Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Maryland (MD)"

Letter from the Brotherhood Activities Committee to MLK

Thursday, October 31, 1963
West Virginia (WV), Ohio (OH), Birmingham, AL, Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

The Brotherhood Activities Committee regrets that Dr. King will be unable to attend their speaking engagement. The committee requests that Dr. King provide them with a possible spokesman to speak in his absence. Fred Shuttlesworth and Morgan Collins serve as two primary options to serve the Ohio-West Virginia community.

MLK Address to District 65, AFL-CIO

Saturday, September 18, 1965
Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Birmingham, AL, New York (NY)

This is the text of an address Dr. King gave to District 65, American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations. Dr. King references his stay in Birmingham Jail and expresses his optimism that the nonviolent movement will be successful.

Importance of the Public Accommodations Section of the Civil Rights Bill

Atlanta, GA

This document features a story of a white civil rights worker who was fined and sentence to jail because she sought to eat with her Negro friends in a restaurant in Atlanta.

Letter from Ruth Decker to MLK

Massachusetts (MA), Atlanta, GA

Ruth Decker acknowledges her complete support to organizations such as the Southern Conference Education Fund and the Fellowship of Reconciliation. She encloses a generous gift to Dr. King to aid in his struggle for peace and compares his dilemma to Gandhi's situation.

Letter from Linda Gillies to MLK

Sunday, March 17, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Indiana (IN), VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Chairman of the Choice '68 Steering Committee, Linda Gillies asks Dr. King about his stance on referendum issues. Topics that Dr. King was asked to respond to included King's opinion on what military action the U.S. should have in Vietnam, the course of action the US should pursue regarding bombing North Vietnam and governmental spending.

MLK Speaks on Church Bombing in Birmingham, AL

Monday, September 16, 1963
Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Dr. King speaks on the bombing at Sixteenth Street Baptist Church that killed four girls in Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter from Student Mobilization Committee

New York, NY, New York (NY), VIETNAM, San Francisco, CA

The Student Mobilization Committee petitions for help to protest the war in Vietnam.

Poor People's Campaign

Sunday, March 17, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C., Los Angeles, CA, Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL)

Dr. King is touring the nation to meet poor people in an effort to expose their living conditions. He also wants them to join the campaign to fight for better housing and jobs.

Man

Dr. King notes poet Algernon Charles Swinburne's ideology of man and his capabilities.

God

Dr. King describes Psalms 135:5 as henotheism: belief in a god without denying the existence of other gods. Because God is the only one worthy of worship, King concludes that the Hebrews were practical monotheists.

MLK's Examination Book for Bible Course

Tuesday, December 3, 1946
EGYPT, GREECE

Dr. King writes six short essays for an examination in his Bible course.

People to People: Civil Rights and Negative Normalcy

Saturday, March 12, 1966
Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C., Jackson, MS, Brooklyn, NY, Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA)

Dr. King attempts to answer questions from white liberals concerning the progress and importance of the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald

Friday, January 6, 1967
New York (NY)

Joan Daves sends Dora McDonald a letter of thanks concerning a photostat of a letter sent to Dr. King. She also informs her that although the title of Dr. King's book has been used, one cannot copyright titles.

Letter from Benjamin Spock to MLK

Tuesday, September 15, 1964
Cleveland, OH, New York, NY, New York (NY), Atlanta, GA, Ohio (OH), Georgia (GA)

Benjamin Spock, Co-Chairman for the National Committee for a Sane Nuclear Policy, solicits Dr. King as a sponsor for a testimonial dinner. The committee will honor Max Youngstein with its Eleanor Roosevelt Peace Award at the dinner.

Nationalism

Dr. King cites a biblical scripture from the book of Isaiah where it is asserted that "God's house is to be a house of prayer for all people."

Letter from Cass Canfield to MLK

Thursday, August 16, 1962
New York, NY

Cass Canfield, of Harper and Row, requests for Dr. King to give commentary on Louis Lomax's book "The Negro Revolt."

SCLC President's Report - MLK

Wednesday, August 10, 1966
Jackson, MS, Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Chicago, IL, South Carolina (SC), Florida (FL), Illinois (IL), Kentucky (KY), Tennessee (TN), Oregon (OR), Washington (WA), Texas (TX)

Delivered at the Tenth Annual Convention of the SCLC, Dr. King presents the annual report for the organization. King addresses several elements of the Civil Rights Movement as he discusses the successes, plans, goals, and vision of the SCLC in relation to the wider movement it represents.

Psychology

This series of note cards addresses psychology through the means of human unity. The concept of human unity is indicated by the presence of the body and the soul working in conjunction to inform the human experience. Dr. King references the views of St. Augustine and St. Thomas as it pertains to "the close union between body and soul."

Long Island Baptist Societies Memorial Resolution on MLK

New York (NY)

In this memorial resolution, the Board of Trustees of the Long Island Baptist Societies expresses its deep sense of loss at the tragic death of Dr. King. The board acknowledges the debt that is owed to Dr. King and commits to continuing his work.

Sin

Dr. King provides insight on the "secret of sin."

Letter from J. M. Lawson Jr. to MLK

Wednesday, September 13, 1967
Memphis, TN, Chicago, IL, Washington, D.C., Cleveland, OH, Atlanta, GA

Minister J. M. Lawson Jr. served as director of nonviolent education for SCLC from 1960 to 1967. In this letter to Dr. King he expresses concerns about program efforts for the summer and fall seasons. Mr. Lawson is conscious of the necessary redirection of the project and informs Dr. King that he has recommendations.

Autograph Request

GERMANY

German citizen, Reinhold Kohl, requests an autograph of Dr. King for his collection.

People in Action: Our New President

Saturday, February 1, 1964
New York (NY)

In this article in the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King writes optimistically about the prospects for civil rights in the transition from President Kennedy to President Johnson. He believes that Johnson's Southern-ness may disarm the likes of George Wallace and that the President's proven commitment to civil rights and skills as Majority Leader in the Senate will aid in passing legislation.

The Gary Crusader: The World of Books

Saturday, June 24, 1967
Indiana (IN)

This review of Dr. King's "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" highlights his examination of the Black Power movement as well as his emphasis on non-violence.

Letter from L. Martinez to MLK

Thursday, March 31, 1966
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Mrs. L. Martinez describes to Dr. King what she has observed about the Lawndale area in Chicago, Illinois. She suggests that instead of relocating to other neighborhoods, the tenants of Lawndale initiate a clean up of the area themselves.

Letter from James Schlatter to MLK

Friday, December 17, 1965
Illinois (IL), Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL)

James E. Schlatter, a student at Illinois State University, writes to Dr. King to request his comment on the effects of civil disobedience on law and order for his term paper on law enforcement.

Letter from Dudley Babcock to MLK

Saturday, October 14, 1967
Virginia (VA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, CAMBODIA, THAILAND, BURMA / MYANMAR, GERMANY, VIETNAM, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR

Dudley P. Babcock writes to Dr. King to assure him he supports his civil rights leadership but questions his involvement in the Vietnam War protests. Babcock reminds Dr. King that there are always pacifists who might need to accept war in order to prevent more war, citing the example of Neville Chamberlain and the escalation of violence in World War II.

Letter from Gaylord Nelson to MLK

Thursday, July 2, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Wisconsin Democratic Senator Gaylord Nelson writes Dr. King expressing his gratitude for his kind letter regarding the passage of the Civil Rights Act. Senator Nelson reports that many of his constituents were solidly in favor of the bill.

Letter from Douglas Mosley and Dwight Campbell to MLK

Monday, August 24, 1964
Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA), Delaware (DE), New Jersey (NJ), Maryland (MD)

The Philadelphia District of The Methodist Youth Fellowship asks Dr. King to be the keynote speaker at an upcoming freedom rally.