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"KENYA"

Letter from Mrs. Ellen H. Mapes to MLK

Tuesday, March 21, 1967

Mrs. Ellen H. Mapes' letter to Dr. King to discusses her concerns regarding living in urban environments. She maintains that personal responsibility initiatives are more in order than current ones, e.g. family planning and self-improvement through education and job training.

God (Isaiah)

Dr. King provides text from the Old Testament book of Isaiah highlighting the "ethical nature of God."

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Friday, May 22, 1964

Joan Daves informs Dr. King that the British Broadcasting Company wants to read extracts from "Strength to Love" in their "First Day of the Week" program.

Proposed Nobel Speech

This is a draft for an optional version of Dr. King's Nobel Peace Prize acceptance speech. He notes the importance of viewing the world as a family and with such perception, understands race issues as an international concern. King also speaks of Sir Alfred Bernhard Nobel, the originator of the Nobel Peace Prize. He accepts the award on behalf of those who came before him and those who continue to fight for freedom.

Letter from D. G. Amaron to MLK

Thursday, December 17, 1964

The National Newspaper Awards of the Toronto Men's Press Club requests Dr. King as the keynote speaker for their dinner honors.

Letter from Tom Offenburger to MLK

In a letter from Tom Offenburger to Dr. King, a response to a newspaper article written by Bruce Galphin is attached. The article refers to the Civil Rights Movement as a rather violent campaign, due to the harm done to the "good order of society." The response argues on the side of the Civil Rights Movement, and further proves that it is indeed a nonviolent campaign.

Statement Regarding Chicago Movement

Friday, December 2, 1966

Dr. King speaks about the Chicago Freedom Movement that is mobilizing to "launch an intensive voter registration" campaign in Negro communities. Dr. King states, "the ultimate goal of this drive is to add substantially to the voter registration and motivate the entire Negro community to participate in the political process."

Letter from David E. McGuire to All Members of First Westminster Presbyterian Church

Wednesday, April 10, 1968

The Session of the First Westminster Presbyterian Church, Yonkers, NY urges a "write-in" campaign to federal, state, or municipal legislators requesting action in the areas of open housing, equal employment opportunities and civil rights.

Project Concern Pamphlet

This Pamphlet, made by Project Concern, discusses the efforts taken to help the impoverished and sick.

Letter from E.E.H. to Reverend Ralph Abernathy

The author of this letter speaks out against the efforts of Reverend Abernathy, calling the March on Washington a cheap show and calling for an end to civil rights demonstrations in general.

Letter from MLK to Mr. C.G. Christian

Wednesday, August 22, 1962

Dr. King sends this letter of recommendation, on behalf of Reverend John Thomas Porter, to the Pulpit Committee of Sixth Avenue Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama. Following the death of Dr. Goodgame, Dr. King nominates without reservation, Reverend Porter who he calls, "one of the finest men on the ministerial horizon."

Thank-U-Gram from June E. Price to MLK

June E. Price sends Dr. King a "Thank-U-Gram" to congratulate him on the inspiring message he recently delivered and his dynamic leadership in the fight for first-class citizenship.

Letter from Ernest Shaefer to Dora McDonald

Saturday, March 18, 1967

Ernest Shaefer, Executive Secretary for the Hadley Executive Committee, writes Miss McDonald to finalize a date and place for Dr. King to give a lecture in support of the Hadley Memorial Fund.

Correspondence to MLK from D. Leon Everett II

Saturday, July 3, 1965

D. Leon Everett is notifying Dr. King that he will be sending two checks from his church for the SCLC and SNCC. He offers his continuous support for the movement. He makes mention of information in regards to holding a recital for Mrs. King and a souvenir book

What the Reformation Took Out

This note card lists the effects of the Reformation on Christian worship. Summarizing the consequences, Dr. King notes, "the intellectual element was overemphasized."

Letter from Harry Walker to Dora McDonald

Thursday, September 21, 1967

Harry Walker summarizes a recent conversation he held with Dora McDonald, Mrs. Tobye Karl, and Particia Hederman that outlined the dates of future speaking engagements for Dr. King.

Letter from A. Martin to MLK

Monday, April 24, 1967

A. Martin expresses his support for Dr. King's work, but advises Dr. King not to run for President. Martin also shares his thoughts about which candidates he considers best suited for the role of President.

Letter from Stewart Udall to MLK

Secretary Udall grants permission to the SCLC to celebrate the 100th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation at the Lincoln Memorial.

Hunger U.S.A.

This pamphlet outlines the necessity for intervention programs, like the National Council of Negro Women's pilot program, to combat the issue of malnutrition within the African American community.

Program - SCLC Presentation of Mahalia Jackson

Sunday, December 1, 1963

This SCLC program is for Miss Mahalia Jackson's concert benefitting the organization.

Letter from John H. Herriford to MLK

Friday, November 11, 1960

John Herriford, a student at the University of Minnesota, offers Dr. King advice on how to improve sit-in demonstrations.

Letter From Rabbi and Mrs. Gendler

Rabbi and Mrs. Gendler sends their support and best wishes to the S.C.L.C, C.O.R.E, and S.N.C.C for their efforts towards violence, Vietnam, and human dignity.

Letter from Eleanor Roosevelt to MLK

Friday, September 21, 1962

Eleanor Roosevelt invites Dr. King to appear in the first installment of a series of televised discussions entitled "The American Experience."

Photograph of MLK

Guenther Jacobs from Germany sends Dr. King a photo for him to autograph.

Address by MLK at Golden Anniversary Conference of National Urban League

Tuesday, September 6, 1960

Dr. King gives an address at the National Urban Leagues's Golden Anniversary Conference in New York City. He speaks on the subject, "The Rising Tide of Racial Consciousness" and discusses the Negroes new sense of "somebodiness." The factors that contribute to this new sense of dignity include a population shift from rural to urban life, rapid educational advance, gradual improvement of economic status, Supreme Court decisions outlawing segregation in the public schools, and awareness that freedom is a part of a world-wide struggle.

Letter from E. R. Boynton to SCLC

Monday, March 18, 1968

Mr. Boynton inquires about a financial contribution to the Southern Christian Leadership Fund for which he has not received a receipt.

Letter from Kennon Brownlee to MLK

Thursday, October 12, 1967

Kennon R. Brownlee, a social science major at Bishop College, asks Dr. King for his opinion concerning the war in Vietnam.

Letter from MLK and Others to President Dwight D. Eisenhower

Friday, January 11, 1957

A group of Southern religious leaders write to President Eisenhower concerning the extreme violence directed towards Negro people throughout the South. They request his immediate action to address the nation's moral and legal framework sustained by the presiding racial climate.

Letter from S. Keith Graham to MLK

Thursday, January 13, 1966

Skyline High School invites Dr. King to attend their annual dance sponsored by the Associated Men of Skyline. The dance is entitled, "The Southern Queen," and may include additional prominent leaders such as President Lyndon B. Johnson.

Lucky to Be an American

An anonymous person tells Dr. King that he has lost his place as the most liked American. The author infers that Dr. King should not look for everything free and work for his success.