Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Johannesburg, South Africa"

On Being a Good Neighbor

Dr. King tells the Biblical story of the "Good Samaritan on the Road to Jericho," in which a traveler has been robbed, beaten and left for dead. Dr. King connects this story to the Declaration of Independence and offers an analysis of the modern era. Following the example of the "Good Samaritan," he encourages looking beyond "race, religion and nationality" to help those wounded by injustices.

Letter from Ruthe T. Sheffey to MLK

Thursday, November 9, 1967

In this letter, Ms. Sheffey asks Dr. King's permission to use his "I Have a Dream" speech in her upcoming textbook, "Impressions in Asphalt." Ms. Sheffey is a faculty member at Morgan State College, who is working on a textbook of poetry and prose with coworker, Eugenia Collier.

Letter from Victor Sharrow to MLK

Monday, February 12, 1968

Victor Sharrow requests a meeting with Dr. King to discuss implementing state and federal plans purportedly suggested by President Johnson. Mr. Sparrow believes that decreasing the number of racist southern representatives will have a collateral affect on southern apportionment of presidential electors.

Letter from Jay Kennedy to MLK

Saturday, October 24, 1964

Jay Richard Kennedy congratulates Dr. King on being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. He also comments on the importance of international recognition for the current struggle for equality.

Postcard Congratulating MLK for Receiving the Nobel Prize

Louise Dekker-Brus congratulates Dr. King on the Nobel Peace Prize and writes that their newspaper says that, in King, America has its Joan of Arc.

Letter from Aggie Smith to MLK

Tuesday, January 25, 1966

Aggie Smith invites Dr. King and his children to visit her school in Chicago, Illinois.

Brotherhood

Dr. King quotes Leslie D. Weatherhead's "Why Do Men Suffer?"

Memo from Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding Schedule

Monday, August 3, 1964

In this memo, Joan Daves informs Dr. King that Victor Weybright will telephone his London organization. Joan then suggests that Dr. King make himself available in London on August 17.

March on Washington Address by Eugene Carson Blake

Wednesday, August 28, 1963

Rev Dr. Eugene Carson Blake, Vice Chairman of the Commission on Religion and Race of the National Council of Churches, addresses the March on Washington. He states that if all the clergy and church members he represents and all of the Roman Catholics and Jews in America were marching for jobs and freedom for Negroes, the battle for civil rights would be won. Despite the pronouncements of the religious community, the churches and society are still segregated. “Late, late we come,” he says, and in a repentant and reconciling spirit.

Letter from the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam

Sunday, March 12, 1967

The Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam outlines a list of requests for its members, including weekly communications and completed bus questionnaires.

Letter from Nancy Claytor to MLK

Friday, December 2, 1966

Nancy Claytor requests Dr. King's permission to use lines from "Letter From Birmingham City Jail" for the publication "The Methodist Student V-VI."

Transition Period

Dr. King quotes an unknown source that links the transition period to Alfred North Whitehead’s rejection of his earlier view about science and philosophy.

SCLC 10th Anniversary Dinner

This formal invitation to the Tenth Anniversary Dinner of the SCLC shows Sidney Poitier as the guest speaker and indicates a ticket price of $10.00. It is requested that all invited guest confirm their reservation prior to the event.

Letter from MLK to Coretta Scott King

Saturday, October 1, 1960

In an intimate letter to Mrs. King, Dr. King informs her of his recent arrival to the State Prison in Reidsville, Georgia. He urges her "to be strong in faith" as she is also pregnant with their third child at the time. He expresses his hope for a family visit that coming Sunday, and his desire to remain intellectually engaged during his four-month sentence.

Letter from Warrington Allsop to MLK

Monday, October 6, 1958

During the fall of 1958, Dr. King was stabbed by an African American woman during a book signing in Harlem, an event that nearly cost him his life. Following this event, Warrington Allsop sends his support and well-wishes for Dr. King's immediate recovery.

Song of Solomon

Dr. King discusses the biblical book Song of Solomon and asserts that it contains minimal significance and little, if any, religious value.

Installation Program for Rev. Kelly Miller Smith

Sunday, September 29, 1963

This is the program for the installation of the Reverend Kelly Miller Smith as Pastor of the Antioch Baptist Church in Cleveland, Ohio. Reverend Smith is installed as the Eighth Minister of the historical church, which began in 1893.

Transformed Nonconformist

In this draft of the "Transformed Nonconformist", Dr. King urges the abandonment of societal practices of injustice.

Letter from B. J. Mason to President Johnson

Friday, February 9, 1968

B. J. Mason deplores how justice is not yet color-blind, at least in Alabama. Mason states that Mr. Boykin's right to "due process of law" is being violated. Edward Boykin admitted guilt to a crime and was sentenced to death, but the trial judge had not ensured that the defendant understood the plea. The U.S. Supreme Court overturned the conviction in Boykin vs. Alabama (1968), citing the Fifth and Fourteenth Amendments.

Financial Report of SCLC

Friday, May 19, 1967

This document is the SCLC's summary of income and disbursements for the fiscal period of May 15-19, 1967.

Letter from Jack Malpas to MLK

Thursday, December 21, 1961

Jack Malpas, a member of the Episcopal Church's Society for Cultural and Racial Unity, contributed financially to the SCLC. Mr. Malpas informs Dr. King that he is working on the appeal for the Prayer Pilgrimage and expresses his previous experience in Jackson, Mississippi.

Anonymous letter to MLK

Sunday, June 26, 1966

An anonymous individual expresses their concern with the methods and efforts Dr. King is using to achieve his goals through the Civil Rights Movement.

L. A. Dotson Attempts to Speak with MLK

Saturday, August 19, 1967

L. A. Dotson has made several attempts to speak with Dr. King on a personal matter. Unfortunately, Dr. King has not responded. L. A. Dotson forwards contact information to Dr. King and has taken residence at the Regency Hyatt room 226.

Photograph Outline for "Why We Can't Wait"

This draft outlines the images and captions used in Dr. King's book "Why We Can't Wait." Some of the material incorporated includes images and descriptions of Dr. King at the 1963 March on Washington, the Birmingham Campaign, other heavily involved civil rights leaders, and Dr. King's family.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dr. King Regarding Saturday Review

Monday, May 11, 1964

Joan Daves, literary agent to Dr. King, wrote Dr. King to gain insight on his preference for a sentence revision to appear in his book "Why We Cant Wait."

Note to Dr. King from JOAN DAVES, New York, NY, dated September 23, 1973

Sunday, September 22, 1963

This note is to request Dr. King's signature on a contract with Oncken for german language edition of Stride Toward Freedom.

The Trinity

Dr. King provides the historical origin and ideology of the Trinity.

Letter from Tadashi Akaishi to MLK Requesting Permission to Publish MLK's Dissertation

Friday, March 26, 1965

This letter from Tadashi Akaishi to Dr. King requests background information and the rights to publish Dr. King's dissertation.

Social Ethics in Psalms

Dr. King writes about social ethics as discussed in Psalms 72.

The Student Protest Movement Special Report

Thursday, February 25, 1960

The Southern Regional Council outlines several facts regarding the Student Protest Movement leading up to February 25, 1960. The contents of this report include detailed examples, legal precedents and public reaction accounts. Also included, is an analysis of the conditions that caused the student protest movement, as well as ideas for solutions.