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"Kansas (KS)"

MLK Note Card - Schleiermacher, Theology and God-consciousness

The person to whom Dr. King is referring is the German philosopher Friedrich Schleiermacher.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. G. Baker

Friday, July 30, 1965

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Baker, President of the Bethune Art and Study Club, for her monetary contribution to the SCLC. King explains that each contribution is necessary for the SCLC to fulfill all its tasks.

Invitation from Haile Selassie I to MLK

Haile Selassie I, emperor of Ethiopia, invites Dr. King to his birthday anniversary at the Shoreham Hotel.

Letter from Victoria Bellard to MLK

Sunday, May 6, 1962

Bellard invites Dr. King to speak on behalf of voting rights and awareness. The event will host members of The Cordelia Green Johnson Beauty Forum. This displays the level of concern at the grassroots.

MLK Manuscript: Why We Can't Wait

This document reflects one page of the original manuscript of "Why We Can't Wait." "Why We Can't Wait" is a book by Martin Luther King, Jr. about the civil rights struggle against racial segregation in the United States, and specifically in Birmingham, Alabama.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK Regarding an Offer from Protestant Publishing

Monday, April 13, 1964

In this Letter, Joan Daves informs Dr. King about an offer from Shinkyo Shuppansha (Protestant Publishing Co. Ltd.). A description of an advancement pay, royalty percentage and number of copies are included in this letter.

Gethsemane

Dr. King notes the Biblical story of Jesus' experience before his crucifixion. He uses the parable to speak to the human experience of pain and the faith one must have in God. Jesus went to Gethsemane to pray. He brought apostles John, James, and Peter and had them take watch while he prayed in the garden. When Jesus returned, his friends were sleeping. At this moment, Jesus realized their indifference to his agony. Though standing in pain and loneliness, Jesus used his faith in God to accept his situation as it was, with no efforts of escape.

Evil (Psalm)

Dr. King notes that Psalm 73 raises the question of why the wicked prosper and suggests that the only solution for the mystery of evil is faith.

VFW Post 2156 to MLK

Friday, September 30, 1966

The members of George Washington Carver Post VFW Post 2156 voice their support for Dr. King, along with a donation.

Letter from Josephine Davis to Dr. King

Friday, June 24, 1966

In this letter, Josephine Davis tells Dr. King that they enjoyed the evening he spent with them. She then informs him that their prayers are with him and that he can look forward to financial help from "THOSE".

The American Jewish Committee Press Release

This press release covers statements made by Morris B. Abram, President of the American Jewish Committee. At the start of Rosh Hashonah, Abrams stated that the deterioration of the cities should be seen as a top priority for the federal government. He also states that the committee will continue to fight for the protection of civil and religious rights of Jews, particularly in the Middle East and Soviet Russia, the improvement of race relations, and global peace.

Letter to MLK from the Daughters of Zion

H.B. Williams, the Shepherdess of the Daughters of Zion, sent this letter to Dr. King saying that they had taken notice to his actions in the fight for civil equality. Williams writes that they do not participate in demonstrations, because that has caused their organization "downfall in ancient times." She further explains that this has "turned into a Holy war, and it is no longer a fight for equality and rights to vote."

Telegram from Jacob K. Javits to MLK

Amidst the confusion of varying interpretations, Senator Jacob K. Javits asks Dr. King to share his interpretation of the term "black power," so that it can serve as a guide to others.

Man, a Being of Becoming

Dr. King documents ideas regarding the philosophy of man. Using the metaphor of a "flowing stream," he addresses man's experience from infancy through adulthood.

Worship: A Selected Bibliography

This sixteen-page document lists a bibliography of worship materials dated May of 1941.

Letter from Helen Hickey to Mrs. King

Monday, April 8, 1968

In this letter Helen Hickey sends her sympathy to Mrs. King pertaining to the loss of her husband. She also comments on the personal characteristics that she admired most about Dr. King.

Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to MLK

Thursday, April 20, 1967

Dr. Benjamin Mays, President of Morehouse College, invites Dr. and Mrs. King to lunch after the Morehouse Board of Trustees Meeting.

Pledge for Peace Campaign

Mr. Karno and Mr. Saunders request assistance for their Pledge for Peace campaign. This campaign specifically targets the economy through the automotive industry. "I hereby pledge not to buy a new car until there is peace in Vietnam".

Letter to Dora McDonald from Fernando Arias-Salgado

Monday, May 22, 1967

Fernando Arias-Salgado acknowledges receipt of Ms. McDonald's letter on behalf of Dr. King and transmits it to Dr. Palasi in Madrid. He also encloses the initial letter of invitation to lecture at the University of Madrid under the signature of Dr. Villar, Director of Cultural Sociology.

Chicago Urban League Golden Fellowship Dinner and Dance

The Chicago Urban League coaxes members and invitees to their Golden Fellowship Dinner and Dance with a night of privilege and a chance to win a 1967 Pontiac.

News Release from SCLC about MLK's telegram concerning Violations of the Fair Labor Standards Acts

Thursday, March 15, 1962

This SCLC press release highlights Dr. King's request for the U.S. Department of Labor to investigate labor violations and discrimination at shrimp factories in Georgia. Dr.King asserts that African-American workers have been harrassed and underpaid.

A Manual for Direct Action

In this foreword Bayard Rustin provides an introduction into the rules and tips involved in nonviolent action concerning protests. Mr. Rustin describes nonviolent methods that people can use when encountering dangerous or difficult situations.

Letter from Robert E. Johnson to Mrs. Agnes Stewart

Saturday, December 17, 1966

This document is a letter from Robert E. Johnson to Mrs. Agnes S. Stewart pertaining to Mr. Johnson's objection to participating in the Armed Forces physical examination due to his belief that "there is a better way to solve conflicting problems that beset men".

Telegram from MLK to Mr.& Mrs. Dick Gregory

In this telegram, Dr. King praises Mr. Gregory for his stance regarding human justice on behalf of another oppressed minority, the Nisgually Indians.

MSGR. Victor G. Moser's Statements Relating to Selma-Montgomery March

Monday, April 26, 1965

Victor G. Moser recounts the activities that took place during the march on Montgomery ,which was one of a serious, dedicated, even religious commitment to a project which would really bring out the serious injustice being perpetrated upon a persecuted and disadvantaged people.

Letter from W.T. Durr to MLK

Wednesday, February 7, 1968

Pastor Durr donates funds to help Dr. King and his efforts of nonviolence.

Letter from Sushil Joseph to MLK

Friday, November 8, 1963

Sushil Joseph, a student at the University of Denver, informs Dr. King of a term paper he is writing on the subject of "Church and the Race Relations." Joseph would like Dr. King to answer one of the questions he enclosed with this letter to aid him with his paper.

Freedom

Here, Dr. King defines freedom.

Letter from D. G. Witt to MLK

Monday, April 3, 1967

D. G. Witt notifies Dr. King that Preferred Risk Mutual Insurance Company has reconsidered canceling Dr. King's automobile insurance. Due to the number of accidents Dr. King has had, continued coverage will require payment of a higher surcharge.

Letter from MLK to Boldwen Collins

Monday, October 21, 1963

Dr. King responds to a previous letter sent to him from Miss Boldwen Collins. He clarifies various points that were unclear to Miss Collins pertaining to the overall purpose of the civil rights movement and its effect on the nation. Dr. King explains that Negroes in the North and South want the same things as other human beings: freedom.