The Archive

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"Los Angeles, California"

Letter from Eleanor Allen to MLK

Wednesday, November 20, 1963

Eleanor Allen, Director of Christian Education of the Edgewood Congregational Church, writes Dr. King in an effort to connect with a Pastor of a Negro church that is in need of rebuilding "after the recent bombings."

American Nurses' Association Names Judges for Integration Award

Friday, September 1, 1967

The American Nurses' Association announces its panel of judges for the 1968 Mary Mahoney Award, which honors progress in integration and nursing.

Revolution In The Classroom

Friday, March 31, 1967

Dr. King addresses the Georgia Teachers and Education Association about the education of children in the South.

Letter from Sandra Greenia to MLK

Monday, November 4, 1963

Sandra Greenia requests that Dr. King send her some information regarding integration. She emphasizes that she gained a lot by living in various integrated U.S. Naval Bases.

Letter from O. O. Rabb to MLK

Monday, March 27, 1967

This note and newspaper clipping from O.O. Robb was addressed to "The Right Reverend Martin Luther King, Pastor & Civil Rights Agitator." Robb assures Dr. King that he would, in fact, find supporters, "for there are many soft-headed wild-eyed people who have a soft heart and no brains who will follow." Robb contines that President Johnson's Great Society and War on Poverty must go on and ends that Dr. King and his supporters will get their reward - a prison cell.

"Insight and Outlook..Negro Road to Power"

In this article, Joseph Kraft discusses the influences of Blacks voting.

Telegram from MLK to Jack Greenberg

Dr. King informs Jack Greenberg that he agrees with a plan to dissolve the Leadership Conference.

Anti-Poverty Expenditures that Cheat Federal Taxpayers and the Poor

Harry G. and Elizabeth R. Brown express their concerns about housing in America. They claim that while open housing will help Negroes who can afford it, those who cannot will continue to live in slums. They pose the idea of reforming the tax policy as a solution to this problem.

Letter from Mildred Lynch to MLK

Saturday, November 25, 1967

Secretary of the Canadian Anti-Apartheid Committee Mrs. Mildred Lynch inquires about Dr. King's availability to join group members for an upcoming 1968 public meeting to be held in Toronto.

Letter from William S. Stein to MLK

Friday, May 6, 1966

William Stein informs Dr. King that the Executive Council of the Episcopal Church will be contributing to SCLC.

Letter from Harold Swank to Helen Brooks Regarding Financial Assistance

Friday, August 6, 1965

Harold O. Swank, director of the State of Illinois Department of Public Aid, writes Helen Brooks regarding her request for financial assistance and housing.

Letter from Gerold Newmark to MLK

Monday, April 10, 1967

In this letter, Mr. Newmark requests a copy of the speech Dr. King delivered in New York City on Vietnam.

Letter from Hubert Marshall to MLK

Wednesday, August 28, 1963

Hubert Marshall writes Dr. King enclosing a contribution to the SCLC. Marshall states the Reverend's address in Washington was one of the most moving speeches he has ever heard.

SCLC Annual Conference Registration

Monday, September 11, 1961

Wyatt Tee Walker, Executive Director of the SCLC, sent this letter to associates of the SCLC prior to the 1961 Annual Convention held in Nashville, Tennessee. The letter included registration cards for the event with a request to RSVP immediately.

Eartha, Verbal Tempest, Flies to Los Angeles

This article references statements made by entertainer Eartha Kitt during a White House luncheon for women. Kitt expressed her concerns about the impact of the Vietnam War on American families and their sons.

Letter from Ethel Harvey to MLK

Tuesday, February 6, 1968

Ethel Harvey writes to Dr. King regarding her desire to support the Civil Rights Movement. She then expresses her ideas towards resolving tension between whites and black relations.

Desegregation and the Future

Saturday, December 15, 1956

This document contains the first eight pages of Dr. King's address at the annual luncheon of the National Committee for Rural Schools at New York's Commodore Hotel in 1956. In it, he condemns segregation as an evil which has been allowed to exist in American life for too many decades. Dr. King points out that many states now stand in opposition to desegregation, and the federal government and the Supreme Court must now face how to make this new legislation a reality.

Memorandum from Benjamin F. Payton Regarding Meredith Mississippi March

Benjamin F. Payton, Executive Director of the Commission on Religion and Race of the National Council of Churches, constructs this document as a debriefing on the Meredith Mississippi March. It is evident that the march is symbolic of the nation's struggle with racial conflict and aims to dismantle fear among African American voter registration. James Meredith, Mississippi citizen and first African American to desegregate the University of Mississippi, had organized and led the march.

Flyer Advertising SCLC Benefit

Harry Belafonte and his "entire company" host a full evening of entertainment for an SCLC benefit.

Letter to MLK from Paul Feldman

Friday, January 26, 1968

Paul Feldman is writing Dr. King about the new release of Michael Harrington's pamphlet "American Power in the Twentieth Century."

Pueblo Poll: "King's Vietnam Opinion Lacks Majority Support"

Sunday, May 7, 1967

This article contains opinions from various residents of Pueblo, CO, concerning Dr. King's position on the Vietnam War.

Dr. King Sermon Outline - "Choose Life"

This handwritten document is an outline of a sermon entitled "Choose Life."

Letter to Mr. Wilkinson from Dr. Schrade

Monday, May 3, 1965

Dr. Schrade asks Mr. Wilkinson in the NAACP office in New York to pass on a request for Dr. King to write an article for his magazine. Previous Nobel Prize winners have submitted an autograph photo and a short biography to the magazine. In additional to the requested article, Dr. Schrade hopes Dr. King will do the same.

The Black Revolution

This pamphlet produced by the SCLC is an excerpt from Thomas Merton's "The Black Revolution: Letters to a White Liberal." Merton seeks to awaken the conscience of white America by presenting the Negro perspective in the struggle for civil rights. He discusses how Dr. King utilizes the philosophy of nonviolence as a tool of progress and the contrasting reaction of Negros based upon their religious association as either Christian or Muslim. The concluding message is a call for the complete reform of America's social system which permits and breeds injustice.

Letter from Angilcan Students' Federation to MLK

Tuesday, August 17, 1965

Stephen Hayes, of the National Union of South African Students, invites Dr. King to speak at their open national congress. The subject of discussion is "The Role of the Christian Student in the Struggle for Social Justice." Hayes does fear that the South African government might refuse to grant Dr. King a visa if he accepts the invitation.

Invitation from the Council on Human Relations of Greater Atlanta Dinner Meeting

Monday, January 8, 1968

On behalf of the Council on Human Relations of Greater Atlanta, Chairman Mrs. John W. Stanley extends an invitation to an upcoming dinner meeting where Mrs. Eliza Paschall, Executive Director of the Community Relations Commission of the City of Atlanta, will be honored. Morehouse College President Emeritus Dr. Benjamin E. Mays is scheduled to discuss "Black Power versus White Power" with the attendees.

Daily News: NAACP Anti-South Propaganda Article

Thursday, March 5, 1959

The author writes about a secret meeting that was held at the NAACP's headquarters regarding race identification.

Letter from Jacques Muhlethaler to MLK

Thursday, May 25, 1967

The EIP, an association which seeks to establish the greatest number of schools in the world, asks Dr. King to become a member of their Board of Patrons.

Photograph Outline for "Why We Can't Wait"

This draft outlines the images and captions used in Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait." Some of the material incorporated includes images and descriptions of Dr. King at the 1963 March on Washington, the Birmingham Campaign, other heavily involved civil rights leaders, and Dr. King's family.

Letter from Bernard Hollowood to MLK about Writing an Article

Thursday, July 28, 1966

"Punch" editor Bernard Hollowood asks Dr. King to write an article focusing on the following question: "Is America capable of solving its own race problems?" The article would be part of a series of articles focusing on whether the United States can be trusted as leader of the Western World.