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Anti-Poverty Bill

Tuesday, August 9, 1966

This document outlines and provides the status of the Anti-Poverty legislation in Congress.

Letter from Patterson Charles Jr. to Dora McDonald

Tuesday, June 6, 1967
Georgia (GA)

Patterson Charles, Jr. writes Dora McDonald asking for Dr. King's help regarding alleged racial discrimination in a legal matter.

MLK Notes on Ministers Arrest

Dr. King, protested the arrest of three ministers who were advocating for desegregation. He warned that individuals that did not take a stand against oppression will help push the South into 'fascism.'

Telegram to MLK from Various Organizational Leaders

Monday, June 19, 1967
Washington, D.C., New York, NY

Several organizational leaders request that Dr. King join them in Washington, D.C. for an event in which Ambassador Galbraith will address a luncheon with a "major statement on Vietnam."

Debit Memo from Joan Daves to MLK

Wednesday, March 1, 1967
New York, NY

This is a debit memo for "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?"

Letter to the Honorable Jerome Cavanagh from Gloria Fraction

Tuesday, June 7, 1966
Detroit, MI, Chicago, IL

Miss Gloria Fraction drafted this response to a correspondence, sent from the Honorable Jerome Cavanagh, Mayor of Detroit, Michigan. Miss Fraction took the role as an additional secretary for Dr. King, while the SCLC underwent a major Open Housing Campaign Movement in Chicago in 1966. At the time this letter was written, SCLC operated out of their headquarters in Atlanta and their temporary offices in Chicago.

Racism in the United States

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Mississippi (MS), New York (NY), Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), North Carolina (NC), Albany, GA

Dr. King discusses the issues of racism, Jim Crow and nonviolence in this edition of Current. He further explains that, without the tactic of nonviolence, Negroes can become hostile and bitter. Throughout this issue several other writers are featured including Leslie W. Dunbar, Langston Hughes and Fay Bennett.

Telegram from MLK to the Letters Department at Newsweek Magazine

Tuesday, November 21, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King praises Newsweek magazine for making a persuasive appeal to the conscience and sanity of the nation on the racial crisis which engulfs America.

A Realistic Look at Race Relations

Thursday, May 17, 1956
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL)

Dr. King gives the three views one can take regarding the state of race relations: optimism, pessimism, and realistic. Dr. King argues for a realistic stance because America has accomplished much in race relations, but still has a long way to go. He further explains that he thinks segregation is in its last days.

Letter from JohnFischer to MLK Regarding an Article in Harper's Magazine

Wednesday, September 26, 1962
New York (NY), Albany, GA

John Fischer of Harpers Magazine informs Dr. King that the Albany Georgia article will not be published in the upcoming edition.

Telegram to MLK from H. Rap Brown

Tuesday, June 13, 1967
Alabama (AL), Lowndes County, AL

Police brutality in the black communities of Prattville, Alabama prompts this request sent to Dr. King, which seeks immediate federal investigation and protection of black prisoners.

Letter from Paul Van Der Crabben to MLK

Thursday, March 25, 1965
NETHERLANDS, Montgomery, AL

Paul van der Crabben of the Netherlands encourages Dr. King to continue to follow the Christian path of love. The letter was written during the culmination of the Selma to Montgomery March.

Statement by Norman Truesdell About Selma-Montgomery March

Monday, April 26, 1965
Alabama (AL), Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL, Iowa (IA)

Norman Truesdell refutes Congressman William Dickenson's speech before the United States House of Representatives in which Dickenson claimed Reverend Truesdell left the Alabama Freedom March due to the immoral conduct of the marchers. Reverend Truesdell asserts that he left due to his studies at Wartburg Theological Seminary.

Letter from Rev. Herbert H. Eaton to Dr. and Mrs. King

Tuesday, April 9, 1963
Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL)

Reverend Eaton, pastor of the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, congratulates Dr. and Mrs. King on the birth of their child, Edith Bernice.

Letter from WSB-TV's Don Elliot Heald to MLK

Friday, December 29, 1967
Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Don Elliot, of WSB Television in Atlanta, encloses an editorial for Dr. King to review. In the editorial, American Baptist Convention President J. H. Jackson criticizes Dr. King for not taking a more constructive approach towards influencing Congress to pass more civil rights legislation.

Letter from Edna Hedrick to MLK

Sunday, November 8, 1964
Michigan (MI)

Edna Hedrick, writing on behalf of the Ypsilanti, MI, branch of the NAACP, congratulates Dr. King for being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Loretta Dun to the SCLC

Monday, December 16, 1963

Loretta Dunn, secretary for the Providence for Civil Rights, Inc., contributes to the SCLC for their efforts in the field of civil rights.

Women Are For Peace/Jeanette Rankin Rank and File Poster

Washington, D.C., Brooklyn, NY, New York, NY

Flyer announcing "Women are for Peace" sponsored by Former Congresswoman Jeannette Rankin. Representative Rankin led thousands of women to Washington, DC to petition former colleagues in Congress to end the war.

MLK Writes on Miracles

Dr. King outlines Dr. James Moffatt's views on students understanding of new testament.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Lucile Giles

Tuesday, December 10, 1963
Chicago, IL

Dora McDonald informs Lucile Giles that Dr. King will be notified of her books upon his return to the office.

Invitation from Nuhu Bamali to Dr. and Mrs. King

NIGERIA

Dr. and Mrs. King receive an invitation to a reception from the Chairman of the Nigerian Delegation to the Twentieth Session of the General Assembly and Deputy Foreign Minister.

Americans Need Some Discipline

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Chicago, IL, New York, NY, Los Angeles, CA

This Daily Californian editorial calls for "self-restraint" in civil rights demonstrations and a return to the "hard work, thrift, and adherence to the moral precepts that form the basis for this democracy." It continues to maintain that gratuitous demonstrations cause racial riots and violence, provoking the "wrath of whites who resent Negro intrusion in their neighborhoods" and thus undermine political support for Dr. King's cause. Dr.

Letter from Ken Pardue to MLK

Monday, March 18, 1968
Texas (TX), Atlanta, GA

Ken Pardue, the Election Commission Chairman of the Student Association at West Texas University, invites Dr. King to be a guest speaker at Choice '68, a program conducted by Time magazine.

The Eternality of God Verses The Temporality of Man

This document is an outline of the sermon titled "The Eternality of God Versus the Temporality of Man." In the first two sections, Dr. King contrasts the time-conditioned nature of man with God, who transcends time. The final portion highlights a significant fact that God is absolute and unchangeable.

Letter from Edward Taylor to MLK

Tuesday, February 20, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), VIETNAM

Staff Sergeant Edward Taylor, United States Army, requests Dr. King's assistance or advice in appealing his bar to reenlistment and court martial.

Letter from Bill Dady to MLK

Tuesday, May 26, 1964
Kentucky (KY), Louisville, KY, New York (NY)

In this letter, "Free Men and Free Markets," a book by Robert Theobald, is introduced to Dr. King by Bill Dady.

Rutgers Professor Liberties Advocate

Thursday, August 18, 1966
New Jersey (NJ), New York (NY), Mississippi (MS)

Arthur Kinoy, a civil rights lawyer, was arrested in House Un-American Activities Committee hearings. During the few minutes he was in jail, Kinoy spent his time offering free advice to the other inmates.

Letter from Herbert E. Brown to MLK

Thursday, July 20, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, VIETNAM

Mr. Brown informs Dr. King that though he is an "enthusiastic backer" of Dr. King's efforts "to improve the lot of the Negro," he does not agree approve of Dr. King combining the Civil Rights Movement with a stance against the war in Vietnam. If Dr. King continues on this path, Brown warns that he will no longer be able to support Dr. King.

Schleiermacher's Meaning of Religion

Dr. King cites a quotation from Friedrich Schleiermacher's perception of the meaning of religion. Schleiermacher asserts that the soul is dissolved in the immediate feeling of the infinite and eternal. Dr. King notes that in order for one to understand the externals of religion, we must first have the inner experience.

Letter from David W. Letts to the S.C.L.C.

Wednesday, April 10, 1968
Cleveland, OH

This letter, coupled with a donation, was sent from Baldwin-Wallace College to the S.C.L.C following Dr. King's assassination. The writer discusses the initiation of student activism that was taking place at the college in response to Dr. King's tragic death.