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The Future of Integration

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, EGYPT, SOUTH AFRICA

Dr. King discusses "The Future of Integration." King opens with background history of three distinct periods of race relations. The first period extends from 1619 to 1862, the era of slavery. The next period extends from 1863 to 1954 when blacks were emancipated, but still segregated. The third period started on May 17, 1954 when segregation was deemed unconstitutional and integration commenced. Furthermore, Dr. King explains the changes that occurred as a result of integration and how it will affect blacks and whites in the future.

Letter from Maynard Gertler to MLK

Monday, November 18, 1963
CANADA, Atlanta, GA

Maynard Gertler, of Harvest House Limited Publishers, informs Dr. King that he was able to obtain a copy of one of his speeches and his correct mailing address.

Letter from Ernestine Lee to MLK

Thursday, December 7, 1967

A fourteen-year-old child, inspired by Dr. King's speeches, sends a small contribution and a prayer to the King family.

Why Negroes Are Still Angry

Friday, July 1, 1966
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Alabama (AL), Mississippi (MS), New York, NY, Philadelphia, PA, Detroit, MI, Connecticut (CT), Cleveland, OH, Chicago, IL, Texas (TX), Montgomery, AL, Atlanta, GA

American journalist Victor Bernstein details for Redbook why Negroes are still angry in the face of the apparent success of the Civil Rights Movement. He points out that the Movement has enabled many whites to see that integration and equal rights are right, but still knowingly choose to behave as if they are wrong.

Letter from Al Fann to MLK About Hunter College Program

Wednesday, March 6, 1968
New York, NY, CANADA

In this letter A1 Fann, director of A1 Fann & Co., gives an overview of the company and it's founding while offering up the services of the company under the direction of Dr. King.

Letter from MLK to U Thant

Monday, December 28, 1964
New York, NY, Oslo, Norway

Dr. King thanks U Thant, the Secretary General of the United Nations, for a luncheon in Oslo, and wishes him well as he recovers from an illness.

Letter From Irving Neiman to MLK

Monday, October 18, 1965
Connecticut (CT), GERMANY

Irving Neiman offers his legal services to the SCLC for their work in the civil rights movement.

Letter from J. Carter Fahy to Mr. Roy Wilkins about NAACP Name Change

Friday, July 28, 1967
Massachusetts (MA), New York (NY), New York, NY, Cambridge, MA

In this letter to the president of the NAACP, Fahy suggests changing the name of the NAACP to NAABA, replacing "colored people" with "Black Americans."

Minutes for the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights

Wednesday, April 19, 1967
New York, NY, Washington, D.C., VIETNAM

The minutes for this meeting include the Civil Rights act of 1967, the "Freedom Budget," and discrimination in military off-post housing.

Statement Condemning Judge Elliot's Restraining Order

Sunday, July 22, 1962
Albany, GA

Dr. King and Dr. William G. Anderson, President of the Albany Movement, denounce US District Judge J. Robert Elliott's temporary restraining order that prevents them from staging protests. They add that, out of respect for the federal judiciary, they will abide by the order and appeal to a higher level. They assume the order applies only to the named defendants and colleagues and not to the entire community and will not discourage others from taking action. Judge Elliott’s injunction was later overturned by the Fifth Circuit US Court of Appeals.

Self-World

Dr. King paraphrases Paul Tillich's view on the "self world polarity." Being a self, Dr. King writes, means being "both subject and object." This subject matter later appeared in Dr. King's dissertation "A Comparison of the Conceptions of God in the Thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman."

Letter from Ruth N. Smith to MLK

Sunday, March 10, 1968
Rhode Island (RI), Atlanta, GA, Washington, D.C.

Ruth Smith sends a monetary contribution in support of Dr. King's efforts for African Americans and the Civil Rights Movement. She informs him that she will not be physically present for the upcoming demonstration in D.C., but she will support him in spirit.

Letter from Florida Writer to President Lyndon Johnson on True Equality

Florida (FL), Washington, D.C., Detroit, MI

This letter from a Florida resident to President Johnson expresses the writer's views on the nation's racial challenges.

Man (His Split Personality)

Dr. King quotes St. Augustine’s “Confessions.”

Notes on a Letter from Birmingham Jail

Dr. King records notes on three different topics. First, he examines the concept of extremism and individual responses in their respective environments. Next, he expresses disappointment with the white church and its leadership. The final note describes the challenges and hardships of early Christians.

Religion

Dr. King writes on the topic of religion, stating that the people living in the 18th century regarded religion as "the source of both political tyranny and social conflict."

Protest Against MLK Flyer

Chicago, IL, CHINA

This flyer accuses Dr. King of being a traitor and calls for a protest rally when he appears at Grosse Pointe High School in Detroit

Letter from an Asylum Inmate to MLK Seeking Assistance

Monday, May 29, 1967
Pennsylvania (PA), Philadelphia, PA, Georgia (GA), Hartford, CT, Connecticut (CT)

Paul Douglas Ware, an untried inmate, requests Dr. King's "understanding, moral support, and possible assistance." Mr. Ware informs Dr. King of detailed information regarding his unjust treatment, his personal life, his present state of mind and most importantly his desire to have a stronger bond with "his own people."

Letter from E. Paul Weaver to MLK

Tuesday, January 9, 1962
Indiana (IN), Atlanta, GA

E. Paul Weaver writes to Dr. King enclosing a small contribution for the work of the SCLC. Weaver also requests that the Dr. King visit Camp Mack as a guest speaker. The Executive Secretary of Church of the Brethren, one of three historic peace churches in the U. S., informs Dr. King of the Brethren's strong stand against slavery long before the Civil War.

Dexter Echo: April 6, 1960

Wednesday, April 6, 1960
Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL

This edition of The Dexter Echo addressed to Dr.

A Perspective for Christian Peace Concern

New York (NY), ITALY, ISRAEL

Brewster Kneen writes about the roles that Christians and the church play in the peace-making process. He cites Saint Peter and Saint Luke to support his argument.

Letter from William Welsh to MLK

Friday, April 21, 1967
Pennsylvania (PA)

William Welsh objects to Cassius Clay's (Muhammad Ali) rejection to enter the draft for the Vietnam War. Mr. Welsh asks that if Dr. King agrees with this notion, he should denounce Mr. Clay publicly.

Letter from Nicholas Katzenbach to MLK

Tuesday, August 30, 1966
Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS)

Charles L. "Chuck" Fielding

California (CA), Los Angeles, CA, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), South Carolina (SC), Arkansas (AR)

This document provides a detail description of Charles L. "Chuck" Fielding, a candidate for the Democratic primary in the 53rd assembly district.

Philosopher (definition)

Dr. King quotes poet William Wordsworth's definition of a philosopher.

The Dexter Echo: February 20, 1957

Wednesday, February 20, 1957
Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL), GHANA, Washington, D.C., PUERTO RICO, Detroit, MI, Michigan (MI), Baltimore, MD, Maryland (MD), New Orleans, LA, Louisiana (LA), Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), Los Angeles, CA, California (CA), Ohio (OH), New York (NY), New York, NY

The Dexter Echo is the official publication of the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church in Montgomery, Alabama. The newsletter mentions Dr. King, who was minister of the church at the time, and Coretta Scott King in articles pertaining to their farewell party and Mrs. King receiving an award.

Letter from Grace M. Meade to Ralph Abernathy

Thursday, April 18, 1968
Washington (WA)

This message from Grace Meade to Ralph Abernathy relates the details of a Seattle, Washington funeral service conducted for Dr. King.

Letter from Kate Krautheimer to MLK

Friday, September 10, 1965
Pennsylvania (PA), New York, NY

Kate Krautheimer informs Dr. King of an invitation from the University of Pennsylvania requesting that he address the undergraduate student body.

Letter from Phillip O. Foss to MLK

Monday, February 13, 1967
Colorado (CO)

Phillip O. Foss requests permission to use excerpts from "Letter from Birmingham Jail".

Letter from Tadashi Akaishi to MLK

Monday, December 20, 1965
Virginia (VA)

Tadashi Akaishi, Associate Book Editor for John Knox Press, writes Dr. King requesting to use his endorsement for Dr. Kyle Haselden's book "Mandate for White Christians" as the book's preface. The endorsement was initially to be included on the book's cover, but Akaishi feels that it is so well written that he now asks permission to use it as the preface.