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"Little Rock, AR"

Letter from Charles C. Diggs Jr. to the General Motors Corporation

Tuesday, July 18, 1967
Washington, D.C., Detroit, MI

In this letter, Congressman Charles Diggs of Michigan asks Mr. Louis Seaton of General Motors for his comments in regards to automobile dealerships. The Congressman then points out that General Motors is the only one of the "Big 3" automobile companies that has not taken initiative in having a Negro franchise holder.

Telegram from Winfield P. Woolf, Jr. to the SCLC Board of Strategy

Sunday, March 31, 1968
Atlanta, GA

Just three days before the assassination, Winfield P. Woolf, Jr. asserts that removing Dr. King from the SCLC would be disastrous.

Letter from J. M. Koelbe to Dr. King

Friday, August 12, 1966
Minnesota (MN)

Mr. Koelbe writes Dr. King about his financial distress. He also tells Dr. King that he admires him for his courage and gives him encouragement for the future.

MLK Notes on Ministers Arrest

Dr. King, protested the arrest of three ministers who were advocating for desegregation. He warned that individuals that did not take a stand against oppression will help push the South into 'fascism.'

Letter from Richard U. Smith to MLK

Tuesday, March 14, 1967
Maryland (MD), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Rev. Richard Smith expresses his political views on the possible re-election of Adam Clayton Powell. Smith explains to Dr. King and other leaders that to rally for Mr. Powell is to ignore the moral character of man.

Rejection Letter to Nusas Journal

Monday, May 24, 1965
SOUTH AFRICA

Dr. King informs the editor of Nusas Journal that he will not be able to contribute an article.

Letter from MLK to Louis Pollak

Tuesday, February 27, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Connecticut (CT)

Dr. King writes a recommendation letter for Alan B. Watchel to Dean Louis Pollak of Yale Law School. Dr. King highlights the contributions that Mr. Watchel has made to support the struggle for human dignity and equality.

Hosea

Dr. King writes notes regarding the prophet Hosea and his views of God.

A Christmas Sermon

Sunday, December 24, 1967
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, INDIA, GERMANY, VIETNAM, Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL, Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King discusses the topics of peace, the state of mankind, and his vision for the future during the delivery of this sermon to the congregation of Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Georgia.

Letter to Reverend Ralph D. Abernathy

Monday, April 29, 1968
Virginia (VA)

In this letter, the author suggests that the marchers of the Poor Peoples March should make a surprise visit to the estates of Senator Robert and Edward Kennedy during the historic event.

Suggestions for SCLC Mobilization of Jobs and Income

Friday, February 9, 1968
Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

This document outlines suggestions given by The North City Congress, a federation of independent groups concerned with North Central Philadelphia. The Congress seeks to enable the community to exercise a strong voice in government and social welfare operations pertaining to the improvement of surrounding ghettos. Included is a summary of recommendations and detailed points of consideration.

Resurrection of Jesus

Dr. King quotes George Hedley’s “The Symbol of the Faith.”

Letter from Norma Lineberger to MLK

Tuesday, December 17, 1963
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Washington, D.C.

Mrs. Lineberger encloses a financial contribution for Dr. King to use for his personal well-being. She states that the gift is in memory of the late President Kennedy with hopes that his death will result in a unified stride "toward the good life."

Ben Shahn on Human Rights

Washington, D.C.

The following brochure advertises the contents associated with the Frederick Douglass Institute of Negro Arts and History located in Washington, D.C. This particular exhibition sponsored by Ben Shahn highlights the subject of human rights. The brochure contains sketches of Gandhi and Dr. King.

Letter from Culbert G. Rutenber to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967
Massachusetts (MA)

Professor Rutenber, of Andover Newton Theological School, writes Dr. King on behalf of Lovic Dean, an African American minister, who has requested Dr. King send him "the best books" to build a library on the subject of pacifism.

Telegram from David Livingston to MLK

Thursday, October 20, 1960
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY, Georgia (GA), New York (NY)

David Livingston and Cleveland Robinson, on behalf of their district of the AFL-CIO, send encouragement to Dr. King.

Letter from MLK to Anna Frank

Monday, May 7, 1956
New York, NY

Dr. King informs Mrs. Frank, assistant to Dr. Chalmers, of his travel arrangements to New York where he is set to speak at the NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund dinner.

Ritschl (God)

Dr. King quotes Albrecht Ritschl’s “The Christian Doctrine of Justification and Reconciliation.”

Letter from MLK to Private Freddie J. Friend

Sunday, February 25, 1962
New York (NY)

Responding to a letter dated February 8th, which made claims of mistreatment, Dr. King responds to Private Friend with a proposed solution to his problem.

Folder

The folder, shown here, contained a sermon of Dr. King entitled "Paul's Letter to American Christians." This address was one of Dr. King's well-known sermons.

Letter from George E. Riddick to MLK

Wednesday, July 8, 1964
Chicago, IL

Mr. Riddick writes to Dr. King and thanks him for speaking at Soldier Field. He expresses the support of the Illinois community for Dr. King's ministry on behalf of Civil Rights.

Chicago - Striving Toward Progress

Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

The author of this article identifies two leaders, to include Dr. King and Joseph Germano, in the civil rights movement to speak on the new political focus on economic disparities.

Letter from Burke Marshall to MLK

Wednesday, October 16, 1963
Louisiana (LA), Atlanta, GA

Burke Marshall, Assistant Attorney General, writes Dr. King in response to a telegram sent by the Reverend protesting action be taken by the State of Louisiana against the Southern Conference Educational Fund.

Brotherhood Cannot Be a Theory

Friday, February 19, 1965
Chicago, IL, Los Angeles, CA

This newspaper clipping of The Southern Israelite features segments on the Atlanta banquet honoring Dr. King's acceptance of the Nobel Peace Prize. Given on his return to the States, there were twelve hundred and fifty Atlanta citizens in attendance. Included articles are: welcoming comments by Rabbi Jacob Rothschild, a tribute by Archbishop Paul Hallinan, and a transcription of Dr. King's speech.

Letter from Dr. E. Wolf to MLK

Thursday, April 2, 1964
NORWAY, Oslo, Norway

Professor Dr. E. Wolf, Chairman of the International Peace Bureau, writes Dr. King expressing the bureau's desire to have him as a guess speaker at their annual conference in Norway.

Letter from Elisabeth T. Babcock to Dora McDonald

Thursday, February 25, 1965
New York (NY)

Elisabeth T. Babcock writes Dora McDonald regarding Dr. King's schedule around May 8, 1965. Babcock desires Dr. King to address high school students "in support of Long Island." Babcock states that maybe Dr. King can help the children display their courage.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Tuesday, June 9, 1964
New York, NY, Atlanta, GA

Joan Daves writes to Dr. King to thank him for making a visit, in reference to his book. Ms. Daves mentions the positive reactions from the audience and how she believes that their positive feedback will make for a good start of the book.

Redwood City, CA Tribune

Saturday, June 10, 1967
Berkeley, CA, Pennsylvania (PA)

At the bottom of this clipping, from the Redwood City, California Tribune, is a brief update on the release of Dr. King's final book. The book entitled: "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?", according to the tribune, anticipated that it would be a very must-read publication.

Letter from James R. Herrington to MLK

Wednesday, August 16, 1967
Missouri (MO), Detroit, MI

James R. Herrington wrote this adverse letter to Dr. King, calling both him and his doctrine of civil disobedience "trash." Herrington ends his letter by saying that President Johnson cared more for Dr. King and the Civil Rights Movement than the rest of the country, and therefore, won't be president again.

MLK Outline - "Beyond Condemnation"

This handwritten note of Dr. King's is one of many such notes and outlines he wrote in preparation for a speech or sermon. The body of this outline references the Biblical passage John 8:2-11.