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"Little Rock, AR"

"Leaders of 'Socialist Scholars' Talk Guerrilla War in Cities Next Year"

Saturday, December 30, 1967

Alice Widener argues that the Black Power movement will result in domestic guerilla warfare. The writer's stance originates from a Black Power workshop she attended. Widener argues that the U.S. government must "round up and imprison" the "Red-Black power criminals."

God (Dewey)

According to Dr. King's understanding of Dewey's interpretation, God is the connection between the ideal and the actual.

MLK's Public Statement Regarding Julian Bond

Tuesday, January 12, 1965

Dr. King expresses his indignation for the State Legislatures refusal to seat Representative-Elect Julian Bond. Dr. King asserts that there are obvious racial overtones in the State Legislatures decisions since Mr. Bond received 82 percent of the votes in his district. Dr. King will commence direct action due to the state of urgency.

Letter from Kivie Kaplan to MLK Regarding His NewBook

Wednesday, February 22, 1967

In this letter, Kaplan requests an autographed copy of Dr. King's new book enclosed with a personal message. Mr. Kaplan also requests that Dr. King autograph the books ordered from Harper & Row, since he gets a discount buying in bulk.

Letter from Hubert Humphrey to MLK Regarding Regarding Wiley Branton

Thursday, April 29, 1965

In this letter the office of the Vice President informs Dr. King of the new role of Wiley Branton to serve as Executive Secretary of the President's Council on Equal Opportunity.

Immortality

Dr. King highlights a quote from Harry Emerson Fosdick's book "Assurance of Immortality."

Letter from Bronx High School Student Paul Kylar to MLK

Wednesday, May 31, 1967

Paul Kylar, a student from the Bronx, writes Dr. King to convey support for his plea for peace. Kylar mentions that he attended a peace parade and how elated he is to know that Dr. King works for all people and not just Negroes.

Pride

Dr. King quotes Bertrand Russell’s “Power: A New Social Analysis.”

Letter of Invite From Coval Bryant MacDonald to MLK

Thursday, March 24, 1966

In this letter, Minister Coval Bryant MacDonald invites Dr. King to speak with the minsters and priest of The Greater Oak Ministerial Association.

Letter from Florence of Scepter Records, Inc. to MLK

Friday, August 18, 1967

In this letter, Florence thanks Dr. King for his address at the NATRA Convention. She also encloses a contribution to continue the work of the movement.

SCLC Affiliates

Tuesday, October 17, 1967

Tom O. writes Mrs. King attaching an example of a brochure which entails a description SCLC's affiliate program. Tom O. also insures Mrs. King that the color in which the brochure is printed is not final.

Telegram from Floyd B. McKissick to MLK

Wednesday, July 6, 1966

In this telegram, Floyd B. McKissick tells Dr. King that he will not be able to attend a march and rally in Chicago due to his schedule.

Holiday Card from the King Family

This is a holiday card from the King Family.

MLK's Response to Vietnam Criticism

This is an early draft of Dr. King's response to those who wrote him letters critical of his stance on Vietnam. He says that it would be hypocritical to protest against black oppression in America, but not against Vietnamese colonization. He also cites the ideology of non-violence as an explanation for his stance, and expresses regret that "much of America has failed to understand the full meaning of the non-violent method."

Roy A. Gage Sends Support to MLK and SCLC

Friday, November 15, 1963

Roy A. Gage of Phoenix Mutual Life Insurance Company writes Dr. King and the SCLC Newsletter expressing his interest in the work of Dr. King and encloses $10.00

Jesus

Dr. King outlines some thoughts on the effect Jesus' life had on his followers.

Letter from Jack Delano to MLK

Tuesday, July 20, 1965

Jack Delano expresses how pleased the radio and television service of Puerto Rico is to learn that Dr. King has agreed to appear on their press interview program.

Telegram from Lee C. White to MLK

Wednesday, September 18, 1963

Lee C. White, Assistant Special Counsel to the President, confirms a meeting with President Kennedy and Dr. King to discuss the Birmingham bombing incident.

Letter from MLK to Peter S. Kliewer

Thursday, July 13, 1967

In response to a "letter to the editor" from the "Times-Advocate" sent in by a reader, Dr. King addresses America's role in Vietnam.

Letter from Mary Hart to MLK

In one of three letters Mary Hart sends Dr. King, she thanks him for his efforts in assisting poor people in America. Hart says that she is representing all poor people and sends apologies that she will not be present for the March of Poor People to Washington.

Letter from Tore Lundby to MLK

Wednesday, January 13, 1965

Tore Lundby, editor, requests Dr. King to write an article on equality in America for a secondary school magazine.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rose R. Silvers

Tuesday, January 26, 1965

Dora McDonald informs Rose Silvers that Dr. King was concerned about an unknown speaking arrangement that he was scheduled to fulfill. Due to a congested schedule, Dr. King will notify Silvers about his availability to speak in the near future.

Letter from Mrs. Eugene B. Stinson to Mr. Roy Wilkins

Tuesday, June 13, 1967

Mrs. Stinson of Pennsylvania writes Mr. Wilkins suggesting that all of the major civil rights organizations merge together to form one organization. She believes this will create a unified front in the fight for racial equality. In addition, Mrs. Stinson provides a list of suggestions this new organization could implement to facilitate change.

SCLC's People to People Tour

The SCLC held their Alabama "People to People Tour" from December 5-8, 1962. This itinerary lists the SCLC staff that participated in addition to the locations of their meetings.

Letter from Stanley Singer to MLK

Sunday, August 5, 1962

Stanley Singer replies to Dr. King's article in the NY Times Magazine entitled, "The Case Against 'Tokenism'." Mr. Singer implies that the Negro race is inferior due to their immorality. He highlights the perceived negative attributes of the African American community by the inadequacies within their family structure. Mr. Singer expounds on nonviolent resistance, the Civil War, the U.S. constitution, and more.

Letter from Tom Offenburger to MLK

In a letter from Tom Offenburger to Dr. King, a response to a newspaper article written by Bruce Galphin is attached. The article refers to the Civil Rights Movement as a rather violent campaign, due to the harm done to the "good order of society." The response argues on the side of the Civil Rights Movement, and further proves that it is indeed a nonviolent campaign.

Letter from Harriet C. Kelley to MLK

Monday, January 8, 1962

Ms. Kelley explains to Dr. King why she cannot send a contribution to him. She is on a limited income and already donates both to the NAACP and the United Negro College Fund.

Letter from William L. Hungate to MLK

Tuesday, January 5, 1965

Congressman Hungate challenges allegations made by Dr. King in a recent telegram regarding the Mississippi Delegation. Dr. King states, "A vote to seat the Mississippi delegation is a vote for organized violence, murder, and oppression." However, Congressman Hungate implies that Dr. King's claim is dubious unless he has sufficient evidence to support it. In closing, Congressman Hungate assures Dr. King of his allegiance to "real progress" while disapproving of "headline-hunting tactics."

Note Cards on God

Dr. King's writes on the possibility of finding God from the First Book of Chronicles.

Western Union Telegram from Mr. and Mrs. Count Basie to Dr. King

Famous jazz musician, Count Basie and his wife Catherine, sent Dr. King this Western Union telegram, following Dr. King's nearly fatal 1958 stabbing in Harlem. The Basie family, offered Dr. King any assistance he may have needed during his recovery.