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"KENYA"

Operation Breadbasket Food Store Agreement

Economic conditions begin to change as High-Low Foods and the ministers of Operation Breadbasket team up to provide better opportunities for African Americans.

The Road to Freedom

This draft of Dr. King's "The Road to Freedom" speech explains "there is nothing more powerful in all the world than an idea whose time has come." He further states that the time has indeed come for the ideas of human dignity and freedom.

Letter from A. Phillip Randolph to MLK

Tuesday, April 7, 1964

Mr. Randolph addresses his concerns with current events that could potentially harm the Civil Rights Movement. His list of developments includes Malcolm X's promotion of rifle clubs, the use of propaganda tactics to separate white people from the Civil Rights Movement, the increasing totalitarian influence on protest groups in northern cities and demagogic leadership that creates confusion and frustration. Mr. Randolph requests a meeting to discuss how to address these issues.

Letter From Mitchell Sviridoff to MLK

Tuesday, April 11, 1967

Mitchell Sviridoff responds to a telegram from Dr. King, in which Dr. King states his support of the Queens Clinical Society's proposal for a neighborhood health service center.

Royalty Statement for MLK from Joan Daves

In this royalty statement, Joan Daves provides a detailed report of earnings for the British edition of Dr. King's book "Strength to Love."

Schrag

Dr. King cites Oswald O. Schrag’s article “The Main Types of Existentialism” that appeared in Religion in Life, winter 1953-54.

Ebenezer Baptist Church. Dr. King with Daughter Bernice (Bonnie). Atlanta, 1967

This photo comes from the Benedict J. Fernandez "Countdown to Eternity" portfolio.
(Copyright: Benedict J. Fernandez)

SCLC Voter Registration Report

After having a successful election year as a result of voter registration in Georgia and Tennessee in 1962, the SCLC decided to approach the whole South in attempting to get African Americans to vote. This report gives an overview of the voting situation at that time across the southern states. Other organizations, such as SNCC and the Southwide Voter Education Project, are also referenced as key organizations who helped influenced voter registration.

MLK's Statement at Prayer Rally in Albany, Georgia

Wednesday, August 15, 1962

After the bombing of a local church, Dr. King delivered this statement attempting to both criticize the actions of the perpetrators and provide a sense of calm to Albany demonstrators.

Letter from E. J. Moorer to Dr. King

Wednesday, July 21, 1965

E. J. Moorer of the Alabama Young Democratic Congress asks Dr. King to speak at one of their events.

Letter to Mrs. King from Hon. C.P. Carter and James H. Beverly

Sunday, April 7, 1968

This document was sent from the St. John Grand Lodge Masons of New Jersey, expressing their condolences for Mrs. King's tragic loss following Dr. King's assassination. The letter asks that God grant the King family peace, during their time of bereavement.

Freedom Festival Speech on Chicago Campaign

At the Freedom Festival a speech was made in regards to the Chicago Campaign. The campaign focuses on the urban renewal of the area. Specifically, it discusses the unemployment rate and housing conditions of African-Americans.

Letter from W. Warner Beckett to MLK

Friday, June 23, 1967

Mr. Beckett, a publisher at New Lady Magazine, writes to Dr. King requesting that he lead an "armada" of people with the intent of focusing on businesses and industries. Mr. Beckett believes that Negroes and concerned whites should fight against large businesses by "diverting money from key industries."

Conference on Strengthening the New Politiics

Sunday, November 28, 1965

The Conference on Strengthening the New Politics was formed from a desire to have real constituencies who have control over their elected officials and a concern for local grassroots political development. It is the hope of this conference that the styles of liberalism and the Civil Rights Movement could come together to form a new elective politic.

SCLC News Release

The Southern Christian Leadership Conference issues a new release stating Dr. King's demands that the Department of Justice act immediately to halt brutal treatment and intimidation of Negro school children and parents in the State of Mississippi. Dr. King cites several violent and near violent incidents that have occurred in Mississippi during the month of October.

An Open Letter to Congress from John H. Murphy III

Thursday, November 9, 1967

John H. Murphy III, president of the National Newspaper Publishers Association, urges Congress to pass the Anti-poverty Bill, because voting down the bill would be "cruel and inhumane."

Letter from Erma Jewell Hughes to MLK

Wednesday, February 12, 1964

Erma Jewell Hughes writes Dr. King to congratulate him on the Nobel Peace Prize award and cover on Time Magazine as "Man of the Year." Hughes invites the Reverend to speak at the Business College's annual commencement and encloses traveling expenses for the event. Hughes also states that they are raising additional funds to go towards the "Freedom Fight."

God

Dr. King quotes Psalms 111:3 and writes that "here is the familiar emphasis of the mercy and grace of God."

MLK in his Study

This is a photograph of Dr. King in his study in Atlanta.

Letter to Mr. Otwell from Dr. King Regarding the Request for an Article for the Chicago Sun-Times

Monday, March 30, 1964

Dr. King informs Mr. Otwell that, due to prior obligations, he will not be able to write the article for the Sunday edition as requested. However, he assures Mr. Otwell that he will look into the possibility of editing a section of "Why We Can't Wait" to be published instead.

Letter from Fra Morton Sims to MLK

Monday, April 3, 1967

Dr. King is encouraged to read a US News & World Report article entitled, "One Negro Woman's Advice to Her People." The article approaches the issues of the African American community from an understanding perspective.

Postcard from Friedrich Derz to MLK

Wednesday, March 6, 1963

Friedrich Derz's brief message of "solidarity" illustrates the unity fostered by the international community in the fight for civil rights.

Letter from Michael Bennett to MLK

Saturday, July 18, 1964

In this letter, Mr.Michael Bennett expresses how delighted the NAACP is knowing Dr. King will lecture on Kent State University's campus.

SCLC Direction

Thursday, November 17, 1966

The SCLC establishes a new direction in which they are seeking to promote nonviolence on an international level by creating a universal human rights movement. Ira Sandperl details this new direction of the SCLC which includes the improvement of current political and economic issues.

Letter from T.J. Morrow to MLK

Monday, July 5, 1965

T.J. Morrow writes Dr. King in an effort to gain support for his film idea. Having already submitted it to a motion picture company and subsequently denied, Morrow hopes that King can help with promotion. He believes the film can offer positive messages of brotherhood and feels confident in its impact on society.

Handwritten Letter from MLK to "Dorothy"

This document is a draft of an addendum to a letter Dr. King had previously worked on and is addressed to "Dorothy." While most of this document centers on "support" and is based on form templates, Dr. King specifically mentions a "suggestion concerning 'Lil Abuer" [phonetic].

American Negro Corporation Plan

This document is a plan created by Sterling B. Conaway. The purpose was to create a business organization for Negro professionals to invest in their future. This document also outlines the purpose and priorities of the organization.

Letter from Joan Daves to MLK

Monday, September 11, 1967

Joan Daves informs Dr. King that Harper and Row is having difficulty publishing a paperback edition of "Where Do We Go From Here? "

Memo from Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding a Japanese Edition

Joan Daves, literary agent to Dr. King, requests permission from Dr. King to proceed with the Japanese edition of his book "Strength to Love" per the terms outlined in her letter of April 13.

Letter from National Committee for Free Elections in Sunflower to MLK

Monday, August 14, 1967

The National Committee for Free Elections in Sunflower informs Dr. King of the tremendous strides made by the African American community during the elections in Sunflower County, Mississippi. Four years prior, the loss of elections by black candidates was attributed to local intimidation, but new organizational tactics provided the group with tools to combat this issue. The success of the election set a precedent for many other Mississippi counties to view voting rights as a means to change citizens' lives and the nature of the state.