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Barth, Karl

New York (NY)

Dr. King references Karl Barth's "The Doctrine of the Word of God."

Letter from Leon Levy to MLK

Tuesday, December 26, 1961
New York (NY)

Leon Levy congratulates Dr. King on his leadership and the efforts of the SCLC. Mr. Levy contributes to the organization and states that he follows Dr. King's work with interest.

A Contentious Telephone Message

Wednesday, February 16, 1966
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

William Harold Johnson contacts Dr. King to inform him of a telephone message publicizing controversial information from a number listed in Springfield, Illinois. Mr. Johnson asks Dr. King for advice on how the Council of Churches could contend the information while also mentioning that he and his associates are interested in becoming more familiar with the approach being taken in Chicago.

SCLC Voter Registration Agenda

This document captures the Southern Christian Leadership Conference's voter registration agenda in Detroit, Michigan between August 18 and August 23, 1967.

Philosophy

Dr. King records a note on G. K. Chesterson's view on man's personal philosophy.

Lincoln

Dr. King gives a brief description of the timeline for Abraham Lincoln. He describes Lincoln's many defeats and eventual presidential triumph.

Letter from Dr. Benjamin E. Mays to MLK

Wednesday, January 29, 1964
Atlanta, GA

Dr. Benjamin E. Mays writes to Dr. King, thanking him for his financial pledge to the college and asking him to join the Morehouse men who have either paid out their pledges or whose pledges are up to date. This letter includes Dora McDonald's holograph shorthand in red ink.

Letter from Alfred A. Haesler to MLK

Wednesday, September 6, 1967
SWITZERLAND

Alfred A. Haesler of Die Tat or "the fact," a publication in Switzerland, asks Dr. King a series of questions that revolve around the role of hatred in American politics.

Statement from MLK to Time Magazine

Friday, January 12, 1962

Dr. King writes to Time Magazine regarding the President's call for "new civil rights legislation." He expresses the unfortunate lack of originality in the President's statement on the issue and stresses the importance of executive action.

Registration for the Annual Youth Retreat

Friday, May 12, 1967
Fort Valley, GA, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

This is a document from Reverend Earl Stirewalt with information on the annual Youth Retreat of the Georgia Baptist Convention. The retreat aims to aid in the spiritual growth of young men and women.

SCLC Newsletter: July 1963

Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, SOUTH AFRICA, Johannesburg, South Africa, New York (NY), Michigan (MI), Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Washington, D.C., Nashville, TN, Tennessee (TN), Georgia (GA), North Carolina (NC), Virginia (VA), Atlanta, GA

This SCLC newsletter features numerous articles written by members of the SCLC regarding Birmingham, Alabama. Also featured is a graphic story of the crisis in Birmingham.

Letter from Hano Bailey to MLK

Friday, December 22, 1967
Washington, D.C., UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Hano Bailey praises Dr. King for asking black athletes "to sit out of the Olympics." He informs Dr. King that there are 15 teachers at his University writing letters to their relatives in support of Dr. King's campaign.

Letter from Edna R. McKinnon to MLK

Thursday, December 14, 1967
California (CA)

Edna McKinnon praises Dr. King for his wonderful work with the SCLC and its effect on the "entire world." She agrees with Dr. King's nonviolent philosophy and approach to American military intervention in Vietnam. Ms. McKinnon is the sister of Jeanette Rankin, the first woman of Congress, and the only member to vote against U.S. entry into both world wars.

Memorandum from Benjamin F. Payton Regarding Meredith Mississippi March

New York (NY), Memphis, TN, Mississippi (MS), Jackson, MS

Benjamin F. Payton, Executive Director of the Commission on Religion and Race of the National Council of Churches, constructs this document as a debriefing on the Meredith Mississippi March. It is evident that the march is symbolic of the nation's struggle with racial conflict and aims to dismantle fear among African American voter registration. James Meredith, Mississippi citizen and first African American to desegregate the University of Mississippi, had organized and led the march.

Detroit Council for Human Rights: Walk To Freedom

Sunday, June 23, 1963
Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI)

The Detroit Council of Human Rights adopted a declaration for Detroit, Michigan on May 17, 1963. In the declaration, the Council decided to stand in solidarity against the injustices that plague the city's African American population. This program is from the yearly demonstration that the Council holds to commemorate their pledge to combat the "inequality of this country."

Liberation: Our Struggle

Sunday, April 1, 1956
New York, NY, New York (NY), Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA, Chester, PA, Boston, MA, Alabama (AL), South Carolina (SC), Mississippi (MS), Birmingham, AL

Dr. King contributes an article to the "Liberation" publication explaining the reasons for the 1955 Montgomery Bus Boycott. He conveys the issues involving segregation on buses, the demise of Negro inferiority and the miscalculations of white Montgomery civic leaders. According to Dr. King, "Every attempt to end the protest by intimidation, by encouraging Negroes to inform, by force and violence, further cemented the Negro community and brought sympathy for our cause from men of good will all over the world."

Letter from Mary Brown to MLK

Sunday, October 31, 1965
New York, NY

Mary Brown, a student at Seward Park High School, asks for Dr. King's assistance in her presentation of a discussion on the challenges of the "Civil Rights workers."

SCLC Tenth Anniversary Convention

Monday, August 14, 1967
Atlanta, GA

A program outlining the course of events for the 10th Anniversary Convention of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Prafulla Chandra Das to MLK

Monday, February 27, 1967
INDIA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Mr. Das informs Dr. King that his book "Why We Can't Wait" has been translated for readers in India and printing is underway. Mr. Das asks Dr. King to send a message to UN Secretary General U Thant, the recent Nehru Peace Prize Award winner.

People in Action: Our New President

Saturday, February 1, 1964
New York (NY)

In this article in the New York Amsterdam News, Dr. King writes optimistically about the prospects for civil rights in the transition from President Kennedy to President Johnson. He believes that Johnson's Southern-ness may disarm the likes of George Wallace and that the President's proven commitment to civil rights and skills as Majority Leader in the Senate will aid in passing legislation.

Letter from James E. Byrd to MLK

Friday, March 15, 1968
North Carolina (NC), Atlanta, GA

James E. Byrd, Campus Coordinator at Lenoir Rhyne College, writes Dr. King requesting materials for the Choice '68 campaign.

Telegram from Rev. Andrew J. Young to Mrs. Rosa M. Mcghee

Monday, August 9, 1965
Birmingham, AL, Tennessee (TN)

Rev. Andrew Young sends this telegram to Mrs. Rosa Mcghee apologizing on behalf of the SCLC for neglecting to invite the officials and members of the American Federation of Teachers.

The Danger of A Little Progress

Saturday, February 15, 1964
Atlanta, GA, Birmingham, AL

In Dr. King's article, The Danger of a Little Progress, he discusses the work of the SCLC and SNCC in correlation to statistics regarding integrated housing and schools, as well as discrimination in employment. Dr. King concludes that there has been little progress among blacks in Atlanta statistically.

National Student Christian Federation Bulletin

Monday, February 29, 1960
New York, NY, Nashville, TN, Ohio (OH), New York (NY)

The National Student Christian Federation released several bulletins and informational letters regarding the student demonstrations in the 1960s. Herluf Jensen, General Secretary of the NSCF, provides readers with the progress of different trials related to the movement, arrest statistics and institutions involved. Obtaining strong civil rights legislation through Congress is discussed as well.

Letter from Eleanor A. Lofton of the Pittsburgh Courier to MLK

Wednesday, January 27, 1965
Pittsburgh, PA

Eleanor Lofton, Acting Publisher for the Pittsburgh Courier, asks Dr. King to include a message for the "Brotherhood" edition of their publication. Lofton explains that they are seeking "all men of goodwill" to be a part of the edition and that they will be anticipating his timely response.

Invitation from Frederick S. Wallin to MLK

Saturday, December 14, 1963
West Virginia (WV), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Frederick E. Wallin invites Dr. King to speak at the Alderson-Broaddus College's Civic Interest Week, a weeklong study and discussion on political and economic concerns. He explains that he is inviting the most controversy speakers would seriously appreciated Dr. King's attendance.

Letter from S.W. McAllister to MLK

New York (NY), Norfolk, VA, Georgia (GA)

Mr. McAllister, a father of three, requests Dr. King's assistance in obtaining a divorce from his wife who is living with another man. Dr. King was an image of hope for many people and often received requests for help in areas unrelated to civil rights.

Telegram from George Houser to MLK

Thursday, November 11, 1965
New York, NY

George Houser of the American Committee on Africa urges Dr. King to telegram the President about Rhodesia's unilateral declaration of independence. The Rhodesian government, under Prime Minister Ian Smith, took this illegal action to break from the United Kingdom after days of negotiation with British Prime Minister Harold Wilson. The British sought to give blacks a fair share of power.

Guidelines for a Constructive Church

Sunday, June 5, 1966
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL)

In this sermon delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Dr. King spells out guidelines for the church: healing the broken-hearted, preaching deliverance to the captive (freeing people from everything that enslaves), and preaching the acceptable year of the Lord. The acceptable year of the Lord, he says, is every year the time is right to do right, stop lying and cheating, do justice, learn to live as brothers and beat swords into plowshares.

Man (His Split Personality)

Dr. King quotes St. Augustine’s “Confessions.”