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Press Release - MLK Mass Meeting

Sunday, August 21, 1960

This document is a 1960 press release detailing a voter's rally at the Jefferson County Armory in Kentucky where Dr. King will be the principle speaker.

Schleiermacher (Where Religion Is to Be Found)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher’s “Speeches on Religion.” The full title of this work is “On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.”"

Map of Morehouse College

These maps are an overview of the buildings located at Morehouse College.

Primacy of Events

Dr. King notes Alfred North Whitehead’s view on the primacy of events over space and time.

Royalty Summary from J. Campe to MLK

Tuesday, October 25, 1966

This cable from J. Campe to Dr. King details royalty checks disbursed from the sale of "Why We Can't Wait" and "Strength to Love."

Anonymous Letter to the SCLC

This anonymous writer seeks assistance from the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in the removal of Judge George Jackson from the Ocmulgee Superior Court. The author claims Jackson was involved in the wrongful freeing a man convicted of murder.

Letter from Dora McDonald to Rosa A. King

Thursday, July 12, 1962

Miss McDonald informs Rosa King that Dr. King will be unable to speak at Central Baptist Church.

Trinity

Dr. King quotes a sermon by Bernard of Clairvaux

Nomination Letter from Benjamin E. Mays to Dr. King

Tuesday, September 10, 1963

In this letter, Benjamin E. Mays notifies Dr. King that he has nominated him for the Florina Lasker Civil Liberties Award.

Letter from Gerald Feffer to MLK

Thursday, October 17, 1963

Gerald Feffer of Lehigh University invites Dr. king to speak at the university in the near future.

Address by MLK at the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary

Wednesday, April 19, 1961

In his address to the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, Dr. King discusses the subject of the "Church on the Frontier of Racial Tension." King describes the crisis state of the US as it passes from an old order of segregation to a new order of integration, proclaiming that this is both a moral issues as well as a political issues. King implores the church to open the channels of communication between races and institute social reform, especially economic justice. Lastly, he invites all people to step into the new age with understanding and creative good will in their hearts.

Letter from Matthew T. Doherty to MLK

Tuesday, July 26, 1966

Matthew Doherty responds to an "eloquent and moving" appeal from Dr. King in the July 26th issue of The New York Times. Doherty discusses the recent surge in "black power" and its role in the ongoing struggle for equal rights. The writer also mentions his "small" contribution to aid Dr. King's efforts to "make this a better world for all of us."

MLK Schedule for November, 1960

This schedule lists Dr. King's travel itinerary and speaking engagements for November, 1960.

Letter from Bella McGregor to MLK

Tuesday, October 17, 1961

Bella T. McGregor asks Dr. King for a copy of his sermon titled "St. Paul's Letter to American Christians."

Jesus: Mission

Dr. King notes passages in Matthew and Luke related to Jesus' mission.

Press Release: SCLC Add New Members

Monday, October 19, 1964

The SCLC reports about the six new members added to its executive board during the Annual Convention held in Savannah, Ga.

Business Reply Envelope from Morehouse College

This document is a postcard invitation to a breakfast at Morehouse College. Dr. King served as a member on the Morehouse Board of Trustees.

Letter from High School Senior Doris Magwood to MLK

Thursday, November 5, 1964

The senior class of Haut Gap School in John's Island, South Carolina invites Dr. King to deliver its baccalaureate sermon.

Moral Law

Dr. King documents a statement from the Federal Council of Churches concerning the significance of moral law. King writes, "This statement from the Federal Council of Churches is pertinent."

Religion (Definition)

Dr. King quotes from D. Miall Edwards’ “The Philosophy of Religion.” Miall is misspelled on the note card.

Racism in the United States

Dr. King discusses the issues of racism, Jim Crow and nonviolence in this edition of Current. He further explains that, without the tactic of nonviolence, Negroes can become hostile and bitter. Throughout this issue several other writers are featured including Leslie W. Dunbar, Langston Hughes and Fay Bennett.

Letter from MLK to Murray Thomson

Thursday, November 9, 1967

Dr. King regretfully informs Murray Thomson he will not be able to speak at the upcoming conference in Portland, Ontario due to commitments for the Civil Rights Movement in the US and his pastoral duties for Ebenezer Baptist Church in Atlanta, Georgia.

Liberalism

Dr. King notes a view of liberalism in Harry Emerson Fosdick’s “The Modern Use of the Bible.”

Telegram from Terrence Hallinan to MLK

Tuesday, November 7, 1967

Mr. Hallinan requests Dr. King's assistance in aiding a service member undergoing a "court martial for refusal to go to Vietnam."

Reception Honoring Ambassadors of the Organization of African Unity

In 1966, while President Lyndon B. Johnson was in office, Dr. King received this invitation to a reception at the White House. The reception honored Ambassadors of the Organization of African Unity States.

Telegram from Dr. and Mrs. King to Rev. Samuel B. McKinney

Dr. and Mrs. King express their condolences for the passing of Reverend Samuel B. McKinney's mother.

Letter from L. Alexander Harper and Charles E. Cobb to Edith M. Lerrigo

Monday, October 24, 1966

Edith Lerrigo writes with concern regarding the support of the "Crisis and Commitment" call by several civil rights leaders. Lerrigo endorses Dr. King's decision to refuse his signatory on the document supporting the call, stating that this act "should have been sufficient to give pause to groups like the YWCA before jumping on the moderate bandwagon."

Schleiermacher

Dr. King quotes theologian Schleiermacher regarding the meaning of a miracle.

Letter from Seabury Press to MLK

Wednesday, August 30, 1967

Alda Lee Boyd, publicity director for the Seabury Press, asks Dr. King if he would write a statement that can be used to promote "The Jon Daniels Story." The book is about an Episcopal seminary student, Jonathan Daniels, who was killed while working in Mississippi following the Selma to Montgomery March.

Order of Commitment

Wednesday, October 18, 1967

An Order of Commitment was issued for Dr. King on October 18, 1967 following a conviction for contempt of Court. The charge stemmed from a matter dating back to the 1963 Birmingham campaign. He was sentenced to five consecutive days in Jefferson County Jail, the famed location where "Letter from Birmingham Jail" was conceived.