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"LIBERIA"

Letter from Roy Pfaff of Promoting Enduring Peace Inc.

Connecticut (CT), HONG KONG, Tokyo, Japan, Honolulu, HI, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, MONGOLIA

Promoting Enduring Peace Inc. invites friends of the organization to participate in one of their 1968 travel seminars. The three tours consist of the Round-The-World Goodwill Seminar, Soviet Union Tour, Around-The World Across Siberia, Mongolia and Japan. The traveling seminars include conferences, interviews, and other cultural educational features. The organization provides the member with possible materials they could order prior to leaving for one of the seminars.

Letter from Alfred T. Davies to Coretta Scott King

Wednesday, May 26, 1965
Ohio (OH)

Alfred T. Davies writes Mrs. King thanking her for her performance before the General Assembly. Davies also sends well wishes and support to Dr. and Mrs. King in their endeavors.

To Fulfill These Rights

Friday, June 1, 2012
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C.

The White House Conference on Civil Rights printed this program in preparation for their June 1966 conference. The theme of this agenda is entitled To Fulfill These Rights.

Letter from Juanita McKinly to MLK

Thursday, February 24, 1966
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Juanita McKinly requests Dr. King visit her home to evaluate the less than standard living conditions of the building. As a key figure for addressing social ills, many people sought the help of Dr. King in relation to individual concerns.

Card From Marjorie Baker

Marjorie Baker sends a card expressing wishes to maintain courage until things are better.

Religious Leadership

Dr. King cites Henry Nelson Wieman's "Normative Psychology of Religion."

Letter from MLK to C. I. C. Bosanquet

Tuesday, January 30, 1968

Dr. King expresses his gratitude to Dr. Bosanquet for being awarded an honorary degree from the University of Newcastle Upon Tyne. Dr. King deeply appreciated being considered for the degree and for the generous hospitality he received while at the university.

Letter from Wallace Terry to MLK

Monday, April 8, 1963
Washington, D.C., Birmingham, AL, Atlanta, GA, Alabama (AL), Georgia (GA)

The Washington Post anticipates Dr. King's presence as their speaker for the Public Lecture Series "One Hundred Years of Freedom." However, the coordinator of the event, Wallace Terry, understands that Dr. King's imprisonment in the Birmingham jail might prevent Dr. King from appearing. Terry suggests that the Reverends Fred Shuttlesworth, Ralph Abernathy or Wyatt Walker could serve as a substitute. Lastly, Terry pledges to collect an offering for the SCLC.

MLK Interview: The Negro Protest

Boston, MA, Massachusetts (MA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL, Birmingham, AL, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Albany, GA

Kenneth B. Clark conducts a televised interview with Dr. King, James Baldwin, and Malcolm X. Clark discusses with Dr. King his personal history, the relationship between the love ethic and nonviolent direct action, Malcolm X's claim that nonviolence is perceived by white leaders as weakness, and Baldwin's concern that Negroes will not remain nonviolent if met with brutal responses.

Letter from MLK to J. E. L. Graham

Thursday, September 15, 1966
CANADA, Chicago, IL

Dr. King informs Mr. Graham that he is unable to accept an invitation to speak in Ontario extended by the Hamilton Branch of the United Nations. He further explains that this decision is necessary in order to spend more time resolving racial injustice issues in our country.

International Issues: January 26, 1968

Friday, January 26, 1968
VIETNAM, Cleveland, OH, BELGIUM, New York, NY

This edition of the National Council of Churches "International Issues" features a report on the indictment of Dr. King's close associates and fellow peace activists Rev. William Sloane Coffin, Jr. and Dr. Benjamin Spock along with three other peace leaders. The indictment accuses the men of "conspiracy to counsel, aid and abet" draft evasion. The accused were charged on January 5, 1968, a few months after signing an open letter entitled "A Call to Resist Illegitimate Authority," which was published in several newspapers.

Notre Dame Law School Library Letter to MLK

Wednesday, April 19, 1967
Indiana (IN), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Miss Boller, the law school library assistant of Notre Dame, inquires about a recent speech by Dr. King concerning his perspective on the United States and violence.

Images from a Shot Sheet by Victor Summa

Chicago, IL

This piece vividly describes a poet's conception of an urban "Negro" scene. The poetic imagery paints a picture of a dilapidated neighborhood occupied by impoverished, helpless neighbors and drunkards who undergo tremendous emotional struggle. Dr. King's handwriting at the top of the poem indicates that he wanted this document filed.

Man

Dr. King quotes Pascal's "Pensees" in this excerpt that focuses on man's greatness.

Letter from Dan H. Elkind to MLK

Tuesday, August 22, 1967
Florida (FL), ISRAEL

Mr. Elkind discusses recent actions of the SNCC and the SCLC's plans for a massive civil disobedience campaign. He believes that the actions made by the SNCC will lead to violence and also "alienate" supporters of civil rights legislation. He views Dr. King's plans for a massive civil disobedience campaign to be unlawful, and therefore suggests a different approach for Dr. King to take.

Letter to Representatives of Harper & Row and N.A.L from Joan Daves Regarding "Why We Cant Wait"

Tuesday, April 14, 1964
Chicago, IL

This memo serves to inform all parties involved with the publishing of "Why We Can't Wait" of the arranged prepublication agreements made by Mrs. Joan Daves.

The Negro Family: A Challenge to National Action

Thursday, January 27, 1966
Chicago, IL

Dr. King addresses the topic of the Negro family. He emphasizes the importance of discussing the Negro family in comparison to other races.

Schleiermacher (Religion as More Than Outward Form)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher's "Speeches on Religion." The full title of this work is "On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.

Letter from W. A. Rutherford to James Orange

Friday, December 15, 1967
Philadelphia, PA, Atlanta, GA

Mr. Rutherford encourages Reverend Orange to be patient regarding his request for a raise, which must receive Dr. King's final approval.

Resolution of the SCLC Board Regarding Vietnam

Thursday, August 11, 1966
Mississippi (MS), Jackson, MS, VIETNAM

This resolution of the Tenth Annual Convention of the SCLC, outlines the effects of the expansion of the Vietnam War and recommends future action steps for the administration of the organization.

Forgiveness

Dr. King gives examples of what it means to forgive. Among other definitions, forgiveness means "that the past is overlooked" and that there is "a renewal of higher fellowship."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ray Gibbons

Wednesday, December 27, 1961
New York, NY, New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

Dora McDonald returns a check from Alice E. Gwinn to Dr. King because it is made out to the Council for Christian Social Action, and it needs to be endorsed before Dr. King can deposit it.

Unity

These notes, prepared by Dr. King, were for a sermon entitled "Unity." This sermon, believed to be composed during the time of 1948-1954, was never delivered.

Statement Before the Credentials Committee by MLK

Saturday, August 22, 1964
Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL), SOUTH AFRICA

In this statement before the Credentials Committee of the Democratic National Committee, Dr. King urges that the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party be seated and recognized at the convention. Dr. King declares that the Democratic Party in Mississippi itself is unjust and vows to keep black Mississippians off of the voting rolls. Dr.King uses the analogy of how can we as Americans preach "freedom and democracy" in Africa and Asia, yet refuse to provide its own citizens with such rights.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mr. Thomas J. Gilliam, November 8, 1967

Friday, November 8, 1968
Georgia (GA)

In this correspondence to Mr. Thomas J. Gilliam, Miss. Dora McDonald - Dr. King's secretary, informed him that his letter came during his Dr. King's absence, but she had an opportunity to communicate with him. She expressed that Dr. King's calendar would not allow him to meet with Mr. Gilliam, for an interview, but suggested that he send in one or two questions for Dr. King to answer and send back.

Letter to MLK from Carl Fuqua

Friday, February 1, 1963
Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA

Rev. Carl Fuqua writes a letter to Dr. King expressing regret that he could not attend the NAACP meeting due to a sudden virus.

Affidavit of Theo R. Wright

Friday, May 10, 1963
Birmingham, AL

In an attempt to redirect the focus of Negro students in Birmingham, Superintendent Theo R. Wright presents a sworn affidavit detailing his responsibilities and plans to revitalize the educational direction of Birmingham Public Schools.

Letter from J. Edgar Hoover to MLK

Monday, March 29, 1965
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

J. Edgar Hoover, Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, sends his thanks for Dr. King's telegram concerning the recent work of FBI agents in Alabama.

Letter from Viva O. Sloam to CORE Members

Tuesday, June 19, 1962
New York (NY), New York, NY, Kentucky (KY), Michigan (MI), West Virginia (WV)

Viva O. Sloam, sends a letter to members of the Congress for Racial Equality regarding integration in a Kentucky neighborhood.

Letter from MLK Regarding the Movie "Two Eyes, Twelve Hands"

In this letter, Dr. King writes to an unknown recipient regarding royalty matters of a movie entitled "Two Eyes, Twelve Hands". Dr. King thanks the recipient for consideration, and urges that further communication should be directed to Reverend Andrew Young.