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"Johannesburg, South Africa"

Invitation from Hubb Coppens to MLK

Sunday, August 16, 1964

Hubb Coppens invites Dr. King to make an appearance at West Berlin to address the Dutch students during his time in Europe. Mr. Coppens explains that it is the schools aim to educate their students on world issues.

Letter from Al Hearin to MLK about Public Appearance

Monday, October 30, 1967

In this letter Al Hearin expresses his admiration for Dr. King and his character, but also expresses his concerns that he, Dr. King, is possibly being used by communist elements in society. Hearin also requests that Dr. King write him a handwritten letter about a life changing experience. Furthermore, Hearin requests an autographed picture.

The Pulpit: A Journal of Contemporary Preaching

As a "journal of contemporary preaching," The Pulpit includes numerous sermons and various religious teachings including Dr. King's "A Tough Mind and a Tender Heart."

Letter from Eugene Exman to MLK

Thursday, March 22, 1962

Eugene Exman expresses his delight that Dr. King will be completing the manuscript for a book of sermons. Exman also asks Dr. King to meet with him in August, if Dr. King plans to travel to Martha's Vineyard. The book of sermons mentioned in this letter eventually would be entitled "Strength to Love."

Letter from Richard Schweiker to MLK

Tuesday, October 5, 1965

Representative Richard Schweiker offers his gratitude to Dr. King for his support for home rule in the District of Columbia. He, however, states that the legislation has been defeated on the floor of Congress. Schweiker urges persistence to see that home rule is established in Washington, D.C.

Royalty Statement from Harper & Row Publishers

Here Harper and Row Publishers itemize the royalties from Dr. King's "Stride Toward Freedom" for a total of $689.44.

Sin

Dr. King explains the relationship between punishment and sin by referencing the biblical verse, I Chronicles 21:17.

Chicago Freedom Movement on Open City Reform

The Chicago Freedom Movement requests that the city's mayor equally enforces the Chicago Fair Housing Ordinace.

Program for SCLC Annual Freedom Banquet

Monday, August 8, 1966

This program from SCLC's Tenth Annual Freedom Banquet features Senator Edward M. Kennedy as guest speaker.

Letter from MLK to John Evarts

Tuesday, April 5, 1966

The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, a specialized agency of the United Nations, contributes to peace and security by promoting international collaboration through education, science, and culture in order to further universal respect for justice, the rule of law, human rights, and fundamental freedoms proclaimed in the UN Charter. Dr. King thanks his contact in France after a successful joint fundraising event.

Letter from Coretta Scott King to Velma B. Hall

Wednesday, October 12, 1960

Mrs. King addressed this correspondence to Velma Hall, in 1960. In this document, Mrs. King extended apologies for the delay in sending her biographical information.

Conversion

Dr. King quotes Russian novelist Leo Tolstoy's book "What I Believe." Tolstoy asserts that when he came to believe in Christ's teachings his whole life and perception changed.

World Journal Tribune: Dream and Demagogy

Thursday, April 6, 1967

The World Journal Tribune writes an article entitled "Dream and Demagogy." The article expounds upon Dr. King's involvement of foreign policy in opposition of the Vietnam War. The authors assert that Dr. King actions have crossed a "thin line" between responsible dissent and irresponsible divisiveness. The article criticizes Dr. King for his political activism and details the military's involvement.

Category Time

Dr. King outlines Paul Tillich's view on time.

Faith In The Heart

Dr. King uses the steadfast faith of biblical figures Abraham and Paul to express his desire to part from the traditionalism of religion and make it applicable to all aspects of a person's life. King also iterates this position by using excerpts from various philosophers such as Edgar Brightman and Ralph Waldo Emerson.

Schleiermacher (Religion as More Than Outward Form)

Dr. King quotes Friedrich Schleiermacher's "Speeches on Religion." The full title of this work is "On Religion: Speeches to Its Cultured Despisers.

Letter from Beverly A. Asbury and David W. Stoh to the SCLC

Thursday, February 22, 1968

In this letter, dated February 22, 1968, the chaplains at Benton Chapel of Vanderbilt University enclose a check of support to the S.C.L.C.

Unfair to Put Blame on Mississippi Poor

This editorial in the Tupelo (MS) Daily Journal claims it is unfair to attribute the proposed Poor People's Campaign in Washington, D.C. to poor Mississippians, who are uneducated and have no knowledge of Congress or how to mount a massive protest. The piece takes both Dr. King and Stokely Carmichael to task for suggesting that the wheels of government be ground to a stop until their demands are met.

Letter from Joan Daves to Tetsuo Kohmoto

Monday, April 13, 1964

In this letter Joan Daves informs Tetsuo Kohmoto that his letter to Dr. King has come. Joan also says that the terms are being worked out with Katahira of Charles E. Tuttle Co. The letter closes by telling Mr. Kohmoto that he will be hearing more about the matter.

Letter from MLK to Vincenso Lapiccirella

Thursday, January 14, 1965

Dr. King thanks Dr. Lapiccirella for his invitation to participate in a program in Florence, Italy.

Letter from S. Scott to MLK

Tuesday, August 1, 1967

S. Scott states how he objects to Dr. King's leadership because he believes that Dr. King's influence has resulted in lawless riots. Mr. Scott suggests alternatives for those who live in the "slums" and identifies education as a means of advancement. Furthermore, Mr. Scott assures results from the Civil Rights Bill in time.

Letter from Henry N. Flynt, Jr. to MLK

Sunday, October 15, 1967

Henry N. Flynt expresses his appreciation for a copy of Dr. King's book, "Where Do We Go From Here" and compliments Dr. King on the quality of the book.

Plato Psychology

Dr. King explores Plato's contribution to psychology.

Zwingli, H.

Dr. King records biographical information about Swiss reformer Ulrich (or Huldrych) Zwingli.

Letter from Huub A. J. Coppens to MLK

Friday, September 18, 1964

Huub, A. J. Coppens, Foreign Secretary of the "De Tribune," reminds Dr. King that they are waiting for a response to their invitation.

Negro Population

This document compares the number of Negro registered voters and the potential number of registered Negro voters to the Negro population in the Southern United States.

Autograph Request

German citizen, Reinhold Kohl, requests an autograph of Dr. King for his collection.

Press Release: MLK Joins Sponsors of April 15 Marches on San Francisco and New York City

Friday, February 24, 1967

In this press release, Dr. King announces his support of a massive mobilization against the Vietnam War. Sponsored by the Spring Mobilization Committee to End the War in Vietnam, major peace marches are being held in New York City and San Francisco. Mrs. King is also listed as a leader who endorsed the demonstrations.

Letter from Boston University Graduate School

Friday, October 9, 1953

Ms. Bessie A. Ring, a representative from the Boston University Graduate School registrar's office, highlights and outlines various changes that have been made to the leaflet on the "Preparation of the Dissertation for the Ph.D. Degree."

Hegel's Social Ethics

Dr. King writes notes on Hegel's social ethics. He quotes, "The principle triad here consist of law in the sense of abstract right, morality, and social ethics." According to Hegel, abstract right may be defined as being a person and respecting other people, while morality refers to one's conscience and social ethics regards another triad, being family, civil society, and the state.