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"KENYA"

MLK Speech at 4th Constitutional Convention - AFL-CIO

Monday, December 11, 1961
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Florida (FL), Louisiana (LA)

This is an annotated copy of an address given by Dr. King at an AFL-CIO convention. Dr. King thoroughly discusses the working conditions of Negroes, and states the Negro unemployment rate is similar to "malignant cancer." He concludes that the two most dynamic forces in the country are the labor movement and the Negro Freedom Movement.

Mass Letter from Mr. Maurice A. Dawkins, OOEE

Tuesday, February 20, 1968
Washington, D.C.

This letter from Maurice A. Dawkins, a representative from the Office of Economic Opportunity, accompanies materials that encourage the reader to take action "in pledging to beat swords into plowshares," namely transferring funds spent in the Vietnam conflict to domestic endeavors.

Letter from George W. Cooke to MLK Requesting Autograph

Montana (MT)

Mr. George Cooke of Great Falls, Montana requests Dr. King's autograph on a Time Magazine cover where his photo appeared. Mr. Cooke further states he has been collecting autographs for over 7 years and has more than 300 autographs.

The Student Movement and You: Strength in Unity

Tennessee (TN), Nashville, TN, Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

The Committee on Appeal for Human Rights in Atlanta, Georgia issued this handbill to illustrate the results of a boycott successfully conducted by African American students in Nashville, Tennessee.

Letter from Jerome S. Ozer to MLK

Thursday, May 18, 1967
New York, NY

Mr. Ozer informs Dr. King that his organization will be publishing "Eyewitness: The Negro in American History" by William Loren Katz, which covers the Negro in every aspect of American life. He then requests that Dr. King write an introduction for the book.

Letter from Laura Taylor to MLK

Sunday, May 21, 1967
California (CA), Montgomery, AL, VIETNAM, Washington, D.C.

A supporter writes Dr. King to commend his work in the anti-war movement. The author also tells Dr. King that she writes President Johnson and other legislators regularly on the topic, and references a series of letters she sent on the recent Mother's Day holiday.

Dr. King's response to a letter from Mr. Joseph Beaver

Friday, October 24, 1958
MEXICO

Dr. King, in this letter, thanked Mr. Joseph Beaver for his kindness and for the enclosed booklet entitled "I Want You to Know Wendell Phillips Dabney" sent to him, during his recovery from a nearly fatal stabbing in 1958. Dr. King took a moment to apologize for he and Mrs. King not being able to communicate with Mr. Beaver, while they vacationed in Mexico. He concluded the letter by acknowledging his readiness to rejoin those fighting in the battle for civil rights, once his healing process was complete.

Letter from Noel N. Marder to MLK

Thursday, January 18, 1968
New York (NY), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA

Noel N. Marder, manager of the Negro Heritage Library, encloses a silver certificate from a coin shop to attempt to amuse Dr. King. Mr. Marder also hopes to connect with Dr. King to discuss his thoughts regarding the new plans that are in a stage of creation.

Telegram from Vice Chancellor Newcastle University to Dora McDonald

Wednesday, November 1, 1967
Atlanta, GA

The Vice Chancellor of Newcastle University states that they "regretfully understand" Dr. King's inability to attend their engagement due to his current imprisonment.

Letter from MLK to Peter Servetnyk

Thursday, July 14, 1966
CANADA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Dr. King declines an invitation from Peter Servetnyk to speak in Toronto.

Letter from MLK to William A. Bennett Jr.

Tuesday, January 18, 1966
New Jersey (NJ)

Dr. King responds to a letter from William Bennett in which Bennett suggested the phrase "dark skinned American" be used to describe African Americans. Dr. King discusses the connotations of the hateful words "deeply rooted in the debilitating racist caste ordering of our society's slavery epoch and segregation era."

Telegram from MLK to Rev. James Bevel

Chicago, IL, Atlanta, GA, Washington (WA)

Dr. King informs Rev. Bevel of an urgent meeting with the Action Committee for Washington Mobilization at Paschal's Motel.

Letter from Beatrice Rossell to MLK

Saturday, July 4, 1964
Arizona (AZ), Atlanta, GA

Beatrice Rossell wrote this letter to Dr. King on Independence Day in 1964, commending him on the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and enclosing a donation. She ends her note, saying "God bless you, your fine family, and the future of your great work."

Letter from James L. Davis to MLK

Saturday, November 11, 1967
Texas (TX), New York (NY)

Here a retired minister offers support and good wishes to Dr. King while pleading with him to reconsider his stance on Vietnam.

Letter from James A. Dombrowski Regarding S.C.E.F. Contribution

New Orleans, LA, Louisiana (LA)

In this document, James A. Dombrowski, the Executive Director of the Southern Conference Educational Fund, Inc. requests a $10.00 contribution.

Black Marches and White Hysteria

Monday, August 15, 1966
Chicago, IL, Illinois (IL)

This editorial by WBBM-TV in Chicago, a CBS station, highlights recent civil rights marches and the corresponding white hysteria. Carter Davidson, editorial director, discusses the marches and the middle-class citizens who displayed Nazi swastikas in response.

MLK's Letter Addressing Poverty

Cleveland, OH

Dr. King addresses poverty, unemployment and other issues relevant to Americans and the mission of the SCLC before requesting funds to counter these issues.

Letter from Rev. J. H. Cole to Roy Wilkins and MLK

Monday, July 31, 1967
Mississippi (MS), Louisiana (LA), Detroit, MI, New Jersey (NJ), Washington, D.C.

Rev. Cole writes to Dr. King and Roy Wilkins of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) to convey his disgust at the treatment of Negroes in such areas as housing, education, politics and police brutality. He suggests the initiation of a nationwide letter writing campaign to every member of Congress to highlight this treatment and seeks a program that will provide Negroes with jobs skills. Cole also encloses a letter he sent to President Johnson and Attorney General Ramsey Clark regarding Congress' disregard of "racial discontent."

Telegram from Robert L. Green, Floyd McKissack and Roy Wilkins to MLK

Atlanta, GA, Michigan (MI)

Mr. Wilkins, Mr. Kissack and Mr. Green express their viewpoint regarding restrictive racial policies towards the Negro, more specifically towards Negro women by members of the Women's City Club of Detroit. The author encourages a dismembership from the club based on their findings.

Letter from MLK to Ernest Gruening

Wednesday, June 24, 1964
Washington, D.C.

Dr. King expresses gratitude to Ernest Gruening, a United States Senator from Alaska, for supporting the passing of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Letter from Mr. & Mrs. Mills to Rev. Abernathy

Saturday, April 27, 1968
Texas (TX)

This letter from a couple in Austin, Texas is a "message of encouragement" to Rev. Ralph D. Abernathy, recently appointed as the head of the SCLC in the aftermath of Dr. King's assassination.

The Inauguration of Hugh Morris Gloster

Atlanta, GA, Detroit, MI

This program commemorates the inauguration of Hugh Morris Gloster as the seventh president of Morehouse College.

America's Chief Moral Dilemma

Wednesday, May 10, 1967
Atlanta, GA

In this 1967 speech to the Hungry Club, Dr. King addresses America’s chief moral dilemma by focusing on three major evils: racism, poverty, and war.

Telegram from Stanley Levison to Coretta Scott King

Friday, January 17, 1969
ITALY

Stanley Levison warns Mrs. King about interceding between governments.

Memo From Hosea Williams to SCLC Staff

Friday, March 8, 1968
Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

Hosea Williams, the National Director of Mobilization of the SCLC, sends this memorandum urging members to have their assigned region organized before Dr. King arrives on his People-To-People tour.

MLK: A Profile In Leadership

VIETNAM, New York, NY, New York (NY)

Outraged by recent allegations, civil rights leaders rally to unify their support of Dr. King and his position on the War in Vietnam. This document encourages his supporters to unite for a common purpose.

Letter from T. K. Mahadevan to MLK

Friday, February 17, 1967
INDIA, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, New York (NY)

T. K. Mahadevan writes Dr. King asking him to contribute to an article paying homage to the late Reverend A. J. Muste.

Free Southern Theater Requests MLK's Financial Assistance

Tuesday, June 29, 1965
New Orleans, LA, Atlanta, GA

John O'Neal, Executive Director of the Free Southern Theater in New Orleans, requests financial assistance from Dr. King and the SCLC. Mr. O'Neal oversees a professional touring ensemble that performs in six states in the Deep South and a pilot project for a community theater program.

Letter from Sharon Judith Bresler to SCLC

California (CA), Los Angeles, CA

Sharon Bresler encloses a check to the SCLC and requests that they write Rabbi Sanford Shopero from the Congregation of Temple Emmanuel to inform him that the gift was made in his honor.

Letter from MLK to Dr. and Mrs. J.R. Arnold about a Contribution

Monday, January 30, 1967
California (CA)

In this letter Dr. King offers his belated gratitude to Dr. and Mrs. J.R. Arnold for their financial contribution to the SCLC while also explaining why such contributions are important.