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"Maine (ME)"

Letter from Sarah Harvey to MLK

Wednesday, February 7, 1962
Massachusetts (MA)

Sarah Harvey states that the receipt of Dr. King's letter and book made her feel "very unworthy." Mrs. Harvey also makes financial a contribution.

War

Dr. King quotes Napoleon, Gen. Dwight Eisenhower, Gen. Douglas MacArthur, and Gen. Omar Bradley on war as impractical.

Letter From T. K. Mahadevan to MLK

Saturday, December 24, 1966
New Delhi, India, Washington, D.C., UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

T. K. Mahadevan, a representative of the Gandhi Peace Foundation, writes Dr. King regarding an upcoming visit to the United States. Some primary interests during his visit includes meeting key Negro leaders, spending time with an average Negro family, and perhaps a few speaking engagements.

Rabbi Heschel on the War on Vietnam

VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Rabbi Abraham Heschel, civil rights advocate and associate of Dr. King, writes on the ethical corruption created by the Vietnam War. Calling the war an example of "extreme absurdity" that has been "nurtured on stereotypes," Rabbi Heschel encourages American citizens to recognize the demoralization of the war and take action against it.

Telegram from MLK to Robert Kennedy

Washington, D.C.

Dr. King sends this telegram to Attorney General Robert Kennedy regarding Saint Augustine's refusal to desegregate its public facilities.

Christian

Dr. King defines the Christian personality accroding the John McConnachie.

Memo From Dora McDonald to MLK

Thursday, November 16, 1967
SOUTH AFRICA, Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA, Los Angeles, CA, Chicago, IL

Miss Dora Mcdonald provides a brief summary of phone calls to Dr. King and the context of each.

Letter from The Bulstrode School Children to MLK

London, England, Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL)

The Bulstrode school children write Dr. King concerning their initiative to fundraise for the Negro children in Mississippi and Alabama. They expressed to Dr. King how they decided to sell daffodils that were grown from their own gardens.

History

Dr. King provides the pessimist's perception of history.

Letter from Cornell's L. Paul Jaquith to MLK

Monday, November 7, 1960
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), New Jersey (NJ)

L. Paul Jaquith writes Dr. King regarding his upcoming visit to Cornell University. The student body seeks to discuss issues relating to the inequality of opportunities for Negroes in the United States.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Gulliace

Dr. King writes Mr. Gulliace thanking him for requesting him to comment on the topics of "Happiness" and "Life after Death." However, due to Dr. King's busy schedule with the Movement and ministry, he cannot commit the time to assist Mr. Gulliace.

Letter from Ellen Bandler to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, September 11, 1962
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Ellen Bandler writes Miss McDonald about a letter that was received on September 10, 1962 concerning the publication of Mr. Killens' book being postponed until January 1963.

What is Man?

Sunday, January 12, 1958
Montgomery, AL

Citing views from historical and contemporary figures, Dr. King asserts that the definition of "man" lies somewhere between God and an animal. Dr. King contends that, although man is limited by time and space, humans are not animals, because they have the capacity for rational thought. However, the central theme that Dr. King argues is that humanity is inherently evil and must constantly strive for high moral standards.

King's Way Hurts Rights Movement

Washington, D.C., Massachusetts (MA), Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Mr. White, author of this article, argues that the political fallout from Dr. King's stance on America's involvement in Vietnam hinders the goals of the Civil Rights Movement.

Ravenswood Post: "New Book by Dr. King Is Published"

Wednesday, June 21, 1967
California (CA)

This document is an article on the subject of Dr. King's new book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?". The article sketches an overview of the book and makes synopses of various chapters.

Letter from Rev. Hazel E. Foster to MLK

Thursday, July 14, 1966
Ohio (OH), Atlanta, GA, INDIA, California (CA)

Reverend Hazel Foster writes to Dr. King in support of his continuous struggle. He talks about memorizing the Sermon on the Mount and the importance to him and leaders like Gandhi. He offers words of encouragement and prays that Dr. King may find peace during these hard times.

God

ISRAEL

Dr. King writes about God, according to Jeremiah 3:12.

Ethics (A Criticism of Philosophical Ethics)

Dr. King references Emil Brunner’s "The Divine Imperative: A Study in Christian Ethics."

Letter from MLK to Senator J. Glenn Bealll

Monday, June 22, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King thanks Senator J. Glenn Beall for supporting the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from Judith Brockhart to MLK Regarding a Fine Relief

Monday, October 2, 1967
Kentucky (KY)

In this letter Judith Brookhart appeals to Dr. King and the SCLC for aid in paying fines accrued from being arrested during civil rights marches.

Draft of Address at the Fourth Constitutional Convention of the AFL-CIO

In this address to the AFL-CIO, Dr. King compares the labor and civil rights movements. He argues that those who are anti-labor are also likely anti-civil rights. Thus, the Negro understands the labor movement and shares the same enemies. Dr. King also predicts that the coming years will be trying ones for laborers due to the automation of work processes, stating that "automation will grind jobs into dust." Dr. King urges the labor movement to strengthen itself by embracing the Negro people.

Telegram from King Family to Mrs. Lucille Anderson

Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI)

The King family sends its condolences to Mrs. Anderson.

Letter from John G. Allerdice Jr. to MLK

Monday, April 29, 1963
Indiana (IN)

John Allerdice writes Dr. King on behalf of the Human Relations Council of Shortridge High School regarding a planned conference that will discuss human relations for the high school students of Indianapolis. They would like for Dr. King to "tape a short message" for them to use.

Thank you letter from George R. Metcalf to MLK

Thursday, October 5, 1967
New York, NY

Mr. Metcalf, president of the National Committee Against Discrimination in Housing, thanks Dr. King for joining the Advisory Council. Mr. Metcalf expresses his belief that Dr. King's participation on the council "will greatly strengthen the National Committee in its efforts to attain equal opportunity in housing."

Letter from Bill Kunstler to MLK

Friday, August 9, 1963
New York, NY, Virginia (VA), Mississippi (MS), Baltimore, MD

Famed civil rights attorney William Kunstler states that this was the first time a federal court enjoined prosecution of contempt cases under a state injunction. He would like to use the same procedures in Mississippi.

Letter from Fred C. Becker to MLK

Thursday, January 25, 1968
New York, NY, New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

Fred C. Becker requests Dr. King's schedule of speaking engagements where he plans on selling his books. Becker has published several of Dr. King's books in past.

MLK Sermon Outline

Dr. King prepares an Easter sermon entitled "Why Death Could Not Hold Him." He references scripture passage Acts 2: 24. The date and place of delivery for this sermon is unknown.

Newsletter from The Knights of the Confederacy

Georgia (GA), New Orleans, LA, Atlanta, GA

The Knights of the Confederacy, a student organization that promoted segregation in public schools, used this flyer to recruit students who were aligned with their goal of protecting "white rights."

People to People: A Choice and a Promise

Saturday, November 21, 1964
Birmingham, AL, Mississippi (MS), New York (NY), Virginia (VA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King addresses the idea that American people of all races have a choice to make this nation a great society.

Letter to MLK Requesting Aid

Saturday, September 9, 1967
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

In this plea to Dr. King, Mrs. Venis Whitten asks for assistance with obtaining adequate medical care and welfare, which would tremendously improve the livelihood of herself and her two grandchildren.