgent request to Burke Marshall of the United States Department of Justice. The two ministers seek a federal investigation in the brutal beating of an SCLC Voter Registration worker in Georgia.

Letter from The Charlotte News to MLK

Monday, January 3, 1966

George Willhite, of The Charlotte News, asks Dr. King to comment on accusations of him being a communist. A reader had seen a photo of Dr. King at an allegedly communist school in Tennessee. Willhite asks Dr. King to explain the circumstances of the picture.

Letter From Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding Publication Date of the German Edition of "Why We Can't Wait"

Friday, May 22, 1964

In this letter, Joan Daves informs Dr. King about the desire of the German publishers to have a publication date. Joan Daves also inquires if Dr. King has free time for Mayor Brandt.

New York Welfare Organizers to Join Poor People's Campaign

Wednesday, December 6, 1967

Susan Oreskes, a welfare organizer in New York City, informs Dr. King that 2000 people demonstrated as part of Dr. Spock’s peace campaign. She and Beulah Sanders, Citywide Coordinator of Welfare Groups, took 4 busses from the Upper West Side to George Wiley’s Poverty Rights Convention in Washington in August where they met with Senator Jacob Javits about a guaranteed minimum income. Mrs. Oreskes also states she wants to work with Dr. King and includes addresses for Beulah Sanders and Arnaldo Barrow of the Puerto Rican Community Project.

Letter from Colin W. Bell to MLK

Tuesday, May 17, 1966

Colin W. Bell invites Dr. King to deliver a lecture during the anniversary activities of the American Friends Service Committee. This letter also includes Dora McDonald's shorthand in red ink.

MLK's Examination Book for Bible Course

Tuesday, December 3, 1946

Dr. King writes six short essays for an examination in his Bible course.

Letter from George W. Monroe to President Johnson

Monday, February 26, 1968

A former employee of the US Naval Air Station in Jacksonville, Florida, George Monroe, writes again to President Johnson regarding an injury he received and the discrimination he was met with in trying to receive his sick pay and disability benefits. President Johnson had given Monroe's complaint to the Commanding Officer of the USNA in Jacksonville, however, Monroe was still facing difficulty getting help and wrote again to President Johnson to ask for his help. Dr.