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Letter from Dora McDonald to Rev. C.A. Echols

Wednesday, July 14, 1965

Dora McDonald responds to Rev. C.A. Echols on behalf of Dr. King. She encloses a statement from Dr. King which was pubished in the "Massachusetts Review" for Echol's graduate studies.

Letter from MLK to James L. Hicklin

Monday, February 25, 1963

Dr. King expresses gratitude for being considered for a position on the National Board of Governors for the Freedom For All Foundation, but he declines due to commitments to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference and other pastoral duties.

Telegram from President Johnson to Bernard Lee

Sunday, May 29, 1966

Dr. King's special assistant, Bernard Lee, was the recipient of this telegram requesting his presence at a White House conference called by President Johnson. The theme of the conference was "To Fulfill These Rights."

Telegram from Dr. and Mrs. King to Rev. Ralph Abernathy

Sunday, March 11, 1962

Dr. and Mrs. King congratulate Reverend Ralph Abernathy on his birthday.

MLK Sermon: Non-Conformist

Sunday, January 16, 1966

Dr. King delivers this sermon at Ebenezer Baptist church in Atlanta, Georgia. He references the statement Representative Julian Bond made regarding the Vietnam War and discusses the responsibility of Christians to be morally noble instead of socially respectable. He references multiple biblical figures and explains the importance of not conforming to society.

400 Years of Bigotry and Hate

Dr. King describes the efforts of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference involvement in the civil rights campaign, May-July of 1964, in St. Augustine, Florida. The excerpted article is taken from the SCLC Newsletter.

Catholic Interracial Council Newsletter Honoring MLK

Sunday, March 7, 1965

This 1965 newsletter from the Catholic Interracial Council honors Dr. King with the Pacem in Terris Peace and Freedom Award.

Telegram from MLK to Clarence T. Lundquist

Thursday, March 15, 1962

Dr. King writes Clarence Lundquist of the Wage, Hour and Public Contracts Division of the Department of Labor to request an investigation into complaints of wage discrimination at the Sea Pak Shrimp factories in Elonia and St. Simon's Island, Georgia.

Dr. King Sermon Outline

Dr. King prepares notes for the sermon "Three Levels of Fellowship" deriving from 1st Corinthians 1:2, 9.

Letter from Unitarian Universalist Association President Dana McLean Greeley to MLK

Monday, March 22, 1965

Dana McLean Greeley asks for Dr. King's endorsement of a conference on religion and peace to be held in Washington, DC, and invites Dr. King to serve on the Executive Committee of the conference. Greeley also recounts his time spent in Selma and mentions that he will be in Montgomery soon.

Schleiermacher (Attributes of God)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher's "The Christian Faith."

Telegram from Norwegian Student Association to MLK

The Norwegian Student Association inquires if Dr. King will be available to give a lecture on Human Freedoms.

People in Action: Segregation And The Church

Saturday, February 2, 1963

In this New York Amsterdam News article of February 2, 1963, Dr. King mentions writer James Baldwin’s scathing indictment of the Christian Church and states that the Church has been complicit in the system of racial segregation or remained silent on racial injustice, the nation’s most urgent social ill. The church should be the headlight, he states, not the taillight and be true to the prophetic call for justice. King takes hope, however, having just attended the National Conference on Religion and Race in Chicago, which brought together Catholic, Protestant, and Jewish leaders.

Letter from Reverend Roland de Corneille to Wyatt Walker

Friday, December 6, 1963

Reverend Roland de Corneille writes to Wyatt T. Walker regarding a fundraiser for the SCLC. Reverend de Corneille would like for Dr. King and a notable celebrity, such as Harry Belafonte or Nat King Cole, to come to Toronto, Canada for a benefit show.

Telegram from Ted Aretha to MLK

Monday, October 30, 1967

Ted Aretha sends words of encouragement to Dr. King during his time in the Birmingham City Jail.

Letter from MLK to Congressman Ogden R. Reid

Friday, February 19, 1965

Dr. King informs Congressman Reid (R-New York) of the positive impact he left on Negro citizens during his visit to Selma, Alabama.

Making the Best of A Bad Mess

Sunday, April 24, 1966

This text of Dr. King's "Making the Best of a Bad Mess" sermon encourages the congregation at Ebenezer Baptist Church to remain faithful in times of destitution. He makes clear the point that happiness is not found, but is instead created.

Nobel Peace Prize Lecture

Friday, December 11, 1964

In this lecture delivered the day after he received the Nobel Peace Prize, Dr. King describes the major evils of the world as racial injustice, poverty and war. He presents a vision of a World House in which people learn to transcend differences in race, culture, ideas and religion and learn to live together in peace.

Condolence Letter to Coretta Scott King from Lyman G. Farrar

In this letter Mr. Farrar writes, "Dr. King symbolized for me the celebrant of the century in terms of newness of life in Jesus Christ." With a deep sense of gratitude he reveals the indelible affect Dr. King had on his life and his ministry, as a white middle class male.

Symbols

Dr. King discusses the "ontological structure of self" and its relation to symbols.

My Dream: Peace - God's Business and Man's

Saturday, November 27, 1965

This document is a draft in progress of an article wrote for the Chicago Defender. Dr. King conveys his desire for war to be eliminated as an option to solve the nation's problems. He feels that full equality will never come to pass unless solutions involving violence are deemed to be methods of the past.

Moment (Its Meaning)

Dr. King quotes Alfred North Whitehead's "The Concept of Nature."

Letter from Martin J. Morand to MLK

Monday, December 30, 1963

The Human Relations Council of Greater Harrisburg invites Dr. King to speak at meeting that will be held at the Pennsylvania State Educational Building. Martin Morand, Vice-President of the Council, also includes information about the issues in Harrisburg's black community to show why Dr. King should accept the invitation.

Epitaph for a First Lady: Eleanor Roosevelt

Upon the death of First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt, Dr. King wrote this epitaph, calling her "a symbol of world citizenship." In addition, Dr. King commends Mrs. Roosevelt for her commitment to humanity.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rev. Clyde L. Manschreck

Thursday, August 15, 1963

On behalf of Dr. King, Dora McDonald responds to a previous request made by Rev. Clyde Manschreck of the Methodist Theological School in Ohio. Miss McDonald informs Rev. Manschreck that the "Letter from Birmingham Jail" will be a part of Dr. King's newest publication that will be available in the fall of 1963.

God

Dr. King cites the Old Testament book of Exodus in reference to "the idea of a primitive anthropomorphic God."

Letter from MLK to Rev. Richard T. Andrews, Jr.

Monday, October 21, 1963

Dr. King express thanks for the Mt. Zion Congregational Church's contribution to the SCLC. Dr. King details and outlines how their financial assistance will further foster the improvement of the racial issues in the South. The SCLC would be "caught in a dungeon of despair" if they did not have any moral support from various individuals and organizations.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Monica Wilson

Saturday, April 3, 1965

Dora McDonald, on behalf of Dr. King, responds to Monica Wilson at the University of Cape Town in acceptance of her invitation to speak at the institution. McDonald closes requesting confirmation of a date for Dr. King, as well as accommodation information.

Man (Hamlet)

Dr. King quotes from the Shakespearean play.

SCLC Duties

This document outlines general responsibilities and specific duties of SCLC officers. Top level members listed include Dr. King, President, Wyatt Tee Walker, Executive Assistant to President, Andrew Young, Program Director, Mrs. Dorothy F. Cotton, Office Manager and Educational Consultant, and Ralph Abernathy, Financial Secretary-Treasurer. The document states that Dr. King's general responsibility as President is to "coordinate and interpret the total program of SCLC."