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CORE - Progress Report #1

Friday, August 20, 1965

Benjamin Brown details the structure of the latest publication from the Congress of Racial Equality (CORE). The CORE Guide to Negro History will be a composite of contributing essays, pictures, prized Negro literature and evaluations of social progress by current civil rights leaders. Beacon Press is listed as the potential publisher for the groundbreaking book.

Letter from Thomas T. Krampf to MLK

Wednesday, May 3, 1967

New Jersey resident Thomas T. Krampf expresses support for Dr. King's leadership and viewpoints on race relations, morality, and equality. Krampf encloses a self-written story, "The Rosebuds," which speaks to the "'oneness' and the peaceful 'togetherness' of all humanity."

Letter from Theodore R. Britton Jr. to MLK

Saturday, February 24, 1968

Theodore R. Britton promotes the candidacy of Dr. King for the pastorship of Riverside Church throughout this letter. Britton also asserts that New York is in need of Dr. King's leadership and sermons.

Power

Dr. King cites Karen Horney's "The Neurotic Personality of Our Time.

Letter from Joan Kennedy to MLK

Saturday, July 18, 1964

Joan Kennedy thanks Dr. King for his support.

Letter from Senora Springfied to MLK

Tuesday, September 6, 1966

Mrs. Senora Springfied requests that Dr. King send Leon Hall, an SCLC employee, back to Grenada, Mississippi. She praises Hall and mentions that the town needs leaders like him.

Letter from Mary L. Powell to MLK

Monday, January 8, 1968

Mary L. Powell writes to Dr. King expressing how she has been following and considering his plans, but disproves of his methods.

Our God is Able

Sunday, January 4, 1953

Reverend Frederick M. Meek retells a story in the New Testament about a civilization and their journey to discover that God is able.

Letter from Cryssana Jenkins Bogner to MLK

Monday, June 19, 1967

Mrs. Cryssana Jenkins Bogner writes Dr. King with to both support his leadership in the Civil Rights Movement, and to share her discontent with Executive Director of the NAACP Roy Wilkin's stance on the Vietnam War.

SCLC Newsletter: March 1964

Sunday, March 1, 1964

The March, 1964 SCLC newsletter reports many news items, including a voter registration drive in Alabama, the results of several legal cases, the Civil Rights Act of 1964, an article criticizing Judge Durwood T. Pye and the use of interracial primers in Detroit's public schools.

Draft of Nobel Prize Acceptance Speech

This document is one draft of Dr. King's Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech. Dr. King applauds the world for recognizing the American Civil Rights Movement and states that this award represents for him a "deepening commitment" to the philosophy of nonviolence.

Letter from Carroll Whittemore to MLK

Friday, September 25, 1964

Carroll Whittemore inquires about a promotion for Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait" to be distributed to roughly 60,000 clergymen. He further requests a photograph of Dr. King to be used for publicity purposes, in a gallery of outstanding ministers.

Optimism

Dr. King quotes F. S. Marvin's "The Living Past."

The Dilemma of Negro Americans

In this draft of a chapter for his book Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community?, Dr. King offers an in-depth description of the plight of African Americans over the past few hundred years and how it will never be fully understood by their white counterparts. He recounts the issues associated with American slavery – the dehumanization of slaves and the destruction of the family unit. He ties what happened in the past to what is occurring in the present, explaining that because of these layers of oppression African Americans have to play catch up to be seen as equals in America.

Letter from Morton M. Brooks to MLK

Wednesday, November 4, 1964

Morton Brooks writes Dr. King to check his availability for April, May, or June of 1965 to speak at Mt. Zion's Sunday morning church service. Brooks expresses that he is aware of Dr. King's busy schedule, but would appreciate his consideration.

Christianity

Dr. King finds agreement with Celsus, an opponent of Christianity, in a quote on the root of the Christian faith.

Letter from Abraham Ribicoff to MLK

Wednesday, July 1, 1964

Abraham Ribicoff thanks Dr. King for his kind letter and expresses his contentment with the passing of the Civil Rights Bill. Ribicoff hopes for the progression of the nation in providing equal opportunities for all.

The Ultimate Doom of Evil

These sermon notes outline the inevitable fall of evil. Dr. King uses the work of influential American historian, Charles A. Beard to prove this claim. "A graphic example of this truth" is found in ancient proverbs that Dr. King aims to examine in detail.

Letter of Support from Dorothy Hill to MLK

Saturday, July 1, 1967

Miss Dorothy P. Hill writes this letter to Dr. King thanking him for sending a copy of his book "Where do we go From Here: Chaos or Community?" As previous Director of the Summer Institute for Social Progress at Wellesley College, Hill learned that "skin color seems no bar to congeniality," and she knows of many others who have had similar positive experiences. Hill writes that she admires Dr. King for his principles and leadership ability.

Draft Introduction for "Why We Can't Wait"

This document is a draft of the introduction for Dr. King's book, "Why We Can't Wait." Dr. King uses various African American children stories to explain that one cannot afford to wait for justice.

Apollinarianism

Dr. King defines Apollinarianism.

Proclaim Liberty...

Carl T. Rowan, one of the most prominent black journalists of the 20th century, is honored at the Progressive Club in Atlanta, GA. This reservation form was sent out to invited guests of the celebration.

Death

Dr. King recalls a quote from British prime minister Winston Churchill and his tribute to King George VI.

Letter from Marry Gottesfeld to MLK

Wednesday, August 7, 1963

Mary Gottesfeld, president of the Community and Social Agency Employees Union, writes Dr. King expressing pleasure in contributing more to Dr. King's organization. She also reminds him of the thousands that are behind his cause.

Letter from Joseph Caputo to MLK

Thursday, June 1, 1967

Joseph Caputo, a graphic arts teacher from Russell Sage Jr. High School in Queens, New York, collaborated with his students on a booklet entitled, "Let My People Go." The booklet features various illustrations and verses; and focuses on themes prominent to Dr. King's life and work. The accompanying letter includes a dedication to Dr. King and Roy Wilkins.

Acrostic Poem About MLK

Adolf G. H. Kreiss shows his immense support and gratitude for Dr. King's fight for equality with an acrostic poem using the initials of the civil rights leader.

Letter from Ernest Gruening to MLK

Friday, May 19, 1967

Democratic Alaskan Senator Earnest Gruening informs Dr. King that he has inserted one of Dr. King's speeches into the Congressional Record, in order to combat misconceptions about Dr. King's beliefs. The speech in question was delivered to the Riverside Church in New York, and it conveyed Dr. King's views on Vietnam. Senator Gruening includes this section of the record with his letter.

Response letter from Dr. King regarding Mr. Altomerianos and Charles Evans Hughes High School

Thursday, October 23, 1958

Dr. King took the time to write to the faculty and students of Charles Evans Hughes High School, following his release from Harlem Hospital. In this thank you, he expressed sincere gratitude for the well wishes from the young students relayed to him during his illness. Furthermore, Dr. King acknowledged that the future would be in good hands with their involvement in the struggle for Brotherhood and Human Dignity.

Letter from Dora McDonald to William R. Cummings

Monday, December 18, 1961

Dora McDonald writes William Cummings to inform him that Dr. King is in jail at the moment and the date of his return is difficult to determine. She explains that he will eventually be happy to learn of Mr. Cummings' invitation, but unfortunately his schedule will permit his attendance.

Letter from Gertrude Jimerson to MLK

Tuesday, February 19, 1963

Gertrude Jimerson requests biographical information for Dr. King.