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Letter from MLK to Mrs. Parker

Dr. King sympathizes with the unfortunate plight of Mrs. Parker's financial situation and encourages her to remain steadfast.

Letter from Mahalia Jackson Foundation Requesting Financial Support

In this letter addressed to "Friend," gospel singer Mahalia Jackson requests financial support for the Mahalia Jackson Foundation, which helps deserving children obtain a higher education.

MLK's Examination Book for Bible Course

Dr. King writes this essay about the problems Habakkuk presents to Jehovah. He argues that God no longer judges humanity as a collective entity, but as individuals within humanity.

Letter from James H. Meredith to MLK

Saturday, October 17, 1964

James Meredith writes from Nigeria to congratulate Dr. King on receiving the Noble Peace Prize and emphasizes that the struggle for human rights is a world-wide struggle. Meredith, the first African-American student to attend the University of Mississippi, was at that time a post-graduate researcher in Nigeria.

Address by MLK at Golden Anniversary Conference of National Urban League

Tuesday, September 6, 1960

Dr. King gives an address at the National Urban Leagues's Golden Anniversary Conference in New York City. He speaks on the subject, "The Rising Tide of Racial Consciousness" and discusses the Negroes new sense of "somebodiness." The factors that contribute to this new sense of dignity include a population shift from rural to urban life, rapid educational advance, gradual improvement of economic status, Supreme Court decisions outlawing segregation in the public schools, and awareness that freedom is a part of a world-wide struggle.

Letter from Canary McKay to MLK

Friday, February 4, 1966

Canary McKay shows her appreciation to Dr. King for the progress made as a result of the Civil Rights Movement. She also extends an invitation for King to speak at her church.

Letter from Dorothy L. Shereff to MLK Regarding a Book on Gandhi

Tuesday, January 5, 1965

Dorothy Shereff, Rights and Permissions Manager for The New American Library, requests that Dr. King send a statement to promote Professor Louis Fischer's book on Mahatma Gandhi.

Letter from Mrs. William Wenger to MLK

Mrs. Wenger pleads with Dr. King to never give up the fight for civil rights.

Thank You Note to Martin Luther King Jr. from Mt. Olive Baptist Church

Sunday, July 30, 1967

This letter was written to Dr.King from the Mt.Olive Baptist Church. They were sending a donation to the SCLC and thanking them for rebuilding their church that had been burned.

Memorandum from Ralph D. Abernathy to SCLC Board Members and Executive Staff

Friday, January 6, 1967

Rev. Ralph Abernathy informs the board members and executive staff of SCLC that Dr. King is taking a leave of absence for two months to write his book, "Where Do We Go From Here?" During Dr. King's absence, Rev. Abernathy took over the activities of the SCLC.

Manifesto of the Meredith Mississippi March

Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, and Floyd McKissick sign the Manifesto of the Meredith Mississippi March, which represents a "public indictment and protest of the failure of American society." In solidarity, they demand courses of actions to deal with voting fraud, strengthened civil rights legislation, and impartial application of the law.

Letter from John A. Collison to MLK

Saturday, August 15, 1964

John Collision writes Dr. King regarding race relations in America. Collision wants Dr. King to understand that majority of whites have no hatred toward blacks, but instead "a strangeness" and questioning of why people are different shades.

Man

Dr. King records one atheist’s perspective on man.

Letter from Carey B. Preston to MLK

Friday, August 28, 1964

Carey Preston of the Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, thanks Dr. King for being the public meeting speaker at their convention.

The Evening Star: The Perversion of a Cause

Monday, March 13, 1967

This article describes the effect of James Meredith's withdrawal from the race for Adam Powell's congressional seat. Civil Rights activists such as Dr. King, Mr. Carmichael and Mr. McKissick offer their opinions on how the race was handled.

Letter from Phillip S. Gelb to MLK

Saturday, May 4, 1963

Mr. Phillip Gelb encloses a donation to the SCLC and states that he appreciates the efforts being made by the protestors in Birmingham. Furthermore, he identifies the movement as the "most vital and pro-American in the nation today."

Letter from Mary Whiteside to MLK

Monday, May 7, 1962

Ms. Whiteside, treasurer of the Democratic Club of Paseo, Washington, encloses a check to help Dr. King with "organizing and tutoring." The club decided to send the funds after reading a letter one of its members received from Dr. King.

Letter from Edward Williams to MLK

Friday, May 12, 1967

The United Presbyterian Church's Commission on Religion and Race awarded a grant to SCLC for the salary of Hosea Williams. The letter accompanies a check for partial payment.

Letter from Donna Mitchell to MLK

Thursday, May 16, 1963

Donna Mitchell, an African American youth from Detroit, writes Dr. King to extend her support and express her appreciation for what he and others are doing in Birmingham, Alabama.

Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee

Wednesday, May 1, 1963

This pamphlet details the history, programs and purpose of The Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee.

Letter from Vice President Hubert Humphrey to MLK Regarding Crisis in Detroit

Thursday, August 3, 1967

In this letter, Vice President of the United States of America, Hubert Humphrey, writes to Dr. King to thank him for his statements promoting nonviolence in the crisis situation in Detroit, Michigan.

Letter from Nancy and Bill Brodie to Mrs. King

Thursday, April 11, 1968

Nancy and Bill Brodie write Mrs. King to express their sympathy regarding Dr. King's assassination. As a method to comfort Mrs. King, Nancy includes a poem that she wrote for her father when he died.

MLK Note

Dr. King writes a story about a father and son waiting for a train at New York's Grand Central Station. The son is headed to college in New England and the father gives the young man some simple, yet profound advice. "Bill, never forget who you are."

SCLC Sustaining Contributors Annual Card-1967

Sunday, January 1, 1967

Warren J. Day submits his annual contribution to the SCLC. He adds a small note thanking Dr. King for taking a strong role in the peace movement.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Marilyn Coulter

Thursday, November 7, 1963

Dora McDonald encloses an informational packet from Dr. King to Marilyn Coulter. Dr. King's only request for Coulter is that when she uses the information she cites the source from which it derives.

Request for Message form Amalgamate Laundry Workers Joint Board

Thursday, March 19, 1964

Louis Simon is writing to Dr. King requesting a message that he may include on the souvenir program for a concert the Amalgamated Laundry Workers Joint Board will be hosting.

Dorothy Cotton's Notes

Dorothy Cotton's compilation of notes includes topics such as the advantages of urbanization, diversity, automation, the "purpose of human effort," Denmark, community mobilization, the democratic method, the behavior of a responsible citizen and the "greatest prize" for mankind. Dorothy Cotton was the SCLC's Education Director and one of the organization's highest ranking female members at the time.

Letter from MLK to Dr. James Costar at Michigan State University

Wednesday, February 9, 1966

In this letter to the Chairman of the Department of Counseling and Guidance at Michigan State, Dr. King gives a stellar review of the work of Dr. Robert Green. Dr. King commends Dr. Green's performance in stabilizing the SCLC Citizenship Education Program and expresses appreciation to the university for sharing his expertise.

Letter from Nancy Fuentes to Coretta Scott King

Friday, April 5, 1968

Nancy Fuentes writes Mrs. King to express her condolences for Dr. King's death and extend her love to Mrs. King and her children.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Nagle

Dr. King comments on a Supreme Court ruling that outlaws prayer and Bible reading in public schools. He asserts that the decision is consistant with the Constitution and is meant to keep any single religion from dominating the government.