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"Kansas (KS)"

It's Hard to Be a Christian

Dr. King outlines his sermon entitled "It's Hard to Be a Christian." King asserts that in order for one to be a fully committed Christian he or she must subordinate their ego and prioritize their concern for God's kingdom.

Letter from the Brotherhood Activities Committee to MLK

Thursday, October 31, 1963

The Brotherhood Activities Committee regrets that Dr. King will be unable to attend their speaking engagement. The committee requests that Dr. King provide them with a possible spokesman to speak in his absence. Fred Shuttlesworth and Morgan Collins serve as two primary options to serve the Ohio-West Virginia community.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Irvine I. Turner

Tuesday, April 24, 1962

Dora McDonald explains to Irvine Turner that Dr. King is unable to endorse political candidates due to the "non-partisan nature" of the SCLC.

Letter from Dixie to MLK

Saturday, August 6, 1966

Dixie, a white man and segregationist, states in his letter to Dr. King that it has taken the Whites only a few weeks to get segregation rolling again.

Dr. Luther King Cause of U.S. Violence

Thursday, November 11, 1965

The articles mentions Dr. King and his supposed involvement with the Communist Party. The author is not convinced that Dr. King is the "good Samaritan" everyone believes him to be, and he is ensuring more violence with his cause.

Telegram from Dr. Roland Smith to MLK

Friday, June 2, 1967

Dr. Roland Smith congratulates Dr. King on being honored with a Doctor of Divinity Degree from Morehouse College.

Alabama SCLC July 1966 Report

Thursday, July 21, 1966

Albert Turner of the Alabama SCLC delivers a report on upcoming and continuing programs of the local SCLC. Some of the programs include political action and a SCLC convention.

Co-Op Movements for Black Economic Development

This memorandum sent to Dr. King by Professor St. Clair Drake, is a full proposal for the development/revival of the co-operative movements among negroes in large urban centers.

Letter from Lloyd Wilson to Roy Wilkins

Wednesday, May 10, 1967

Lloyd Wilson affirms his support for Dr. King, but he cannot agree with Dr. King's recent statements concerning the Vietnam War. He lists a series of questions hoping to gain clarity from Dr. King or Mr. Wilkins.

The Ultimate Doom of Evil

These sermon notes outline the inevitable fall of evil. Dr. King uses the work of influential American historian, Charles A. Beard to prove this claim. "A graphic example of this truth" is found in ancient proverbs that Dr. King aims to examine in detail.

A Tough Mind and A Tender Heart

This outline to Dr. King's sermon "A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart" focuses on the premise that being a tough minded individual involves making critical decisions. The sermon emphasizes that those who possess a soft mind tend to be gullible and strictly follow the status quo. According to Dr. King, "We must come to the realization that life demands a tough mind."

Letter from John T. Walker to MLK

Wednesday, February 21, 1968

On behalf of the Washington Cathedral. John Walker extends an invitation for Dr. King to preach at the Cathedral and articulate the true premise of the Poor People's Campaign to their congregation. Walker believes that Dr. King's physical presence will help eliminate doubts that this civil disobedience campaign will turn to violence. Dr. King is would eventually preach the final sermon of his life on March 31 at the Washington Cathedral under the subject "Remaining Awake Through a Great Revolution."

Letter from Mrs. Gossett to MLK

Wednesday, April 3, 1968

Mrs. Gossett writes to Martin Luther King Jr, regarding his article in Look Magazine. Throughout the letter Mrs. Gossett also references issues regarding old age assistance, social security and pensions.

An Appeal by Puerto Ricans for Fair Treatment

This document reviews the economic, political, and cultural disparity of Puerto Ricans. The authors explain the history of American imperialism in Puerto Rico and how Puerto Ricans have been mistreated in the United States, particularly in New York. Criticizing the Vietnam War, the authors suggest focusing the funding used abroad on community building.

People in Action: "The Negro Looks at America"

Dr. King discusses the synonymous relationship between segregation and colonialism which was addressed at the Arden House Campus of Columbia University. This discussion was formally named the American Negro Leadership Conference for it covered in array of issues and involved various organizations.

Letter from Joan Daves Requesting the Table of Contents for "Where Do We Go From Here"

Monday, December 19, 1966

Here Joan Daves requests a table of contents for Dr. King's "Where Do We Go From Here" in order to write a description for the catalog.

MLK Speaks to People of Watts

Thursday, August 19, 1965

Dr. King speaks on what it will take to make Los Angeles a better city.

Recommendations Made to Executive Board of Montgomery Improvement Association

Thursday, May 24, 1956

Dr. King makes recommendations to the Executive Board of Montgomery Improvement Association. He suggests developing a monthly newspaper to inform friends of the movement activity and scheduling weekly mass meetings.

Request For Information Sent to MLK from Abram Eisenman

This second "Request For Information" was sent from Abram Eisenman to Dr. King. He asks Dr. King if he and members of his organization will support him for president. He gives Dr. King five main points of his platform that he hopes to achieve as president. He believes it is "imperative" that someone run against President Johnson and unite the American people based on his platform.

Black is Beautiful, and It's So Beautiful To Be Black

Sunday, October 1, 1967

This staff newsletter "Black Is Beautiful, and It's So Beautiful," published by the SCLC, explains the upcoming events that the organization has in store. The newsletter communicates as to who acquired new positions within the SCLC and speaks to how the SCLC wishes to continue with projects based in Chicago, Cleveland, and Washington through Operation Breadbasket.

Scripps Howard: Dr. King Asks LBJ to Do As Hero FDR Did

Monday, January 15, 1968

Tom Talburt reports in this article that Dr. King urged President Johnson to create jobs and provide for the disadvantaged in order to prevent another summer of riots, such as the Los Angeles Watts Riots of 1965.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Ernest Shaefer

Tuesday, June 28, 1966

Ms. McDonald informs Mr. Shaefer that Dr. King will be able to speak in Kennett Square in Pennsylvania.

Telegram of Support from Richard J. Hughes to MLK

In this telegram, Hughes writes to Dr. King informing him due to important public commitments he will not be able to join Dr. King. Hughes states, "I join millions of other American in wishing you well in your nobel work.

Letter from Verinal Harris to MLK

Monday, January 8, 1968

Mrs. Verinal Harris pleads for the help of Dr. King regarding the brutal actions of the police against children in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Anonymous Letter to MLK

An anonymous individual sends Dr. King newspaper clippings showing African-Americans participating in looting and violence. Dr. King is asked to review the articles and offer comments via television.

Give Decency A Chance in the South...

The Southern Conference Educational Fund (SCEF) is working toward eliminating "all forms of racial segregation in the Southern and border States." This brochure highlights SCEF's accomplishments, supporters, programs and future.

MLK's Statement on Current Electoral Politics

This is the draft of a statement that Dr. King planned to make, concerning the state of politics in America. Dr. King expresses his disappointment in that "the quality of some of the men elected makes a mockery of responsible government," and urges African-Americans to "lose faith in a shallow 'good will' that provides nothing."

Governor Rockefeller Confirms Invitation to Speak at Ebenezer Baptist Church

Wednesday, September 1, 1965

This letter dated September 2, 1965, was sent to Dr. King from Margaret Fowler, calendar Secretary to Gov. Rockefeller. In this letter Ms. Fowler confirms to Dr. King that the governor will be able to speak at the Men's Day Observance at Ebenezer Baptist Church on October 17, 1965.

Letter from Donell Taylor to MLK

Tuesday, February 8, 1966

The author of this document writes to Dr. King offering support to the continued fight for civil rights. The author states Dr. King "can't fail for God is [his] commanding general."

Letter from Adam C. Powell to Wyatt Tee Walker

Reverend Adam Clayton Powell copies to MLK a letter informing Wyatt Walker that his preaching duties at Abyssinian Baptist Church in Harlem are being terminated because of budget constraints.