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Letter from James A Mills to MLK

Friday, August 12, 1966
Colorado (CO)

Rev. James A Mills commends Dr. King on his efforts in the Civil Rights Movement and includes a donation to the SCLC.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, November 20, 1964
Oslo, Norway, Washington, D.C., London, England, New York (NY)

In this letter Ms. Daves informs Dr. King that she is working to solve issue of copyright for his Oslo University address, and stresses the importance of copyrighting all of his "writings...and speeches."

Peace of Mind

Dr. King quotes Marcus Aurelius about peace of mind.

Letter from John to MLK

Connecticut (CT), Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL

John discusses some points on religious ethics with Dr. King and offers gratitude for a Labor Day dinner with the King family.

Negro's Defense Against Acts of Violence

Dr. King describes nonviolent direct action and its effects against oppressors of the movement. He speaks about the undaunted fight and relentlessness even in the face of brutality.

Statement From MLK In Response To Article Alleging Communist Ties

Thursday, July 25, 1963
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY)

This press release issued by the Southern Christian Leadership Conference features a Statement by Dr. King responding to allegations that he and the SCLC has communist ties. Dr. King argues that the SCLC is grounded in the Christian non-violent movement with the intent of reform, wherease communism leads to violent revolution.

Letter from Gitta Badeker to Dora McDonald Regarding "Where Do We Go From Here?"

Tuesday, July 11, 1967
New York, NY

In this letter Badeker writes to McDonald about the advancement from Gummessons Bokforlag for "Where Do We Go From Here."

Letter from Dixie to MLK

Saturday, August 6, 1966
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA

Dixie, a white man and segregationist, states in his letter to Dr. King that it has taken the Whites only a few weeks to get segregation rolling again.

News from the American Jewish Committee

Wednesday, February 14, 1968
New York (NY), New York, NY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C., FRANCE, ISRAEL, ARGENTINA, MEXICO

This news release announces that John Gardner, former Secretary of Health (among other positions) accepted the head position of the Urban Coalition, a campaign that combats urban poverty.

Letter from Ernest Shaefer to Dora McDonald

Thursday, June 30, 1966
Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA

Mr. Shaefer requests that Dora McDonald send two mats and a second biographical sketch of Dr. King for use in two local papers to promote Dr. King's upcoming appearance in Pennsylvania to speak for the Hadley Memorial Fund. He also asks that Dr. King's lecture topic be sent so it may be added to the program for the speech.

SCLC Continues Economic Withdrawal Against National Industries In Alabama

Tuesday, June 1, 1965
Alabama (AL), Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI), Los Angeles, CA, California (CA), Massachusetts (MA), Philadelphia, PA, New York (NY), CANADA

Featured in this Western Christian Leadership Conference newsletter, is an article by Junius Griffin regarding the SCLC. "SCLC Continues Economic Withdrawal Against National Industries In Alabama," describes the reasons and the situations in which the SCLC had to "use the nonviolent economic campaign as an expression of moral indignation and an appeal to the nation's conscience."

Letters To Mrs. Fillmore from MLK

Thursday, April 19, 1962
Georgia (GA)

Dr. King responds to Mrs. Fillmore's previous letter, offering some suggestions to help her. He apologizes that he cannot use SCLC funds because that money is currently in use for the civil rights struggle. Dr. King suggests alternative organizations and programs that may offer her assistance.

Letter from Edmund W. Gordon to MLK

Wednesday, September 27, 1967
New York, NY, Massachusetts (MA), Chicago, IL

Edmund W. Gordon, Professor and Chairman of the Department of Educational Psychology and Guidance at Yeshiva University, invites Dr. King to serve on the Dr. W.E.B. DuBois memorial committee. The committee proposes a memorial park to honor Dr. DuBois in his hometown of Great Barrington, Massachusetts.

A Historian Looks at Our Political Morality

Saturday, July 10, 1965
VIETNAM, RUSSIAN FEDERATION, CHINA, CUBA, Florida (FL), Hawaii (HI), HUNGARY, GUATEMALA, IRAN, BRAZIL

Liberal historian Henry Steele Commager writes on the political morality of the United States. He asserts that the United States is not above the historical tendency to become corrupt, and the issue will become more important as the United States grows more powerful. He argues that the United States must reconcile the "principles of law and of morality."

Letter from Ethelyn Hall to MLK

Saturday, November 30, 1963
Texas (TX)

Ethelyn L. Hall, a student at the University of Houston, writes Dr. King in reference to SCLC's distribution of literature. Hall is preparing a term paper for a sociology class and requests any available literature relating to civil rights, interracial relations, and racism. She is also interested in learning the purposes and functions of the SCLC.

Letter from Nathan P. Feisinger to MLK - 3/21/1968

Thursday, March 21, 1968
Wisconsin (WI)

Dr. King sent this letter to Professor Nathan P. Feinsinger to recommend Miss Barbara Jean Williams for the Russell Bull Scholarship.

Letter to Rev. Ralph Abernathy from E.S. Baker

Tuesday, April 30, 1968
Atlanta, GA

E.S. Baker, manager of the Canadian National Railways, wrote to Rev. Ralph Abernathy requesting a copy of Dr. King's "I Have A Dream" speech. He began the letter by noting that he was an avid admirer of Dr. King and interested in acquiring some of his other recordings.

The Black Rose: Ruth Reese

Thursday, December 10, 1964
New York (NY), FRANCE, ITALY, SPAIN, Alabama (AL), Chicago, IL, London, England, SWITZERLAND, ISRAEL, DENMARK, NORWAY, SWEDEN, SOUTH AFRICA

Ruth Reese, also known as "The Black Rose," thanks Dr. King for his support. This document includes a detailed biography of the vocalist, as well as, critic responses on her performances.

Letter from Billy E. Bowles to MLK about an Interview

Monday, March 27, 1967
South Carolina (SC), Atlanta, GA

In this letter Billy E. Bowles requests an interview with Dr. King. Bowles is especially interested in Dr. King's perception of the new governor, Governor Maddox.

Letter from Mary T. Heathcote to MLK

Tuesday, November 12, 1963
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA, New York (NY)

Mary Heathcote of MacMillan Publishing Company asks Dr. King and the SCLC to help promote a book being written by Henrietta Buckmaster. Buckmaster, whom Dr. King quoted in "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community," chronicles the events of Reconstruction.

Letter from James Lawson to MLK

Wednesday, October 16, 1963
Memphis, TN, Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), Birmingham, AL

Rev. Jim Lawson encloses a check on behalf of Protestant missionaries wanting to support the civil rights movement. He mentions that he taught nonviolence to these missionaries and notes that they wanted the contribution to assist in a scholarship for a student that participated in the Birmingham campaign. Rev. Lawson was the individual who invited Dr. King to Memphis on his final mission to help the plight of disenfranchised santitation workers.

Adverse Letter from J. H. Moore to MLK

Tuesday, February 13, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

J. H. Moore expresses his dislike for Dr. King's leadership style. He argues that Dr. King's efforts have stirred up hatred and discontent, even amongst black citizens.

Program for SCLC Annual Freedom Banquet

Monday, August 8, 1966
Mississippi (MS), Jackson, MS, Massachusetts (MA)

This program from SCLC's Tenth Annual Freedom Banquet features Senator Edward M. Kennedy as guest speaker.

Sin

Dr. King cites a scripture from the Old Testament biblical Book of Leviticus regarding the transformation of sin.

JFK's Executive Order In Housing

Thursday, December 13, 1962

This document is a draft of an article, written by Dr. King, to be placed in the Amsterdam Newspaper. Dr. King breaks down the housing order signed into law by President Kennedy. He makes clear that housing discrimination is a large hurdle to ending segregation.

Forgiveness

Dr. King gives examples of what it means to forgive. Among other definitions, forgiveness means "that the past is overlooked" and that there is "a renewal of higher fellowship."

SCLC Executive Board Approves Montgomery March

Alabama (AL), Virginia (VA), Montgomery, AL

Dr. King’s handwritten notes report on SCLC Executive Board approval of four of his recommendations: a March on the State Capitol in Montgomery, a nationwide economic withdrawal from Christmas shopping to commemorate the tragic deaths of children in Birmingham, a massive direct action program in Danville, Virginia, and selective buying campaign in the South to get better jobs for Negroes

Letter from A. T. Gabriel to MLK

Friday, October 18, 1963
San Francisco, CA, Birmingham, AL

A. T. Gabriel writes Dr. King enclosing monetary contributions from the Local Union and the Birmingham Committee for Civil Rights of Local 110. Gabriel asks that Dr. King acknowledge the contributions with a letter explaining the progress of his work.

The Urban Coalition National Coordinator's Weekly Report

Friday, February 9, 1968
Washington, D.C., Pennsylvania (PA), Missouri (MO)

In the Urban Coalition's weekly report, the National Coordinator notifies members of the events that had occurred within the past week. The report covers local coalitions, legislation, private employment, and the steering committee.

Annual Address Delivered at the First Annual Institute on Nonviolence and Social Change

Monday, December 3, 1956
Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, EGYPT, HUNGARY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, CHINA, UNITED KINGDOM, NETHERLANDS, FRANCE, INDONESIA, INDIA, PAKISTAN, Massachusetts (MA), New York (NY), New York, NY, California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, JAPAN, Tokyo, Japan, Washington (WA), CANADA, Colorado (CO), New Hampshire (NH), Pennsylvania (PA), Mississippi (MS), Georgia (GA), Tennessee (TN)

Dr. King's speech at the First Annual Institute of Non-Violence and Social Change addresses many issues regarding the African American. The most recurring issues are of obtaining and maintaining freedom, equality and personal dignity.