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"Kentucky (KY)"

Letter from Dan C. Lortie to MLK

Monday, May 23, 1966
Chicago, IL

Professor Dan Lortie of the University of Chicago invites Dr. King to speak at the Colver-Rosenberger Lecture Series.

Telegram from MLK to Robert L. Leggett

Washington, D.C.

In this telegram, King urges the House of Representatives to please vote passage demonstration cities for the sake of civil peace.

MLK Statement Regarding the Non-Partisan Position of the SCLC

Tuesday, November 1, 1960
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

While keeping the Southern Christian Leadership Conference's position as a non-partisan organization, Dr. King expresses his gratitude to Senator Kennedy's concern for his arrest.

Letter from Joan Daves to Miss Dora McDonald

Friday, March 26, 1965
New York, NY, Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL

Dr. King's literary agent Joan Daves requests that Dora McDonald send her the full text of Dr. King's speech in Montgomery. She also reports on Dr. King's recent book royalties.

The Categories

Dr. King contemplates the fourth level of ontological concepts, which focus on the categories of thought and being. Referencing Paul Tillich, King notes the categories that are most relevant to theology.

Letter from Audrey Mizer to MLK

Sunday, December 3, 1961
Ohio (OH), Cleveland, OH, Atlanta, GA, CHINA, New York (NY)

Audrey Mizer encourages Dr. King to continue his good works because "the world cannot be robbed of any good." Mizer then discusses her opposing views to a statement in a Christian Monitor Column regarding Red China's admission to the United Nations.

Letter from MLK to Roger Boone

Tuesday, August 31, 1965
New Jersey (NJ)

Dr. King thanks Roger Boone for his financial contribution to the SCLC. He emphasizes the importance of contributions like Boone's to the SCLC's ability to continue its work.

Letter from Dr. King to Earnest Dale

Tuesday, January 23, 1968
New York, NY

This letter serves to acknowledge Earnest Dale's missed call to Dr. King and to thank Professor Dale for his support.

Letter from Birmingham Jail

Wednesday, June 12, 1963
Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), Albany, GA, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

In this copy printed in "The Christian Century," Dr. King writes his letter in response to several Alabama Clergymen who accuse him of being unwise and untimely. His accusers call him an extremist and an "outside agitator" who should not be in Alabama. Dr. King references several sources in his counter to their arguments.

Letter from Norue Crickson to MLK

Tuesday, March 9, 1965
Michigan (MI)

Twelve-year-old Norue Crickson commends Dr. King for his civil rights efforts. He expresses that from now on he will offer his "prayers for this cause."

Telegram to MLK from Various Organizational Leaders

Monday, June 19, 1967
Washington, D.C., New York, NY

Several organizational leaders request that Dr. King join them in Washington, D.C. for an event in which Ambassador Galbraith will address a luncheon with a "major statement on Vietnam."

Letter from Thomas Brown to MLK

Tuesday, August 6, 1963
Washington, D.C.

Thomas Brown, III, the Chairman of the Junior Bar Section of the Bar Association of the District of Columbia, sends a follow up letter to Dr. King regarding an invitation to speak. Brown attempts to appeal to Dr. King by listing prominent individuals that have previously spoke for the organization.

Letter from National Committee for Free Elections in Sunflower to MLK

Monday, August 14, 1967
Mississippi (MS), New York (NY), New York, NY

The National Committee for Free Elections in Sunflower informs Dr. King of the tremendous strides made by the African American community during the elections in Sunflower County, Mississippi. Four years prior, the loss of elections by black candidates was attributed to local intimidation, but new organizational tactics provided the group with tools to combat this issue. The success of the election set a precedent for many other Mississippi counties to view voting rights as a means to change citizens' lives and the nature of the state.

Letter from Irv Kupcinet to MLK

Chicago, IL

Irv Kupcinet of the Chicago Sun-Times extends an invitation to Dr. King for an appearance on his television show, after receiving word of the Reverend's presence in the city.

Letter from Edward W. Brooke to MLK

Monday, April 1, 1968
Washington, D.C.

In this letter, Senator Edward W. Brooke offers his gratitude to Dr. King, for his support of the current civil rights bill.

Press Release on Voter Registration

Monday, October 12, 1964
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C.

The purpose of this press release is to announce Dr. King's nationwide campaign to get individuals to vote in the 1964 presidential election. With sponsorship from the SCLC, Dr. King urges religious leaders to talk to their respective congregations to encourage voter registration. Rev. Walter Fauntroy, who pastored the New Bethel Baptist Church in Washington D.C., will lead the initiative.

Letter from Juanita McKinly to MLK

Thursday, February 24, 1966
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Juanita McKinly requests Dr. King visit her home to evaluate the less than standard living conditions of the building. As a key figure for addressing social ills, many people sought the help of Dr. King in relation to individual concerns.

Letter from Hazel Gregory to MLK

Friday, July 19, 1963
Montgomery, AL, Washington, D.C., Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL)

Hazel Gregory, on behalf of the Montgomery Improvement Association, asks Dr. King about transportation to the March on Washington. She also commends him on his recent article published in "Ebony." Dr. King was president of the Montgomery Improvement Association from 1955 to 1960. The organization was founded after the arrest of Rosa Parks, which sparked the Montgomery Bus Boycott.

Letter from Phyllis E. Ames to MLK

Sunday, October 25, 1964
New York (NY), New York, NY

Phyllis E. Ames, on behalf of the National Association of Negro Business and Professional Women's Young Adults of the New York Club, congratulates Dr. King on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from Bryn Mawr College to MLK

Monday, May 30, 1966
Pennsylvania (PA)

Bryn Mawr College commends Dr. King for his recent "forceful" presentation that impressed those in attendance at the institution.

Immorality

Dr. King cites a quotation from the book entitled "War and Peace" by Leo Tolstoy. Mr. Tolstoy includes a dialogue between two characters in the book that discuss immorality. One character references "Hender's Theory" to expound upon the reality of life and death.

Response letter from Dr. King regarding Mr. Altomerianos and Charles Evans Hughes High School

Thursday, October 23, 1958
New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King took the time to write to the faculty and students of Charles Evans Hughes High School, following his release from Harlem Hospital. In this thank you, he expressed sincere gratitude for the well wishes from the young students relayed to him during his illness. Furthermore, Dr. King acknowledged that the future would be in good hands with their involvement in the struggle for Brotherhood and Human Dignity.

Letter from Robert Hilborn to MLK

Friday, January 15, 1965
CANADA, Atlanta, GA

Robert Hilborn, President of The Empire Club of Canada invites Dr. King to be honored as the guest speaker. Hillborn offers the option of two different dates.

Birthday Card from The Men's Usher Board to MLK

Friday, January 1, 1965
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

The Men's Usher Board of Ebenezer Baptist Church wishes Dr. King a happy birthday.

Birthday Card from Mrs. King to MLK

Tuesday, January 15, 1963
PERU, FRANCE

Mrs. King sends birthday wishes to Dr. King.

Science

Dr. King's notecard addresses the analytical method of science. King interprets Alfred North Whitehead's "Science and the Modern World" to mean "[t]he method of science is to diversify or break up this experience into its component elements." He quotes Whitehead coining the term 'diversification of nature.'

Letter from William W. Stafford to MLK

Thursday, April 13, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY

William Stafford expresses admiration, gratitude and support for Dr. King's work with the Civil Rights Movement and his stand against the Vietnam War.

Telegram from Senator Percy to MLK

Saturday, June 3, 1967
Washington, D.C., Chicago, IL, New York (NY), New York, NY

Senator Charles H. Percy invites Dr. King to a private dinner to discuss innovative approaches for private sector involvement in the "urban problem."

Survey from Jack Hillhouse to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. about Mass Communications Media

Indiana (IN)

This incomplete survey form is from a graduate student, Jack Hillhouse, seeking to understand the connection, if any, between mass communications media and race riots, demonstrations, and disturbances.

Sermon at The Washington Cathedral

Sunday, March 31, 1968
New York (NY), INDIA, SOUTH AFRICA, Washington, D.C.

In a sermon written by Dr. King and addressed to an audience at the Washington Cathedral, the Reverend expounds upon the problem of poverty and war. In describing a projected human revolution, Dr. King states, "Somewhere we must come to see that human progress never rolls in on the wheels of inevitability." This is just one of the many passages in this inspirational sermon encouraging hope and freedom for all.