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"Little Rock, AR"

Letter from Audrey Mizer to MLK

Sunday, December 3, 1961

Audrey Mizer encourages Dr. King to continue his good works because "the world cannot be robbed of any good." Mizer then discusses her opposing views to a statement in a Christian Monitor Column regarding Red China's admission to the United Nations.

Letter from Dora McDonald to William S. Thompson

Wednesday, March 27, 1963

Dora McDonald responds to William Thompson's letter inviting Dr. King to address the National Bar Association. She explains that Dr. King's calendar shows that he will not be able to attend the event due to his travels.

Letter from Edmond F. Tommy to Senator Edward W. Brooke

Monday, April 3, 1967

Mr. Toomy, a veteran of the first World War, writes to Senator Brooke detailing his stance on current military efforts. He provides a historical outline of war related events in relation to the United States military. He asserts that other Negro leaders are hindering progress in the Civil Rights movement due to their lack of patriotism.

Letter from Clare Stover to the SCLC

Monday, May 10, 1965

Mrs. Stover sends the SCLC a copy of a letter she sent to the Hammermill Paper Company following its decision to locate in Alabama. She condemns the company's decision because she feels economic development should be withheld from states that do not uphold federal law. She also questions whether the State of Alabama will be able to honor its promise of tax breaks, which it used to lure Hammermill Paper Company to the state.

Introduction of Edward M. Kennedy

Dr. King introduces Robert Kennedy at a gathering in Jackson, Mississippi, calling him a "capable statesman" with a "great social vision."

SCLC Newsletter: Of Riots and Wrongs Against Jews

Monday, July 27, 1964

Presented here, is a draft of an article published in the July-August 1964 edition of the SCLC Newsletter. The article highlights the discontentment of the author in relation to acts of violence against Jewish citizens.

Letter from MLK to The Boston Globe

Friday, February 24, 1967

Dr. King expresses gratitude to The Boston Globe for their generous contribution to the SCLC.

"Question of Credibility"

Sunday, October 16, 1966

In this article, the author highlights and questions the credibility of The Child Development Group, which was created to assist in educating the youth of Mississippi.

How My Mind Has Changed In the Last Decade

Dr. King discusses how his thoughts about theological theory have changed over the years. It is the only page of the document in the collection.

An Appeal by Puerto Ricans for Fair Treatment

This document reviews the economic, political, and cultural disparity of Puerto Ricans. The authors explain the history of American imperialism in Puerto Rico and how Puerto Ricans have been mistreated in the United States, particularly in New York. Criticizing the Vietnam War, the authors suggest focusing the funding used abroad on community building.

Postcard Sent to MLK

This unsigned postcard sent from Memphis, Tennessee depicts Dr. King and Lyndon B. Johnson pulling down a judge who symbolizes justice.

The Southern Patriot: Today's Hero The Negro Child

This column highlights the brave children who endured the hardships of hostile mobs as they blazed the trail for school integration.

Telegram from Bayard Rustin to MLK

Wednesday, October 19, 1966

Bayard Rustin invites Dr. King to join other civil rights leaders for a meeting that will be held in New York, NY.

Letter from MLK to Senator Abraham Ribicoff

Wednesday, June 24, 1964

Dr. King expresses his appreciation for Senator Abraham Ribicoff's efforts in passing the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

MLK's Statement to SCLC Describing SCOPE

Wednesday, June 16, 1965

In this statement, Dr. King describes the Summer Community Organization and Political Education (SCOPE), an initiative of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Its goals are to train local leaders, inform the public, and register individuals to vote.

Stop the War Bring the Troops Home

This brochure advertises a program to rally the support for eradicating the United States influence in Vietnam. It is distributed by The October Mobilisation, an Australian initiative responding to a call for international protest of the Vietnam War.

Outline of MLK's 1962 Address to NAACP

In Dr. King's handwriting, this outline is from a speech he later addressed to the NAACP, at its 53rd Annual Convention in Atlanta, GA.

Letter from Mrs. William P. Camp to MLK

Thursday, October 28, 1965

Mrs. Camp expresses her gratitude for Dr. King's participation in the Fiftieth Anniversary Celebration ceremonies for the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom. Mrs. Camp requests permission to reproduce excerpts from his speech for use in publication of the organization.

MLK Letter to Mr. Abe Feinglass

Monday, July 27, 1964

Dr. King writes to Abe Feinglass of the Amalgamated Meat Cutters and Butcher Workmen's Union, thanking him for the union's booklet on civil rights, "The Time Is Now." King also encloses a statement of endorsement.

Social Justice

Dr. King notes that Isaiah 1:11-17 describes various forms of worship and declares that God will not hear them but demands righteousness and fulfillment of social obligations. He compares this passage with the prophet Amos.

Letter from Secretary to Joan Regarding the Rights to "Strength to Love"

Monday, June 15, 1964

In this letter, the secretary asks Joan the status of the Japanese Edition to "Strength To Love", since Dr. King hadn't had the time to write the preface.

Letter from MLK to Richmond M. Rudden

Thursday, January 26, 1967

Dr. King writes Richmond M. Rudden to decline an invitation to speak at Lafayette College due to upcoming non-violence workshops, voter registration drives and SCLC fundraising activities.

Telegram from John E. Fogarty to MLK

Friday, July 9, 1965

In this telegram, John E. Fogarty writes Dr. King in support of the Administration Bill.

Letter from Catherine Aller to MLK

Wednesday, July 26, 1967

Catherine Aller took the time to write Dr. King and encourage him to keep pursuing his goals in spite of criticism.

Letter from Robert Lee King to MLK

Sunday, April 14, 1963

A member of Ebenezer Baptist Church expresses concern over Dr. King's imprisonment in the Birmingham Jail. Robert Lee King also shares his wish that he could physically be in jail as well to aid in the "freedom of all Americans." Though nothing in the letter has been blocked out, the letter does contain a stamp of the word "censored."

The Emergency Civil Liberties Committee Defends the Constitutional Rights

Friday, February 16, 1968

ECLC writes to ask for assistance with their efforts to criminalize governmental draft tactics. As staunch supporters of the Bill of Rights and the Constitution, ECLC argues that the Draft is a violation of citizen's constitutional rights. Furthermore, they have dedicated their services to protecting the rights of youth, arguing that the draft is economically discriminatory in "student deferments". The organization challenges other civil liberties organizations to join them in this fight.

Jesus Christ (Two Natures)

Dr. King quotes Reinhold Niebuhr's notion of the "two natures of Christ." Reinhold Niebuhr was a scholastic mentor of Dr. King and was therefore cited in several of his theological works.

Invitation from Harry Wachtel to the Members of the Research Committee

Monday, February 26, 1968

Harry Watchel writes to the members of the research community to inivite theim to participate in a meeting called by Dr. King.

Material to Use Regarding Negro Leaders and Platform Committee

Bayard Rustin sends Dr. King this pre-written answer to be used if the media ask why Dr. King and A. Philip Randolph are not together during the march before the 1960 Democratic National Convention in Los Angeles. The statement explains that Randolph will be in St. Louis to address the campaign to elect the first Negro Senator.

MLK's Address About South Africa

Friday, December 10, 1965

Addressing the apartheid situation in South Africa, Dr. King states that white rulers of South Africa, rather than black Africans, are "modern day barbarians." He continues to say that although black South Africans are the majority, they are oppressed by the minority. This is one of many occasions that Dr. King parallels racial injustices and views civil rights as an international issue.