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The Church

Dr. King writes a note on the Church, calling it the "center of hope."

Letter from MLK to Nelson Rockefeller

Wednesday, August 22, 1962
New York (NY)

Dr. King takes the opportunity to thank New York Governor Nelson Rockefeller for his tremendous contribution to SCLC. He expresses that the struggle couldn't have survived without friends like Gov. Rockefeller and looks forward to their September 7, 1962 meeting.

Letter from Marie Turner to MLK

Thursday, May 2, 1963
Birmingham, AL, Philadelphia, PA

In this letter Marie Turner of the American Friends Service Committee requests copies of Dr. King's "Letter from a Birmingham Jail" to be reproduced and distributed.

Who Are We?

Saturday, February 5, 1966
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), New York, NY, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C., Florida (FL), Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, VIETNAM

In this sermon Dr. King contemplates "who are we?" and "what is man?". He differentiates between the pessimistic attitudes of the materialistic understandings of man and the optimistic attitudes of humanistic definitions of man. King also states that man is neither all good nor all bad, but a combination. Man is both an everlasting miracle and mystery.

Letter from Louis Rome to MLK

Saturday, February 10, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Michigan (MI), Detroit, MI

Louis Rome, Executive Director of the Michigan Commission on Crime, extends an invitation for Dr. King to speak at the Governor's conference being held in Detroit.

Letter from Harris Schultz to MLK

Saturday, April 3, 1965
Nashville, TN, Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Harris Schultz questions the decision to impose an economic boycott in Alabama. He lists several reasons not to boycott, including the voting rights bill currently under consideration in Congress, the bombing of a Negro citizen's home in Birmingham and the apathy of some people in Alabama.

Letter from Elijah Muhammad to MLK

Wednesday, July 6, 1966
Chicago, IL

In this letter, Elijah Muhammad expresses the importance of black unity in the efforts for equality. Elijah Muhammad requests the presence of Dr. King and other prominent civil rights leaders at a meeting to discuss solutions to the ongoing struggle against injustice.

Letter from MLK to Kenneth Keating

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

In this dictation by Dr. King, he expresses gratitude to the Honorable Kenneth B. Keating for his leadership in securing the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from Harry Boyte to Celia Howard Casey

Tuesday, August 13, 1963
New York (NY)

Harry Boyte writes Celia Casey, on behalf of Dr. King, to express appreciation for her letter.

Invitation to John F. Kennedy Funeral

Saturday, November 23, 1963
Washington, D.C.

This telegram sent from The White House in Washington, invites Dr. King to participate in the funeral services for President John F. Kennedy.

Transcendence and Immanence of God

Dr. King quotes Jeremiah 23:23, and he provides his interpretation of the biblical passage.

Anonymous Letter to President Johnson

The anonymous sender of this letter urges President Lyndon B. Johnson to take action to fund programs in order to get people in school or at work in order to quell rising tensions in cities filled with people dissatisfied with their social and economic positions.

Voter Registration and Population Statistics

South Carolina (SC), Virginia (VA), Georgia (GA), Florida (FL), Alabama (AL)

This document lists statistical data for five southern states. The data categories include the overall voting-age populations, which is further broken down by race and registered versus unregistered voters.

Letter from William G. Broaddus to MLK

Wednesday, August 30, 1967
Virginia (VA), Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

The Editor of the Dicta column from The Virginia Law Weekly writes Dr. King to request a contribution to their "Law for the Poor" series. Mr. Broaddus states that an ideal article will discuss landlord tenant problems and offer solutions. He tells Dr. King that his work in Chicago "on the landlord tenant problem...[makes you] well qualified to write on this subject."

Christian Social Philosophy

Dr. King focuses on the interrelatedness of Christian social philosophy, Christian ethics and theology. He argues for the rejection of theology that has no social ethics and also contends that ethics must be dynamic.

Letter from Rev. John Bartos to MLK Regarding "Strength to Love"

Monday, March 1, 1965
Wisconsin (WI)

Rev. John Bartos referenced Dr. King's book, "Strength to Love," in his sermon to the First Baptist Church congregation. Rev. Bartos focused on the chapter "Being a Good Neighbor," in which Dr. King discusses a story of a car accident and the discriminatory triage process that contributed to the occupants' deaths. The sermon produced questions and reactions the writer is hoping Dr. King can address.

Letter from Robert G. Lippmann to MLK

Saturday, November 16, 1963
Utah (UT), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Birmingham, AL

Robert G. Lippmann requests a copy of the sermon Dr. King delivered at the Sixth Avenue Baptist Church for the funeral services of Addie Mae Collins, Denise McNair, Carole Robertson, and Cynthia Diane Wesley.

Atheism

Dr. King records a Francis Bacon quote on atheism.

Letter from Mary B. Courtney to MLK

Sunday, October 24, 1965
Oklahoma (OK), Florida (FL), Atlanta, GA

Mary B. Courtney requests Dr. King's help to sell her property. She explains to him that the house has been on the market for three years in St. Petersburg, Florida, and while "several colored people" have contacted the real estate agency with interest, they are dissuaded by the lack of African Americans in the neighborhood. The author suggests that Dr. King contact some of his associates in St. Petersburg to assist in the matter.

Letter from MLK to Dr. M. R. Cherry

Tuesday, September 27, 1966

Dr. King informs Dr. M. R. Cherry that he will be unable to accept his invitation to speak at Acadia University in Nova Scotia. King states that his schedule is busy as he is trying to spread social justice in America.

Letter from Joseph A. Campbell to MLK

Tuesday, April 18, 1967
Virginia (VA), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Joseph A. Campbell writes to Dr. King in request of information on demonstrations as a means of expression.

Letter from John Lewis to MLK

Friday, May 15, 1964
Atlanta, GA

John Lewis relays his appreciation for the advanced copy of Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait."

Letter from John Lazenby to MLK

Wednesday, May 10, 1967
Wisconsin (WI), Atlanta, GA, San Francisco, CA, New York, NY, New York (NY)

John Lazenby, Professor Emeritus at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, encloses a donation to Dr. King. He further stresses that nonviolence is the prime method to solve problems around the world. Lazenby requests copies of Dr. King's anti-war speech delivered at New York's Riverside Church on April 4, 1967 to distribute to his friends.

Newspaper Submissions on Race from U.S. Soldiers

This newspaper clipping features two submissions from U.S. Soldiers, both concerning racial issues.

MLK honored; He sees Kinship in Civil Rights and Family Planning

Washington (WA), New York (NY)

Dr. King receives the first Margaret Sanger Award in Human Rights at the National Conference. Dr. King states, "Negroes have a special and urgent concern with family planning as a profoundly important ingredient in their struggle for security and a decent life."

More and Faster

Sunday, January 5, 1964
Birmingham, AL, Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Philadelphia, PA, Detroit, MI

Dr. King writes on the topic of "The Negro Goal: More and Faster." King highlights the black political and social climate in 1964 and discusses how the act of nonviolence gave blacks hope.

Letter from MLK to R. P. Bass, Jr.

Thursday, June 16, 1966
New Hampshire (NH)

Dr. King thanks Mr. Bass for his contribution to the SCLC. He briefly explains the progress of Negros in the South and explains the importance of supporters.

Telegram from Robert L. Lucas to MLK

Wednesday, August 11, 1965
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

Robert L. Lucas, the Chairman of the Chicago branch for the Congress On Racial Equality, invites Dr. King and his staff to return to Chicago, Illinois to assist in the struggle for quality integrated education.

Nobel Prize Atlanta Dinner Address Outline

Wednesday, January 27, 1965
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Dr. King outlines his address for the January 27, 1965 recognition dinner honoring him for the Nobel Peace Prize. He intends to speak on topics of racial justice, nonviolence and poverty, while discussing the strides made by the movement and the uphill battles still to be faced. Over 1000 people attended the program, the first integrated dinner in Atlanta's history.

Sin

Dr. King compares the understanding of several philosophers on the subject of sin.