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MLK Speaks on Vietnam War

New York, NY, Los Angeles, CA, New York (NY), California (CA), VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, FRANCE, CHINA, JAPAN, MEXICO, Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), RUSSIAN FEDERATION, Georgia (GA), Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI), GUATEMALA, COLOMBIA, PERU, THAILAND, CAMBODIA, MOZAMBIQUE, GERMANY, PHILIPPINES, UNITED KINGDOM, London, England, DOMINICAN REPUBLIC, HAITI, NICARAGUA, South Africa

This 32-page booklet was published by Clergy and Laymen Concerned About Vietnam shortly after Dr. King’s April 4, 1967 Riverside Church address on the Vietnam War. It features a foreword by Dr. Reinhold Niebuhr, Dr. King’s speech, and remarks by Henry Steele Commager, Dr. John C. Bennett, and Rabbi Abraham Heschel. In addition, it includes a New York Times interview with Dr. King, King’s response to NAACP criticism on his opposition to the war, and letters to the editor of the New York Times.

The Future of Integration

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, EGYPT, SOUTH AFRICA

Dr. King discusses "The Future of Integration." King opens with background history of three distinct periods of race relations. The first period extends from 1619 to 1862, the era of slavery. The next period extends from 1863 to 1954 when blacks were emancipated, but still segregated. The third period started on May 17, 1954 when segregation was deemed unconstitutional and integration commenced. Furthermore, Dr. King explains the changes that occurred as a result of integration and how it will affect blacks and whites in the future.

Jo Marks writes Harry Belafonte Regarding Civil Rights Help

Thursday, February 2, 1967
Texas (TX), Chicago, IL, New York, NY, Alabama (AL), Louisiana (LA), Mississippi (MS)

Jo Marks writes Mr. Harry Belafonte a lengthy letter about the civil rights situation in Houston and to request that he perform at the Astrodome.

Telegram from Thich Nhat Hanh to MLK

Saturday, February 24, 1968
Missouri (MO), VIETNAM

Thich Nhat Hanh informs Dr. King that he will be in Atlanta from February 24th to February 29th.

Telegram from MLK to President Johnson on Rhodesia

Thursday, November 11, 1965
Washington, D.C., South Africa

Dr. King urges President Johnson to respond to the unilateral declaration of independence by Prime Minister Ian Smith of Rhodesia by withdrawing American officials, refusing diplomatic recognition and severing economic ties.

Letter from David Sutton to MLK

Wednesday, June 16, 1965
Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

The associate director of Alumni Relations at Drexel Institute of Technology invites Dr. King to speak at the newly formed Downtown Luncheon Club. Mr. Sutton mentions that the alumni of Drexel revere Dr. King's philosophy and principles of nonviolence. He also informs Dr. King about the confirmed attendance of Pulitzer Prize winner James Michener.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Altina Carey

Monday, January 8, 1962
California (CA)

Dora McDonald informs Altina Carey that she discussed his letter with Dr. King over the telephone and he looks forward to hearing from Mr. Carey after his meeting with Mr. Killens.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Heussenstamm to MLK about a Humanity Button

Friday, March 1, 1968
California (CA), Washington, D.C.

In this letter Mr. and Mrs. Heussenstamm enclose a button called the "Pentagon of Humanity," which the Heussenstamm's also sent to the President and the Joint Chiefs of Staff. Accordingly the symbol represents “love, unity and wisdom—the community of man.”

Letter from Dora McDonald to Walter Ducey

Wednesday, July 1, 1964
Chicago, IL, St. Augustine, FL

Dora McDonald informs Walter Ducey that Dr. King is out of town at the moment and grants him permission to include Dr. King's photograph and remarks in the publication he is producing.

Letter from J. Saba to Clarence B. Jones

Friday, April 5, 1968
New York, NY, Washington, D.C.

"In this the blackest hour of our nation...," J. Saba refers to the assassination of Dr. King. Saba speaks to the urgency to preserve the "American Dream", in light of Dr. King's untimely death. He offers two fitting suggestions: first to establish a MLK, Jr. Memorial Library on Non-Violence and Civil Rights and second to erect a MLK, Jr. Interfaith Chapel at Morehouse College.

Notecard Written by MLK Regarding "Horace Bushnell"

This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Letter from Howard Frazier to MLK

Tuesday, April 25, 1967
Virginia (VA), VIETNAM

Mr. Frazier thanks Dr. King for his "courageous" stand on the Vietnam War. He is impressed by Dr. King's plan to organize thousands of volunteers to participate in the Peace Movement and makes a donation of $25.00 to the peace fund.

Letter from Alfred Gunn to MLK

Tuesday, February 6, 1968
Georgia (GA), New York (NY), New York, NY, New Jersey (NJ), California (CA), Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA, Detroit, MI, Los Angeles, CA, Dallas, TX

Alfred L. Gunn requests Dr King's support of Gunn's "new Democratic way of Philosophy." Mr. Dunn also encloses three manuscripts pertaining to riots, the American gun and rifle laws, and the occurrence of racial problems in America.

MLK's Funeral Procession Outline

Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

This document outlines the funeral procession of Dr. King and specifies how many people wide the procession will be.

Letter from Mervyn Dymally to MLK

Wednesday, October 25, 1967
California (CA), Los Angeles, CA

California State Sen. Mervyn Dymally (D-CA) expresses appreciation and support to Dr. King for the efforts of the SCLC with Operation Breadbasket in Los Angeles, CA.

SCLC Resolution "To Fulfill These Rights"

Thursday, June 2, 1966
Alabama (AL), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C.

The SCLC releases a copy of the resolution, "To Fulfill These Rights," created by the SCLC's Alabama staff and sent to the White House Conference. Hosea Williams states in the resolution that Negroes who voted in the primary were intimidated by white segregationist to not vote in the run-off.

Program from the SCLC's Tenth Annual Convention

Monday, August 8, 1966
Jackson, MS

This is the Tentative Programme of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference's Tenth Annual Convention. The convention was held in Jackson, Mississippi at a Masonic Temple and hosted by the Reverend Allen Johnson. The four day convention was themed "Human Rights - The Continuing Struggle."

Address by MLK to American Jewish Committee

Thursday, May 20, 1965
New York, NY, Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL, GERMANY

In this speech, Dr. King addresses the Civil Rights Movement and the use of nonviolent demonstration tactics. He distinguishes between civil disobedience, which involves breaking laws that one does not agree with, and nonviolent demonstration, which involves using one's right to protest. He states that nonviolent protest is inherently American, citing examples from the Civil War, the Suffragettes, and the American Jewish Committee's own lobbying from the early 20th Century.

Amsterdam Article

Mississippi (MS), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Philadelphia, MS, Jackson, MS, Greenwood, MS

This document describes the fight for civil rights in Mississippi in the early 1960's.

Letter from Robert Brandeis to MLK

Monday, June 12, 1967
San Francisco, CA

Robert Brandies expresses his support regarding the efforts of Dr. King and the Civil Rights Movement.

God

ISRAEL

Dr. King writes about Chapter 11 of the Old Testament Book, Hosea, concerning Israel.

Letter from Jack Michlin to George C. Wallace

Thursday, June 8, 1967
Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), New York (NY)

Jack Michlin criticizes former Alabama Governor George Wallace for making misleading statements about the American and Confederate slave trade on "The Mike Douglas Show."

Letter from MLK to George E. Bass

Thursday, April 7, 1966
Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak at the Annual Luncheon for the Planned Parenthood Association.

Statement Before the National Democratic Platform and Resolutions Committee

Saturday, August 11, 1956
Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL)

Dr. King addresses the National Democratic Platform and Resolutions Committee. He calls for strong federal action in the South to prevent violence and to uphold the decisions of the Supreme Court pertaining to the end of segregation.

Letter from Sampson & Sampson to Ms. Dora McDonald

Wednesday, May 1, 1968
South Carolina (SC), Brooklyn, NY

Ms. Dora McDonald received this telegram pertaining to Mrs. Coretta Scott King. The sender requests that Mrs. King speak at a political action event in South Carolina. The author of this telegram was running for state senate.

Letter from Glenn M. Dunkle to MLK

Wednesday, October 11, 1967
Richmond, VA, Virginia (VA)

Glenn Dunkle, Senior Planner for the City of Richmond, Virginia, requests a copy of a bill proposed by Dr. King that addresses slums and housing clearance. The bill will be used by the Richmond City Planning Commission as it studies "methods of stimulating urban redevelopment and new low income housing."

Letter from MLK to Otis Warren

Thursday, July 22, 1965
Baltimore, MD, Georgia (GA), Alabama (AL), Florida (FL)

Dr. King acknowledges the contribution made by Otis Warren of Baltimore, Maryland to the SCLC. He highlights new initiatives that the SCLC will undertake to boost Negro political participation in Southern states and a project to tackle the ghettos of Northern cities. Dr. King humbly notes that these projects could not move forward without the generosity of individuals like Warren.

Letter from Roosevelt Zanders to MLK

Sunday, June 3, 1962
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), Washington, D.C.

Roosevelt Zanders expresses his appreciation to Dr. King after receiving a kind letter and personal autographed copy of "Stride Toward Freedom." Zanders expresses his appreciation for the luncheon in Washington, D. C. and states his desire to visit the Reverend again.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Curtis J. Jackson

Friday, September 7, 1962
Florida (FL), Birmingham, AL, California (CA), Washington, D.C.

Dr. King notifies Rev. Jackson that he will not be able to travel to Orlando, but offers that he'll hopefully be able to accept more invitations in the near future. In addition, he requested that Rev. Jackson come and visit the Annual Convention of S.C.L.C. in Birmingham, Alabama.

History: Ecclesiastes

Dr. King examines the "author's philosophy of history" recorded in the biblical text Ecclesiastes 1:9. He notes that Ecclesiastes' view of history as "a series of endless cycles which has no underlying theology" is in stark contrast to general Bible philosophy, and is more in line with a Greek view of history.