The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Kansas (KS)"

Papal Infallibility

Dr. King defines papal infallibility.

Cardinal Virtues

Dr. King defines "cardinal virtues" and then lists those held by the Greeks and Christians.

A Statement by Dr. King

Sunday, July 17, 1966
Chicago, IL

In a statement made in Chicago, Dr. King asks for the economic and social betterment of the individuals living in the "slums" of the city.

Letter from Klaus Schwarze to MLK

Tuesday, December 12, 1967
GERMANY, Missouri (MO)

Mr. Schwarze requests that an autograph be sent to him in Germany for his collection from Dr. King.

Letter from T. W. Cole Sr. to MLK

Monday, August 12, 1963
Texas (TX)

The General President of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity sends Dr. King a contribution to aid the SCLC in the quest for "human dignity." Dr. King was inducted into Alpha Phi Alpha at Boston University in 1952.

The Museum of Negro History and Art 1967 Calendar

Sunday, January 1, 1967
Chicago, IL, Pennsylvania (PA), CANADA, Ohio (OH), Tennessee (TN), Missouri (MO), Virginia (VA), New Orleans, LA, New York (NY), New York, NY, Louisiana (LA), Mississippi (MS), Texas (TX), Montgomery, AL, Washington, D.C., Baltimore, MD

Distributed by the Museum of Negro History and Art, this calendar was used by Coretta Scott King and contains biographies of famous African American musicians. Mrs. King studied at the New England Conservatory to be an opera singer. On this calendar, she also marked April 27th as "my birthday."

SCLC Initiative Invitation: Poor People's Campaign Committee

Washington, D.C.

This recruitment letter is an invitation to volunteer for various committees to support the SCLC's Washington, D.C. initiative Poor People's Campaign. The committees cover areas from child care to fundraising and legal aid. The Campaign began in November 1967, but became bogged down due not only to Dr. King's assassination, but also that of Robert F. Kennedy's. The Campaign ceased operations in June 1968 but was resurrected in December, 2003.

Nobel Prize Acceptance Speech

Thursday, December 10, 1964
Oslo, Norway, NORWAY, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Birmingham, AL, Alabama (AL), Philadelphia, MS, Mississippi (MS), Montgomery, AL, South Africa, South Africa

This version of Dr. King's Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech is typed in all capitals, probably to make it easier to read from while delivering the speech.

Letter From Vice President Johnson to MLK

Friday, April 27, 1962
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson wrote this note to Dr. King to respectfully decline his invitation to a luncheon and to serve on the board of directors of the Gandhi Society for Human Rights. He states he enjoyed their last meeting and is looking forward to the next one.

Letter from Robert Nelson to MLK

Monday, October 18, 1965
West Virginia (WV)

Robert R. Nelson notifies Dr. King of the recent invitation that was first extended by Mr. Wendell English on behalf of the Impact Committee at Marshall University. Mr. Nelson requests Dr. King to participate as a key note speaker at one of the events. Impact is a morality driven organization focused on the proper guidance and purpose of life.


Dr. King describes monotheism, the belief in the existence of one God, as it compares to Hebrews and Greeks in a civilized world. He quotes Albert C. Knudson from "Religious Teachings of the Old Testament."

Letter from Dora McDonald to F.A. Guilford

Monday, September 14, 1964
New York, NY, New York (NY), Berlin, Germany

Dora McDonald expresses Dr. King's delight in knowing that F.A. Guilford of Oxford University Press wants to reprint the "Letter from Birmingham Jail." However, she informs Guilford that, due to the letter already being published, it is impossible for a reprint. McDonald refers Guilford to contact Joan Daves, Dr. King's literary agent, for more information.

"Danger in Demonstrations"

Monday, August 8, 1966
Chicago, IL, New York, NY, New York (NY), Selma, AL

This article, from the newspaper "Chicago's American," criticizes Dr. King's demonstrations on open housing in Chicago.


Dr. King quotes F. S. Marvin's "The Living Past."

Address by Rabbi Joachim Prinz

Wednesday, August 28, 1963
Washington, D.C., GERMANY

Rabbi Joachim Prinz's address at the March on Washington focuses on the importance of freedom. He relates the struggle that blacks are currently enduring to the Nazism Jews faced during the reign of Hitler.

Letter from Edward J. Warren to Senator Jacob K Javits

Friday, March 16, 1962
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA, New York (NY)

Mr. Warren writes to Senator Javits to confirm receipt of a previous correspondence. He expresses gratitude for Javits position on Human Rights.

Letter from Aziz Shihab to MLK

Thursday, February 9, 1967

Aziz Shihab offers the services of National Tours of Jordan in arranging Dr. King's trip to the Holy Land.


Dr. King records some quotes about Jesus. He quotes a passage that describes Jesus as being the person who brought about a new trust in God. Dr. King also discusses suffering.


Dr. King records biographical information about Origen.

Letter from Richard L. Zanglin to MLK

Wednesday, August 9, 1967
Cincinnati, OH, Atlanta, GA

Richard L. Zanglin invites Dr. King to speak to the student body at Xavier University in Cincinnati, Ohio.

Letter from W. Warner Beckett to MLK

Friday, June 23, 1967
California (CA), Montgomery, AL

Mr. Beckett, a publisher at New Lady Magazine, writes to Dr. King requesting that he lead an "armada" of people with the intent of focusing on businesses and industries. Mr. Beckett believes that Negroes and concerned whites should fight against large businesses by "diverting money from key industries."

Letter from John Olson to MLK

Friday, January 8, 1965
Oklahoma (OK), Los Angeles, CA

John F. Olson, a fellow graduate of Boston University School of Theology, inquires about Dr. King's availability to speak at Oklahoma City University.

Letter from Tore Lundby to MLK

Wednesday, January 13, 1965

Tore Lundby, editor, requests Dr. King to write an article on equality in America for a secondary school magazine.

Letter From Bessie G. White to MLK

Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

Bessie G. White writes to Dr. King, highlighting the strife that she feels Dr. King will continue to go through while fighting for civil rights in the south.

Telegram from MLK to Governor Albertis Harrison

Virginia (VA), Richmond, VA

Dr. King requests an investigation into acts of police brutality committed in Petersburg, Virginia during a demonstration.

Letter from MLK to C. I. C. Bosanquet

Tuesday, January 30, 1968

Dr. King expresses his gratitude to Dr. Bosanquet for being awarded an honorary degree from the University of Newcastle Upon Tyne. Dr. King deeply appreciated being considered for the degree and for the generous hospitality he received while at the university.

Letter from Bea Subt to MLK

Saturday, April 22, 1967

The author sends Dr. King a letter informing him that she is withdrawing her assistance toward civil rights workers since he has decided to be a politician, military leader and diplomat. She also questions how he can fight for equal rights in a country that's not worth protecting from the communists.


Dr. King quotes Dr. William Temple, stating that "God minus the world equals God; the world minus God equals nothing."

An Evening of Negro Culture and History


This booklet, entitled "Black is Beautiful and It's So Beautiful To Be Black," contains information from an SCLC event held August 16, 1967 that sought to explore Negro culture and history.

"One Solitary Life"

The document, shown here, contains a narrative describing Jesus, entitled "One Solitary Life." Dr. King would use this narrative, in one of his last and most famous sermons "The Drum Major Instinct." The sermon was delivered at Ebenezer Baptist Church, February 4, 1968, exactly two months before his untimely assassination.