Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Kentucky (KY)"

Levels of Love

Sunday, May 21, 1967

Dr. King describes five levels of love, from lowest to highest: utilitarian love, friendship, romantic love, humanitarian love, and agape. The last he refers to as Christian love, the love of God operating in the human heart. The first four, he states, are love for one’s own sake. The fifth is love for another person for their sake. This sermon was delivered by Dr. King on May 21, 1967 at Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Georgia.

Article Written by MLK for The Progressive

In this unfinished draft of an article for The Progressive, Dr. King writes about the social ills of America through the context of what he calls the two most important documents in American history: the Declaration of Independence and the Emancipation Proclamation.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding German Re-Publicaition

Monday, May 11, 1964

In this letter Daves informs Dr. King of what Mr. Von Wehrenalp, Dr. King's German publisher, might have had in mind for Dr. King's special introduction for the German edition. Ms. Daves further discusses other possible uses for such a piece.

Western Union Telegram from Andrew Young to Nils J. Engelesen

In this telegram, Mr. Young informs Rev. Engelesen that Dr. King will accept his invitation to the reception.

Article Request from Sean MacBride to MLK

Tuesday, December 13, 1966

Sean MacBride, Secretary-General of the International Commission of Jurists, requests that Dr. King contribute an article for a special issue of the Journal of the International Commission of Jurists.

Sin

In this set of notecards, Dr. King discusses "sin." Referencing Biblical verses of Psalms 53:2 and 53:3, he says that "these passages seem to be an explicit affirmation of the universality of sin."

Address by MLK at the 30th Anniversary of District 65

Wednesday, October 23, 1963

This document, an address given by Dr. King on the 30th anniversary of District 65, includes handwritten notes. In the address, Dr. King talks about the importance of the Declaration of Independence and the Emancipation Proclamation to human rights.

Letter from Nicholas Gage to MLK

Monday, May 8, 1967

In this letter dated May 8, 1967, Nicholas Gage writes to Dr. King. Mr. Gage, who works for the Boston Herald, thanks Dr. King for allowing him to interview him. He encloses a copy of the story of the interview that Dr. King gave him.

Letter from Harry Wachtel to Theodore Smith

Tuesday, January 2, 1968

Mr. Wachtel informs Theodore Smith and Hosea Williams that they are in danger of breaking the terms of a loan agreement from The American Foundation on Nonviolence.

Letter from Thein Wah to MLK

Thursday, April 20, 1967

Thein Wah expresses appreciation to Dr. King for his efforts in leading peace marches in New York, New York and San Francisco, California.

Letter from Charles W. Lockyer to MLK

Tuesday, August 15, 1967

Charles Lockyer sends Dr. King a special limited edition of the International Library of Negro Life and History as a gift. Lockyer explains that the book series is a collaboration between his publishing company and the Association for Study of Negro Life and History.

Letter from M.J. McGrayle to MLK

Friday, December 30, 1966

M.J. McGrayle from Chicago expresses his or her concerns to Dr. King. McGrayle does not understand some of the actions of African Americans and disagrees with Dr. King's marches. The author believes that many of the events taking place within the Civil Rights Movement are further separating the races, as "black people are afraid of" whites. As a white person, McGrayle states, "I lived in Birmingham, Ala[bama] and took the colored peoples part," though now in disagreement, will "do nothing more for the colored people."

Letter from Victor Carter to MLK

Wednesday, March 24, 1965

Victor Carter writes a letter of support to Dr. King on behalf of he and his wife. The Carters are unable to attend the Selma to Montgomery march but enclose a check to aid in the civil right struggle.

Rousseau

Dr. King writes a quote from Genevan philosopher, Jean-Jacques Rousseau.

MLK Statement Regarding the Land Purchase Agreement with the Atlanta Housing Authority

Monday, July 31, 1967

With a purchase of land through the Atlanta Housing Authority, Dr. King announces that Ebenezer Baptist Church intends to provide new housing in an organized neighborhood near downtown Atlanta. Ebenezer Baptist Church also plans to develop a program with contracting firms to teach men the fundamentals of construction.

Letter from James H. Bowman to Rev. Andrew J. Young

Saturday, July 2, 1966

James H. Bowman writes to Rev. Young requesting for Mr. Ralph Henry to be stationed by SCLC on the near west side of Chicago.

Letter from MLK to Sr. Joao Carlos Meirelles

Thursday, February 25, 1965

Dr. King informs Sr. Meirelles that prior commitments regarding the Right-to-Vote Campaign in Alabama preclude his ability to attend the conference in Brazil.

Voting Rights and Terrorism in the South

The author places the success of the Voting Rights Bill of 1965 in the hands of the Federal Government. It is stated that the only way the Negros will truly feel the effects of the bill is if the government does its part to enforce it.

Go to Black Africa

An unknown author writes to Dr. King advising that he return to Africa if he is unhappy with his plight in America.

Telegram from MLK to Rev. Jesse Jackson

Dr. King writes to Rev. Jesse Jackson, urgently requesting his presence at a meeting of the Action Committee for Washington.

NAIRO Supports March for Freedom

The National Association of Intergroup Relations Officials declares their support of the March for Freedom in Washington, D.C. NAIRO urges its members to support the march for the integration of over "20,000,000 Americans of minority identity."

Love and Forgiveness

Tuesday, May 5, 1964

This is a speech entitled "Love and Forgiveness" that Dr. King delivered at the American Baptist Convention meeting in Atlantic City, New Jersey. Jesus Christ and segregation serve as the major topics for this speech. Dr. King makes the compelling statements that "Jesus decided to meet hate with love," and that "segregation is still the Negro's burden and America's shame."

Fiscal Facts about SCLC

This brochure outlines financial disclosure information regarding SCLC as a non-profit organization.

Letter from Alfred A. Haesler to MLK

Wednesday, September 6, 1967

Alfred A. Haesler of Die Tat or "the fact," a publication in Switzerland, asks Dr. King a series of questions that revolve around the role of hatred in American politics.

Proposed Nobel Speech

This is a draft for an optional version of Dr. King's Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech. He notes the importance of viewing the world as a family and with such perception, understands race issues as an international concern. King also speaks of Sir Alfred Bernhard Nobel, the originator of the Nobel Peace Prize. He accepts the award on behalf of those who came before him and those who continue to fight for freedom.

Letter From Christine Heath to MLK

Wednesday, March 20, 1968

Ms. Christine Heath, a high school student, asks for information on how "Civil Disobedience," by Henry David Thoreau, has affected Dr. King.

Dr. King Sermon Rough Draft - "Man Incurably Religious"

The document, shown here, is a rough draft of sermon notes, prepared by Dr. King, under the title "Man Incurably Religious." The exact timeframe, of this sermon draft, is unknown. Dr. King, in this draft, puts the spotlight on examples such as a baby's attachment to a mother, a flower's direction toward the sun and the flight pattern of a pigeon. He used a quotation of St. Augustine that said, "We come forth from God and we shall be homesick until we return to him."

Professor Andrew Blane Offers Assistance to MLK

Saturday, November 4, 1967

Andrew Blane, Assistant Professor of History at Hunter College, offers to brief Dr. King on the role of religion in Russian culture, particularly the Russian Baptists. He attaches along with his letter, a description of his "scholarly interests and training" for Dr. King to consider.

Letter from Peggy Duff to MLK

Wednesday, May 31, 1967

Peggy Duff writes Dr. King inviting him to attend a conference in Stockholm, Sweden surrounding the issue of peace and the Vietnam War. Duff is an official with the International Confederation for Disarmament and Peace. She thanks Dr. King for meeting with her in San Francisco, California and urges him to attend the conference in Stockholm.

SCLC Voter Registration Prospectus 1961

The SCLC Voter Registration Prospectus discusses the importance of the Negro vote. The SCLC believes that by voting, the Negro "can be heard and demand equal consideration." They believe that for a voter registration drive to be successful it must be church oriented. Thus, this prospectus outlines the programs and organizations needed for a church-oriented registration drive. Also included is a list of duties for the SCLC staff and a proposed budget for the drive.