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Letter from James R. Cary to MLK

Friday, January 17, 1964

A representative from the Southwest Wisconsin Education Association invites Dr. King to serve as the keynote speaker at the organization's annual convention. The executive secretary tells Dr. King that they are interested in his "experience with education in the south and the entire United States," and feel that he would greatly enhance the convention by delivering the keynote speech. The sender also congratulates Dr. King on his recent "Man of the Year" honor by Time Magazine.

Telegram from MLK to Berry Gordy

Wednesday, April 12, 1967

Dr. King congratulates Berry Gordy, Jr. for being awarded the Business Achievement Award from the Interracial Council for Business Opportunity.

Letter from Joan Daves to Senora Barquero and Senor Medina Regarding Spanish Edition

Friday, May 1, 1964

In this letter from Joan Daves, Maria Antonia Barquero and Pedro Medina are informed that their request for a signed copy of Dr. King's book in which they translated into spanish is being forwarded to him.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, September 11, 1967

In this letter, Joan Daves informed Dr. King that “Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" would not be able to be converted into a paperback book. Joan Daves is Dr. King’s literary agent.

Letter from John Lewis to MLK

Saturday, April 11, 1964

John Lewis, chairman of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee and future Congressmen, writes to Dr. King to share his concerns regarding the need for an improved relationship between SNCC and SCLC.

Dr. E. Gallardo Letter Dr. King 1968

Tuesday, March 12, 1968

This is a letter to Dr. E. Gallardo from Dr. King thanking him for his one-hundred dollar contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Eugene Wolfe to MLK

Eugene Wolfe, Executive Director of the Council for Civic Unity, forwards Dr. King a check for SCLC from various religious and civic organizations in San Francisco.

Discrimination Act by a Licensee of the Illinois Department of Registration and Education

Saturday, April 16, 1966

The following is a complaint about an act of discrimination sent to the Illinois Department of Registration and Education from Mrs. McLouis Robinet and William Moyer.

Letter from Cheryl Chambers to MLK

Thursday, November 28, 1963

Cheryl Chambers asks Dr. King to send an autographed picture and a copy of his Letter from Birmingham Jail. She is doing a paper on civil rights for her government project and requests any available literature. Ms. Chambers, who is also a member of the NAACP Youth Council, informs Dr. King that the Council is getting ready to begin their membership drive and inquires if he has any helpful suggestions.

Letter from High School Student to MLK

Friday, November 3, 1967

Sheila Gavin is a high school student writing to Dr. King to inquire about his choice to be a part of the civil rights movement.

Gift from the Jersey City Chapter of the American Jewish Congress to MLK

The Jersey City Chapter of the Women's Division of the American Jewish Congress made a donation to the Louise Waterman Wise Youth Center in Jerusalem in Dr. King's name. They sent him this note, wishing him a very speedy recovery and good luck.

Letter from Wilford Tallie to Dr. King

Friday, January 28, 1966

Wilford Tallie, a Veteran at the West Side Veteran's Hospital, expresses his support for Dr. King's efforts in the SCLC Chicago Campaign.

Letter from E. H. Singmaster to MLK

Thursday, May 18, 1967

E.H. Singmaster informs Dr. King that they should "hang together" and not separate in war and peace. He advocates that those involved in the military are "improved," regardless of color or gender.

Letter from MLK to Howard O. Eaton

Wednesday, December 29, 1965

Dr. King writes Howard Eaton to explain that he will have his assistants read and brief him on the document due to his limited amount of time. He expresses that the document is a worthy contribution to the movement and he and his staff are appreciative.

Affidavit of Cleopatra Kennedy

Monday, April 15, 1963

After being arrested in Birmingham for "parading without a permit" in 1963, Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights singer Cleopatra Kennedy gave this notarized affidavit describing the incident.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Saul Sherman

Thursday, August 20, 1964

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Sherman for her financial contribution to the SCLC.

Letter from Laverne Gobble to MLK

Monday, September 19, 1966

Laverne B. Gobble encloses a publication entitled "Your Vote Makes a Difference," and informs Dr. King of the Votemobile schedule. She also expresses that if he is interested she can assist with educating members of his organization about voting.

A Memo from the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE)

Thursday, April 6, 1967

This memorandum written by Lincoln Lynch, Associate Director of the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE), outlines proposed travel arrangements, speakers, workshop topics and entertainment for the upcoming National Convention.

Toynbee

Dr. King quotes British historian Arnold J. Toynbee from his work "A Study of History."

Bifurcation of Nature

Dr. King notes Alfred North Whitehead's views on the bifurcation of nature into apparent and causal nature in "The Concept of Nature."

A Letter to MLK to President Lyndon B. Johsnon

Friday, April 13, 1962

In a letter to MLK, President Lyndon B. Johnson addresses the issue of Federal employment in Atlanta. Johnson informs King of the previous meeting held with the Civil Service Commission and the steps being taken to move forward.

The Domestic Impact of the War in America

Saturday, November 11, 1967

In his address to the National Labor Leadership Assembly for Peace, Dr. King parallels the war in Vietnam to the injustice and violence inflicted on urban dwelling American Negroes "goaded and infuriated by discrimination and neglect." King implores Congress and the Johnson Administration to reassess the nation's domestic priorities and institute anti-poverty programs, so that the Great Society does not deteriorate into a "troubled and confused society."

Letter from John Bolt Culbertson to MLK

Saturday, May 30, 1964

After great success with the first one, John Bolt Culbertson is sponsoring a second mass rally at the Greenville Municipal Auditorium and requests that Dr. King serve as the speaker for this event.

Letter from Water L. Hoston to SCLC

Saturday, October 28, 1967

Walter Hoston, of American Bridge Association, sends his company's contribution to the SCLC in support of their work for justice and equality.

MLK honored; He sees Kinship in Civil Rights and Family Planning

Dr. King receives the first Margaret Sanger Award in Human Rights at the National Conference. Dr. King states, "Negroes have a special and urgent concern with family planning as a profoundly important ingredient in their struggle for security and a decent life."

Royalty Statement from Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, October 9, 1964

Joan Daves sends Dr. King a royalty statement for "Stride Toward Freedom" and "Strength To Love."

Article in the Martin Luther King Column

Dr. King recognizes that the Committee for United Negro Relief will sponsor a luncheon to honor Mrs. Daisy Bates at the Waldorf-Astoria. Dr. King calls her the "heroine of the Battle for the Soul of Little Rock." He further describes contributions made by Mrs. Bates and her husband, along with the hardships they endured "in retaliation for their temerity in writing, speaking and fighting for freedom."

Letter from Philip Foubert to Joan Daves

Saturday, November 28, 1964

This letter dated November 28, 1964, was sent to Joan Daves from Philip Foubert. Foubert, editor of ECHO at Seattle Prep, writes to Joan Daves requesting that Dr. King write a "short letter, suitable for publication in our yearbook and addressed to the students of Seattle Prep."

Coretta Scott King - Soprano

Friday, July 10, 1959

This 1959 program features Mrs. King in concert. One section of the performance is entitled "Portrait of the Non-Violent Integration Movement in Montgomery."

Outline Written in MLK's Handwriting Entitled: Be Ye Perfect

The document, shown here, is a combination of a handwritten outline and notes for the preparation of a sermon. Under the title, "Be Ye Perfect", Dr. King described Jesus, in relation to rational and moral perfection.