Themes

The Archive

Digital Archive brought to you
by JPMorgan Chase & Co.

Search results for:
"Johannesburg, South Africa"

Letter from Sheldon L. Gutman to MLK

Tuesday, June 20, 1967

Sheldon L. Gutman writes Dr. King urging him to utilize his prominence by consistently speaking out about the issues of the world. Gutman also expresses concern regarding America's potential retaliation to China detonating a hydrogen bomb.

Letter to S. R. Wise from MLK Regarding Anti-Semitism

Friday, September 29, 1967

Dr. King responds to a telegram inquiry about SCLC and anti-semitism. Dr. King continues on at length about Negro-Jewish relations, excerpting from his book, "Where Do We Go From Here?"

Letter from MLK to Katherine Gunning

Thursday, July 13, 1967

Dr. King thanks Katharine Gunning for sending him a copy of the letter she sent to President Johnson. He urges that "those of us who seek peaece through non-violence make our consciences and numbers known to the men who run our government."

Letter from Fra Morton Sims to MLK

Monday, April 3, 1967

Dr. King is encouraged to read a US News & World Report article entitled, "One Negro Woman's Advice to Her People." The article approaches the issues of the African American community from an understanding perspective.

Vietnam Week Pledge Card

The Student Mobilization Committee distributed this card as a promise to participate in the Student Week of Protest on April 8th- the 15th against the Vietnam war.

Transformed Noncomformist

Friday, November 1, 1957

Dr. King delivered this sermon in November 1957 while serving as the pastor of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church. In the sermon, Dr. King discusses the Christian dilemma of being "a citizen of two worlds: the world of time and the world of eternity." He situates the experience of black people in America within this dichotomy, and asserts that Christians must not conform to the world of mass opinion when it lacks Christian virtue, but must assume nonconformity.

Letter from Anwar Katib to MLK

Sunday, January 22, 1967

Anwar Katib, the Governor of Jerusalem, states that he is pleased to hear about Dr. King's decision to lead a pilgrimage to the Holy Land. He also tells Dr. King that his visit will be a blessing and a historical event.

Telegram from Arnold Aronson to MLK

Arnold Aronson requests Dr. King's opinion regarding the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights endorsing the anti-poverty bill.

Letter from MLK to the Erie, Pennsylvania NAACP

Friday, March 30, 1962

Dr. King declines an invitation to speak from Erie Branch of the NAACP.

Letter from the Legislative Director to Senator Gaylord Nelson to MLK

Friday, January 28, 1966

William J. Springs writes Dr. King to send him the enclosed document entitled, "A Brief Account of Historic Connections Between Negro Americans and African in South Africa" by Mary Benson. The material is to be used in correlation with the hearing on American policy toward South Africa that will be held by Congressman Barratt O' Harra, Chairman of the Africa subcommittee.

Roy A. Gage Sends Support to MLK and SCLC

Friday, November 15, 1963

Roy A. Gage of Phoenix Mutual Life Insurance Company writes Dr. King and the SCLC Newsletter expressing his interest in the work of Dr. King and encloses $10.00

Minutes for the Leadership Conference on Civil Rights

Wednesday, April 19, 1967

The minutes for this meeting include the Civil Rights act of 1967, the "Freedom Budget," and discrimination in military off-post housing.

Methodist Church Statement on Vietnam Conflict

The Board of Christian Social Concerns of the Methodist Church releases a statement regarding the conflict in Vietnam and possible outcomes and solutions. The board urges steps leading to a withdrawal of US forces from Vietnam.

Letter from Lewis Conrad to MLK

Monday, January 14, 1963

The Penn Unitarian Fellowship of the University of Pennsylvania extends an invitation to Dr. King to meet with the student body for an informal discussion. The university desires Dr. King to converse with several race relation classes for a more realistic perspective from an active leader in the movement. Due to the growing population of the African American community in Philadelphia, it is the university's hope that Dr. King will address social issues specifically in Philadelphia.

Letter from Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Harris to MLK

Monday, March 25, 1968

Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Harris write Dr. King expressing their appreciation for his role as a Civil Rights leader. They were moved to write to him after hearing him speak at the Masonic Temple in Memphis, Tennessee and request to meet with him the next time he visits.

Letter from Tony Edwards to MLK

Thursday, December 24, 1964

Fourteen-year-old Tony Edwards writes Dr. King to ask for an autograph to add to his collection. He also thanks Dr. King "for making the Civil Rights Bill possible."

Memo from the American Lutheran Church to Denver Area Pastors

David Brown of the American Lutheran Church sends an article and copy of a letter from a pastor responding to the article to Denver area pastors. The article, published in "Common Sense," depicts Dr. King as a "Marxist tool" and agitator.

MLK's Notes On the Influence of Radio

Dr. King records information regarding religious broadcasting. He list percentages of public influence, prize giveaways and other relevant historical details.

Invitation to MLK from Washington North Idaho Conference of the United Church of Christ

Monday, November 8, 1965

Archie Hook invites Dr. King to be the guest preacher at the Annual Meeting of the Washington North Idaho Conference of the United Church of Christ.

Letter from MLK to E. D. Johnson

Monday, April 30, 1962

Dr. King responds to E. D. Johnson's letter expressing appreciation for encouragement by providing knowledge regarding the arrogance of Mr. Johnson's son. Dr. King stresses the importance of valuing the internal factors of self-respect, integrity and selflessness, opposed to the external factors of color, skin and wealth.

Professor Andrew Blane Offers Assistance to MLK

Saturday, November 4, 1967

Andrew Blane, Assistant Professor of History at Hunter College, offers to brief Dr. King on the role of religion in Russian culture, particularly the Russian Baptists. He attaches along with his letter, a description of his "scholarly interests and training" for Dr. King to consider.

Statement by MLK Regarding His Five-Day Jail Sentence in Birmingham

Monday, October 30, 1967

Dr. King releases a statement regarding his return to Birmingham, Alabama to serve a five-day jail sentence. He states that he is happy to serve the sentence, but sad that the Supreme Court did not "uphold the rights of individual citizens." He also questions why the United States' resources are being used to fund the Vietnam War rather than to help the poor.

Letter from Joan Kennedy to MLK

Saturday, July 18, 1964

Joan Kennedy thanks Dr. King for his support.

Invitation to Harry Belafonte Concert

Friday, May 25, 1962

Dr. King invites friends to a Harry Belafonte concert, which is a benefit performance for the SCLC.

Walter Winchell: American Talking Back

In this article, Walter Winchell provides excerpts of news articles and adds his own commentary to each. Following an excerpt about Dr. King's having a conference to coordinate civil disobedience activities, Winchell urges his leaders to write to Dr. King and "tell him to stop posing as a Man of Peace and 'fess up that his big "act" is causing more trouble than Ho Chi Mihn." Other recipients of Winchell's attention in this column include President Lyndon B. Johnson.

What Is Man?

This is one of several documents where Dr. King explores the nature of "man." He considers the question "what is man?" to be a timeless concept that "confronts any generation." Dr. King's analysis incorporates Biblical and Shakespearean texts, among other notable references.

Letter from MLK to Gaynette Henderson

Monday, November 2, 1964

Dr. King regretfully informs Gaynette Henderson that he will be unable to visit the sorority suite of Delta Sigma Theta during his visit to Pennsylvania State University.

Albany Student Penalty Stressed

Approximately 40 African American students were suspended from school and charged for participating in mob action. The students were suspended for taking part in an anti-segregation demonstration to Albany City Hall. The demonstration included White students as well but they were not punished for their actions. The 40 students planned to appeal their cases to the federal court.

Letter from Congressman Edward R. Roybal to MLK

Tuesday, January 5, 1965

California Congressman Roybal responds to a message from Dr. King regarding the seating of the Mississippi delegation. Roybal reminds Dr. King of his record on matters related to civil rights.

Letter from A. Phillip Randolph to MLK

Wednesday, July 19, 1967

A. Phillip Randolph, president of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, writes to Dr. King enclosing a letter to President Lyndon B. Johnson. Mr. Randolph addresses concerns of nationwide rioting in retaliation to social and economic oppression.