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Letter from Richard Clemence to MLK

Thursday, January 27, 1966
Florida (FL), Atlanta, GA

Richard Clemence, a white Air Force officer, thanks Dr. King for his service to the nation in bringing people together. Clemence wrtes that "your steady guiding hand and spirit have led many to see the light of moral right."

Card From Marjorie Baker

Marjorie Baker sends a card expressing wishes to maintain courage until things are better.

Address by MLK to the National Press Club

Thursday, July 19, 1962
Washington, D.C., Albany, GA, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL

During an address to the National Press Club in Washington, Dr. King declares the time for racial justice has arrived.

Suggestions for Survival During Period of Prolonged Civil Disorder

Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI)

This document contains a list of tips and suggested supplies for survival during a period of civil disorder, including specific food items and tools. The document recommends stockpiling enough supplies to survive for at least one month without needing to leave your home.

MLK Note

New York (NY)

Dr. King writes a story about a father and son waiting for a train at New York's Grand Central Station. The son is headed to college in New England and the father gives the young man some simple, yet profound advice. "Bill, never forget who you are."

WDIX: In Whose Interest Is Changing The Law?

Wednesday, March 20, 1968
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Orangeburg, SC

This editorial was broadcast on WDIX, a radio station based out of Orangeburg, South Carolina, on March 20, 1968. The piece questions if President Johnson's actions in favor of civil rights were under the pressure of Dr. King and Stokely Carmichael, stating that the Great Society is an danger. The author further argues that the status of African Americans as been largely improved, just "not as quickly" as they would have hoped and that should be good enough.

Post Card Front from Alice and Jun Hayakawa to Coretta King

The Hayakawa family send this photo greeting to Mrs. King, addressing her as "Corrie." The family expresses their concern for Mrs. King and hopes for the rapid recovery of Dr. King following a recent accident.

Letter from Congressman James G. O'Hara to MLK

Tuesday, August 24, 1965
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C., Michigan (MI), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Congressman James G. O'Hara, US Representative from Michigan, informs Dr. King that he has signed the home rule discharge petition for the District of Columbia.

An Analysis of the Ethical Demands of Integration

Thursday, December 27, 1962
Nashville, TN, Tennessee (TN), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Florida (FL), Washington, D.C.

Dr. King argues that desegregation is only the first step towards the ultimate goal of complete racial equality. He explains that nonviolence, driven by the power of love, is crucial to create true integration.

Transformed Nonconformist

In this draft of the "Transformed Nonconformist", Dr. King urges the abandonment of societal practices of injustice.

Discerning the Signs of History

FRANCE, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King's sermon "Discerning the Signs of History" asserts "evil carries the seeds of its own destruction." King gives examples throughout history, such as slavery, colonialism, and the rise and fall of King Louis XVI.

Letter from Frederic C. Smedley to Lyndon B. Johnson

Saturday, May 6, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, Washington, D.C., VIETNAM

Frederic C. Smedley, a lawyer and peace activist, writes to President Johnson suggesting a program to help end the war in Vietnam. Smedley urges President Johnson to implement the plan to bring an end to the longstanding fight.

Royalties from "Why We Can't Wait"

Sunday, April 30, 1967
New York, NY

This document is a reference to the royalties earned from Dr.King's book "Why we Can't Wait", the Norwegian edition.

MLK on Christian Love

In this statement, Dr. King corrects "what may be a false impression." King states that while he does discuss the Christian way of love and non-violence as a tool to unify blacks in the Movement, integration is still necessary in order to truly obtain change.

Telgram From Denmark to Dr.King

Thursday, October 15, 1964
DENMARK, Atlanta, GA

A representative of the Danish Jewish Community offers Dr. King the "Ben Adam Honorary Award". He invites Dr. King to the event held December 5th, 1964.

Letter From Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding Publication Date of the German Edition of "Why We Can't Wait"

Friday, May 22, 1964
New York, NY, Berlin, Germany

In this letter, Joan Daves informs Dr. King about the desire of the German publishers to have a publication date. Joan Daves also inquires if Dr. King has free time for Mayor Brandt.

MLK's 'People to People' Column on Education

Saturday, May 15, 1965

This article by Dr. King appeared in the New York Amsterdam News. He discusses the segregation of schools and how it is harming African American children and their opportunities.

Sin

ISRAEL

Dr. King paraphrases the teachings of Amos about sin. Dr. King writes that Amos condemns Israel for the sins of bribery, oppression of the poor by the rich, sexual immorality and the "self-indulgent use of what has been wrung from the helpless."

Letter to MLK Regarding Support and Donation

Saturday, September 27, 1958
New York, NY, New York (NY)

A New York couple and their 9 year old son, mailed Dr. King this get well letter praying for his recovery and saluting him for his work.

Letter from Alma Opal to Dr. King

Friday, August 19, 1966
Michigan (MI)

Mrs. Alma Opal informs Dr. King that he should use the word "proud," with complete caution. She also sends him a leaflet entitled, "Lawyer Troubles."

Letter from Jack Greenberg to Chauncey Eskridge

Thursday, December 14, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Jack Greenberg responds to a letter from Chauncey Eskridge regarding bonds posted for the Birmingham demonstration cases. Greenberg reacts to court decisions related to the cases and provides the next steps for the Shuttlesworth v. City of Birmingham case.

MLK's Statement at Prayer Rally in Albany, Georgia

Wednesday, August 15, 1962
Albany, GA

After the bombing of a local church, Dr. King delivered this statement attempting to both criticize the actions of the perpetrators and provide a sense of calm to Albany demonstrators.

Telegram from the Students Union of Aarus University to MLK

Friday, October 16, 1964
DENMARK

The Students Union of Aarus University congratulates Dr. King for receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Statement by MLK & Dr. W. G. Anderson

Wednesday, July 25, 1962
Albany, GA

Dr. King and Dr. Anderson release a statement declaring a "Day of Penance" for those in the Negro community who have not yet adopted the nonviolent strategy.

MLK's Acceptance Sermon, Dexter Avenue Baptist Church

Montgomery, AL

Dr. King accepts his appointment as the new pastor of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church. His first time serving as head of a ministry, Dr. King admits that he has no pretense to being an extraordinary preacher and comes only with the claim of "being a servant of Christ."

God

Dr. King cites a scripture from the biblical book of Isaiah which demonstrates the eternalness and holiness of God.

Schleiermacher (Religion)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher's "On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers" on religion as something experienced.

Letter from Robert L. Green to Dora McDonald

Friday, November 3, 1967
Michigan (MI)

Mr. Green encloses a foreword to Dr. Neal Sullivan's book by Dr. King.

Sensuality

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr's "The Nature and Destiny of Man" on pride as the basic sin and sensuality the result of pride.

Statement of Congressman Seymour Halpern in the House Debate on the Voting Rights Bill

Washington, D.C., New York (NY), New York, NY, PUERTO RICO, Jackson, MS

Mr. Halpern addresses the Chairman of the House of Representatives in favor of passing the Voting Rights Bill. He wants to ensure that the bill is enacted in a way that will not allow it to be manipulated by individual states, causing further discrimination against African Americans and non-English speakers. Mr. Halpern goes on to explain other acts that must take place and suggests other tenants to be incorporated into the bill in order to make sure all Americans have equal rights under the law.