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A. Philip Randolph Institute Minutes

Tuesday, November 7, 1967

These meeting minutes of the Executive Board of the A. Philip Randolph Institute include discussions on the urgent need for legislative action on the Freedom Budget, a possible theoretical and analytical magazine on the Negro struggle for equality, and celebration of Mr. Randolph's 80th birthday.

Letter Dated 12/4/62 from MLK's Secretary to Melvin Arnold

Tuesday, December 4, 1962

In this correspondence to Mr. Melvin Arnold, Miss Dora McDonald, at the request of Dr. King, informed Mr. Arnold that Dr. King was still working on his sermons for publication. She also stated that Dr. King had a meeting later that afternoon on December 12, 1962 and would like to scheduled a meeting with Rev. Wallis for earlier that day.

Church, Negro

Dr. King provides insight on the interaction between the church and the Negro youth.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

The anonymous author details some of the hardships of his life and expresses his desire to incarcerate Dr. King permanently.

Definition of Christianity

Dr. King records a definition of Christianity. He defines Christianity as the belief in the "potential good in human nature."

Telegram from Harry Van Arsdale to MLK While in Jaill

Monday, October 24, 1960

Harry Van Asrdale, President of the New York City Central Labor Council, informs Dr. King that the organization has voted to demand the release of Dr. King and others from Fulton County Jail. He states that the arrest violates "basic constitutional rights" and that the Council fully supports the fight to end discrimination and segregation in the United States.

How Do You View Progress in School Desegregation?

In this rough draft of an article written by Gene Roberts of the New York Times, Roberts expresses his optimistic and realistic views of the progress being made in integrating schools.

Women's International League for Peace and Freedom Newsletter

This issue of the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom newsletter, Four Lights, was sent to Coretta Scott King. It features an article about the current state of their demonstrations against Vietnam, including a quote by Dr. Benjamin Spock calling on President Johnson to end the attack on the Vietnam War.

The United Ministries

The prayer ask for God to help people become stronger in Christ while saving them from the evil and violence within the world.

Freedom

Dr. King quotes Tillich in sketching his views on man's freedom in relation to destiny.

Royalty Statement from Harper & Row Publishers for MLK

Saturday, December 31, 1966

This royalty statement from Harper & Row Publishers, details earnings for Dr. King's book "Strength to Love," for the six-month period ending 12/31/66.

Telegram from Rodney Clurman to MLK

Rodney Clurman writes to Dr. King concerning recent updates with regard to political and social agendas. He concludes by requesting a wire transfer to his current location in New York City.

Letter from Robert Birley to MLK

Wednesday, March 20, 1968

Robert Birley invites Dr. King to give an address at a program in London. Mr. Birley informs Dr. King of the four topics that will be discussed and requests that Dr. King address the topic of racial discrimination.

The Future of Integration

Friday, August 21, 1959

Dr. King discusses the various forms of segregation and the corresponding legislative acts that affect African Americans at the National Convention of the Fellowship of Reconciliation. King also provides details of how he hopes integration will take place.

International Brotherhood of Teamsters Flyer

This flyer from the International Brotherhood of Teamsters, which includes a quotation from Dr. King, encourages membership in the organization.

Letter to MLK from Eugene Exman of Harper & Brothers, Feb. 15, 1962

Thursday, February 15, 1962

Eugene Exman, of Harper & Brothers, addressed this letter to Dr. King informing him that his first book, "STRIDE TOWARD FREEDOM" was chosen as one of 500 books in President Kennedy's collection at the White House. The decision, regarding Dr. King's book was made by the American Booksellers Association. Mr. Exman, lastly, inquired about Dr. King's progress on a manuscript for his second book.

Symbolic Mountains

On the stationary of the Waldorf-Astoria hotel in New York, Dr. King outlines a sermon entitled "Symbolic Mountains." These include the mountains of ethical relations, practical materialism, indifference concerning poverty, and racial segregation.

SCLC: Summary Of Ninth Annual Convention

This summary of the SCLC's Ninth Annual Convention describes events that were instrumental in the formation of the organization. The document outlines the ongoing projects of the organization and offers proposals for future efforts.

Letter from MLK to Mr. and Mrs. E. M. Schiltz

Tuesday, October 12, 1965

Dr. King thanks Mr. and Mrs. Schiltz for their financial contribution to the SCLC. He explains the current efforts of the organization and the significance of their contribution.

Letter from Herman Schuchman to MLK

Thursday, June 22, 1967

Herman Schuchman writes Dr. King on behalf of the American Orthopsychiatric Association to invite him to their annual meetings in the spring of 1968. The association is interested in presenting a program that involves the issues of war, civil rights and human rights. They request Dr. King share his intellect and experiences surrounding the civil rights issues in the United States.

Newspaper Clippings from New York and New Jersey

These newspaper clippings represent the views of several individuals who are critical of the Black Power Movement, the work ethics of African Americans and the government's policies.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Silas Norman of SNCC

Wednesday, July 21, 1965

Dora McDonald writes Silas Norman of SNCC to explain that Dr. King is currently touring several cities on the People-to-People tour and will be presiding over the SCLC convention. She informs him that his letter will be brought to Dr. King's attention upon his return.

Letters To Mrs. Fillmore from MLK

Thursday, April 19, 1962

Dr. King responds to Mrs. Fillmore's previous letter, offering some suggestions to help her. He apologizes that he cannot use SCLC funds because that money is currently in use for the civil rights struggle. Dr. King suggests alternative organizations and programs that may offer her assistance.

Anticommunist Flyer

This flyer suggests that the U.N. consists of communists Jews. Several contacts are provided for Americans to receive support and be educated about Communism.

Letter from MLK to Mr. & Mrs. Charles Digioia

Monday, October 24, 1966

Dr. King expresses his sincere gratitude for the sculpture of John Henry that was created and sent to him by Mr. & Mrs. Digioia. As intended by the artist, the art work embodies the magnificence of strength and courage held with in the oppressed. Honored to accept it, Dr. King sees John Henry as an inspirational symbol of will and spirit.

Letter from CORE to MLK

Friday, February 2, 1968

The Kansas City, Missouri Chapter of CORE writes to Dr. King inviting him to attend their Negro History Week program.

Letter from Lynne Ansorge to MLK

Lynne Ansorge invites Dr. King to Lawrence College. He also tells Dr. King about the issues that have been occurring in their community.

Letter from Robert Sandberg from MLK

Robert Sandberg criticizes Dr. King for his recent statements on the Vietnam War. Mr. Sandberg states that Dr. King's position has now undermined his effectiveness as a leader in the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Carmen Rivera to Mrs. King 4/5/68

Carmen Rivera, a young girl from NYC, writes to Mrs. King to offer her condolences after the assasination of Dr. King.

SCLC Newsletter: June-July 1965

Thursday, July 1, 1965

The cover story for this 1965 SCLC Newsletter features Dr. King leading a March in Chicago, and also includes the usual wide gamut of Civil Rights Movement issues. Editor Ed Clayton's column discusses the "loss of fear" among Negroes, who "never again will be systematically excluded from office, or driven back from the voting booth."