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"Kansas (KS)"

Letter from William E. Duncan to MLK

Wednesday, February 2, 1966

The branch director of a Chicago based youth center welcomes Dr. King to their neighborhood. William Duncan conveys his support to Dr. King's initiatives for community revitalization. His letter was written at the beginning of a major campaign undertaken by Dr. King and SCLC to campaign for open housing in Chicago.

Letter from Martha Roberts to MLK

Tuesday, April 25, 1967

Martha Roberts, of Scranton, Pennsylvania, chastises Dr. King for leading marches and speaking against the war in Vietnam. She expresses to Dr. King that his focus should be on teaching "your people" to learn trades, enhance education and accept gradual change.

Letter from Morris Kight to MLK Regarding March on Washington

Thursday, November 16, 1967

This document is a letter from Morris Kight to Dr. King in which Kight expresses his gratitude for Dr. King's efforts and offers his assistance in mobilizing individuals for the planned March on Washington February 1968.

Letter from Matthew T. Doherty to MLK

Tuesday, July 26, 1966

Matthew Doherty responds to an "eloquent and moving" appeal from Dr. King in the July 26th issue of The New York Times. Doherty discusses the recent surge in "black power" and its role in the ongoing struggle for equal rights. The writer also mentions his "small" contribution to aid Dr. King's efforts to "make this a better world for all of us."

MLK Endorses Septima Clark's Autobiography

Monday, July 2, 1962

King writes this endorsement of Septima Clark's autobiography"Echo In My Soul," which captured her struggle as a Negro woman in the South. Clark was a prominent civil rights activist considered to be the "Grandmother of the American Civil Rights Movement."

Letter from Robert Way to MLK

Tuesday, April 25, 1967

Robert Way, Chairman of the Hadley Executive Committee, writes to correct a misunderstanding regarding restrictions on the contents of a lecture Dr. King is scheduled to deliver. Mr. Way assures Dr. King he has the freedom to express what he feels is important.

Telegram from the Church of Sweden to MLK

Tuesday, March 3, 1964

The Church of Sweden invites Dr. King to take part in a great church event in the fall of 1964. The church assures Dr. King that all expenses will be paid for his travel and the archbishop of Sweden will provide him with the official invitation letter.

Postcard Congratulating MLK for Receiving the Nobel Prize

Louise Dekker-Brus congratulates Dr. King on the Nobel Peace Prize and writes that their newspaper says that, in King, America has its Joan of Arc.

Faith and Reason

Dr. King references Albert Knudson's "The Doctrine of God."

Letter from the Lamar W. Sessoms Family to MLK

Sunday, June 25, 1967

In this letter, the Sessoms family informs Dr. King that rural sections of Mississippi are systematically starving their Negro residents. The Sessoms family asks for Dr. King's advice and assistance in alleviating this problem.

Letter from Joan Daves to Clarence Jones

Friday, October 30, 1964

Joan Daves writes to Dr. King's attorney to discuss her receipt of the Martin Luther King Treasury published by the Educational Heritage. Impressed with the volume, Daves proceeds to give details on its organization and content. Raising the issue of whether certain material is in the public domain, Daves offers to expedite the copyright assignment process.

Six Lessons from Red China

Wednesday, August 1, 1951

The author discusses six lessons that readers can learn from Communist China concerning America and the church. The first lesson being on corruption, if uncontrolled, leads to tyranny. The second and third lessons focus on change. The forces in the world during that time (namely Communism) and the methods they used exceeded what people thought was possible in history.

Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to MLK

Friday, September 21, 1962

Benjamin E. Mays offers celebratory wishes to Dr. King on the sixth anniversary of the Southern Christian Leadership Conferece. Mays offers words of support and encouragement for the great work Dr. King has done in the fight for equality and justice.

Life Magazine: Why We Can't Wait

Friday, May 15, 1964

This excerpt, taken from Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait," appears in an issue of Life Magazine. King parallels the experience of handicapped people to the social handicap of the Negro. Comparing instances of governmental aid, he notes that there has been "countless other measures of compensatory treatment that the nation has accepted and approved as logical and moral." King continues the segment by referencing the stance of three American presidents that he has engaged conversation on the subject of civil rights.

Letter From Mitchell Sviridoff to MLK

Tuesday, April 11, 1967

Mitchell Sviridoff responds to a telegram from Dr. King, in which Dr. King states his support of the Queens Clinical Society's proposal for a neighborhood health service center.


Dr. King discusses the meaning of the Book of Daniel, namely to reinforce the idea of the kingdom of God.

Letter from Julian Bond to MLK

Friday, September 15, 1967

Julian Bond, a member of the Georgia House of Representatives, encloses a memorandum that proposes that the Atlanta Student Movement performs the following actions: "educate and involve the community, convince the Atlanta Board of Education that 'everyone cares,' and force action from the Board."

The Self

Dr. King quotes Henry Nelson Wieman's book "The Source of Human Good."

Telegram from Jacob K. Javits to MLK

Amidst the confusion of varying interpretations, Senator Jacob K. Javits asks Dr. King to share his interpretation of the term "black power," so that it can serve as a guide to others.


Dr. King cites a passage from American philosopher William Ernest Hocking's "Meaning of God in Human Experience," in which he discusses various forms of mysticism.

Letter from Representative Charles Longstreet Weltner to MLK

Monday, January 4, 1965

Representative Weltner disagrees with Dr. King's assessment that Weltner's decision to seat the regular Mississippi delegation "was a vote for organized violence, murder, and oppression." Weltner also reminds Dr. King that he voted for the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from Adrienne Lombardi to MLK

Thursday, February 8, 1968

Adrienne Lombardi writes Dr. King to express her gratitude that he believes everyone owes their first allegiance to God. She also discusses her view on religion and her sentiments regarding the war.

Letter from Gene Young to Joan Daves

Monday, May 15, 1967

Gene Young of Harper and Row Publishing sends this letter to Joan Daves, Dr. King's literary agent. He explains that he is waiting to send out promotional copies of Dr. King's most recent book, "Where Do We Go From Here," until after he receives a list of who Dr. King and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference have already sent copies. He attaches a list of those sent copies of Dr. King's last book so that they might use it as a checklist, including President Johnson, Vice President Humphrey, Robert F. Kennedy, and Dr.

Letter from Ernest Shaefer to Dora McDonald

Thursday, June 30, 1966

Mr. Shaefer requests that Dora McDonald send two mats and a second biographical sketch of Dr. King for use in two local papers to promote Dr. King's upcoming appearance in Pennsylvania to speak for the Hadley Memorial Fund. He also asks that Dr. King's lecture topic be sent so it may be added to the program for the speech.

Employment Recommendation Letter to MLK from Stone's Mercantile Agency on behalf of Raymond C. Fauntroy

Tuesday, October 24, 1967

In this letter Thelma Goldsborough, a representative of Stone's Mercantile Agency, requests a personal reference for Raymond C. Fauntroy from Dr. King.

SCLC Strategy North/South

This document addresses indifference of the Northern and Southern movement contributions. The direct-action techniques that are exercised in the South do not exist in the North. The SCLC is in need of a fundamental and effective political action in the North. The primary focus is to lay political foundations for the basic social and economic reforms throughout the nation.

Letter from Ruth E. Foster to MLK

Monday, March 11, 1968

Mrs. Foster writes Dr. King expressing doubt in his nonviolent methods. She feels his nonviolent marches are an ineffective way to gain equality for Negroes.

Letter from Dave Dellinger to MLK

Saturday, April 8, 1967

Dave Dellinger outlines the events and requirements for the rally, sponsored by the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam, to be held in New York City, New York on April 15th, 1967.

SCLC's Eighth Annual Convention Resolution

Friday, October 2, 1964

This SCLC Resolution for the 8th Annual Convention, outlines the plan to encourage churchmen across the country to vote in the light of religious faith and conviction.

Birthday Card from Mrs. King to MLK

Mrs. King wishes Dr. King a happy birthday and expresses her love for him.