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"Kansas (KS)"

Registration for the Annual Youth Retreat

Friday, May 12, 1967

This is a document from Reverend Earl Stirewalt with information on the annual Youth Retreat of the Georgia Baptist Convention. The retreat aims to aid in the spiritual growth of young men and women.

SCLC Minutes

This undated and unsigned memorandum functions essentially as minutes for an SCLC strategy session.

Right & Wrong

Dr. King quotes James Martineau’s “Types of Ethical Theory, Volume II.”

Telegram from MLK to the Honorable Carl Sanders

Dr. King invites the Honorable Carl Sanders to share the pulpit with himself and Mayor Ivan Allen at the Annual Layman's Day celebration at Ebenezer Baptist Church. He also invites him to a dinner to honor Governor Nelson Rockefeller at the home of Rev. Martin Luther King Sr.

Letter from Jack Stern to Romanelli Studios

Monday, May 17, 1965

Jack Stern discusses the details with Romanelli Studios regarding the portrait plaque of Dr. King.

Letter from J. Carter Fahy to Mr. Roy Wilkins about NAACP Name Change

Friday, July 28, 1967

In this letter to the president of the NAACP, Fahy suggests changing the name of the NAACP to NAABA, replacing "colored people" with "Black Americans."

Letter from A. S. Young to MLK

Monday, May 1, 1967

Mr. Young criticizes Dr. King and the black community for their support of heavyweight champion Cassius Clay's refusal to be drafted into the military. He also expresses worry about the quality of black leadership and urges a move from a selfish focus on Negroes only to concern for all people.

Letter from Thein Wah to MLK

Thursday, April 20, 1967

Thein Wah expresses appreciation to Dr. King for his efforts in leading peace marches in New York, New York and San Francisco, California.

Letter from MLK to Adolf Kriess

Friday, December 7, 1962

Dr. King sends a note of thanks to Mr. Kriess for a poem he sent.

Letter from Anne Jewett to MLK

In this letter dated May 5, 1967, Jewett informs King of her song. Let There Be Peace. Jewett believes that this simple song is what churches and peace marchers need, so that they can be heard. She has given the song to King in hopes that the people everywhere will be able to sing out.

Letter from MLK to Jesse Hill, Jr. Regarding His Speech on Vietnam

Thursday, May 11, 1967

Dr. King sends two of his recent speeches on Vietnam, so that Jesse Hill, Jr. may know firsthand his position rather than distorted statements from other sources.

Letter from Ms. Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, November 20, 1964

In this letter Ms. Daves informs Dr. King that she is working to solve issue of copyright for his Oslo University address, and stresses the importance of copyrighting all of his "writings...and speeches."

Telegram from Mrs. Ernest Bavely to MLK

Wednesday, October 19, 1960

Mrs. Bavely sends a supportive telegram to Dr. King during his confinement at the Fulton County Jail. She assures him "children of tomorrow, tomorrow, and tomorrow, will inherit those values for which you are striving."

Letter from Samuel G. Jackson

Mr. Jackson requests assistance with the Minority Youth in a Higher Education project. This particular project is aimed at increasing the number of black and Puerto Rican students at predominantly white institutions.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Mr. Maurice B. Fagan

Wednesday, December 27, 1967

In this letter, Ms. Dora McDonald confirms receipt of recent letter from Mr.Maurice Fagan. She conveys to Mr. Fagan of Dr. King's desire to nominate The Honorable Richard Hatcher Mayor of Gary, Indiana, for the 1967 National Fellowship Award.

SCLC Sustaining Contributors Annual Card-1967

Sunday, January 1, 1967

Warren J. Day submits his annual contribution to the SCLC. He adds a small note thanking Dr. King for taking a strong role in the peace movement.

Letter to MLK from Stewart Meacham

Thursday, March 2, 1967

Stewart Meacham writes Dr. King about his availability to attend a conference hosted by the American Friends Service Committee at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri. He mentions the theme of the ocnference, other invited guests, and that the orgranization is prepared to cover Dr. King's travel and housing expenses.

Mission Development Report

Sunday, January 1, 1967

This report outlines the structure and development of the North Carolina Leadership Training Project.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, March 13, 1967

Joan Daves informs Dr. King that Constance Webb would to ask him questions regarding the biography she is writing on Richard Wright.

Excerpts from Remarks of The Vice President

Saturday, May 28, 1955

Vice President Richard M. Nixon speaks about the Eisenhower Administration’s support of Negroes in the fight to remove discrimination in employment.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Bob Alpert

Thursday, March 21, 1963

Dora McDonald writes Bob Alpert of the Hotel and Club Employees Union to thank him for his previous correspondence. Miss McDonald informs Mr. Alpert that she cannot fulfill his request to receive additional copies of Dr. King's article that was published in the "Nation." However, she recommends that Alpert communicate with Carey McWilliams, editor of the "Nation," to receive those copies.

Letter from Michael George to MLK

Thursday, December 5, 1968

Mr. George expresses his views on Dr. King's response to the riots Dr. King assisted in ending.

Letter from Maurice Mitchell to Neil Sullivan

Wednesday, September 6, 1967

Mr. Mitchell discusses fundraising for SCLC's Chicago literacy project. HEW recently withdrew their support of the project, but Mitchell is optimistic about potential support from foundations and major donors.

The Synagogue Council of America

This pamphlet provides information on the Synagogue Council of America, including its goals and financing methods. The Council was formed to unite the orthodox, conservative and reform Jewish movements into a single group.

Draft Letter from MLK to Donald DuMont

This draft by Dr. King addresses the goals and similarities of the SCLC with Christian principles. He asserts that the aims of the SCLC "...are [to] work to provide those same basic needs for all men."

Letter from Ernest Shaefer to MLK

Sunday, April 18, 1976

Ernest Shaefer writes Dr. King relaying detailed information regarding Dr. King's travel to Philadelphia International Airport and his speech at Unionville High School in Pennsylvania.

The SCLC and Leadership of MLK

The various protest mechanisms and action organizations serves as a long lasting contribution to the Negro community initiated by the movement in the South. The church has served as a location for organization which progresses community participation. During slavery, the slaves were allowed to congregate only at weddings and funerals. Many of these events were fabricated in order to create a means of collective communication between the slaves. The author asserts that it was in this tradition that the SCLC was formed.

Cover to Cover

Saturday, June 24, 1967

The Trentonian newspaper, under the subheading "Cover to Cover," published a brief review of Dr. King's last book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community." This review examines Dr. King's perspective on racism, poverty and militarism. "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community" was Dr. King's first publication, since he received the Nobel Peace Prize. The book was published and released in 1967.

Letter from MLK to AJ Muste

After considerable thought and prayer, Dr. King informs the recipients of this letter of his decision to travel to the Soviet Union under the sponsorship of the American Baptist Convention. He conveys his sense of duty as a Negro leader to speak to Baptists in Russia.

Letter from Dorris M. Roberts to MLK

Dorris Roberts, Chairman of the New Breed Committee, writes to Dr. King concerning inaccurate statements regarding her organization's participation in a recent march. Mrs. Roberts encloses a newspaper article regarding the march and also requests that Dr. King release a statement declaring that the New Breed Committee were supporters of the march and not protestors.