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Letter from MLK to Mr. Gambbacinni

Dr. King acknowledges Mr. Gambaccini's request to the Pope for peace regarding the Vietnam War. Dr. King adds, "As the strength of our world's weapons increases and the war in Vietnam continues to escalate the crying need for world peace becomes greater and greater."

Letter from MLK to E. D. Johnson

Monday, April 30, 1962

Dr. King responds to E. D. Johnson's letter expressing appreciation for encouragement by providing knowledge regarding the arrogance of Mr. Johnson's son. Dr. King stresses the importance of valuing the internal factors of self-respect, integrity and selflessness, opposed to the external factors of color, skin and wealth.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. White

Dr. King informs Mrs. White that she should seek financial assistance from her local welfare office because the SCLC will not be able to provide that service.

Letter from Leonard Newell to MLK

Friday, March 1, 1968

Leonard A. Newell writes to Dr. King to ask for his opinion about the pursuit of a consumer strike to protest the War in Vietnam.

Jesus

Dr. King cites a quote from Claude J. Montefiore's book, "Some Elements of the Religious Teaching of Jesus."

Project Chicago Staff Meeting Minutes

Monday, July 3, 1967

This document recaps the minutes of the Project Chicago staff meeting held at West Side Christian Parish on July 3, 1967. Dr. King is listed as a proposed member of the Advisory Committee.

Letter from Clifford L. Alexander to MLK

Monday, January 29, 1968

Clifford L. Alexander, Chairman for the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, wrote to Dr. King to encloses some clippings from the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission News Digest, the New York Times, Los Angeles Times, and the Washington Post regarding the EEOC's hearings on white collar discrimination in New York.

Letter from MLK to Charles H. Dorr

Friday, January 5, 1968

Dr. King writes Charles Dorr acknowledging his support of the young African American men who are boycotting the Olympic games. King states, "the country must concern itself with the plight of all Negroes and not just the privileged few."

Invitation from Clarence Williams to MLK

Monday, September 26, 1966

Clarence Williams invites Dr. King to a campaign kick-off rally sponsored by the Dallas County Independent Free Voters Organization.

Letter from Anderson Davis to MLK

Thursday, October 3, 1963

Mr. Davis invites Dr. King to speak at West Virginia's Emancipation Proclamation centennial celebration. Mr. Davis informs Dr. King that the event is an opportunity to collect contributions for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Henry N. Flynt, Jr. to MLK

Sunday, October 15, 1967

Henry N. Flynt expresses his appreciation for a copy of Dr. King's book, "Where Do We Go From Here" and compliments Dr. King on the quality of the book.

MLK Thanks Rev. Isaac Green

Wednesday, July 10, 1963

Dr. King writes to Rev. Isaac Green of Central Baptist Church thanking him and his congregation for their contributions to the S.C.L.C.. He explains that without those contributions the conference would not be able to work effectively reach its goals.

Letter from MLK to Eliot Stadler

Thursday, August 20, 1964

Acknowledging receipt of a letter and a $1000 contribution to the SCLC, Dr. King sends his appreciation to Dr. Eliot Stadler. In closing, the Reverend expresses interest in meeting Stadler with regard to potential aid during the summer months.

God's Omniscience

Dr. King references the Biblical Book of Psalms regarding God's omniscience. King notes that God knows everything before it is even done. This, however, does not have an effect on human free will.

Letter from MLK to A.S. Grant

Dr. King thanks Elder Grant for the kind remarks from his previous letter and lets him know that due to the business of his schedule as the President of the SCLC, he is unable to devote attention to Grant's proposal.

Letter from Irving Engel to MLK

Monday, August 2, 1965

Dr. King has been invited to visit Israel. While they are delighted to have him, because of the demands of the Civil Rights Movement, it is suggested that he make this visit while he is at the meeting of the Organization of African Unity in Ghana in order to be considerate of his time.

Telegram from L. M. McCoy to MLK

Friday, May 12, 1967

L. M. McCoy telegrams Dr. King expressing the urgency that the Methodist Church of Brazil receive a reply to their invitation for him to speak at their Centennial celebration in Brazil.

Letter from MLK to Harry Wachtel, Esq.

Tuesday, November 22, 1966

Dr. King updates Attorney Harry Wachtel about a nonviolence workshop that took place at the Penn Center in Frogmore, South Carolina.

Why Integration Won't Slow Up

Tuesday, November 20, 1962

This article featured in the St. Louis Post Dispatch is an extract from Dr. King's address at Cornell College. Dr. King discusses three attitudes that can be taken toward the question of progress in race relations: extreme optimism, extreme pessimism and the realistic position.

Letter from Claude Leman to MLK

Friday, August 27, 1965

Claude Leman, Chairman of the University Model United Nations, invites Dr. King to speak at a Model United Nations Seminar in Montreal, Canada.

Letter from Francis Stern to MLK

Friday, February 19, 1965

Francis H. Stern, Chairman of the Humanitarian Award Committee, writes Dr. King informing him that he has been selected unanimously to receive the 1964 Brith Sholom Humanitarian Award. Stern points out that past recipients include Eleanor Roosevelt, Thurgood Marshall, Rabbi Stephen Wise, UN secretary general Trygvie Lie, and former Prime Minister of Australia Herbert Evatt.

Letter from D. G. Witt to MLK

Monday, April 3, 1967

D. G. Witt notifies Dr. King that Preferred Risk Mutual Insurance Company has reconsidered canceling Dr. King's automobile insurance. Due to the number of accidents Dr. King has had, continued coverage will require payment of a higher surcharge.

Manichaeism

Dr. King describes Manichaeism, a religion and philosophical doctrine that originated in Persia.

Letter from Marshall Bean to MLK

Saturday, July 3, 1965

Marshall Bean, a public school teacher suffering from cancer, writes Dr. King requesting an autographed picture and a "few words of joy."

Letter from Carolyn B. Russell to MLK

Sunday, May 29, 1966

Carolyn B. Russell is a high school student in support of Dr. King and informs him about different aspects of her life. As a result of living in her single mother's household, Carolyn desires employment and to continue her education.

Letter from Joan Daves to Seong Hak Lee

Wednesday, October 21, 1964

Joan Daves responds to a request to translate Dr. King's books "Strength to Love" and "Why We Can't Wait" into the Korean language. She conveys Dr. King's gratitude about such an interest while also expressing hesitancy in granting permission immediately. The project can only be green lighted if specific procedures are followed which Daves lays out in her response.

Mobilizer: February 1967

Monday, February 6, 1967

This February 1967 issue of the "Mobilizer: To End Mass Murder in Vietnam" focuses on James Bevel's direct action anti-war demonstrations. As National Director of the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam, Bevel outlines his strategy to launch a national movement involving community churches, students, labor groups, and others. The initiative is designed around a march to be held on April 15, 1967 in San Francisco and New York.

Letter from Isac Anderson to MLK

Sunday, August 20, 1967

Isac Anderson is requesting help from Dr. King in regards to obtaining a higher education. Anderson was forced to withdraw from school due to interfernece and his inability to concentrate. He hopes that with Dr. King's help he will be able to resolve this issue.

Book payment to MLK

Monday, January 29, 1968

This cable from Dr. King's agent accompanied a royalty payment for the Japanese language edition of "Where Do We Go From Here?"

Justice Versus Injustice

Dr. King explains that the power that establishes justice also generates injustice. He also references an ancient Egyptian story "The Eloquent Peasant" and James Henry Breasted's "The Dawn of Conscience."