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St. Augustine Tutorial Project

This document references a tutorial program organized by students from Yale for the benefit of students in St. Augustine. The flyer advises those interested in the program to stop by the SCLC office and fill out an information sheet.

Aristotle in Thomas

Dr. King outlines aspects of St. Thomas Aquinas' philosophy, which are structurally Aristotelian. Points he discusses include similarities between the two philosophers' ontology and epistemology, while also outlining a point of divergence in Aquinas' view of God as an "efficient cause."

5th Company Gives in to Breadbasket Demands for Jobs

The author writes about how operation breadbasket completed successful negotiations for new jobs for Negroes within the Chicago dairy industry.

Liberation: Our Struggle

Sunday, April 1, 1956

Dr. King contributes an article to the "Liberation" publication explaining the reasons for the 1955 Montgomery Bus Boycott. He conveys the issues involving segregation on buses, the demise of Negro inferiority and the miscalculations of white Montgomery civic leaders. According to Dr. King, "Every attempt to end the protest by intimidation, by encouraging Negroes to inform, by force and violence, further cemented the Negro community and brought sympathy for our cause from men of good will all over the world."

Letter from Herman E. Talmadge to MLK

Wednesday, April 28, 1965

Senator Herman E. Talmadge expresses his views on the poll tax with reference to the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

Descartes

Dr. King quotes Rene Descartes' discovery of his famous principle. The idea, "I think, therefore I am," Descartes says, is essential, irrefutable and fitting to be the first principle of his philosophy.

Segregation and Political Allegiance

Dr. King addresses segregation calling it "a house of prostitution built to perpetuate an illicit intercourse between injustice and immortality." He references James Meredith, the African American student who was prohibited from enrolling at the University of Mississippi because of his race, and encourages the Federal Government to exercise the force of the Constitution. He also asserts that African Americans must recognize the importance of voting and uniting with allies whose "interests are common with our own."

Sacrifice

Dr. King cites passages from Leviticus that suggest that the smell of sacrifice is pleasing to God.

Statement Upon Return to Montgomery

Dr. King reflects on his near death experience after Izola Ware Curry stabbed him with a letter opener at a book signing in New York City on September 20, 1958. Although Dr. King refers to Curry as a "deranged woman," he has "no bitterness towards her" and sees her actions only as a "reflection on the moral climate." Dr. King further states what he will remember most is the "vast outpouring of sympathy" that was received from all races and creeds.

Letter from MLK to Kathy Sasso

Monday, April 27, 1964

Dr. King shares his pleasure in being named "Person of the Week" by Miss Sasso's class. He encloses a copy of one of his speeches.

Letter from Joani Kalmers to MLK

Saturday, July 15, 1967

Joani Kalmers, a senior at Thiel College, requests information from Dr. King and the SCLC regarding her thesis topic "Christianity and the Negro."

Letter from American Friends Service Committee to MLK

Monday, March 14, 1966

R. Ogden Hannaford and Kale A. Williams, representatives of the American Friends Service Committee, enclose a pre-publication edition of a book aimed at peacefully resolving the issues in Vietnam.

Memorandum from William Rutherford to Staff Members

Friday, December 29, 1967

William Rutherford, Executive Director of SCLC, sends a memorandum to the staff informing them of a program entitled "Poverty in Mississippi," which is being broadcast on Channel UHF in the Atlanta area on January 7, 1968.

Letter from Bruce A. King to MLK

Wednesday, October 28, 1964

Bruce King, Secretary of the Baptist Union of New South Wales, congratulates Dr. King for winning the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Constance Beitzell to MLK

Sunday, April 14, 1963

In the aftermath of Dr. King's arrest in Birmingham, Constance Beitzell expresses her dissatisfaction with federal officials not putting an end to the intimidation against Negroes in Birmingham. Beitzell is perplexed at the fact that the United States promotes freedom but does not allow freedom for many of its citizens who happen to be Negro. According to Beitzell, "What man in a Christian nation can trample on the rights of a citizen because of his race?"

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to Mr. August Schou

Friday, November 20, 1964

In this letter Ms. Daves addresses Mr. Schou's request to have copyright assignment to the speech which Dr King delivered at the University of Oslo, after receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. She stipulates to Mr. Schou's "first call" but stresses the importance of copyright protocol "after Oslo."

"Life" by Eudora V. Savage

In this poem, Ms. Savage expresses her views on "Life."

Note from Joan Daves to Dr. King

Sunday, September 22, 1963

This note is to request Dr. King's signature on a contract with British publishers, Hodder & Stroughton in London for his book "Strength To Love."

Letter from MLK to Eliot Stadler

Thursday, August 20, 1964

Acknowledging receipt of a letter and a $1000 contribution to the SCLC, Dr. King sends his appreciation to Dr. Eliot Stadler. In closing, the Reverend expresses interest in meeting Stadler with regard to potential aid during the summer months.

Telegram from MLK to Hugh Shearer

Dr. King sends a congratulatory telegram to Mr. Shearer for his elevation to Prime Minister of Jamaica.

Letter from Fred Bennette to MLK

Friday, April 7, 1967

Director Reverend Bennette requests that Dr. King increase the telephone allowance for Operation Breadbasket, stating that frequent phone calls must be made in order to keep the program active.

Moral Law

Dr. King quotes Edgar S. Brightman on the principle of moral law.

Letter from the United Nations to MLK

Tuesday, December 12, 1967

Robin Skuce, Education Secretary of the United Nations Association in Canada, writes Dr. King inquiring of his availability to lecture at a seminar for high school students at their New York headquarters.

Flyer for Confront the Warmakers at the Pentagon

This flyer from the Southern California Mobilization Committee advertises a public meeting. At the meeting, the committee plans to provide comprehensive reports from Washington and display a slide show of recent demonstrations. In addition, they plan to discuss future SCMC activities.

Letter from Prarthana Samaj Bombay (India) to MLK

Wednesday, April 14, 1965

The former ambassador of India to the United States previously wrote Dr. King, inviting him to the Centenary Celebrations. The author recalls this invitation and references the history of Bombay's Prarthana Samaj. The organization is founded on the betterment of society, religion and education. The Prarthana Samaj would be proud to welcome Dr. King, as he is an "apostle" of Mahatma Gandhi.

Letter from Erik Ruden to MLK

Thursday, January 11, 1968

Upon learning of Dr. King's speaking engagement at the upcoming World Council meeting in Uppsala, Sweden, Ruden invites him to an additional meeting at luncheon or area Baptist Church.

SCLC Administrator Job Description

Monday, August 29, 1966

This document outlines the responsibilities of the role of an Administrator for the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Mr. Herbert. H. Fisher to MLK

Saturday, July 17, 1965

Mr. Fisher, President of the Chatham Avalon Park Community Council, provides an organized detailed account of community concerns. More specifically, he addresses various social and political issues regarding schools, housing, insufficient leadership, and government services.

Memorandum from William M. Gray

Friday, April 5, 1968

This memorandum from William M. Gray lists the address to which mourners should send acknowledgements following Dr. King's death.

Letter from Governor Philip H. Hoff to MLK

Wednesday, April 3, 1968

In this letter, Vermont Governor Philip H. Hoff expresses his gratitude for the autographed book that Dr. King sent to him.