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Sin (Augustine's definition)

Dr. King records a note on St. Augustine's definition sin, referencing passages from Reinhold Niebuhr's "The Nature and Destiny of Man: A Christian Interpretation," volume 1: "Human Nature."

Letter from David P. Gaines to MLK

Friday, July 12, 1963

David P. Gaines criticizes Dr. King's tactics for instant integration.

Letter from Tenant to MLK

A tenant from a "slum" building writes to Dr. King requesting help for the building in which she lives. Throughout the letter she lists several problems with the building and hopes that Dr. King can offer assistance.

Letter from Ralph Turnidge to MLK

Friday, January 24, 1964

The Reverend Ralph Turnidge, General Secretary of the Washington-Northern Idaho Council of Churches, invites Dr. King to be the featured leader at a conference on the Church and Human Rights.

Letter from Charles V. Arthur to MLK

Tuesday, July 9, 1963

Charles V. Arthur of Vancouver's Kitsilano Secondary School encloses a contribution for the SCLC. He explains that the staff wishes to show appreciation for the efforts of the SCLC.

Man

Dr. King quotes Proverbs 3:5 on human insight and knowledge and reflects upon its meaning.

Letter from Frank M. Rudon to MLK

Saturday, February 5, 1966

Frank Rudon requests an autographed New York metered postage from Dr. King to add to his collection.

Letter from George A. Wiley to Rev. Andrew Young

Monday, March 25, 1968

George A. Wiley writes Reverend Andrew Young and other staff of the SCLC regarding National Welfare Rights Organization's (NWRO) participation with the Poor People's Campaign.

Letter from MLK to William A. Bennett Jr.

Tuesday, January 18, 1966

Dr. King responds to a letter from William Bennett in which Bennett suggested the phrase "dark skinned American" be used to describe African Americans. Dr. King discusses the connotations of the hateful words "deeply rooted in the debilitating racist caste ordering of our society's slavery epoch and segregation era."

Senator Edward Kennedy's Address to SCLC

Monday, August 8, 1966

Sen. Edward Kennedy (D-MA) addresses the 1966 SCLC Annual Convention, stating that the sit-ins, freedom rides and Montgomery bus boycott created a movement that brought about the most important change of the last 20 years. He says that while the caste system in politics is over, the life of the average Negro hasn’t changed much. Society is becoming divided rich and poor, black and white, and a massive commitment of national resources must be made to upgrade Negro life in America.

Gregory the Great (540-604)

Dr. King outlines historical information regarding Gregory the Great otherwise known as Pope Gregory I.

Letter from Frazer Earle to MLK

Monday, November 16, 1964

Frazer Earle, a member of the Canadian Council of Christians and Jews Inc., extends Dr. King a second invitation to their Annual Banquet. Mr. Earle informs Dr. King that his acceptance to this invitation will allow him to meet with the students, the press, the religious community, and businessmen.

Letter from Martin Sizemoreto to Gentlemen

Martin Sizemore explains that the Madison Senior High School's Speech Department is researching a topic for their debate team and is in request for any literature that could contribute to their research.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding Schedule with Publisher

Monday, May 4, 1964

Joan Daves provides details for the Monday, June 8th schedule that Dr. King's publisher would like to set up. The day starts off with the Today Show and ends with a cocktail party.

Letter of Condolence from MLK

Friday, November 22, 1963

Dr. King expresses his grief as a result of President Kennedy's assassination.

Address by Dabbs entitled 'Quit You Like Men' Delivered at SCLC

Thursday, October 1, 1959

This address to the Fall Session of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference was delivered in October, 1959, by James McBride Dabbs. Dabbs speaks to the social condition in the United States, highlighting the equality of the races. Arguing that justice is a two way street, Dabbs brings up Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom," in which Dr. King defends the Montgomery bus boycott as an essential non-cooperation to show discontent.

Letter from John Due Jr. to MLK

Mr. Due writes Dr. King to offer his services as a Field Representative for the SCLC. He provides a summary of his Civil Rights background along with a list of character references.

Letter Dated 11/14/62 from D. McDonald to Mel Arnold

Wednesday, November 14, 1962

Per Dr. King's request, Ms. Dora McDonald forwards the sermon "The Man Was A Fool," to Mr. Mel Arnold of Harper and Row Publishing. The sermon is to be included in a forthcoming book of Dr. King's sermons.

Letter to Eugene Exman from D. McDonald Referencing an Enclosure

Wednesday, September 5, 1962

Dora McDonald, Dr. King's secretary, sent this correspondence to Eugene Exman, regarding the enclosure of a letter by Dr. King to Melvin Arnold.

Appeal for Brotherhood to the City of Birmingham

On behalf of the Southern Alabama Movement for Human Rights and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, C. T. Vivian writes this appeal in the "spirit of nonviolent love" to the citizens of Birmingham. His purpose is to awaken conscientiousness and gain their support in creating brotherhood and a better city.

Flyer Advertising SCLC Benefit

Harry Belafonte and his "entire company" host a full evening of entertainment for an SCLC benefit.

Telegram from A. J. Gervantes to MLK

Tuesday, January 23, 1968

Mayor Cervantes of St. Louis, invites Dr. King to participate in a conference entitled, "Tell It Like It Is."

I've Been to the Mountaintop

Wednesday, April 3, 1968

Dr. King gave this address at the Mason Temple in Memphis, Tennessee the night before he was assassinated. He called for nonviolent protest and a boycott of Memphis area businesses in support of the Memphis Sanitation Workers strike. Conveying a sense of foreboding, he not only recounted a near-death experience when he was stabbed near the heart, but also spoke of the possibility of his own demise at the hands of those who opposed him.

MLK Press Conference Birmingham, Alabama

Saturday, November 4, 1967

This document contains dialogue during a press conference in Birmingham, Alabama. The reporters asks Dr. King questions regarding plans for the Soviet Union, Washington D.C., and the Civil Rights Movement.

MLK Note Card - "God"

On this handwritten note card, entitled, simply, "God," Dr. King evokes an interpretation that would suggest the reverse of existentialism (existence before essence).

The State of Alabama - Equal Administration of Justice

This document addresses issues of discrimination in the South, particularly in Alabama, by state and federal institutions since the Republican Compromise of 1877. The document outlines a response to the many forms of discrimination occurring.

Telegram from President Johnson to Bernard Lee

Sunday, May 29, 1966

Dr. King's special assistant, Bernard Lee, was the recipient of this telegram requesting his presence at a White House conference called by President Johnson. The theme of the conference was "To Fulfill These Rights."

Ossie Davis Defines Blackness and Whiteness

In this document,Ossie Davis uses Roget's Thesaurus and defines the words "whiteness" and "blackness" only to find many positive outcomes for whiteness and an abundance of negative synonyms for blackness.

Letter from Joseph S. Clark to MLK

Friday, May 20, 1966

Mr. Clark, a representative of the United States Senate, requests a written statement from Dr. King concerning a recent Bill (2993) up for election.

Letter from Rev. Robert Harrison and R. H. White

Monday, February 5, 1968

In this letter, Rev. Robert Harrison and R. H. White of the New Samaritan Baptist Church inform Dr. King that they are unable to send a donation immediately, but will take up a special donation to be sent as soon as possible.