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"LIBERIA"

Letter from William H. Booth to MLK

Wednesday, March 20, 1968

Commission on Human Rights Chairman William Booth invites Dr. King and a designated representative to a conference in New York entitled, "Testing Human Potential - New Techniques for Selecting Employees from Minority Groups."

SCLC Citizenship Education Program Brochure

This brochure, which describes the Southern Christian Leadership Conference's Citizenship Education Program, states the purpose of the program and also explains how the community can "prepare for first-class citizenship." Included is a brief article by Dr. King entitled "What Makes A First Class Citizen." In the article, Dr. King lists characteristics that first class citizens possess, such as literacy, participation in the political process and an understanding of the Constitution.

I Marched on Washington

Kelly E. Miller composed this poem for Dr. King as a tribute to the March on Washington.

Civil Rights Act of 1957

Monday, September 9, 1957

The Civil Rights Act was signed into law on September 9, 1957 by President Dwight D. Eisenhower. Commonly referred to as the Civil Rights Act of 1957, this was the first such federal law since Reconstruction. The law was aimed at ending voter discrimination tactics such as poll taxes and literacy tests, but it also created the Civil Rights Commission to ensure proper administration of the law.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding the "Times"

Tuesday, June 9, 1964

Joan Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, provided a detailed advertisement schedule for his latest book "Why We Can't Wait." Advertisements appeared in the Times, Harper, The Atlantic, Christian Herald and the Christian Century to name a few.

Nobel Prize Atlanta Dinner Address Outline

Wednesday, January 27, 1965

Dr. King outlines his address for the January 27, 1965 recognition dinner honoring him for the Nobel Peace Prize. He intends to speak on topics of racial justice, nonviolence and poverty, while discussing the strides made by the movement and the uphill battles still to be faced. Over 1000 people attended the program, the first integrated dinner in Atlanta's history.

Correspondence - Mrs. King from The Alumni Association of Antioch College/ Alumni Fund 4/26/60

Tuesday, April 26, 1960

This 1960 fundraising letter is from the Alumni Association of Mrs. King's alma mater, Antioch College. The fundraising committee for the Alumni Association sent this appeal to Mrs. King as a request for her continued support.

People to People: Civil Rights and Negative Normalcy

Saturday, March 12, 1966

Dr. King attempts to answer questions from white liberals concerning the progress and importance of the Civil Rights Movement.

"Negro Leader Looks Down Road Ahead"

Sunday, June 25, 1967

The Augusta Chronicle wrote this extensive review on Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?" In this document, the review places special emphasis on Dr. King's views on the War on Poverty, the Black Power Movement and the state of the Civil Rights Movement.

Letter from Mrs. Emil Singdahlsen to MLK

Friday, March 17, 1967

Mildred Singdahlsen writes to Dr. King concerning the attitude of negro leaders regarding New York Congressman, Adam Clayton Powell. She calls Powell, "not only dishonest, but an opportunist who selfishly advances his own ends," and expresses her hope that Dr. King would speak out about the situation.

Dexter Echo: April 6, 1960

Wednesday, April 6, 1960

This edition of The Dexter Echo addressed to Dr.

Letter from Samuel Starr to MLK

Friday, January 12, 1968

Mr. Starr shares his thoughts regarding the "negro people," suggesting they go back to Africa and organize civilization under Dr. King's leadership.

Letter from Clarence G. Petersen to MLK

Thursday, August 25, 1966

Clarence G. Petersen tells Dr. King that he should avoid marching in the city of Cicero. Petersen describes Cicero as a slum with old houses and an oppressive, industrial atmosphere. While Petersen supports Dr. King's campaign, he believes it'd be best if the city were avoided for Dr. King's safety.

Chicago Nonviolent Action Proposal

SCLC's proposal for a nonviolent action campaign in Chicago identifies the city as the prototype for the northern urban race problem. The proposal includes a snapshot of the situation in Chicago, past approaches, SCLC?s philosophy of social change, a description of twelve different aspects of the problem of economic exploitation, and a plan and timetable for mobilizing forces. Objectives are stated for the federal, state, and local levels. SCLC proposes to work in collaboration with the Coordinating Council of Community Organizations.

Letter from A. Dale Fiers to MLK

Saturday, January 15, 1966

A. Dale Fiers, Executive Secretary for the International Convention of Christian Churches, informs Dr. King of the order of events to take place at the Dallas Assembly of the International Convention on September 25, 1966.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Eleanor H. Allen

Monday, December 16, 1963

Dora McDonald responds to a letter from Eleanor Allen regarding assisting a church affected by recent bombings. McDonald encloses the address of Reverend John Cross, Pastor of 16th Baptist Church, in Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter from Asbury Howard to MLK

Wednesday, June 30, 1965

Asbury Howard, Vice President of the International Union of Mine, Mill and Smelter Workers, informs Dr. King of the harassment and attacks their union has endured for several years. He explains the 1949 indictment of officers from the union on charges of "falsely signing non-Communist affidavits." The case was dormant until government brought the case to trial in 1959 during a strike of 40,000 allied worker and copper miners. Howard cites this as evidence of union busting. He requests Dr. King's commentary and encloses a pamphlet regarding the case.

Letter from Jimmie Barnett to MLK

Wednesday, March 9, 1966

A Negro owner of "so-called slum property" takes offense at Dr. King's stance on the subject. He argues that the owners of the properties are primarily Negroes who are not at fault. Dr. King undertook an extensive "End to Slums" campaign in Chicago in 1966 under the sponsorship of the SCLC and various community organizations.

Revolution and Redemption

Sunday, August 16, 1964

This document contains the address, "Revolution and Redemption," given by Dr. King in Amsterdam. Dr. King discusses the concerns of the "Gospel of Jesus Christ." He states there are two aspects of the world that must never be forgotten: "this is God's world," and that Jesus Christ gave his life for redemption.

God (Dewey)

According to Dr. King's understanding of Dewey's interpretation, God is the connection between the ideal and the actual.

Ritschl and Schleiermacher

Dr. King compares the thoughts of German theologian's Friedrich Schleiermacher and Albrecht Ritschl.

Telegram from Bishop Ljungberg Dean Zetterberg to MLK

Thursday, October 15, 1964

Bishop Ljungberg Dean Zetterberg writes Dr. King on behalf of the Cathedral in Stockholm congratulating him on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize and invites him to attend a peace service.

Letter from MLK to Daniel Casten, M.D.

Tuesday, July 26, 1966

Dr. King took the opportunity to address this letter to Daniel Casten, M.D. thanking him for his financial donation to the Mississippi "James Meredith" March. He noted that the march allowed Negroes, in Mississippi, to resolve their fears and fight for justice. A key quotation, in this document, stated to Dr. Casten, "You are a part of that dedicated group of people standing as a beacon light of hope to all of the disinherited men and women of our nation."

Letter from Apuyva J. Mehta to MLK

Monday, October 2, 1967

Written on the day of Mahatma Gandhi's birthday, Mehta requests Dr. King's autograph.

Letter from David L. Clark and Charles E. Young to MLK

Tuesday, March 23, 1965

David Clark and Charles E. Young of the University of California Los Angeles write to Dr. King to ask him to speak to the UCLA student body. They express that their students are very interested in the Civil Rights Movement and have planned an entire "Selma Week" to correspond with his speech and raise money for the Selma Movement.

Mission Development Report

Sunday, January 1, 1967

This report outlines the structure and development of the North Carolina Leadership Training Project.

Letter from Robert L. Tucker Jr. to MLK

Tuesday, February 7, 1967

Robert Tucker inquires about Dr. King's views on Adam Clayton Powell and his position in Washington. Tucker states that he has great respect for Dr. King, which is why he wants clarity on his sentiments regarding the Powell controversy.

The Task of Christian Leadership Training for Education in the Local Community

This undated manuscript was used as the basis for a speech Dr. King gave at the National Sunday School and Baptist Training Union Congress in Atlantic City, New Jersey in 1944. Dr. King defines community, lists three current problems within the community and explains the role of Christian leaders and education in a community. Dr. King identifies the most pressing problems as the economy, divisions within Christianity and race relations.

Zwingli, H.

Dr. King records biographical information about Swiss reformer Ulrich (or Huldrych) Zwingli.

Letter from President Johnson to Robert W. Gilmore

Wednesday, August 9, 1967

President Johnson writes Robert Gilmore regarding the "Democratic Action in South Vietnam" statement of the Center for War/Peace Studies. Johnson assures him that the U.S. government shares his concern for the development of democracy in Vietnam.