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Race Problem

Dr. King discusses the solution to the race problem, citing Reinhold Niebuhr's view that human methods are irrational.

Man's Dilemma

Dr. King states that man’s dilemma results from “the divorce of nature from the supernatural.”

Interruptions: Man from Porlock

Sunday, January 21, 1968

Dr. King delivered this sermon, "Interruptions," on January 21, 1968 at Ebenezer Baptist Church. He describes how no one lives a life free of interruptions, and that the major problem of life is learning how to handle them.

Letter from Louis Rome to MLK

Saturday, February 10, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Michigan (MI), Detroit, MI

Louis Rome, Executive Director of the Michigan Commission on Crime, extends an invitation for Dr. King to speak at the Governor's conference being held in Detroit.

Letter from MLK to Douglas A.C. Davis

Friday, December 13, 1963

Dr. King informs Douglas A. C. Davis that due to his current commitments, he will be unable to accept Davis' invitation to speak at the University of Western Ontario during the current academic year.

Telegram from MLK and Wyatt Walker to Burke Marshall

Monday, July 2, 1962
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Washington, D.C.

Dr. King and Rev. Wyatt Tee Walker send a urgent request to Burke Marshall of the United States Department of Justice. The two ministers seek a federal investigation in the brutal beating of an SCLC Voter Registration worker in Georgia.

Letter from Douglas Mosley and Dwight Campbell to MLK

Monday, August 24, 1964
Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA), Delaware (DE), New Jersey (NJ), Maryland (MD)

The Philadelphia District of The Methodist Youth Fellowship asks Dr. King to be the keynote speaker at an upcoming freedom rally.

Points for Progress, Birmingham, Alabama

Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

This is a list or outline of points for progress in the Birmingham Campaign. They may have been used in a face-to-face presentation with local community leaders or with media officials. These words carefully enumerate the demands or wishes of the civil rights leaders and the Negro community.

Telegram from Johnnie McKinney to MLK

Monday, April 5, 1965
Wyoming (WY), Atlanta, GA

Johnnie McKinney telegrams Dr. King to invite him to a fundraising event that is set to occur in Wyoming. McKinney states, "Wyoming needs you to make Reverend Reebs home state a real fortress of equality."

Letter from Arthur L. Baney to the SCLC

Thursday, June 24, 1965
Baltimore, MD, Maryland (MD)

Arthur Baney writes the SCLC on behalf of Eastman Dillon, Union Securities & Company regarding five shares of General Electric Company stock that was gifted to the SCLC by Mary Cushing H. Niles.

Letter from Elaine Attias to MLK

Monday, November 13, 1967
Los Angeles, California, Atlanta, GA

Elaine Attias of the Jewish Federation Council follows up on a previous request for Dr. King to appear on the television series "Commitment Profiles." She mentions other prominent people who have participated, including former Israeli Prime Minister David Ben-Gurion.

Articles Regarding Operation Breadbasket

Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA

These two articles from the Chicago Daily News and The Washington Post, discuss the economic improvement of Negroes in Chicago, IL.

SCLC Staff Meeting - Suggestions and Assignments

Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

These notes from a SCLC staff meeting discuss a plan of action for the Chicago Campaign and the Soldier Field rally. The document covers an array of topics, such as advertising, speaking engagements and smaller rallies.

"Are We Ready"

This column by Joseph D. Bibb makes the argument that not only is "the colored American" ready for his civil rights, but also it is hypocritical to deny him those rights given the ignorance and savagery of many of his white counterparts.

Advertising and Promotion Expenditures

Tuesday, September 17, 1963

This is a copy of the advertising and promotion expenditures for Dr. King's book, "Strength To Love".

Letter from Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding Education Heritage

Friday, March 13, 1964
New York, NY

In this letter, Joan Daves informs Dr. King that the Educational Heritage Company has come to an arrangement about distributing "Stride Toward Freedom" and "Strength to Love." The letter goes on to say that Educational Heritage will pay a guarantee of $2500 against a royalty of 42 cent per copy sold.

An Ambitious Dream Confronts Reality

Wednesday, June 23, 1965
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Michigan (MI), Alabama (AL), Selma, AL, Montgomery, AL

Dr. King talks about the Summer Community Organization and Political Education Project (SCOPE) as well as the political changes that have occurred in Georgia.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, November 20, 1964
New York, NY, Oslo, Norway

Joan Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, suggests a discussion concerning future writing plans. She mentions the possibility of publishing a collection that would include several of Dr. King's speeches and writings, among them the March on Washington address and the Oslo speech.

Southern Christian Leadership Resolutions

Friday, June 30, 1967
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Washington, D.C.

Chauncey Eskridge sends Andrew Young resolutions related to the Southern Christian Leadership Foundation. Mr. Eskridge explains that an examination into the foundation's tax exempt status by the IRS prompted his letter.

Crusade For The Ballot

GEORGIA, Virginia (VA), North Carolina (NC), South Carolina (SC), Mississippi (MS), Louisiana (LA), Texas (TX), Atlanta, GA

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference issues a pamphlet addressing the need for increased registration of Negro voters in the southern states of America.

Instructions for Honorary Degree Recipients

This document reflects instructions for Dr. King as the recipient of an honorary degree from Yale University. The program also includes some random handwritten notes by Dr. King and information regarding his seating arrangement.

Letter from Ronald C. Bauer to MLK

Wednesday, April 7, 1965
PUERTO RICO, Selma, AL, Alabama (AL)

Ronald Bauer, President of the Inter American University of Puerto Rico, follows up with Dr. King about previous letters. The university again hopes Dr. King will accept its invitation to become a member of the International Council.

Financial Report of the SCLC

Monday, July 25, 1966
Atlanta, GA

This document outlines the financial statements of the Atlanta home office of the SCLC. The figures are from July 25, 1966 through July 28, 1966.

To Fulfill These Rights

Friday, June 1, 2012

The White House Conference on Civil Rights printed this program in preparation for their June 1966 conference. The theme of this agenda is entitled To Fulfill These Rights.


Dr. King notes some attributes and results of worship.

Information on the National Welfare Rights Organization

Washington, D.C., Los Angeles, CA, New York, NY, New York (NY), Columbus, OH, Chicago, IL, Pittsburgh, PA

The National Welfare Rights Organization (NWRO) is a nationwide membership organization of welfare recipients. The goals of the NWRO are to develop a system that guarantees adequate income, dignity, justice and democracy.

Letter to Dora McDonald from F. Fishman

Friday, October 27, 1967

This document is a correspondence between Mr. Frank Fishman and Miss. Dora McDonald, Dr. King's secretary. Mr. Fishman had enclosed a copy of a letter dated July 25 and his letter September 25, enquiring that he did not receive a reply about his script that was sent back July 25, 1967.

Nobel Lecture Itinerary

Oslo, Norway

This is an itinerary for the King family for the Nobel Peace Prize luncheon and lecture.

Letter from Esther Davey to MLK

Friday, April 23, 1965
Selma, AL

Esther Davey writes Dr. King in support of his crusade. She expresses her dismay in some of Dr. King's speeches made after the march from Selma, Alabama and stresses the importance of Christianity in his crusade.

Letter of Appreciation to MLK from Mrs. A.M.Digilio

Friday, July 30, 1965

In this letter, Mrs. A.M. Digilio writes to Dr. King. Along with her expressions of appreciation, she admits to being one of the millions of whites who have "prayerfully" followed Dr. King's work. Mrs. Digilio states that Dr. King has been a voice to those of the "inarticulate working class", both white and black. She speaks of the unfortunate decline of morality amongst Americans and the necessary Christian might to rectify it. Mrs. Digilio further compares Dr.