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SCLC Revel Report

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

In this report, the Southern Christian Leadership Conference provides the strategic planning for a nationwide program aimed at educating African Americans on nonviolence principles.

Facing Life's Inescapables

Brooklyn, NY

Dr. King uses an allegory regarding life to express that if an individual follows God's plan they will live an abundantly happy life.

Letter from Mrs. Nat Cole to Donald Frey

Thursday, May 6, 1965
Illinois (IL)

This letter was sent from Mrs. Nat (Mona) Cole to Mr. Donald S. Frey. In this letter Mrs. Cole thanks Mr. Frey for forwarding the Open Occupancy Award Certificate to her, honoring her late husband Nat King Cole.

The Student Movement and You

Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

This handbill calls for a boycott on Rich's and A & P in response to their discriminatory practices in employment and services to the Negro population of Atlanta, Georgia.

Letter from Vanessa Garrett to MLK

Friday, February 2, 1968
Chicago, IL

Vanessa Garrett writes Dr. King discussing various problems African Americans face. She seeks advice on how to solve these issues.

Letter from Eva Rosenfeld to MLK

Tuesday, April 11, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Eva Rosenfeld writes Dr. King expressing her support of his stance on the Vietnam War, regardless of critics like the NAACP. She asserts that King's mentality is wise and "that hope for all of us lies in seeing these issues as one issue, an issue of our humanity."

Telegram to MLK Regarding Honor Group MLK

Thursday, May 25, 1967
Ohio (OH), Cleveland, OH

In this telegram, sponsor Virginia Price Principal Clarence Fitch write to Dr. King to see if they can name Honor Group Martin Luther King a chapter of the National Junior Honor Society, at Roosevelt Junior High in Cleveland.

Condolence Letter Regarding Assassination of MLK

Monday, April 8, 1968
Minnesota (MN)

Anabella Anderson discusses the sadness that she feels over Dr. King's assassination. She says that she grieves for his family and the conditions that brought about Dr. King's death. Ashamed of her white skin, she blames the white race for social ills. Ms. Anderson wants to give of her self to non-whites in America and those under white domination in Africa. Though saddened, she is comforted by the words she heard at Dr. King's funeral and is hopeful that his legacy will live on.

Letter from MLK to a Donor

Montgomery, AL

Dr. King expresses gratitude for a contribution received by The Montgomery Improvement Association.

Letter from Alan J. Rankin to Miss Dora McDonald

Monday, January 23, 1967
CANADA, Atlanta, GA

Dr. King informs Alan J. Rankin to communicate to Dora McDonald about his availability to speak at the University Christian Council of McMaster University. The theme of the discussion for the "Teach-In" is going to be "The Religious Dilemma of Twentieth Century Man." Mr. Rankin expects over 2,000 students in attendance and church people from Canada. Furthermore, Mr. Rankin asserts that there will be news coverage on this event.

Letter from Morris A. Morse to Rev. Abernathy

Sunday, April 28, 1968
Minnesota (MN), Atlanta, GA

Morris Morse sends his condolences regarding the death of Dr. King. Mr. Morse further explains his opposition of the idea of building a two million dollar church in Dr. King's honor, because he believes that the reverend would not want such a memorial when so many people are in need.

Anti-Semitism, Israel and SCLC:- A Statement on Press Distortions

Sunday, August 27, 1967
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), New York, NY, Chicago, IL, Mississippi (MS), Cleveland, OH, ISRAEL, Alabama (AL)

This is a document that addresses the impression that the press created reporting that the SCLC was part of a group that condemned Israel and endorsed the policies of the Arab powers. This document also includes the annual report of the president by Dr. King.

Unitarian Universalist Statement of Consensus on Racial Injustice

Friday, May 20, 1966
Florida (FL), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

The Fifth General Assembly of the Unitarian Universalist Association listed several laws adopted by the association. Some of the laws incorporate civil rights, demonstrations, voting rights, equality, civil disobedience, and discrimination in employment and housing.

Letter from Gaylord Nelson to MLK

Thursday, July 2, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Wisconsin Democratic Senator Gaylord Nelson writes Dr. King expressing his gratitude for his kind letter regarding the passage of the Civil Rights Act. Senator Nelson reports that many of his constituents were solidly in favor of the bill.

A Journey of Conscience

VIETNAM, CHINA, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, Washington, D.C., SOUTH AFRICA, ALGERIA

In this draft of his 1967 speech, "A Journey of Conscience," Dr. King provides the many reasons he so strongly opposes the war in Vietnam. He writes of how he first felt it was important to remain silent, but gradually felt compelled to speak out, as the US made no initiatives toward peace. He points at that the war abroad takes away our focus on our problems at home, and we must "combine the fervor of the civil rights movement with the peace movement."

Letter from Irene M. Koch to MLK

Tuesday, August 9, 1966
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL)

Irene M. Koch uses a Native American legend of a man walking in the moccasins of his enemy to gain understanding of his enemy. She relates this legend to the current civil rights movement and specifically the civil rights movement in Chicago, Illinois.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Myles Campbell

Monday, December 23, 1963
Maryland (MD), Washington, D.C.

Dr. King expresses his thanks to Mrs. Myles Campbell for the kind response to his "I Have A Dream" speech during the March on Washington. He explains that prayer is needed for those who are unable to see past their own prejudices and acknowledge everyone as God's children. Dr. King asserts that the federal government is needed to change behaviors in the south and send Mrs. Campbell season's greetings.

Letter from Henry N. Flynt, Jr. to MLK

Sunday, October 15, 1967
Massachusetts (MA)

Henry N. Flynt expresses his appreciation for a copy of Dr. King's book, "Where Do We Go From Here" and compliments Dr. King on the quality of the book.

Biographical Sketch of Dr. Ralph David Avernathy

Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, GHANA, HOLY SEE (VATICAN CITY STATE), NORWAY, Oslo, Norway, SWEDEN, FRANCE

This biographical sketch of Dr. Abernathy outlines his positions, recognitions, education, travel experience and personal life. Dr. Abernathy served as President of the SCLC after Dr. King's death and also served as a member of the NAACP, and Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc.

Elinor G. Galusha Request "I Have a Dream" by Dr. King 1966

Tuesday, September 6, 1966
Washington, D.C.

This is letter from Elinor G. Glusha requesting permission to reprint Dr. King's "I Have a Dream" speech in book titled "Words of Faith".

Atlanta Workshop in Nonviolence Newsletter

Tuesday, August 1, 1967
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY, Chicago, IL, San Francisco, CA, Boston, MA, California (CA), Illinois (IL), Georgia (GA), Massachusetts (MA), New York (NY), VIETNAM, Mississippi (MS), Washington, D.C., Connecticut (CT), CANADA

This newsletter, Volume I Number 4, is published by Henry and Sue Bass of Atlanta. They write about the Atlanta Peace Parade, an anti-Vietnam protest to take place on August 6, 1967. The Atlanta Peace Parade would become the south's first major peace parade, about which the Basses write President Johnson was worried, calling for counter-demonstrations.

Hell (Definition)

Dr. King quotes Nikolai Berdyaev on the concept of hell.

Letter from Mrs. Frances Pauley to Albany Residents

Monday, July 30, 1962
Albany, GA, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Little Rock, AR

Mrs. Pauley provides a call to action amidst the troubles in Georgia so that everyone can participate to resolve the troubles.

Letter from Harry Daniels to President Johnson

Sunday, December 25, 1966
Washington, D.C.

Harry Daniels sends a copy of his letter to President Johnson to Dr. King, granting him permission to reprint it in his publications. In the letter, Daniels urges that in order to advance the freedom and equality of the United States, we must end poverty.

Letter from MLK to Keith Black

Thursday, June 9, 1966
Minnesota (MN), Chicago, IL, Alabama (AL)

Dr. King thanks Keith Black and the Valley Community Presbyterian Church for their contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, stating the progress and upcoming goals of the organization.

Letter from Miss McDonald to Mr. Virginia M. Burke

Tuesday, May 10, 1966
Milwaukee, WI

Miss McDonald writes to Mr. Burke of the University of Wisconsin granting permission to quote Dr. King's historical "I Have a Dream" speech.

Letter from Agnes Mack to MLK

Sunday, November 24, 1963
Florida (FL)

Agnes Mack writes Dr. King to request a copy of his "I Have a Dream" speech from the March on Washington. She also encourages him to continue in his efforts.

Letter from Preston Smith to MLK

Wednesday, June 6, 1962
Ohio (OH), Virginia (VA)

Preston Smith of the Program Committee of Zion Baptist Church inquires if Dr. King can speak to the people of Parkersburg, West Virginia.

Letter from Abby Seldes to MLK

Pennsylvania (PA), Washington, D.C.

Young Abby Seldes writes Dr. King to inform him of how inspirational his words are. Seldes mentions that she is a 12-years-old from Pennsylvania and an avid supporter of Dr. King's leadership. She also discusses her parents' participation in the March on Washington.

Proposed Nobel Speech

SWEDEN

This is a draft for an optional version of Dr. King's Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech. He notes the importance of viewing the world as a family and with such perception, understands race issues as an international concern. King also speaks of Sir Alfred Bernhard Nobel, the originator of the Nobel Peace Prize. He accepts the award on behalf of those who came before him and those who continue to fight for freedom.