Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Maine (ME)"

Letter from Oxford JACARI to MLK

Saturday, June 6, 1964

Frank R. Parker, Vice-Chairman of the Oxford Joint Action Committee Against Racial Intolerance (JACARI) extends yet another speaking invitation to Dr. King, emphasizing his eagerness to hear the message of non-violent resistance.

Letter From Dr. Fred Lange - Nielsen to MLK

Thursday, December 10, 1964

Dr. Fred Lange - Nielson writes Dr. King informing him of a recent appeal that was sent to several Norwegian Bishops. He also encloses a copy of an official translated 'Manifesto'.

A. N. Whitehead

Dr. King quotes Alfred North Whitehead's view of the philosophy of science in The Concept of Nature.

Letter from Woodrow T. Hughes to MLK

Monday, April 18, 1966

This letter from Woodrow Hughes and Norman Seay of the Kinloch Gateway Center invites Dr. King to speak at their Second Annual City Wide Workshop. The letter refers to an enclosure with basic information about the city of Kinloch, Missouri. Kinloch is one of the largest all-black cities in the United States

States Avoid Woes: Hughes and Stanley Attacks Deadbeats in UN

Sunday, January 5, 1964

These are two articles from the Des Moines Sunday Register. The first article entitled "States Avoid Woes: Hughes" by Donald Kaul focuses on a statement by then Iowa Governor Harold Hughes. Hughes asserts that it is the right and responsibility of the states to solve domestic social problems. The other article explores the opinion of then state representative David Stanley. Stanley believes that all United Nations members should share in the operating costs of the UN.

Address by MLK at 47th NAACP Annual Convention

Wednesday, June 27, 1956

Dr. King addresses the audience at the 47th NAACP annual convention in San Francisco, California. King begins with background information of slavery and its physical and mental effects on Africans, then tells the "Montgomery Story." This story begins with a mental transformation among blacks, which led to the Montgomery boycott. As a result of the boycott, blacks were empowered and began fighting injustice and seeking changes in unfair legislation.

Telegram from Edward Daniels to MLK

Tuesday, February 6, 1968

Edward Daniels extends an invitation for Dr. King to be the keynote speaker at the National Conference of Anti-Poverty Agencies.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding German Re-Publicaition

Monday, May 11, 1964

In this letter Daves informs Dr. King of what Mr. Von Wehrenalp, Dr. King's German publisher, might have had in mind for Dr. King's special introduction for the German edition. Ms. Daves further discusses other possible uses for such a piece.

Statement of the Committee for Emmett Doe

The Committee for Emmett Doe issues a statement both explaining Doe's situation and also asking for support. Doe, an Army paramedic, faced court-martial for allegedly cursing a white superior. He was later acquitted of the charges.

Letter from Massachusetts Mental Health Center to MLK

Tuesday, January 16, 1962

Drs. Myron Sharaf and Milton Greenblatt invite Dr. King to speak at the Commonwealth of Massachusetts' Department of Mental Health where the staff and researchers share an interest in ending "hate in social life."

Anonymous Letter to Charles C. Diggs Jr.

This anonymous letter to Congressman Charles Diggs, Jr. of Michigan details the grievances suffered by Negro and Caucasian females in the U.S. Army. The authors assert that they routinely are subjected to segregation in public accommodations and are denied equal opportunity for promotion and reenlistment.

Letter from MLK to Peter A. Mullin

Tuesday, February 27, 1968

Dr. King writes Mr. Mullin to express his deep appreciation for being selected to receive the Gold Key Award at Boston College.

Jesus Christ

Dr. King highlights a quote from "Evil and the Christian Faith" by Nels F S. Ferre regarding Jesus and his relationship with humanity.

Letter from Lova Delabarre to MLK

Sunday, July 10, 1966

Washington state native Lova Delabarre informs Dr. King that her church youth group is studying on the subject of nonviolence. As a white person, Delabarre extends her full support to Dr. King in his efforts for equality and justice. She humbly states, "I pray that some day we will live as one. May God help and guide you in your work."

Letter from Brenda Sepulveda to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

A student from New York writes this letter of condolence to Mrs. King following Dr. King's death.

Call to Survival

Sunday, November 5, 1967

This advertisement offers a "realistic appraisal" of the Vietnam situation and offers possible solutions.

Letter from John B. Morris to Alfred Hardman

Wednesday, July 3, 1963

The Executive Director of the Episcopal Society for Cultural and Racial Unity writes the Lovett School Board of Trustees regarding the decision not to accept Negroes. Reverend John Morris informs Reverend Alfred Hardman that the church does not agree with the decision and will protest it. Dr. King's son, Martin Luther King III was one of the students not admitted into the school.

SCLC President's Report - MLK

Wednesday, August 10, 1966

Delivered at the Tenth Annual Convention of the SCLC, Dr. King presents the annual report for the organization. King addresses several elements of the Civil Rights Movement as he discusses the successes, plans, goals, and vision of the SCLC in relation to the wider movement it represents.

Letter from MLK to Robert McDougal, Jr.

Tuesday, December 14, 1965

Dr. King thanks Robert McDougal, Jr. for his contribution and support to SCLC and the NAACP Legal Defense Fund.

Letter from Cadet Jim Sutherland to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967

This letter from Cadet Jim Sutherland to Dr. King request Dr. King send and autograph for the St. John's Military Academy autograph collection.

Letter from MLK to Attorney General Robert Kennedy

Tuesday, March 31, 1964

Dr. King writes to Attorney General Robert Kennedy requesting an investigation in Williamston, NC to relieve the Negro community from violence and "unconstitutional police action."

Letter from David J. Walker to MLK

Wednesday, January 6, 1965

David Walker, Chairman of the Speakers Committee for Toronto Junior Board of Trade writes Dr. King inviting him to speak at their Tuesday night dinner meeting. Walker continues with his own personal adulation on the Reverend receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

God

Here, Dr. King writes a theoretical view of the existence of God.

Antagonistic Letter

Abraham Lincoln is referenced in this negative message.

We Shall Overcome Sketch

Charlie Cheese Carson's created this sketch which illustrates many notable civil rights leaders as chess pieces.

Letter Requesting a Meeting, to MLK from Harper & Brothers

Wednesday, November 7, 1962

In this correspondence to Dr. King, Mr. Mel Arnold of Harper and Row Publishers, referenced that he received notice that Dr. King would be preaching at Riverside Church, in New York City. Mr. Arnold asked whether or not Dr. King would be available for a meal, after his sermon at Riverside. He also thanked him for the additional sermons that had been received, for the preparation of Dr. King's second book.

Tillch's Significance

Dr. King records Rhode Island Senator Theodore Greene's opinion that German-American theologian and philosopher Paul Tillich is "the most enlightening and therapeutic theologian of our time."

Letter from J. M. Koelbe to Dr. King

Friday, August 12, 1966

Mr. Koelbe writes Dr. King about his financial distress. He also tells Dr. King that he admires him for his courage and gives him encouragement for the future.

Telegram from Zaira Singh to Pope Paul VI

Wednesday, February 14, 1968

Mrs. Singh, a Roman Catholic, requests that Pope Paul VI becomes a hostage in Hanoi, in order to end "barbarous American bombardment."

Letter from Elisabeth Leonard to MLK

Monday, April 3, 1967

Elisabeth Leonard expresses her support and gratitude for Dr. King's work, which includes his speeches about the Vietnam War as well as an upcoming speech on the Spring Mobilization.