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Metaphysics

Dr. King quotes from F. H. Bradley's "Appearance and Reality."

The Black Revolution

California (CA), Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), BRAZIL, Washington, D.C., Jackson, MS, Mississippi (MS), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This pamphlet produced by the SCLC is an excerpt from Thomas Merton's "The Black Revolution: Letters to a White Liberal." Merton seeks to awaken the conscience of white America by presenting the Negro perspective in the struggle for civil rights. He discusses how Dr. King utilizes the philosophy of nonviolence as a tool of progress and the contrasting reaction of Negros based upon their religious association as either Christian or Muslim. The concluding message is a call for the complete reform of America's social system which permits and breeds injustice.

Worship

Dr. King describes the challenge of the Protestant Church as finding a balance between objective and subjective worship.

Schleiermacher and the Bible

Dr. King references a quote from Friedrich Schleiermacher regarding the relationship between religion and sacred texts.

King Finds New Target

Tuesday, April 18, 1967
VIETNAM, New York (NY), Kansas (KS)

This article from The Topeka Daily Capital discusses Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War. Dr. King verbalizes his stance after seeing anti-poverty funds being used for war. The article also mentions civil rights leaders who are against joining both causes for civil rights and world peace.

References (Religion and Philosophy)

Dr. King cites three articles about Borden Parker Bowne. The first, “Personalism and the Influence of Bowne,” was written by Edgar S. Brightman and appeared in the journal The Personalist.

MLK Sermon Notes

Dr. King examines the contradictions in human nature in this handwritten draft of a sermon.

MLK Debuts the Book of the Year

Wednesday, June 10, 1964
Montgomery, AL

This "Christian Century" ad debuts Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait."

Letter From Andrew Young to Chris Folcker

Wednesday, June 1, 1966
Stockholm, Sweden, Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), SWEDEN, VIETNAM

In this letter, Andrew Young thanks Chris Folcker for his work with the Martin Luther King Fund, the Europe-wide fundraising campaign on behalf of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and Dr. King. Young praises the "tremendous success" of the fund.

Letter from MLK to Senator Hiram L. Fong

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King thanks Hawaii Republican Senator Hiram Fong for his role in the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Fong was the first Asian American and Chinese American to become a US Senator.

Speaking Out

New York, NY

Dr. King discusses the roles of Civil Rights leaders. He states that leaders do not control crime but have the responsibility of maintaining discipline. Dr. King reminds his audience that the Negro was the creator of nonviolence.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Curtis J. Jackson

Friday, September 7, 1962
Florida (FL), Birmingham, AL, California (CA), Washington, D.C.

Dr. King notifies Rev. Jackson that he will not be able to travel to Orlando, but offers that he'll hopefully be able to accept more invitations in the near future. In addition, he requested that Rev. Jackson come and visit the Annual Convention of S.C.L.C. in Birmingham, Alabama.

Statement to Be Used If There is a Victory for Reagan

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York (NY), Maryland (MD)

SCLC prepares a contingency statement, with Dr. King's handwritten edits. The statement asserts that some elections' newly overt racism reflects the prejudice and bigotry in America. The statement calls on Negroes to collaborate with honest white allies to gain legal and moral rights.

Letter from Hubert Humphrey to MLK

Friday, December 3, 1965
Washington, D.C.

Vice President Humphrey thanks Dr. King for participating in a recent White House Conference, "To Fulfill These Rights," which focused on jobs, jobs training and economic security.

Letter from Neale J. Pearson to MLK

Thursday, October 18, 1962
Florida (FL), Atlanta, GA, Albany, GA, Mississippi (MS)

A Ph.D. candidate from the University of Florida writes Dr. King to tell him about the political and social progress made by the university's Americans for Democratic Action (ADA) chapter. The writer tells Dr. King that the Chapter has invited various political figures to speak at an upcoming lecture series. He extends the invitation to Dr. King and Dr. Charles Anderson, while simultaneously seeking Dr. King's help in contacting Dr. Anderson. The student informs Dr.

SCLC SCOPE Pamphlet

Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL)

This pamphlet is a product of the Summer Community Organization and Political Education project (SCOPE), a project initiated by the SCLC dedicated to increasing voter participation and political education in Alabama and throughout the South. The pamphlet highlights several common economic and political issues that face Negro communities.

Religion

Dr. King comments on Plato's view of religion and records a quote from A.G. Keller's "Science and Society."

Who Are We?

Saturday, February 5, 1966
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), New York, NY, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C., Florida (FL), Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, VIETNAM

In this sermon Dr. King contemplates "who are we?" and "what is man?". He differentiates between the pessimistic attitudes of the materialistic understandings of man and the optimistic attitudes of humanistic definitions of man. King also states that man is neither all good nor all bad, but a combination. Man is both an everlasting miracle and mystery.

Telegram from Wyatt Tee Walker

Saturday, July 28, 1962
Albany, GA, Georgia (GA)

Walker sends out this telegram to inform its recipients that Dr. King and Rev. Abernathy have been unjustly arrested in Albany, Georgia.

Crusade For Citizenship

Texas (TX), Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), Louisiana (LA), North Carolina (NC), South Carolina (SC), Virginia (VA), Mississippi (MS), Tennessee (TN), Florida (FL), Little Rock, AR, Birmingham, AL, Montgomery, AL, Memphis, TN, New Orleans, LA, Tallahassee, FL, Atlanta, GA, Louisville, KY

"Crusade For Citizenship," an initiative of the SCLC, illustrates the importance of Negro voters in the South. The brochure incorporates important facts to implement emphasis on how imperative the cause is.

Summit Conference Program

Sunday, December 15, 1963
North Carolina (NC)

This program outlines the schedule and issues of concern to be addressed at the Summit Conference.

Review on "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community" 1967

Saturday, April 15, 1967

The Virginia Kirkus Review wrote this descriptive review on Dr. King's final book, Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community? The context of the review shows differences between the messages of Dr. King's earlier works and Where Do We Go From Here. Dr. King's earlier publications focused on the work of gaining decent treatment and basic civil rights for black Americans. However, this book heavily challenged the status quo in America.

Letter from Elsa Wischkaemper McIntyre to MLK

Sunday, November 3, 1963
California (CA)

Elsa McIntyre writes to Dr. King to seek information on how to contribute to his organization. Mrs. McIntyre was moved by Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech and inquires about obtaining a copy.

Ritschl and Schleiermacher on Method

Dr. King sketches his view of methodologies employed by German theologians Friedrich Schleiermacher and Albrecht Ritschl.

MLK's Address About South Africa

Friday, December 10, 1965
South Africa, DOMINICAN REPUBLIC, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, FRANCE, SPAIN, PORTUGAL, ANGOLA, MOZAMBIQUE, New York, NY, New York (NY), CHINA, UNITED KINGDOM, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, INDIA, GERMANY, JAPAN

Addressing the apartheid situation in South Africa, Dr. King states that white rulers of South Africa, rather than black Africans, are "modern day barbarians." He continues to say that although black South Africans are the majority, they are oppressed by the minority. This is one of many occasions that Dr. King parallels racial injustices and views civil rights as an international issue.

Telegrams from MLK to the Kennedys

Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Washington, D.C.

Dr. King informs President John F. Kennedy and Attorney General Robert Kennedy of the bombings and police behavior in Birmingham, Alabama. Dr. King suggests that if desegregation does not occur the city will experience a "racial holocaust."

Netherlands Request Autograph

Saturday, December 16, 1967
NETHERLANDS

Theo Roling, of The Netherlands, urges Dr. King to promote peace in the world. He requests Dr. King's signature for his Nobel Prize autograph collection.

Letter from New York Third Grader Debbie Bass to MLK

Tuesday, April 6, 1965
New York (NY), Alabama (AL)

Third grade student Debbie Bass chose Dr. King for her writing assignment. Bass feels that Dr. King was the right individual chosen to receive the Nobel Peace Prize. She also conveys her frustration towards Alabama Governor George Wallace for not allowing Negroes to vote.

Letter from MLK to Senator J. Glenn Bealll

Monday, June 22, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King thanks Senator J. Glenn Beall for supporting the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from Ernest Shaefer to MLK

Sunday, April 18, 1976
Pennsylvania (PA), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Philadelphia, PA

Ernest Shaefer writes Dr. King relaying detailed information regarding Dr. King's travel to Philadelphia International Airport and his speech at Unionville High School in Pennsylvania.