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"LIBERIA"

Letter from Rev. A. S. Markham to MLK

Monday, October 19, 1964

Reverend Markham, Executive Head of the British Methodist Episcopal Church and Executive of the Martin Luther King Fund of Toronto, informs Dr. King that the Brotherhood Society of Beth Sholom Synagogue would like to present an award to him. The award honors a person who has contributed to "the needs of humanity in a most outstanding manner."

Letter from Edward Taylor to MLK

Tuesday, February 20, 1968

Staff Sergeant Edward Taylor, United States Army, requests Dr. King's assistance or advice in appealing his bar to reenlistment and court martial.

Letter from John A. Bodkin to MLK

Friday, April 7, 1967

John Bodkin writes Dr. King regarding the speech Dr. King delivered at Riverside Baptist Church in New York detailing his views on the war in Vietnam.

Letter from Joseph Merchant to the Editor of the New York Times

Saturday, October 22, 1966

Mr. Merchant writes to the editor of the New York Times concerning Sargent Shriver's commitment to the poor of Mississippi. Mr. Merchant is concerned with the fact that Mr. Shriver did not refund the Child Development Group of Mississippi (CDGM).

Letter from Julian Bond to Voters

Georgia State Representative Julian Bond requests support for his Georgia House of Representatives re-election bid. Mr. Bond elaborates on planks in his campaign platform concerning education, housing, and employment. Bond was also a long time civil rights activist who helped found the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee.

Statement Regarding Fred L. Shuttlesworth's Court Appearances

Tuesday, July 12, 1966

This document explains Rev. Shuttlesworth upcoming court appearances as a result of his civil rights activities. He faces charges for blocking a sidewalk during a demonstration and for protesting at Drake Memorial Hospital.

MLK's Remarks at the World March Toward Human Rights Luncheon

Thursday, May 28, 1964

This is a draft of remarks made by Dr. King to the World March Toward Human Rights Luncheon of the NAACP's Legal Education Defense Fund. The event took place at the Americana Hotel in Arlington, Virginia. Dr. King states that human rights involve two elements: recognition and opportunity. Dr. King proposes that the United States launch a Bill of Rights for the Disadvantaged.

Servetus, Michael

Dr. King writes biographical notes about Michael Servetus, a citizen of Spain known for his study of medicine and theology. Servetus was burned at the stake because of his anti-Trinitarian views.

Mystery

Dr. King records a quote on mystery from Robert Flint's "The Philosophy of History."

MLK Delta Flight Itinerary

This is Dr. King's flight itinerary. Included destinations are New York, Nassau, and Buenos Aires, South America.

Letter from R. Terry Taft to MLK

Monday, March 19, 1962

R. Terry Taft expresses his disappointment in reading Dr. King's feelings in Newsweek regarding the failure of the Office of Urban affairs to become a federal cabinet position.

MLK's Statement on Endorsing a 1960 Presidential Candidate

Tuesday, November 1, 1960

Dr. King states that the SCLC is a non-partisan organization and that he cannot endorse a political party or candidate. He then goes on to express gratitude for Senator Kennedy and Mayor Hartsfield for their continuous support and leadership.

God

Dr. King notes that Jeremiah 9:23 speaks of man's ability to know and understand God in contrast to modern theology's claim that God is beyond knowing.

Letter from W. Russell Chapman to MLK

Monday, January 22, 1962

The York County, Pennsylvania branch of the NAACP sends a second invitation to Dr. King to be a guest speaker.

Announcement Flyer

This flyer to the public announces that W.S.O. and Dr. King will be holding a warm up rally.

Letter from Tenant to MLK

A tenant from a "slum" building writes to Dr. King requesting help for the building in which she lives. Throughout the letter she lists several problems with the building and hopes that Dr. King can offer assistance.

Letter from High School Student Elizabeth L. Andrews to MLK

Monday, November 18, 1963

Elizabeth Andrews, a sophomore at North Hills High School, requests Dr. King's autograph for her class letter writing project.

Youth, Nonviolence, and Social Change

The conference on "Youth, Nonviolence, and Social Change" at Howard University contains various speakers deriving from various academic disciplines. Dr. King participated in the lecture and discussed how nonviolent methods impacted individuals, especially the youth.

Letter from MLK and Associates to Mr. Grover Hall

Friday, January 11, 1957

Dr. King and associates write to Grover Hall, Editor of the Montgomery Advertiser, to express appreciation for an article the publication carried. The clergymen state that "law and order can be restored" if other periodicals throughout the South follow the newspaper's example.

Herbert Hill Statement Before the House Committee on Education and Labor

Friday, August 17, 1962

Herbert Hill, National Labor Director for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, addresses the House Committee on Education and Labor regarding the questionable practices conducted by the leadership of the International Ladies' Garment Workers' Union.

Letter from Sidney M. Peck to MLK

Thursday, March 17, 1966

On behalf of the University Circle Teach-In Committee, Western Reserve University Professor Sydney Peck invites Dr. King to speak about the Vietnam War at a conference on US foreign policy.

Handwritten Notes on Science and Religion

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines Brightman's views on Science and Religion.

The Future of Integration

Dr. King discusses "The Future of Integration." King opens with background history of three distinct periods of race relations. The first period extends from 1619 to 1862, the era of slavery. The next period extends from 1863 to 1954 when blacks were emancipated, but still segregated. The third period started on May 17, 1954 when segregation was deemed unconstitutional and integration commenced. Furthermore, Dr. King explains the changes that occurred as a result of integration and how it will affect blacks and whites in the future.

Handwritten Notecard Defining Philosophy

Dr. King documents a quote from a book entitled "Philosophy of Religion".

A Look To The Future

Monday, September 2, 1957

For the twenty-fifth anniversary of the Highlander Folk School, Dr. King delivers the speech "A Look To The Future." He uses a timeline to explain the adversities African Americans endured to gain recognition as American citizens. He also points out the efforts of the Ku Klux Klan and the White Citizens Councils to make African Americans second class citizens. Lastly, Dr. King points out that America should be more maladjusted in order to avoid failing to cope with the demands of the normal social environment.

Toynbee

Dr. King highlights a quote from Arnold J. Toynbee's twelve-volume analysis of the rise and fall of civilizations, "A Study of History."

Letter from S. W. Molodtsov to MLK

Thursday, January 19, 1967

The International Institute for Peace sends this letter to Dr. King on behalf of the World Council of Peace. A recent meeting undertook "a major step towards the international coordination of activities to end the war in Vietnam," and the meeting resulted the decision to host an international peace conference. Dr. King is invited to participate in the conference. The Council expresses that his presence and contribution would greatly enhance the conference's impact on anti-Vietnam efforts.

Draft Letter from MLK Regarding Grand Freedom March

Dr. King addresses his "Brother-In-Christ" requesting assistance for an up and coming March for Freedom held in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. He makes three requests including financial and social support.

Malcolm X Memorial Flyer

Thursday, February 22, 1968

The United Federation of Parents, Teachers and Students present the Malcolm X Memorial flyer saluting American Freedom Fighters. Honorees include LeRoi Jones, Bill Epton and Dr. Benjamin Spock. Slated guest speaker, H. Rap Brown and many other community activists/entertainers.

Religion

Dr. King quotes Albrecht Ritschl's "The Christian Doctrine of Justification and Reconciliation."