The Archive

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"Louisiana (LA)"

Letter from Josephine Baker to MLK

Saturday, August 31, 1963

Josephine Baker expresses her admiration for Dr. King as a great leader and articulates her commitment to the Civil Rights Movement.

Do the Following to Keep National Attention Focused on Selma

Dr. King composes a list of activities that will keep national attention focused on Selma. Written on Waldorf Astoria Hotel stationary, the list includes measures such as contacting top level government officials like President Johnson, organizing a march, and enlisting the help of celebrities. Dr. King concludes the list by emphasizing "We must insist that voting is the issue and here Selma has dirty hands."

Memo from Dora McDonald to MLK

Wednesday, December 6, 1967

Dora McDonald sends Dr. King a list of the letters, telephone calls and voice mails he received while out of the office. She also sent him information on public speaking arrangements and the publishing of books along with the royalties Dr. King would receive.

Letter from Charles H. K. to MLK

Wednesday, August 25, 1965

Charles H. K., from the University of Montreal, encloses a financial contribution and informs Dr. King that he is moving to Canada and would like information on how to continue his contributions.

Letter from Lillian Robertson to MLK

Monday, July 15, 1963

The Baptist Pacifist Fellowship confirms that Dr. King will speak at its upcoming annual meeting. Lillian Robertson, Secretary-Treasurer of the Fellowship, also encloses a brochure about the organization.

Program from the SCLC's Tenth Annual Convention

Monday, August 8, 1966

This is the Tentative Programme of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference's Tenth Annual Convention. The convention was held in Jackson, Mississippi at a Masonic Temple and hosted by the Reverend Allen Johnson. The four day convention was themed "Human Rights - The Continuing Struggle."

Letter from Edward Wright to MLK

Edward Wright, a member of the Black Panther Party, request Dr. King helps his leader, Huey P. Newton. Newton was wrongfully charged with murder of an Oakland city policeman during the fight for freedom.

SCLC Citizenship Education Program

This pamphlet describes the SCLC's Citizenship Education Program. The SCLC provides information on the purpose of the school, first class citizen preparation and the characteristics of an ideal candidate for training.

Letter from MLK to Edwin and Louise Flowers

Tuesday, October 31, 1967

In this correspondence to Mr. Edwin C. and Mrs. Louise M. Flowers from Dr. King, he wanted to personally thanked Mr. Edwin and Mrs. Flowers for their generous contribution to SCLC and to express his appreciation and gratitude for their support toward the Civil Right Movement.

Press Internationale Concludes Fifth Year of Broadcasting Over WBKB-TV

Le Van Enterprises, Inc. announces that Press Internationale,a television show that provides analysis of international issues, has completed five years of weekly broadcasting in Chicago.

Letter from Ernest Evans to MLK about Help

Wednesday, February 23, 1966

Ernest Evans is writing to Dr. King asking him to come by his home while he is visiting Chicago. Evans discusses the problems of his living conditions and the increase in the cost of living. He hopes that Dr. King will be able to bring about positive change for the community.

Letter from Mildred Hood to MLK

Saturday, May 7, 1966

Mildred Hood explains to Dr. King what she and her daughter experienced at the Cook County Hospital in Chicago. Hood wants to know what she can do about the situation.

Letter from Mary Ann Quilter to MLK

Tuesday, March 26, 1968

Ms. Quilter informs Dr. King of a political event taking place on campus and asks him for any campaign literature he can provide and a picture of himself.

What is Man?

Sunday, January 12, 1958

Citing views from historical and contemporary figures, Dr. King asserts that the definition of "man" lies somewhere between God and an animal. Dr. King contends that, although man is limited by time and space, humans are not animals, because they have the capacity for rational thought. However, the central theme that Dr. King argues is that humanity is inherently evil and must constantly strive for high moral standards.

Request For Information Sent to MLK from Abram Eisenman

This second "Request For Information" was sent from Abram Eisenman to Dr. King. He asks Dr. King if he and members of his organization will support him for president. He gives Dr. King five main points of his platform that he hopes to achieve as president. He believes it is "imperative" that someone run against President Johnson and unite the American people based on his platform.

SCLC Newsletter: June-July 1965

Thursday, July 1, 1965

The cover story for this 1965 SCLC Newsletter features Dr. King leading a March in Chicago, and also includes the usual wide gamut of Civil Rights Movement issues. Editor Ed Clayton's column discusses the "loss of fear" among Negroes, who "never again will be systematically excluded from office, or driven back from the voting booth."

Letter from Kathleen Reid to MLK

Monday, October 9, 1967

Kathleen Reed, the editor of Alert Catholic, writes to Dr. King enclosing the most recent copy of the publication. The Newsletter of the National Council of Catholic Men features a quote by Dr. King to President Johnson which stated "the conditions which you so bravely set out to remedy when you entered office" have not changed.

Letter from Jim Vickrey to Thomas Offenburger

Tuesday, November 7, 1967

Jim Vickrey of Auburn University requests that Thomas Offenburger, Director of the SCLC Office of Public Relations, provides information regarding Dr. King's background.

Letter from MLK to Claes Collenberg

Monday, April 25, 1966

Dr. King expresses his sincere appreciation to Claes Collenberg of Sweden for his help in raising money to assist with the civil rights movement in America. He conveys to Mr. Collenberg that he will be notified of updates involving the Chicago Campaign on housing.

Letter from Hugh Bingham to MLK

Friday, April 22, 1966

Hugh Bingham, Associate Editor of the London Daily Mirror, requests help planning his trip to the United States to report on the "progress and processes of integration." He explains that, in addition to the political aspects of integration, he would also like to write about the people involved in the movement.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ethelyn L. Hall

Monday, December 9, 1963

Miss McDonald sends Ethelyn Hall information that Dr. King thinks Hall will find helpful.

Letter from Harry B. Henderson Jr. to MLK

Sunday, April 23, 1967

Harry Henderson writes Dr. King in support of Dr. King's stance on Vietnam. Henderson expresses his appreciation for Dr. King's "clearout and moving" speech regarding the United State's presence in Vietnam and he feels that only clergymen can take an effective stance. He also discusses how the Vietnam War is used as a scapegoat to keep the government from having to deal with discrimination issues in America.

Black Power

This flyer gives a description of what black power entails.

North and South: SCLC Staff News January, 1967

Sunday, January 1, 1967

The January, 1967 edition of SCLC's staff newsletter shares Christmas and New Year stories from the staff members and their families. The newsletter also reports on recent activities of the organization such as a Chicago boycott, Junius Griffin's move to the Republican National Committee, a political rally, the SCLC's housing project in Chicago, a recent conference on Negro history, the situation in Grenada, Mississippi and other news items.

Letter from the Weyburn Chamber of Commerce to MLK

Saturday, March 20, 1965

The Weyburn Chamber of Commerce, a Canadian organization, is partaking in the various events surrounding the 60th founding anniversary of the Province of Saskatchewan. The chamber commends Dr. King as a Nobel Peace Prize winner and aspires to have him visit to discuss the racial issues in America.

Letter from Adam Powell to MLK

Tuesday, November 23, 1965

In this letter, Mr. Powell informs Dr. King how important he is to society and that he is in full support of his work. He also wishes to invite Dr. King to the next session of Congress for advice and ideas.

The Montgomery Story

Wednesday, June 27, 1956

Dr. King delivers an address entitled the "Montgomery Story" at the NAACP 47th Annual Convention. He address several issues throughout the address including: segregation, civil rights, equality, slavery and religion.

The Church Says No on Proposition 14

Thie Council of Churches in Northern and Southern California argues against the goals of Proposition 14. This 1964 ballot proposition sought to amend the California consitution by nullifying the Rumford Fair Housing Act. Prop 14 would go on to pass, but two years later the California Supreme Court deemed it unconstitutional.

The Pastor and His Reference Library

Here is "The Pastor and His Reference Library" by Edward C. Starr. Starr served as librarian at Bucknell. Dr. King more than likely used this resource to conduct research and organize citations while attending Crozer Theological Seminary in Upland, PA.

William E. Channing

Dr. King references theologian William E. Channing regarding his views on "Unitarian Christianity."