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War and Pacifism

New York (NY), New York, NY

Dr. King examines War and Pacifism. He determines that absolute pacifism is not acceptable, but neither is war. He cites several different philosophies of pacifism and nonviolence set forth by such figures as Nels Ferre, John H. Hallowell, A. J. Muste and Mahatma Gandhi.

Letter from Wyatt Walker to Hy Resnick

Friday, December 8, 1961
New York (NY)

On behalf of Dr. King, Wyatt Walker thanks Hy Resnick and the Mount Vernon YM & YWHA for their efforts to raise money to aid the civil rights movement. He then suggests a number of entertainers that might be useful through Harry Belafonte's associations.

Nature

Dr. King writes notes regarding the topic of nature.

Remarks by the Right Rev. Richard S. Emrich

Friday, June 28, 1957
Detroit, MI, Montgomery, AL

This address accompanies the awarding of the Springarn Medal to Dr. King. The Medal is presented annually by the NAACP for Outstanding Achievement by a Negro Citizen.

Letter from Mrs. Elizabeth Sherrill to MLK

Thursday, November 9, 1967
New York (NY), Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL)

Mrs. Sherrill informs Dr. King of a young man, Mr. Jerry Peace, from her church, St. Mark's, who shows great promise as a poet. She encourages Dr. King to reach out to Mr. Peace to help direct his "rather anger energy" into a new direction.

Letter From Clifford Alexander Jr. to MLK

Wednesday, June 28, 1967
Washington, D.C.

Clifford Alexander Jr. thanks Dr. King for supporting him in his nomination as Chairman of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.

Letter From Elaine Kennedy to MLK Regarding the Media

Wednesday, June 30, 1965
Los Angeles, CA

In this document Kennedy, a medical secretary, writes to Dr. King expressing her political concern in reference to the use of racial designations in the media.

Letter from Chester Bowles to MLK

Tuesday, December 31, 1957
Connecticut (CT), Montgomery, AL, INDIA

Chester Bowels writes Dr. King requesting the use of his quotes to submit to the Saturday Evening Post. Mr. Bowels also regrets to inform Dr. King that he cannot join the national committee to raise funds to fight for Negros voting rights in the Southern states.

Letter from Sandra A. Lonsfoote to MLK

Saturday, March 16, 1968
Indiana (IN), Atlanta, GA

Sandra A. Lonsfoote, Campus Coordinator at Bethel College, writes Dr. King requesting campaign information for the Choice 68' campaign.

Telegram from Dr. and Mrs. King to Rev. Ralph Abernathy

Sunday, March 11, 1962
Atlanta, GA

Dr. and Mrs. King congratulate Reverend Ralph Abernathy on his birthday.

Letter from June Gordon to MLK

Friday, July 9, 1965
New York, NY, New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

June Gordon, as the Executive Director of the Emma Lazarus Federation of Jewish Women's Clubs, issues a check to SCLC. They also pledge to assist other civil rights groups involved in the struggle for equality.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Florence Wright

Wednesday, August 1, 1962
INDIA, Georgia (GA), Albany, GA

Dora McDonald informs Florence Wright that Dr. King is currently in jail in Albany, Georgia. Dora McDonald reassures Miss Wright that her encouraging words will mean a great deal to Dr. King.

Letter from Staughton Lynd to MLK

Wednesday, March 27, 1963
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Straughton Lynd, Chairman of the Greater Atlanta Peace Fellowship, informs Dr. King of his organization and asks to meet regarding "the nuclear test ban negotiation." Lynd also encloses the organization's purpose statement.

Telegram from Donna Jean Stancliff to MLK

Thursday, December 28, 1967
Washington, D.C., Norfolk, VA, Atlanta, GA

Donna Jean Stancliff informs Dr. King of Mrs. Zelma G. Proctor's funeral.

Anonymous Sender Criticizes MLK

Michigan (MI), VIETNAM

This anonymous writer challenges Dr. King with his complaints concerning the Civil Rights Movement. He argues that a Negro man should be held responsible for breaking the law and should expect rightful punishment.

Letter from Phale D. Hale to MLK

Saturday, December 7, 1963
Ohio (OH), Columbus, OH, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Phale D. Hale, Pastor of Union Grove Baptist Church, sends $100.00 in support of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Pastor Hale praises Dr. King's efforts in the Civil Rights Movement and offers to organize a massive fund-raising event in Columbus, Ohio if Dr. King will attend.

MLK Writes Rev. Frank N. Williams Thanking Him for Support

Thursday, October 11, 1962
New Jersey (NJ)

Dr. King writes Rev. Williams and expresses his appreciation for his witness in Albany, Ga. He also apologizes for the time delay of the letter explaining that there was an accumulation of mail in his office. He goes on to say that the work that Rev. Williams has done was very important and will continue to be needed in the movement.

It is Not Enough to Condemn Black Power...

Saturday, October 1, 1966
Mississippi (MS), Chicago, IL

Dr. King addresses the "Black Power" movement in this two-page document. He also explains his thoughts and experiences relating to the tactics and goals of the Civil Rights Movement.

Women Strike for Peace: How Can You Be Silent?

Thursday, April 1, 1965
New Jersey (NJ), New York (NY), Connecticut (CT), VIETNAM

This newsletter exemplifies the struggle that Vietnamese children faced during the war. It also urges many to protest in order to prevent young children from dying.

Telegram from Anne Farnsworth and Marty Peretz to MLK

Friday, April 14, 1967
New York, NY, New York (NY)

Anne Farnsworth and Marty Peretz offer their encouragement to Dr. King.

Letter from Walter Davis, Jr. to MLK

Monday, April 11, 1966
CONGO / ZAIRE, Atlanta, GA

Walter Davis, Jr. encloses a donation to SCLC sent all the way from the Congo. Mr. Davis expresses, "Of particular interest to us is the way in which you and your organization are able to get the participation of many groups who are interested in justice and social reform."

Address by MLK to Southern Association of Political Scientist

Friday, November 13, 1964

Dr. King addresses the issues of poverty, unemployment, education, health, and housing disparities within the nation. Granted, many strides have been made but there is still more work to be done. Equality has still not come full circle in regards to these social issues. Dr. King urges the people to continue the fight of social justice in all aspects of inequality.

Schleiermacher (Religion More Than Dogma)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “Speeches on Religion.” The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”

Letter from Lionel H. Newsom to MLK Regarding Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc.

Tuesday, July 18, 1967
Atlanta, GA

In this letter, Lionel H. Newsom, the General President of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc., provides Dr. King with a check for support.

MLK Style Sheet: Why We Can't Wait

Here we see what is known as a style sheet for Dr. King's third book, "Why We Can't Wait." Dr. King's book was published in 1964 following the success of the infamous SCLC Birmingham desegregation campaign.

Schleiermacher (Religion as More Than Knowledge)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “Speeches on Religion.” The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”

Letter from Raphael Gould to Coretta Scott King

VIETNAM

Mr. Gould of the Fellowship of Reconciliation sends Mrs. King a compilation of writings about and by Phan Thi Mai, a Vietnamese student who self-immolated on May 16, 1967 in an appeal to end the war in Vietnam. Mai "decided to burn herself to make her voice heard by the war."

Non-Violence Takes Courage: King's Wife

Friday, March 29, 1968
Washington, D.C., Alabama (AL), Selma, AL, Ohio (OH), Boston, MA, Massachusetts (MA)

Mrs. Coretta Scott King elaborates on her commitment to nonviolence, referring to it as "the best instrument of change," throughout her involvement in the Civil Rights and Peace Movements.

Deism

London, England, FRANCE

Dr. King defines "deism" as a concept developed by a group of English and French religious thinkers who "interpreted God purely in terms of natural order" during the 17th and 18th century.

Appreciation Letter to MLK

Wednesday, August 21, 1963
Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

President John F. Kennedy writes Dr. King expressing appreciation for his support during this difficult time. President Kennedy is referring to the death of his second son, Patrick Bouvier Kennedy, who died two days after his birth August 7, 1963.