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"KENYA"

Letter from Richard B. Specht to MLK

Tuesday, February 27, 1968

Richard B. Specht requests Dr. King's opinion regarding the importance of Latin for modern day students.

Letter from MLK to Bernard Goldstein

Monday, September 9, 1963

Dr. King thanks Mrs. Bernard Goldstein for her contribution to the SCLC. Dr. King explains the importance of her contribution and how it helps in their fight for equality.

Letter from Ada Krozier to MLK

Sunday, April 23, 1967

Ada Krozier encloses a contribution to Dr. King for his work in the civil rights movement and his stance on the Vietnam War. She feels that Dr. King's position is an opportunity to pursue peace and call an end to the war.

Postcard from Dekker Family

The Dekker family of Holland sends its support to Dr. King.

Telegram from Charles William Butler to MLK

Tuesday, March 30, 1965

Charles William Butler, Pastor of New Cavalry Baptist Church, informs Dr. King that he will not be present at a board meeting. The lateness of the invitation and his involvement in Detroit, Michigan prevent his attendance.

Science Surpasses the Social Order

Dr. King wrote this essay during his career at Crozer Theological Seminary in 1951. In the paper, he discusses the disproportionate growth of science and technology compared with that of the social order. Referencing the sociological term, Dr. King refers to this predicament as "cultural lag." He attributes this problem to the "lack of world brotherhood" and asserts that the survival of civilization depends on global unity. Drawing on Republican politician Wendall Wilkie and Prime Minister Clement Attlee, Dr.

Southern Rural Action Project

The Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty announces the initiation of its Southern Rural Action Project. The Southern Rural Action Project coordinates local support groups in the areas of housing, voter registration and other issues in the fight against poverty.

Invitation from the Negro American Labor Council to MLK

Wednesday, December 8, 1965

On behalf of the Negro American Labor Council, August Hill invites Dr. King to visit Racine, Wisconsin. He tells Dr. King that they are suffering from problems regarding employment in addition to all of the other inequalities. He also says that their community is not involved and that they need to be concerned about the issues in their society.

Dr. King Sermon Notes

Under the subject, "The Vision of a World Made New," Dr. King drafted these sermon notes. The essential message of the sermon referred to a need for a "new world order". Plato and Karl Marx are two of the great philosophers referenced in this document. Dr. King delivered this sermon at the annual meeting of the Woman's Convention Auxiliary, National Baptist Convetion in St. Louis, Missouri on September 9, 1954.

University of Wisconsin Speakers Bureau Contract for MLK

This is a contract from the Adult Education Council of Greater Chicago signed by Darrel R. Douglas, of the University of Wisconsin. It records the stipulations agreed upon for Dr. King to deliver a speech.

Traditionalism

Dr. King quotes Edgar S. Brightman’s “Introduction to Philosophy.”

The Domestic Impact of the War in America

Saturday, November 11, 1967

In his address to the National Labor Leadership Assembly for Peace, Dr. King parallels the war in Vietnam to the injustice and violence inflicted on urban dwelling American Negroes "goaded and infuriated by discrimination and neglect." King implores Congress and the Johnson Administration to reassess the nation's domestic priorities and institute anti-poverty programs, so that the Great Society does not deteriorate into a "troubled and confused society."

Letter from Betty Morton to MLK

Sunday, October 8, 1967

Betty Morton of Selma, Alabama writes to solicit help from Dr. King. She also informs him of her hardships with school and her family.

Cover Page for SCLC's Financial Report

This cover page for SCLC's financial report indicates the period will cover from August 15 to August 19, 1966.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. Elizabeth Thornton

Wednesday, April 5, 1967

Dr. Kings thanks Mrs. Elizabeth Thornton for her and Mr. James Peterson's contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Autograph Request from Donald Koos

Donald Koos of Detroit, Michigan requests an autograph from Dr. King for his collection.

Letter from Sarah Harvey to MLK

Saturday, December 9, 1961

An "English Quaker" thanks Dr. King for his letter and references an impending donation. The contributor informs Dr. King that she intends on communicating with her bank to find out if she can transfer the whole sum and promises to have definite news soon.

Letter from Bayard Rustin to MLK

Tuesday, May 18, 1965

Mr. Rustin informs Dr. King that he has reached out to the American Jewish Committee and has included the appropriate person to recognize prior to the delivery of his speech.

Statement by MLK on Jailings

Thursday, May 9, 1963

Dr. King states that there have been blatant violations of constitutional principles in the arresting of nonviolent protesters. He further states that those incarcerated have been subject to beatings.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK Regarding a Publication

Thursday, March 30, 1967

In this letter Joan Daves informs Dr. King that a copy of the jacket text for "Where Do We Go from Here" is enclosed.

Thank You Letter from Dr. King to Eartha Kitt

Tuesday, December 18, 1962

In this letter, Dr. King is expressing his deep apprecitation to Eartha Kitt for her contribution to the Southern Chrisitan Leadership Conference.

Humanism

Dr. King discusses the relationship between God and humanist thinking.

Letter from William Stuart Nelson to MLK

Thursday, July 15, 1965

William Stuart Nelson writes Dr King prompting him to take into consideration a request from Mr. G. L. Mehta as will as to visit Africa. Nelson comments on the importance of the non-violence concept being propagated across India and Africa.

Letter from Pat Carter to MLK

Saturday, November 30, 1963

Dr. King receives a letter from Miss Pat Carter, the public relations director at Katz Radio, thanking him for his address regarding the assassination of President John F. Kennedy.

Gethsemane

Dr. King notes the Biblical story of Jesus' experience before his crucifixion. He uses the parable to speak to the human experience of pain and the faith one must have in God. Jesus went to Gethsemane to pray. He brought apostles John, James, and Peter and had them take watch while he prayed in the garden. When Jesus returned, his friends were sleeping. At this moment, Jesus realized their indifference to his agony. Though standing in pain and loneliness, Jesus used his faith in God to accept his situation as it was, with no efforts of escape.

Letter from MLK to Dr. Fielder

Thursday, July 13, 1967

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Dr. Fielder for sending two poems and reminds him of the necessity of seeking peace through non-violence.

Letter from John H. Telfer to MLK

Saturday, March 13, 1965

Mr. Telfer, a 6th grade teacher, offers his sincerest gratitude for Dr. King and his efforts to eradicate injustice. He includes an additional thanks to Reverend Fred Shuttlesworth, a fellow civil rights leader.

Letter from Alfred Gunn to MLK

Tuesday, February 6, 1968

Alfred L. Gunn requests Dr King's support of Gunn's "new Democratic way of Philosophy." Mr. Dunn also encloses three manuscripts pertaining to riots, the American gun and rifle laws, and the occurrence of racial problems in America.

Barth

Dr. King writes about Karl Barth's theology regarding revelation.

Telegram from Tuskegee Students and Teachers to the SCLC

Wednesday, April 12, 1967

Teachers and students from Tuskegee write members of the SCLC to express their support for the upcoming mobilization and Dr. King's stance on the Vietnam War.