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"Little Rock, AR"

Letter from Glenn Greenwood to MLK

Tuesday, August 20, 1963

Glenn Greenwood informs Dr. King of a directive the United States Army issued that forbids all US Army personnel from participating in civil rights demonstrations. Greenwood expresses that this is a huge "infringement on freedom of assembly" and should be brought to the public's attention immediately.

Letter from Mrs. Everett L. Brantley to the SCLC

Friday, June 11, 1965

Mrs. Brantley asks that the SCLC forward an enclosed check for Mrs. Reeb, funded by money raised at a citizens meeting in New Jersey.

War and Pacifism

Dr. King examines War and Pacifism. He determines that absolute pacifism is not acceptable, but neither is war. He cites several different philosophies of pacifism and nonviolence set forth by such figures as Nels Ferre, John H. Hallowell, A. J. Muste and Mahatma Gandhi.

Amsterdam News Article by MLK About European Tour

Thursday, September 17, 1964

Dr. King recalls an address he gave at the Berlin Arts Festival, where he witnessed an enthusiastic crowd. The crowd's interest confirmed his belief "that the Negro is now in a position to lead the world." He also mentions the Christians of East Berlin, who, though Communists, maintain their faith in God.

SCLC Answers Attorney General Cook

Friday, August 16, 1963

Mr. Clayton releases a statement concerning accusations made against Dr. King. In the statement, Georgia Attorney General Eugene Cook states that Dr. King refused to give him information him concerning a known communist named Jack O'Dell. Dr. King confirms that he has, in fact, cooperated with Cook and that O'Dell no longer works for the organization.

Letter from Marlyn Roach to MLK

Wednesday, April 3, 1968

Marlyn Roach requests an interview in hopes of a job with SCLC, as she is disillusioned with the antipoverty programs on which she has been working. She cites the cause of the "total failure" of the program to be the difference between the Negroes' and the state and federal government's objectives.

Statement on SCLC Commitment to Albany, Georgia

Thursday, July 12, 1962

Dr. King announces that he is organizing an operation in Albany, Georgia in which the members of the SCLC will be present and active.

Letter from Ali Beno Veidt to MLK

Saturday, February 26, 1966

Comparing Black Muslims to Nazis, Veidt speaks against Dr. King's practices in the movement, as well as his involvement with Elijah Muhammad. Veidt's correspondence includes a photograph of the two men together.

Telegram from Jeffrey Archer to MLK

Wednesday, December 2, 1964

Jeffery Archer of Brasenose College requests a signed copy of one of Dr. King's books for the Oxfam Campaign.

The Purpose of the State

Dr. King records some thoughts on the functions of the state.

Letter from Congressman Lionel Van Deerlin to MLK

Monday, August 30, 1965

Congressman Lionel Van Deerlin, the 37th district Representative from California, thanks Dr. King for the telegram urging him to sign the discharge petition for the home rule bill for the District of Columbia, and he lets Dr. King know he has already signed it.

Index card written by MLK regarding Faith

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines another thinker's insights on the subject of faith. This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for quick reference to quotations, ideas, and bible verses, among other things. Material covered on these index cards includes topics such as theology, philosophy, and history. Some material from these reference notes would later emerge in his speeches and sermons.

1967 Geneva Convocation

Monday, May 29, 1967

Dr. King provides introductory remarks to participants of the Pacem In Terris II Convocation held in Geneva, Switzerland. He addresses several moral and political concerns as it relates war and Vietnam.

New Wars For Old

Alfred Noyes writes a poem entitled, "New Wars For Old." Mr. Noyes focuses on various aspects of life and repeatedly asks, "when have we prayed for peace."

The False God of Money

Sunday, July 19, 1953

This sermon titled "The False God of Money" was preached by Dr. King on July 19, 1953. Dr. King raised a question to his congregation stating, "Will you serve the transitory god of money which is here today and gone tomorrow or will you serve the eternal God of the universe who is the same yesterday, today and forever?"

Letter from Nathan P. Feisinger to MLK - 3/21/1968

Thursday, March 21, 1968

Dr. King sent this letter to Professor Nathan P. Feinsinger to recommend Miss Barbara Jean Williams for the Russell Bull Scholarship.

Letter from Frederick K. Arrington to MLK

Tuesday, February 16, 1965

Frederick Arrington of Third Street Bethel A. M. E. Church writes Dr. King on behalf of the male Ushers asking his permission to use a photo of Dr. King on key tags for a fundraiser.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald

Friday, May 19, 1967

Ms. Daves informs Ms. McDonald that permission has been given to the High Commission of India's Education Department to publish a Marathi version of "Why We Can't Wait."

Statement Regarding Fred L. Shuttlesworth's Court Appearances

Tuesday, July 12, 1966

This document explains Rev. Shuttlesworth upcoming court appearances as a result of his civil rights activities. He faces charges for blocking a sidewalk during a demonstration and for protesting at Drake Memorial Hospital.

Holiday Card from the King Family to Rosa Parks

The King Family send their holiday greetings to Mrs. Rosa Parks in this holiday card.

Letter From Jimmy Williams to MLK

Sunday, February 25, 1968

Jimmy Williams, a U.S. Air Force officer, writes Dr. King requesting assistance in protesting his unjust termination from Officers Training School.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

Friday, August 5, 1966

An anonymous writer sends a letter to Dr. King and several other civil rights leaders. Although the exact message of the letter is unclear, the writer quotes numerous Biblical passages and Christian prayers. The writer, intermittently, also refers to the recipient as "Michael."

Letter to MLK from Homer Brown

Monday, October 4, 1965

Homer Brown writes Dr. King regarding his experience with racism in the Railway Express Agency.

A Chronology of Violence and Intimidation in Mississippi Since 1961

Thursday, April 4, 1963

This pamphlet produced by SNCC includes a number of reported violent attacks and intimidation tactics imposed on black Mississippi citizens from January 1, 1961 through February 4, 1964.

Statement Regarding the Passage of the Civil Rights Act, 1964

Dr. King gives a brief statement regarding the importance of the passage of the Civil Rights Act, 1964.

Tillch's Significance

Dr. King records Rhode Island Senator Theodore Greene's opinion that German-American theologian and philosopher Paul Tillich is "the most enlightening and therapeutic theologian of our time."

I'll Take My Stand

Thelmore Cooper Trotman composes this poem entitled "Ill Take My Stand." The poem expresses the plight of the Negro struggle and the injustices of a case involving the rights of five Negros. Mr. Trotman elaborates on his personal health as he is of old age and explains his appreciation for Dr. King's organization.

Homeric Problem

Dr. King briefly outlines the problem surrounding the work of the Greek poet Homer. The note card references the view of German scholar and critic Friedrich August Wolf and documents two primary theories regarding Homeric literature.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, December 12, 1966

Here Joan Daves informs Dr. King on the availability of Hermine Popper, who will be working on a manuscript with Dr. King.