Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Little Rock, AR"

Letter from Laurence V. Kirkpatrick to MLK

Wednesday, September 8, 1965

Mr. Kirkpatrick thanks Dr. King for his address at the Assembly in Puerto Rico for the World Convention of Churches of Christ. He also encloses a monetary donation to care for his expenses and serve as an honorarium.

MLK's Sermon Notes

Dr. King drafted the intro of this sermon to place emphasis on the pros and cons of despair. The place and date of where this sermon was preached is not known.

Letter from Lyndon B. Johnson to MLK

Monday, May 18, 1964

President Lyndon B. Johnson writes Dr. King, thanking him for sending him an advance copy of "Why We Can't Wait."

Address by MLK at the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary

Wednesday, April 19, 1961

In his address to the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, Dr. King discusses the subject of the "Church on the Frontier of Racial Tension." King describes the crisis state of the US as it passes from an old order of segregation to a new order of integration, proclaiming that this is both a moral issues as well as a political issues. King implores the church to open the channels of communication between races and institute social reform, especially economic justice. Lastly, he invites all people to step into the new age with understanding and creative good will in their hearts.

Letter from Betty D. Richardson to MLK

Wednesday, February 22, 1967

Betty Richardson reminds Dr. King of his speaking engagement for the American Friends Service Committee 50th Anniversary Dinner.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding Saturday Review

Monday, May 11, 1964

Joan Daves, literary agent to Dr. King, wrote Dr. King to gain insight on his preference for a sentence revision to appear in his book "Why We Cant Wait."

Letter from Helen E. Saum to MLK

Tuesday, February 27, 1968

Ms. Saum applauds the positive attitude and accomplishments of organizations like the National Urban League, which she contrasts with the marches and riots that she feels hinder goodwill and cooperation.

Letter from Freddye Henderson of Henderson Travel to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, November 4, 1964

Freddye Henderson encloses information regarding flight schedules, rates for transportation, and suggested hotels for Dr. King's trip to Oslo, Norway.

Flyer Announcing Benefit Performance by CSK

Thursday, February 22, 1962

This 1962 flyer announces a benefit musical performance, featuring Mrs. King, with the proceeds going to the SCLC.

Letter from Cornelius E. Gallagher to MLK

Tuesday, August 24, 1965

Cornelius E. Gallagher writes Dr. King concerning the signing of the discharge petition concerning home rule for the District of Columbia.

Messianic Age

Dr. King reviews a bible verse that discusses the rule of the Messiah.

Notecard Written by MLK Regarding "Horace Bushnell"

This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

MLK - Notes on Ranke

Dr. King discusses history and the power of man having " made voyages, extended commerce, founded cities, and established great universities."

Why Negroes Are Still Angry

Friday, July 1, 1966

American journalist Victor Bernstein details for Redbook why Negroes are still angry in the face of the apparent success of the Civil Rights Movement. He points out that the Movement has enabled many whites to see that integration and equal rights are right, but still knowingly choose to behave as if they are wrong.

Telegram from MLK and Coretta King to the McCall Family

In this telegram, Mr. and Mrs. King give their condolences to the McCall family as a result of the death of Walter McCall.

Painting

Dr. King paraphrases Homer's "The Odyssey" and quotes some prose entitled "The Bible."

Freedom

Dr. King summarizes theologian Reinhold Niebuhr and his conceptualization of "Freedom."

Letter from T.J. Morrow to MLK

Monday, July 5, 1965

T.J. Morrow writes Dr. King in an effort to gain support for his film idea. Having already submitted it to a motion picture company and subsequently denied, Morrow hopes that King can help with promotion. He believes the film can offer positive messages of brotherhood and feels confident in its impact on society.

Resurrection of Jesus

Dr. King writes about John Mansfield's play entitled "The Trial of Jesus."

Invitation from Charles H. Day to MLK

Wednesday, December 8, 1965

In this letter, Charles H. Day encloses a letter that invites Dr. King to Iowa on the behalf of Reverend Edwin T. Dahlberg.

Huge Crowd Hears King Speak

Friday, November 4, 1966

The University of Pittsburgh's campus newspaper, "The Pitt News," reports that Dr. King's speech drew a larger crowd than "John Kennedy, Theodore Sorenson or Herbert Aptheker when these men spoke at the University." Dr. King answers questions about issues such as Vietnam, Black Power, white backlash and Negro anti-Semitism. He also discussed the importance of an anti-poverty effort, particularly when examining what is spent on the war in Vietnam and the nation's space program.

Letter from Homer Jack to MLK

Wednesday, April 26, 1967

Homer Jack, Director of the Unitarian Universalist Association's Department of Social Responsibility, communicates his support for Dr. King's stance against the Vietnam War. Jack, co-founder of CORE and active participant in the civil rights movement, encloses a report that includes a statement made to the US Inter-Religious Committee on Peace and discusses the courage of Buddhist monks in South Vietnam. He also congratulates Dr. King for his public address made at the United Nations regarding his opposition to the war.

Letter from Peggy Hutter to Mrs. King

Friday, April 5, 1968

A white college student writes to Mrs. King, expressing her condolences and shock after the death of Dr. King.

Letter from Keith Black to MLK

Sunday, May 8, 1966

Keith Black, on behalf of the Valley Community Presbyterian Church, sends Dr. King a check for the SCLC.

Clarence Jordan's Open letter to to the First Baptist Church of Atlanta

Tuesday, September 24, 1963

Clarence Jordan writes to the First Baptist Church of Atlanta to voice his opinion on the Ashton Jones affair. Ashton Jones, a white Methodist minister, was jailed for "disturbing divine worship" when he and two African American associates attempted to take part in a segregated church service. Jordan attempts to parallel this event to biblical accounts where Judeo-Christian leaders disrupted services involved with idol worship. Jordan further asserts that while the state of Georgia may permit the worshipping of a "segregated god," "God himself does not."

Letter from MLK to Art Simmons

Tuesday, April 5, 1966

Dr. King extends his gratitude to Mr. Simmons for the evening at the Palais des Sports.

Man

Dr. King quotes Proverbs 3:5 on human insight and knowledge and reflects upon its meaning.

Black Out: Dress Rehearsal for the Revolution

Kenneth Goff warns about the potential race riots predicted in a Communist manual.

Letter from Jan A. Hatch & Norman A. Bacon to MLK

Tuesday, February 23, 1965

Jan Hatch and Norman Bacon, white citizens of Athol, Massachusetts, write Dr. King inquiring about how they can contribute to the fight for racial equality. They inform him of the non-existent Negro population in Athol and request information on how to join the NAACP if it is conducive to their movement and financial limitations.

SCLC Newsletter: September 1962

Saturday, September 1, 1962

Dr. King discusses the terrible cost of securing voting rights for blacks, especially in Leesburg, Georgia, where the Shady Grove Baptist Church was bombed and burned following the SNCC's use of the space to register voters.