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"Kansas (KS)"

Amsterdam News: The Measure of A Man - Jackie Robinson

Thursday, September 20, 1962

Dr. King describes his interpretation on the life and efforts of Jackie Roosevelt Robinson to further the cause of Social Justice in America.

Letter from Senator Hugh Scott to MLK

Wednesday, July 1, 1964

US Senator Hugh Scott, writes Dr. King expressing thanks for the Reverend's letter of recent date. In addition, Scott reveals that he sponsored the Civil Rights legislation long before the present act was introduced. Scott also expresses that he would enjoy speaking with Dr. King during his next visit in Washington, D. C.

Letter from Helga Gulbrandsen to MLK

Monday, December 7, 1964

Helga Gulbrandsen responds to a previous letter from Dr. King and congratulates him on receiving the Nobel Peace Prize. Gulbrandsen expresses regret concerning the Reverend's unavailability for a lecture in the Oslo Group.

Letter from Marcel Bernfeld to MLK

Tuesday, June 16, 1964

Mr. Bernfeld writes Dr. King, letting him know that he published some of his work. He also asks Dr. King's permission to publish the "Letter from Birmingham Jail," in its entirety, with an introduction and notes. He encloses copies of his own speech for Dr. King's reading pleasure and expresses his well-wishes in closing.

Recommendations to Committee on Future Program

Tuesday, October 27, 1959

Dr. King outlines several initiatives of the SCLC and other civil rights leaders.

Sermon at The Washington Cathedral

Sunday, March 31, 1968

In a sermon written by Dr. King and addressed to an audience at the Washington Cathedral, the Reverend expounds upon the problem of poverty and war. In describing a projected human revolution, Dr. King states, "Somewhere we must come to see that human progress never rolls in on the wheels of inevitability." This is just one of the many passages in this inspirational sermon encouraging hope and freedom for all.

Faith

Dr. King quotes an excerpt from William Adams Brown's "Beliefs that Matter."

Telegram from Dr. Benjamin Spock to MLK

Wednesday, September 8, 1965

Mr. Spock invites Dr. King to send a representative to a discussion on the upcoming Washington Vietnam Mobilization.

Letter from Harry Belafonte to MLK

Tuesday, May 2, 1967

Harry Belafonte outlines the details of the African Program to Dr. King. The document references King's future delegation to several African countries and emphasizes the "Afro-American Banking Proposal" as a topic of interest.

Telegram from Mrs. King to Canon L. John Collins

Friday, January 3, 1969

Mrs. King confirms with Canon L. John Collins the dates of her visit to England.

Letter from W.O. Gill to MLK

W. O. Gill expresses his gratitude for the generosity that Coretta Scott King extended to him. He then tells Mrs. King that his secretary is sending her a check for $2.00, and that he looks forward to being able to visit with Dr. King. He ends the letter with a quote from the bible.

Letter from Kenneth B. Keating to MLK

Friday, July 23, 1965

Kenneth B. Keating, the Chairman of the Population Crisis Committee, invited Dr. King to join the committee. The organization seeks to help deal with the growing population and ever scarcer resources.

Dr. King recounts civil rights struggle in Albany, Georgia

Monday, August 20, 1962

Dr. King recounts the civil rights struggle in Albany, Georgia. Every element of the community participated in mass demonstrations protesting discrimination in public spaces, school segregation, denial of voting rights, and the deprivation of freedom of speech and assembly. King explains the purpose and use of nonviolent methodologies as "resistance to injustice and non-cooperation with evil." He describes several examples of direct action and the building of political strength.

Affidavit of Captain G.V. Evans

Wednesday, April 10, 1963

G.V. Evans, a captain in the Police Department of the City of Birmingham, confirms a series of sit-ins and marches that took place in Birmingham. The nonviolent actions, called Project C, was headed by Wyatt Tee Walker. Captain Evans believes that this conduct will result in serious injury to the police department and the demonstrators.

People In Action: The Role of the Church

Dr. King discusses the issues of segregation and the role of the church in rectifying the situation.

The Secular in Relation to the Holy

Dr. King quotes theologian and philosopher Paul Tillich's "Systematic Theology." Dr. King's doctoral degree is in systematic theology from Boston University and his dissertation is on Paul Tillich. According to Tillich, secular and holy correlate and cannot act separately. Tillich states, "The holy embraces itself and the secular."

Program for Mass Meeting with MLK

Friday, September 22, 1967

Dr. King spoke at the Scott High School Field House in Toledo. Mayor John W. Potter opened the program with an official welcome to the city and Rev. Robert Culp welcomed the prticipants on behalf of the Toledo Chapter of the NAACP. Rev. B. F. Wright, the President of the Interdenominational Ministerial Alliance of Toledo and Vicinity, gave the benediction.

Letter from Donald G. Brownlow to MLK

Thursday, December 9, 1965

After hearing Dr. King's speech at Billanova University, Mr. Brownlow requests that the Reverend speak at the Haverford School located in Pennsylvania. Secondarily, Brownlow requests that Dr. King send a few words of congratulations to a student attending the college.

Letter from Jimmie Wattson to MLK

Monday, February 26, 1962

An inmate at the Virginia State Penitentiary requests Dr. King's help with his legal situation. The sender informs Dr. King that he is serving a fifteen-year sentence for second-degree murder although he did not get a fair trial. He claims he has written government officials to appeal his case, however he cannot "seem to get any consideration." The inmate asks Dr. King to write him back and let him know what information is required for further assistance.

Introduction to the Demands of the Freedom Movement

The Negros in Chicago are faced with numerous systematic societal restrictions as they are excluded from many aspects of an American life. The Negros are subjected to segregation and substandard housing that are identified as "crime-infested slums." The plight of the Negro in Chicago involves insufficient housing and education as well as economic and social exclusion.

Schleiermacher (Dogmas & Creeds)

Dr. King references Friedrich Schleiermacher's notions of dogmas and creeds, stating that they are mere descriptions of feeling.

Power of Attorney

Wednesday, November 29, 1961

This document appoints Chauncey Eskridge as agent and attorney for Rev. and Mrs. Martin Luther King, Sr. in Philadelphia.

Letter from R. William Johnson to MLK

Monday, December 5, 1966

Bill Johnson writes Dr. King with an interest in starting a chapter of the SCLC in Oak Ridge. Johnson also invites Dr. King to visit Oak Ridge and speak with members of its community.

Mr. Reed, Mr. Baldwin and Slums

Dr. King writes a story pertaining to a Mr. Reed and Mr. Baldwin to describe the importance of keeping after one's soul.

Liberal Theology

Dr. King paraphrases [Theodore G.] Soares on the religious liberal.

God, Knowledge Of (Wieman)

Dr. King quotes Henry Nelson Wieman's article "How Do We Know God?" from the Journal of Religion.

Letter from Joan Daves to Carlota Frahm

Monday, October 26, 1964

Joan Daves denies permission to Norwegian Publishers to reprint Dr. King's "I Have A Dream" speech in connection with "Why We Can't Wait." Daves asserts that the speech will be part of Dr. King's forthcoming publication.

Request for MLK's Autograph

Thursday, October 21, 1965

Thomas Smith, Director of Placement at Saint Peter's College, requests that Dr. King autograph a program for friends of Father McGlinchey.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Alan J. Rankin

Tuesday, April 25, 1967

Dora McDonald writes Alan Rankin on behalf of Dr. King regarding a possible visit to McMaster University.