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Letter to MLK Requesting Information to Rebut Allegations of Communist Affiliation

Wednesday, February 16, 1966

Ernest O. Norquist, Director of the Commission on Religion and Race of the Illinois Synod of the Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A., commends Dr. King for his recent speech at Illinois Wesleyan University. He alerts Dr. King of the Birch Society’s attempts to spread allegations of his communist’s affiliations, and recommends a booklet refuting the charges and offers to help prepare and print it. Norquist requests a meeting with Dr. King in Chicago for himself, and other executive members of the Illinois Council of Churches to discuss how they can support Dr. King’s work.

Letter from Florida Congressman Dante B. Fascell to MLK

Friday, July 9, 1965

Representative Fascell informs Dr. King that he will vote against the McCulloch Amendment to the Voting Rights Bill of 1965, but he will vote for the bill itself.

Pamphlet on Benjamin E. Mays

Benjamin E. Mays, the President of Morehouse College, is highlighted in this pamphlet.

Letter from William T. Chapman to MLK

Friday, January 15, 1965

William T. Chapman, a member of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity of Knoxville College, requests Dr. King's response concerning his involvement with their program.

Coronet Magazine: After Desegregation-What

Sunday, January 1, 1961

In this draft of an article for Coronet Magazine, Dr. King outlines the challenges that Negro college students will face after desegregation and the impact of the student movement as a whole. He argues that desegregation is not the same as integration, but that the former must happen in order for the latter to exist. Dr. King also explains that Negro students are gaining a much richer education by participating in sit-ins and other civil rights demonstrations, which will prepare them for society once desegregation is a reality.

Notre Dame Law School Library Letter to MLK

Wednesday, April 19, 1967

Miss Boller, the law school library assistant of Notre Dame, inquires about a recent speech by Dr. King concerning his perspective on the United States and violence.

Letter from Alma Weil to MLK

Thursday, August 11, 1966

Alma Weil expresses deep intolerance for prejudice and further discloses a desire to support Dr. King's efforts.

Program for Ecumenical Service in Storkyrkan

The following document is a program for an ecumenical service held at Storkyrkan in Stockholm, Sweden. Dr. King provided the sermon for the service that was translated in the Swedish native language.

Letter from Mr. & Mrs. Ernest Geerten to MLK

Monday, April 17, 1967

Mr. & Mrs. Ernest Geerten express their appreciation for Dr. King's address at Riverside Church and extend their complete support.

Letter from Eulah M. Eubank to MLK

Monday, February 19, 1968

In this letter, Eulah Eubank writes Dr. King regarding the Washington, D.C. Camp-In. She states she is "not...opposed" to marches and sit-ins, but feels that the Camp-In would be counter-productive. She believes it "will ad [sic] fuel to fires the extremists are trying build."

Letter from Steve Rubicz to MLK

Thursday, September 20, 1962

Steve Rubicz, of the Student Peace Union at the University of Washington, invites Dr. King to join a "speakers circuit" that will travel to a number of colleges in the Pacific Northwest.

Letter from Frances Witherspoon to MLK

Monday, July 17, 1967

Frances Witherspoon offers his or her thanks and praise to Dr. King's new book and efforts in promoting racial unity.

Letter from H. W. Brown to MLK

Wednesday, October 24, 1962

H. W. Brown, a pastor at Bethel Baptist Church and proponent of Bahamas' Progressive Liberal Party, writes to Dr. King, asking him to be their honored speaker at a pre-election rally. Brown asks if Dr. King would also deliver the sermon at his church the morning of the rally.

Letter from Dinkar Sakrikar to MLK

Monday, October 18, 1965

Dinkar Sakrikar writes Dr. King in reference to a proposed statue of Gandhi for a children's park. The statue seeks to reflect friendly relations between India and the United States. They ask Dr. King for his consideration along with a swift response.

Youth in the World of Work

Daniel H. Kruger describes many aspects of current labor trends in regards to automation, education and employment ratios in the United States.

Letter from Leonard Kane to MLK

Monday, March 15, 1965

Leonard Kane, Chairman of the Democratic Town Committee, sends Dr. King a financial contribution on behalf of the committee. He also expresses the importance of democracy for all.

MLK to Bill Moyers of Newsday

Friday, May 19, 1967

Dr. King writes to Bill Moyers of NEWSDAY and apologizes for not responding to his letter in a timely manner.

Letter from D. E. Goorman to MLK

Saturday, February 17, 1968

D. E. Goorman advises Dr. King on how to promote peace, freedom and economic security for all US citizens. He suggests "appealing to the moral conscience" of the majority while implementing an economic action plan.

Justice in Mississippi

Dora McDonald records notes by Dr. King concerning an unjust ruling in Mississippi. He claims that more legislation is needed to enable the federal courts to prosecute these crimes.

Telegram from MLK to Robert Kennedy

Monday, June 4, 1962

Dr. King issues an urgent request for Robert Kennedy's immediate involvement in the prosecution of four students who were arrested while engaged in a peaceful demonstration in Jackson, Mississippi. Dr. King has also received information of gross violations of the students' constitutional rights.

Jesus: Mission

Dr. King notes passages in Matthew and Luke related to Jesus' mission.

Letter from MLK to Mary M. Drummond

Thursday, July 18, 1963

Dr. King thanks Ms. Drummond for her supportive correspondence regarding "Letter from Birmingham Jail." He states that the opportunity to fight racial injustice is a "rare privilege" and regards his open letter as an attempt to examine racial inequity under the lens of Christian ethics.

Congratulatory Telegram to Thurgood Marshall from MLK

Tuesday, June 13, 1967

Dr. King congratulates Thurgood Marshall on being appointed to the US Supreme Court. Dr. King also emphasizes that Marshall's position is a major advancement towards a color-blind society.

Letter from Carol Thomas to MLK

Saturday, February 24, 1968

Carol Thomas writes Dr. King to inform him that she is making a donation to help with the war on poverty. Enclosed with the letter is a $125.00 check. She also explains that she received one of King's books in the mail. Ms. Thomas further inquires of the purchasing and mailing information of books made to the public.

Memorandum from SCLC Personnel Committee to the Steering Committee

Wednesday, March 13, 1968

SCLC's Personnel Committee conducts a meeting to review the release of William Whitsett from Department of Information. The meeting resulted in the committee's unanimous decision to send a list of recommendations for the Steering Committee to review.

Correspondence: Letter to Dr.King from Miss Marelda G. Fontenot (Jan. 8, 1965)

Thursday, January 7, 1965

In this letter Marelda Fontenot encloses a copy of the school paper, "The Paraclete." The paper features an article about Dr. King receiving the Nobel Peace Price. She offers her sincere gratitude and admiration for Dr. King and his accomplishments.

Thank You Letter from MLK to Lilace Reid Barnes

Monday, May 23, 1966

Dr. King expresses his deep appreciation for the contribution made by Lilace Barnnes to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Dr. King states that without the contributions from supporters the initiatives of the SCLC would not be possible.

Letter from Howard R. Neville to MLK

Tuesday, June 29, 1965

Michigan State provost, Howard Neville, tells Dr. King that Dr. Robert Green is available for a one year leave of absence for the Neighborhood Leader Training Program.

United Auto Workers Convention Speech

Monday, May 1, 1961

Dr. King delivered this speech at the 1961 United Automobile Workers convention. He highlights the changes that have taken place in organized labor. He also connects the organized labor movement to equal opportunity in housing and the political process.

1964 Election

Dr. King explains "a sizable number of Negro voters" will register for the 1964 presidential election, recognizing the significance of political participation.