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The Martin Luther King Column - No. 3

In the 3rd installment of "The Martin Luther King Column," Dr. King praises the Jewish people for seeking freedom for all. Dr. King discusses their contributions to "philanthropy and social organization."

Which Way for the Negro Now?

Monday, May 15, 1967

In his thirteenth civil rights cover story, Newsweek General Editor Peter Goldman reports on a movement in crisis, with fragmented leadership, impatient black followers, and increasingly alienated white supporters. Goldman and reporters interviewed top leadership ranging from the Urban League’s Whitney Young to black power advocate Stokely Carmichael. This article asks what will become of the Negro Revolution.

Letter from MLK to Eliot Stadler

Thursday, August 20, 1964

Acknowledging receipt of a letter and a $1000 contribution to the SCLC, Dr. King sends his appreciation to Dr. Eliot Stadler. In closing, the Reverend expresses interest in meeting Stadler with regard to potential aid during the summer months.

Letter from Fred S. Bertsch Jr. to MLK

Thursday, April 22, 1965

Fred Bertsch Jr., Principal of the Holland School in Michigan, informs Dr. King that the school has made other arrangements for its commencement ceremony.

Joint Statement on Violence in the Cities

Wednesday, July 26, 1967

Dr. King, A. Philip Randolph, Whitney M. Young Jr., and Roy Wilkins issue a joint statement urging Negro Americans in cities such as Newark and Detroit to end the public disorder and rioting. The civil rights leaders emphasize the potential damage the urban riots pose to "the Negro population, to the civil rights cause, and to the entire nation."

References (Religion and Philosophy)

Dr. King cites three articles about Borden Parker Bowne. The first, “Personalism and the Influence of Bowne,” was written by Edgar S. Brightman and appeared in the journal The Personalist.

Apollinarianism

Dr. King defines Apollinarianism.

Esther

Dr. King discusses the religious and moral teachings in the biblical book of Esther.

A Big Johnny Reb Special Editorial

Sunday, April 9, 1967

The Big Johnny Reb Radio Show, a show syndicated throughout the State of Georgia, criticizes Dr. King for his position on the Vietnam War. The management of the radio station agrees with the view that too much American blood has been spilled, but they also state Dr. King should not denounce his own country's cause in the fight against Communism.

The Modern Negro Activist

Dr. King profiles the emergent young Negro civil rights activist who is college-educated, creative, brave and committed to the discipline of non-violence. He attributes the activist's diligence to a keen awareness that they inhabit a world on the cusp of positive social change and that they will have the privilege to direct that change. They are no longer to be an imitator of his white counterpart, but rather an initiator and leader in this new age.

Funeral

Dr. King quotes Shakespeare's "Hamlet."

Letter from J. P. Brookshire to MLK

J. P. Brookshire supports Dr. King's desire for equality and justice, but is critical of the methods by which Dr. King uses to obtain these goals. He also criticizes Dr. King's stand on the conflict in Vietnam and the draft.

Treitschke

Dr. King references Heinrich von Treitschke, a German historian and political writer, regarding the responsibilities of the state.

Sixth Grade Wisconsin Achievement Test Responses

This is a collection of responses from sixth graders of average ability in a Wisconsin school. Although the instructions are not provided, it seems evident that the students were tasked to paraphrase the passage or, simply tell what the passage meant to them.

Letter From Jane Hall to MLK

Friday, February 9, 1968

Jane Hall writes Dr. King suggesting that there be a focus on equitable representation of the negro in television advertising in order to attain "maximum quality and quantity" of integration.

Monotheism

Dr. King describes monotheism, the belief in the existence of one God, as it compares to Hebrews and Greeks in a civilized world. He quotes Albert C. Knudson from "Religious Teachings of the Old Testament."

Letter to SCLC from Lisa Goldiamond about Volunteer Service

Monday, April 15, 1968

Goldiamond, a student at Royal Victoria College, requests that the SCLC. Putting words to action, she offers to keep Dr. King's work alive by volunteering in local civil rights organizations over summer break.

150 Religious Leaders March on OEO

Friday, October 14, 1966

This press release addresses Sargent Shrivers' decision not to refund the Child Development Group of Mississippi and to express concerns regarding the National War on Poverty.

Telegram from Reverend Daniel Speed to Reverend Andrew Young

Monday, August 2, 1965

A telegram from Rev. Speed informing Rev. Young of arrival information for the 1965 Southern Christian Leadership Conference Convention in Birmingham, Alabama.

Shriver Outlines Summer Program

Saturday, March 4, 1967

This New York Times article reports that if Congress approves the $75 million supplemental appropriation for antipoverty programs, Sargent Shriver, director of the Office of Equal Employment Opportunity, plans to use $47 million for the Neighborhood Youth Corps and $25 for community action agencies to help provide youth with employment and recreation. It also mentions efforts in the Senate to increase the supplemental appropriation.

Letter from Hadley Executive Committee to MLK

Wednesday, November 18, 1964

Ernest Shaefer, Executive Director of the Hadley Executive Committee, requests Dr. King's participation in the Hadley Memorial Fund lecture.

"Rev. King Jumps Back into the Act"

This article expresses how Dr. King wants to take the attention off of the militants and place the focus back on non-violent expression.

Draft of Nobel Prize Acceptance Speech

This document is one draft of Dr. King's Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech. Dr. King applauds the world for recognizing the American Civil Rights Movement and states that this award represents for him a "deepening commitment" to the philosophy of nonviolence.

Ghettos and Segregation in City Urbanizing

Dr. King writes this speech explaining the current economic and social conditions of city ghettos. As cities urbanize, ghettos expand and segregation increases. "The ghetto has become the hallmark of our major cities just as truly as the cities themselves are becoming the hallmark of the nation." Though the last thirty years has seen advancements in legislation, what remains unrecognized is the gap between legislation intent and the actualization of community programs that have tangible affects on the neighborhoods.

Letter from the Baptist Union of Western Canada to MLK

Friday, February 11, 1966

The Baptist Union of Western Canada informs Dr. King that they have released him from any obligation to participate in the convention in Winnipeg. The union is conscious of Dr. King's great responsibilities and the difficulty he faces while attempting to make appearances.

Letter from James A Mills to MLK

Friday, August 12, 1966

Rev. James A Mills commends Dr. King on his efforts in the Civil Rights Movement and includes a donation to the SCLC.

Letter from James McDaniel to MLK

Monday, October 31, 1966

This appreciation letter from James A McDaniel, thanks Dr. King for his willingness to serve as a member on the Executive Committee of the National Citizens Committee for the Child Development Program in Mississippi.

Messages From Dora McDonald to Dr. King

Notes from Dr. King's secretary, Dora McDonald, detailing phone messages from key movement stakeholders and colleagues.

Letter from Fr. John McNamara to MLK

Monday, July 26, 1965

Fr. McNamara, Catholic Chaplain at the Louisiana State Prison at Angola, writes Dr. King to extend congratulations on being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from MLK to Pastor Charles Westphal

Monday, November 8, 1965

Dr. King shares his contentment with the company of Pastor Charles Westphal and the rest of the French Protestant Federation.