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"Los Angeles, CA"

Letter from J. Percy to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967
New Jersey (NJ)

J. Percy sends Dr. King an unpleasant note asserting that he is always complaining. Percy also wishes that Dr. King would stop talking about slums.

Draft Letter from MLK to Mr. Makola

VIETNAM, SOUTH AFRICA

Dr. King thanks Mr. Makola for reminding him of the "injustices and inequalities" Negroes face both in the United States and South Africa. Dr. King asserts that the issues Negroes face are symptoms of a deeper issue involving foreign policy and that his current focus is on the Vietnam War.

Letter from Mary T. Clark to MLK

Wednesday, November 11, 1964
New York (NY)

This letter from the Social Action Secretariat, National Federation of Catholic College Students references an enclosed letter which was issued to all member colleges. The enclosed letter supports student activity in the 1964 Freedom Fast.

Letter from Major J. Jones to MLK

Wednesday, October 9, 1963
Tennessee (TN), Chattanooga, TN, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

Major J. Jones wishes to confirm Dr. King's speaking engagement at the Jobs and Freedom Conference in Chattanooga, Tennessee on November 13, 1963.

Letter from John Vannorsdall to Dora McDonald

Monday, September 25, 1967
Pennsylvania (PA)

Gettysburg College Chaplain, Mr. Vannorsdall, writes Ms. McDonald concerning the grounds of Dr. King's travel arrangements to speak at the college. He reassures Ms. McDonald of Dr. King's minimal travel time and further discloses his accommodations.

Letter from Cornell's L. Paul Jaquith to MLK

Monday, November 7, 1960
New York (NY), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), New Jersey (NJ)

L. Paul Jaquith writes Dr. King regarding his upcoming visit to Cornell University. The student body seeks to discuss issues relating to the inequality of opportunities for Negroes in the United States.

The Power of Nonviolence

Thursday, May 1, 1958
Montgomery, AL, Berkeley, CA

Dr. King delivers this address to the YMCA and YWCA in the Bay Area of California. The power of nonviolence is discussed being intertwined with the knowledge of agape, love and maladjustment. Agape can be defined as an understanding of the redemptive good will of all men. In relation to maladjustment, Dr. King explains how he never intended to adjust himself to segregation and discrimination. Dr. King expounds on how justice strengthened the Montgomery movement. He further explains how the powerful influence of love is a significant factor in the practice of nonviolence.

Letter from MLK to Herman Strase

GERMANY, SOUTH AFRICA

Dr. King writes to Mr. Herman Strase expressing his appreciation for an earlier letter that including sentiments to extend justice to all people regardless of race. The Reverend states that he agrees with Strase regarding the demand of Christianity in the expression of compassion and love for all people, no matter their race.

Letter from Carey B. Joynt to Rev. Carroll D. Payne

Tuesday, June 20, 1967
Georgia (GA), VIETNAM, CHINA, INDIA, JAPAN, THAILAND, London, England, Washington, D.C.

In this letter, dated June 20, 1967, Carey Joynt asks Rev. Carroll Payne to review her rough draft regarding the Vietnam War and Ramsey's ideas. She has simplified the arguments to the best of her abilities and hopes that Payne can offer suggestions for her draft.

SCLC Form Letters

The first letter states that Dr. King is out of the city for a few days. The second letter expresses gratitude for the recipient's moral support and Christian generosity.

Letter from Bond R. Faulwell to MLK

Friday, November 8, 1963
Iowa (IA)

Faulwell, a freshman at Grinnell College, is writing a term paper on civil rights for a political science course and requests advice from Dr. King as an "acknowledged leader" of the protest movement.

Invitation to President Johnson's Inauguration

Washington, D.C.

Dr. King receives an invitation to attend and participate in the Inauguration of President Lyndon B. Johnson and Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey.

Letter from Malsenia Armstrong to MLK

Wednesday, September 6, 1967
Atlanta, GA

Miss Malsenia Armstrong writes to Dr. King requesting help with a "Legislative Action Project" pertaining to Southern Displaced Teachers.

Dairy Agrees to Double Number of Negro Workers

Wednesday, June 22, 1966
Chicago, IL

Operation Breadbasket shares an article on the organization's letterhead, which appeared in the Chicago Sun-times. The article highlights the end of a boycott after Mellody Dairy announces a decision to more than double its Negro employees.

Letter from Arthur C. Holden to MLK Requesting Publication Review

Monday, December 11, 1967
New York, NY

Arthur C. Holden sends his paper entitled "The Negro, The Small Group, And Our Slum Problem" to Dr. King for review.

March On Mississippi

Saturday, July 1, 1967
Mississippi (MS)

Florence Fyall describes a scene of violence on peaceful demonstrators in her poem entitled March On Mississippi."

Letter from MLK to Alyce Bledsoe

Monday, July 12, 1965
California (CA)

Dr. King thanks the Women's Auxiliary to the Charles R. Drew Medical Society for its contribution to the SCLC. The contribution will be used to send California students to assist in voter registration projects.

Letter from MLK to Harry Belafonte

Tuesday, July 23, 1963
Washington, D.C., CANADA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, California (CA), New York (NY)

Dr. King writes Harry Belafonte to discuss the date, time, and occasion for the March on Washington. Dr. King also expresses his desire for Belafonte to be present.

God

Dr. King quotes Plato's views regarding God.

Letter from Victor Lebow to MLK

Friday, September 15, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY

Victor Lebow, owner of a marketing firm, writes Dr. King to propose a business venture that could benefit the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and the African American community. The venture could provide income for the organization and aid in employing African Americans.

Letter from Secretary to Joan Regarding the Rights to "Strength to Love"

Monday, June 15, 1964

In this letter, the secretary asks Joan the status of the Japanese Edition to "Strength To Love", since Dr. King hadn't had the time to write the preface.

Letter from R. Lennox to MLK

Wednesday, November 25, 1964
CANADA, New York, NY

Dr. King is invited to deliver the main address for The Presbyterian College of Montreal's Annual Convocation in April of 1965. The institution will be preparing to celebrate its 100th Anniversary.

Walter Winchell: Man Doing A Column

South Carolina (SC), New York (NY), California (CA)

In part of this edition of his syndicated gossip column, Walter Winchell briefly criticizes SNCC in the irreverent style for which he was known.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Curtis Barge

Friday, September 24, 1965
Chicago, IL

In this letter addressed to Rev. Barge and Friends, of the Northern Illinois Ministerial Association. Dr. King expresses his gratitude for a contribution to the SCLC. Dr. King explains the current endeavors of the organization and conveys the importance of their contribution.

Western Union Telegram from Barrington Dunbar to MLK

Friday, November 3, 1967
Birmingham, AL, New York (NY)

In this telegram, Barrington Dunbar of the peace and social committee from New York, informs Dr. King of the support from his religious society.

Letter from MLK to Lenn Latham

Ohio (OH)

Dr. King expresses gratitude for support of his work and advises that nonviolence is the only way to achieve change.

Letter to Dr. Abernathy from Rev. Parker

Wednesday, May 1, 1968
California (CA), Los Angeles, CA

Rev. Ralph Abernathy, President of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, received this correspondence following the assassination of Dr. King. In this letter, Rev. Richard Parker of the St. Cross Episcopal Church in California, highlighted his interest in a television interview of Mrs. King, shown on the day of Dr. King's funeral.

How Modern Christians Should Think of Man

New York, NY

In the early 1950's, Dr. King writes a paper elaborating on how modern Christians should think about man. He discusses the difficulty of transition by idealizing the perception of man in a mild neo-orthodox or liberal view. Dr. King battles with having an optimistic view of man and the reality of his experiences in the south. He asserts that man is neither good nor bad by nature by has the potential for either. The objectivity of man as a finite child of nature is further expounded upon. He explains that man is rational, free, and a responsible being.

Memo from Clarence Jones to MLK

Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA), Tennessee (TN), North Carolina (NC)

Clarence Jones sends Dr. King an article regarding the increasing number of blacks being elected into local governments in the Deep South. Also included is in article informing readers that Jones has been named partner in a member firm of the New York Stock Exchange.

Letter from Alan Sapiro to MLK

Monday, April 17, 1967
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Alan Sapiro, Public Relations Officer of Bankers Trust Company, writes Dr. King enclosing a letter he wrote to the New York Times that contains comments the Reverend made during a Peace Rally press conference at the United Nations.