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Letter to Mr. R.C. Firestone

Sunday, January 22, 1967
Albany, GA, Ohio (OH)

An unknown author writes to Mr. R. C. Firestone stating how delightful it is to hear that the Firestone Company plans to build a new plant in Albany, Ga.

Letter from MLK to Sara B. Jackson

Friday, April 13, 1956
New York, NY

Dr. King extends gratitude to Mrs. Jackson for her moral and financial support.

Letter from MLK to Frances H. Vicario

Monday, February 26, 1968
New York (NY), New York, NY, Washington, D.C.

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Mrs. Vicario and the Chemical Bank New York Trust Company for their generous contribution to the SCLC. He explains how the contribution will help in a time of need as the SCLC enters the critical phase of their ten-year ministry.

Letter of Support to MLK

Wednesday, January 3, 1962

Although unable to send financial support, the author expresses "intense admiration" for Dr. King's leadership and courage.

Letter from Claudie Erleigh to MLK

Wednesday, October 5, 1966
Johannesburg, South Africa, Atlanta, GA

On behalf of the NUSAS Local Committee, Claudie Erleigh writes Dr. King requesting that he submit an article for the "NUSAS Journal." Dr. King's entry would extend further beyond the "general interest." The committee has also invited other influential leaders, such as Senator Robert F. Kennedy, to contribute to this journal.

Letter From A. S. Raman to MLK

Thursday, December 8, 1966
INDIA, Indiana (IN)

In this letter, Raman invites Dr. King to be a part of a discussion in the anniversary issue of the Indian Republic by contributing about 800 to the article.

Manifesto of the Meredith Mississippi March

Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King, Stokely Carmichael, and Floyd McKissick sign the Manifesto of the Meredith Mississippi March, which represents a "public indictment and protest of the failure of American society." In solidarity, they demand courses of actions to deal with voting fraud, strengthened civil rights legislation, and impartial application of the law.

Letter from Alan Campbell to MLK

Friday, July 26, 1963
Illinois (IL), Atlanta, GA

Alan B. Campbell writes Dr. King to express his appreciation for the address "Paul's letter to American Christians," which he hopes to republish in national journals such as Readers' Digest.

A Program of Education in the Philosophy of Non-Violence

California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

The American Foundation on Non-Violence and the SCLC outline a proposal to the Stern Family Fund to educate America on the philosophy of non-violence. The proposed program includes a semi-annual leadership seminar, community leaders conferences, and youth and student workshops.

Injunction from the City of Birmingham

Atlanta, GA, Ohio (OH), Cincinnati, OH, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

Several members of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, including Dr. King, receive a temporary injunction from the City of Birmingham.

National Student Christian Federation Bulletin

Monday, February 29, 1960
New York, NY, Nashville, TN, Ohio (OH), New York (NY)

The National Student Christian Federation released several bulletins and informational letters regarding the student demonstrations in the 1960s. Herluf Jensen, General Secretary of the NSCF, provides readers with the progress of different trials related to the movement, arrest statistics and institutions involved. Obtaining strong civil rights legislation through Congress is discussed as well.

Letter from MLK to High School Students

Dr. King writes some high school students to inform them of his inability to attend their graduation. He also offers some words of encouragement.

Letter to Coretta Scott King from Public School 33 Manhattan's Student Council

Wednesday, April 10, 1968
New York, NY, Memphis, TN

The Student Council of Public School 33 in Manhattan, NY, wrote this letter of condolence to Mrs. King. The council pledged to practice Dr. King's principles on nonviolence and mentioned how impressed they were to see Mrs. King on television, following Dr. King's death.

Letter from Thomas Brown to MLK

Tuesday, August 6, 1963
Washington, D.C.

Thomas Brown, III, the Chairman of the Junior Bar Section of the Bar Association of the District of Columbia, sends a follow up letter to Dr. King regarding an invitation to speak. Brown attempts to appeal to Dr. King by listing prominent individuals that have previously spoke for the organization.

Reason (William James)

Dr. King quotes William James' "The Variety of Religious Experience."

Pass The Ammunition

Ernie Sheffield voices his opinion on the "Department of War Violence and Brute Force" and the spending of a billion dollars a week on violence. He states that in their spending of valuable money not "even a dime" has been spent on a "Department of Peace, Goodwill and Coexistence."

Letter from Edna Hedrick to MLK

Sunday, November 8, 1964
Michigan (MI)

Edna Hedrick, writing on behalf of the Ypsilanti, MI, branch of the NAACP, congratulates Dr. King for being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Royalty Statement from Joan Daves to MLk

Wednesday, January 31, 1968
New York, NY

In this document, Dr. King's literary agent, Joan Daves, forwards a royalty statement, for the French editions of Dr. King's books "Why We Can't Wait" and "Strength to Love."

Immortality

Dr. King quotes philosopher John Fiske regarding the topic of immortality.

Letter from Mayor El-Khatib of Jerusalem to MLK

Tuesday, January 24, 1967
ISRAEL

Rouhi El-Khatib, the Mayor of Jerusalem, Jordan, welcomes Dr. King to the city in advance of a pilgrimage planned for November 1967. At the time of this letter, East Jerusalem was part of Jordan and West Jerusalem was Israeli territory. During the 1967 Six-Day War, Israeli occupied and annexed East Jerusalem, but that annexation is not recognized by the international community.

Letter from Carl E. Farris to William Rutherford

Wednesday, December 27, 1967

Mr. Farris strongly rejects Mr. Rutherford's offered position to answer Dr. King's mail and to act as Deputy Director of CEP at board meetings.

Articles Regarding Strides Made in the Civil Rights Movement

Atlanta, GA, Cleveland, OH, Chicago, IL, Birmingham, AL, GRENADA, VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

This SCLC news bulletin published around 1964, discloses information regarding Dr. King and others staying in the Birmingham jail. Also included are updates on the progress of the Civil Rights Movement in various cities, additions and changes within the SCLC and relationships with familiar and notable personalities.

Knox, John

Dr. King gives brief biographical information on John Knox.

Notecard Regarding God

In this handwritten notecard, Dr. King gives a description of God.

Letter from Marjorie Heins to MLK and Dora McDonald

Thursday, September 14, 1967
New York, NY, VIETNAM, Washington, D.C., GERMANY

Marjorie Heins informs the SCLC that the Campaign for Disarmament, a peace group in Germany, requests for Dr. King to give 5-10 lectures for about 2,000 - 3,000 people.

Montesquieu

Dr. King references French social commentator Montesquieu regarding his ideas on history. King quotes, "He attempts to show how civilization has been modified by the action of the external world."

Telephone Log: January 22

Connecticut (CT), Massachusetts (MA), Washington, D.C., Virginia (VA), Atlanta, GA

This memo from the desk of Dr. King includes several missed telephone calls noted for his later response.

Letter from Robert Brandeis to MLK

Monday, June 12, 1967
San Francisco, CA

Robert Brandies expresses his support regarding the efforts of Dr. King and the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Reverend James A. Pike to MLK

Friday, September 9, 1966
California (CA), Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), London, England

Reverend James A. Pike, a famous American Episcopal Bishop, writes to Dr. King regarding an appearance at the University of Cambridge's Great St. Mary's.

Malcolm X Trio Still Marking Time Waiting for Trial

Wednesday, August 11, 1965
New York, NY, New York (NY)

This article documents the legal aftermath of the assassination of Malcolm X on February 21, 1965. It also discusses the three men accused of the killing and reports comments made by the lawyers involved in the case.