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"Louisville, KY"

Lincoln

Dr. King gives a brief description of the timeline for Abraham Lincoln. He describes Lincoln's many defeats and eventual presidential triumph.

Letter from Sue Jane Mitchell Smock to MLK

Wednesday, January 27, 1965
NIGERIA, New York (NY)

Mrs. Smock writes to Dr. King a "note of appreciation" regarding the Nobel Peace Prize and her artwork. A 1964 issue of Time Magazine featured a photograph of Dr. King's living room which displayed a "woodcut print" of Mrs. Smock's work. She also invites Dr. and Mrs. King to a future exhibition in Atlanta.

Letter from Adele Fishman to MLK

Monday, August 31, 1964
Montgomery, AL, California (CA), New York (NY)

The American Book Company is requesting permission to reprint Dr. King's "Letter from Birmingham Jail." They hope to include the letter, in a text book, entitled THE STREAM OF AMERICAN HISTORY, THIRD Edition. This letter includes Dora McDonald's holograph shorthand in blue ink.

Metaphysics

Dr. King quotes from F. H. Bradley's "Appearance and Reality."

History

Dr. King cites Reinhold Niebuhr's definition of history and its relation to God.

Letter to Ralph D. Abernathy from Ralph E. Gulliver

Tuesday, November 26, 1963
New York (NY)

The James H. Farrell Lodge contributes to the SCLC for the cause of Freedom-Now.

MLK Sermon Notes

Dr. King writes notes regarding the story of Jesus and the healing of the paralytic. Jesus asked the crippled man, "will thou be made whole?" Dr. King states that some people are happy to be crippled because they lack the responsibilities of life that a healthy man has, and many people cater to their needs, but cautions against this attitude.

The Integrity of Martin Luther King

Boston, MA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, VIETNAM

This letter was written in response to Dr. King's address concerning U.S. involvement in Vietnam. The address was given at the Ford Hall Forum, in Boston, MA. The author speaks to Dr. King's courage and integrity for humanity.

Statement by MLK

Friday, October 14, 1966
Birmingham, AL, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Chicago, IL

In this statement, Dr. King enforces the mission and organizational structure of the SCLC as a means of denouncing the traditional ideas associated with the "Black Power" slogan.

Dorothy Cotton's Notes

Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI), DENMARK

Dorothy Cotton's compilation of notes includes topics such as the advantages of urbanization, diversity, automation, the "purpose of human effort," Denmark, community mobilization, the democratic method, the behavior of a responsible citizen and the "greatest prize" for mankind. Dorothy Cotton was the SCLC's Education Director and one of the organization's highest ranking female members at the time.

Letter from Bengt Bjerke to Dora McDonald

Thursday, December 10, 1964
Oslo, Norway, NORWAY, Stockholm, Sweden

Bengt Bjerke from the Legal Counsel of the Nobel Foundation informs Dora McDonald that a signature is needed for Dr. King's copyright assignment form for his Nobel Lecture.

Letter from Ben A. Todd to MLK

Friday, April 14, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, VIETNAM, Texas (TX)

Ben A. Todd commends Dr. King for his recent stand against the United States' position in Vietnam, particularly because making such a statement may hurt the Civil Rights Movement.

Schleiermacher (The Religious Man)

Dr. King quotes Schleiermacher's views on man's identification with Religion.

Problem of Evil Notecard

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines his views on the problem of evil. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verse.

Letter from James A Mills to MLK

Friday, August 12, 1966
Colorado (CO)

Rev. James A Mills commends Dr. King on his efforts in the Civil Rights Movement and includes a donation to the SCLC.

Why We Chose Jail Rather than Bail

Dr. King cites seven reasons for choosing jail not bail. Among them is that ?the highest expression of nonviolence is self suffering.?

Letter from MLK to Verna L. Halll

Tuesday, January 29, 1963
Los Angeles, CA, California (CA)

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Hall and the rest of the Mississippi Club for their donation. He assures her that "good will contributions" are necessary for the work of the SCLC to continue.

Dr. King Notecard

In this notecard, Dr. King expresses his ideals and philosophical viewpoint pertaining to the doctrine of "Puritanism."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ozell Sutton

Wednesday, July 1, 1964
Arkansas (AR), Atlanta, GA, Birmingham, AL

Ms. McDonald responds to Mr. Sutton's request for seventy-five copies of Dr. King's "Letter from the Birmingham Jail." She regretfully informs the sender that their office is out of re-prints; however she suggests that he obtain copies of Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait" in which the Letter from the Birmingham Jail is printed.

Letter from S.Leiss to MLK Regarding Dutch Publication Rights

Wednesday, September 1, 1965
New York (NY), New York, NY

S. Leiss sent Dr King this satement regarding a payment for the Dutch rights to "Why We Can't Wait".

Lenin

Dr. King labels a quote from Vladimir Lenin "a false dictum."

Postage Stamp, April 4, 1968

This postage stamp to Washington D.C is dated April 4, 1968.

SCLC Pamphlet- Why?

Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

This brochure highlights the various forms of discrimination African Americans faced in Alabama, primarily the legal right to vote. Housing, unemployment, and police brutality are other key topics discussed. There is also a call to action on solutions for these problems.

Telegram from Civil Rights Leaders to President Kennedy

Monday, September 16, 1963
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, Birmingham, AL, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL)

Members of the SCLC and prominent civil rights leaders request an immediate conference with President John F. Kennedy regarding the 1963 Birmingham church bombing.

Letter from Leslie Cohen to MLK

New York (NY)

Leslie Cohen informs Dr. King that Miss Egnal's eighth grade classes from Great Neck South Junior High School in New York have each elected him their "Man of the Year" over all other world leaders.

Letter from the Dutch Vietnam Committee to MLK

Sunday, May 7, 1967
NETHERLANDS, VIETNAM

An unknown author writes Dr. King on behalf of the Dutch Vietnam Committee to seek assistance in stopping the bombing in Vietnam. The committee requests Dr. King record a few powerful remarks which will hopefully influence ending the war.

Letter from The Norwegian Church to MLK and Friends

Wednesday, December 9, 1964
NORWAY, Oslo, Norway, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Washington, D.C.

A member of the Norwegian Church extends congratulations to Dr. King for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize for 1964.

Fisk News: The Montgomery Story

Thursday, July 12, 1956
Montgomery, AL, CHINA, INDIA, PAKISTAN, JAPAN

This publication of Fisk News features one of Dr. King's speeches on page five. The speech is entitled "The Montgomery Story," and was delivered at the 13th Annual Institute of Race Relations at Fisk University. Dr. King commences to share of Rosa Parks' refusal to move from her bus seat and help begin the historic Montgomery Bus Boycott. Blacks boycotted public transportation for 7 months in Montgomery, Alabama and achieved success in changing the city's discriminatory practices.

Manifesto of the Meredith Mississippi March

Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, and Floyd McKissick sign the Manifesto of the Meredith Mississippi March, which represents a "public indictment and protest of the failure of American society." In solidarity, they demand courses of actions to deal with voting fraud, strengthened civil rights legislation, and impartial application of the law.