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"Kansas (KS)"

Knowing God (Wieman)

Dr. King notes Henry Nelson Wieman's ideas on how man comes to know God.

Ben Shahn on Human Rights

Washington, D.C.

The following brochure advertises the contents associated with the Frederick Douglass Institute of Negro Arts and History located in Washington, D.C. This particular exhibition sponsored by Ben Shahn highlights the subject of human rights. The brochure contains sketches of Gandhi and Dr. King.

Schleiermacher (Religion as More Than Outward Form)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher's "Speeches on Religion." The full title of this work is "On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.

The Forbidden Book of the Century

California (CA)

J. Partyka's book, "Never Come Early" is announced as the "Forbidden Book" of the century. This announcement claims that the book wil "quake the hallowed halls of psychiatry, education and religion."

Civil Rights Movement Suggestions from MLK Supporter

This note to Dr. King outlines six suggestions to address inequality and aid with employment, education and civil rights reform.

Letter from Ivor Liss to MLK

Monday, April 15, 1963
New Jersey (NJ), Atlanta, GA, POLAND, HUNGARY

Ivor M. Liss writes Dr. King and explains his support for the movement that Dr. King is leading. He talks about how being silent would actually hurt Dr. King and the Civil Rights Movement. Liss explains that as a Jew he understands the fight for equality as it is something that Jewish people are still fighting for. He encloses a check for $100.00.

Request for Preliminary Determination of Eligibility - Nonprofit

Tuesday, November 7, 1967
Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

This document serves as a request to establish Ebenezer Baptist Church as a Non-Profit Sponsor or Mortgagor.

Letter from Paul P. Martin to MLK

Monday, March 26, 1962
Pennsylvania (PA)

The Erie Branch of the NAACP invites Dr. King to be the principal speaker at its Freedom Rally.

Letter to MLK from Robert McAfee Brown to MLK

Thursday, January 18, 1968
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), VIETNAM, California (CA)

Mr. McAfee requests that Dr. King issues a statement, and host a service in his Church, supporting Bill Coffin.

Address by MLK to American Jewish Committee

Thursday, May 20, 1965
New York, NY, Montgomery, AL, Selma, AL, GERMANY

In this speech, Dr. King addresses the Civil Rights Movement and the use of nonviolent demonstration tactics. He distinguishes between civil disobedience, which involves breaking laws that one does not agree with, and nonviolent demonstration, which involves using one's right to protest. He states that nonviolent protest is inherently American, citing examples from the Civil War, the Suffragettes, and the American Jewish Committee's own lobbying from the early 20th Century.

Letter from Anwar Katib to MLK

Sunday, January 22, 1967
ISRAEL, JORDAN

Anwar Katib, the Governor of Jerusalem, states that he is pleased to hear about Dr. King's decision to lead a pilgrimage to the Holy Land. He also tells Dr. King that his visit will be a blessing and a historical event.

Letter from Fred Bennette to MLK

Friday, April 7, 1967
New York, NY, South Carolina (SC)

Director Reverend Bennette requests that Dr. King increase the telephone allowance for Operation Breadbasket, stating that frequent phone calls must be made in order to keep the program active.

Letter from Glenn Leggett to MLK

President Leggett expresses his appreciation to Dr. King for agreeing to speak at an upcoming Convocation, for Grinnell College. Leggett informs Dr. King that he is welcomed to rest in his home during his visit at the college.

Injunction from the City of Birmingham

Atlanta, GA, Ohio (OH), Cincinnati, OH, Alabama (AL), Birmingham, AL

Several members of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, including Dr. King, receive a temporary injunction from the City of Birmingham.

Notecard regarding freedom

On this notecard, Dr. King outlines another thinker's views on freedom, according to the book, "Human Nature and Conduct." This is an example of one of the many notecards Dr. King kept in a cardboard filing box for reference to quotations, ideas, books and other publications, definitions, and bible verses.

Birmingham Manifesto

Birmingham, AL, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

The Birmingham Manifesto was formulated as a testament to explain the reasons why efforts were being made to desegregate Birmingham. According to the Manifesto, broken promises were made by city and state officials, which led to plans of direct action.

103:24 General Correspondence 1967 (S)

Monday, May 1, 1967
Minnesota (MN), Atlanta, GA

Addressed to Sigrid L. Sharp, this receipt is forwarded to Minneapolis, MN for a donation of $3.00 to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Robinson to Rev. Abernathy

Thursday, April 25, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Michigan (MI)

Mr. and Mrs. Robinson send a sermon to Reverend Abernathy and his followers hoping to encourage them on their difficult days ahead.

Letter from Cindy Eder to MLK

Thursday, December 24, 1964
Michigan (MI)

Cindy Eder sends Dr. King warm wishes for his receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Gus Efroymson

Thursday, January 28, 1965
Massachusetts (MA)

Dr. King expresses his deep appreciation to Mr. Gus Efroymson for the contribution of $100.00 to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Irvine I. Turner

Tuesday, April 24, 1962
New Jersey (NJ)

Dora McDonald explains to Irvine Turner that Dr. King is unable to endorse political candidates due to the "non-partisan nature" of the SCLC.

Letter from Dorothy O. Bucklin to MLK

Wednesday, November 27, 1963
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY, New York (NY), Wisconsin (WI), Pennsylvania (PA)

Mrs. Bucklin invites Dr. King to deliver a series of sermons highlighting his biblical preference and his experiences with the SCLC. The conference will host affiliates of the American Baptist Home Mission Societies.

Memo on Strategy of the Integration Movement

Birmingham, AL

An anonymous writer pens a comprehensive strategy that focuses on achieving racial integration. Within the text of the document, the writer identifies various political, social and economical developments that are needed in order to end racially stemmed inequalities for African Americans.

Letter from William M. Gray to Ralph Abernathy

Monday, April 8, 1968
Brooklyn, NY, New York (NY)

William Gray offers his prayers and support as Rev. Abernathy takes over command of the SCLC following Dr. King's death.

Friends Journal: A Quaker Weekly

Saturday, July 26, 1958
New Jersey (NJ), Philadelphia, PA, CANADA, MEXICO, London, England, Berlin, Germany, Indiana (IN), JAPAN, LEBANON, NORWAY, Geneva, Switzerland, TURKEY, Pittsburgh, PA, Richmond, VA, California (CA), Montgomery, AL, INDIA

Dr. King's article, "Nonviolence and Racial Justice" is included in this edition of the Friends Journal. Dr. King's entry discusses the various implications of race relations in America and the beneficial elements of nonviolence.

Letter from Grandison Cherry-El to MLK

Thursday, October 21, 1965
Washington, D.C., UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Michigan (MI), Maryland (MD), Baltimore, MD, Detroit, MI, Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

Grandison Cherry-El, Minister with The Moorish Science Temple of America, contacts US Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbak in reference to discrimination in citizenship in American public schools.

Suffering

Dr. King records J. S. Mill’s view of suffering.

Letter from Homer Jack to MLK

Wednesday, April 26, 1967
Boston, MA, Atlanta, GA, New York, NY, Washington, D.C., VIETNAM

Homer Jack, Director of the Unitarian Universalist Association's Department of Social Responsibility, communicates his support for Dr. King's stance against the Vietnam War. Jack, co-founder of CORE and active participant in the civil rights movement, encloses a report that includes a statement made to the US Inter-Religious Committee on Peace and discusses the courage of Buddhist monks in South Vietnam. He also congratulates Dr. King for his public address made at the United Nations regarding his opposition to the war.

Letter from V.R. Hardy to MLK

Pennsylvania (PA)

V.R. Hardy lectures Dr. King regarding his methods of obtaining equality. He asserts that such methods will only result in a race of people wallowing in self-pity. Hardy cites the long-term oppression of Jews as a case in point of how to overcome the tragedies of the past.

Statement for Immediate Release from Harper & Row, Publishers

Monday, May 29, 1967
New York, NY

Harper & Row Publishers issued this press release to announce the arrival of Dr. King's final publication. The book, "Where Do We Go From Here: Chaos or Community?", was his first written narrative, since he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. The release also noted that the book would address Dr. King's perspective on racism, poverty and militarism. The tentative date of publishing, according to the document, was June 19, 1967.