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Letter from Robert Gabor to MLK

Thursday, June 27, 1963
Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), New York, NY, Oslo, Norway

Robert Gabor writes Dr. King inviting him to Oslo, Norway to speak at the 7th International Congress of the International Union of Socialist Youth. Gabor expresses to Dr. King that their organization supports "the present struggle of the American Negro."

Letter from David A. Gill

Tuesday, September 5, 1967
Ohio (OH)

Mr. Gill requests a photograph of Dr. King for classroom display.

Reason (Its Value in Revelation)

Dr. King quotes John Locke’s “An Essay Concerning Human Understanding, Book IV.”

The SCLC Hall of Fame Dinner of July 1962

Friday, July 20, 1962
New York (NY), New York, NY, Georgia (GA), Boston, MA, Massachusetts (MA), Brooklyn, NY

This pamphlet is from the Hall of Fame Dinner for Jackie Robinson. It features several ads from organizations supporting the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Georgia Council on Human Relations: Program Highlights

Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), New York, NY

This newsletter informs readers of the upheaval in the state of Georgia by reporting a variety of incidents around the state. The program focuses on events around Atlanta, including an attack in the Dixie Hills community in which two Molotov cocktails were thrown and, during the ensuing chaos, one man one was killed by a shotgun blast and three others wounded.

Letter from Vivian S. Florence to MLK

Sunday, November 10, 1963
Birmingham, AL

Ms. Florence informs Dr. King she has sent two other letters to the SCLC, both of which included contributions from the United Mine Workers of America. She expresses concern regarding mail tampering due to Dr. King's notoriety.

Condolence Letter to Mrs. King from Charles Ocasio

Friday, April 5, 1968

This letter from a middle school student in New York City is a letter of condolence written to Mrs. King the day after Dr. King’s assassination.

Letter from Rev. Oliver W. Holmes to Dora McDonald

Thursday, January 23, 1964
Atlanta, GA, New York, NY

Reverend Oliver Holmes confirms the possibility of a meeting between Dr. King and Mrs. Leonard Faber, a graduate student in religion. Her dissertation involves Dr. King, German monk and theologian Martin Luther and Jewish philosopher Martin Buber.

Letter from MLK to Rev. E. Wayne Roberts

Sunday, January 3, 1965
Washington (WA), Atlanta, GA

Dr. King writes Rev. E. Wayne Roberts in support of his fellow friend and SCLC Co-Founder Rev. C. K. Steele, Jr. He notes Rev. Steele as "a thorough and competent pastor" that exemplifies the teachings of Jesus Christ.

Address by MLK at Golden Anniversary Conference of National Urban League

Tuesday, September 6, 1960
New York, NY, NIGERIA, SOUTH AFRICA, LIBERIA, ETHIOPIA, INDIA, Mississippi (MS)

Dr. King gives an address at the National Urban Leagues's Golden Anniversary Conference in New York City. He speaks on the subject, "The Rising Tide of Racial Consciousness" and discusses the Negroes new sense of "somebodiness." The factors that contribute to this new sense of dignity include a population shift from rural to urban life, rapid educational advance, gradual improvement of economic status, Supreme Court decisions outlawing segregation in the public schools, and awareness that freedom is a part of a world-wide struggle.

Letter from Minnie Summers Lindsey to MLK

Tuesday, December 5, 1967
California (CA), Birmingham, AL

Mrs. Lindsey asks Dr. King for a copy of a speech she recently heard on the radio and his "Letter from Birmingham Jail."

Metaphysics

Dr. King notes an insight from American psychologist and philosopher William James regarding metaphysics.

Letter from James G. T. Fairfield to MLK

Monday, October 23, 1967
Virginia (VA), Georgia (GA), Atlanta, GA, Ohio (OH), Cleveland, OH

"Alive" magazine editor James G. T. Fairfield expresses gratitude to Dr. King for sending a copy of "Where Do We Go From Here." Fairfield also sends several copies of his magazine, a publication of Mennonite Broadcasting which published an excerpt of Dr. King's "Riverside" speech.

John P. Gallagher of the Community Renewal Society, Letter to Dr. King 1967

Chicago, IL

John Gallagher is writing to Dr. King to promote the initiative of the Community Renewal Society. The society is piloting a project titled Toward Responsible Freedom. The program targets slum areas of Chicago and wants to collaborate with private enterprises to improve the conditions of the environment.

People in Action: Sit In, Stand In, Wade In, Kneel In

Nashville, TN, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Chicago, IL, Philadelphia, PA, Los Angeles, CA, New York (NY), Mississippi (MS), Alabama (AL)

In this article in the New York Amsterdam News May 25, 1963, Dr. King says that, through the ballot, Negro voters can change the political structure of the South. He states that for democracy to live, segregation must die; therefore, every form of nonviolent direct action will be used to dismantle it in the South, where it is visible, and in the North, where it is more hidden. Finally, he points out that modern psychologists use the term “maladjusted.” He is glad to be “maladjusted” to segregation, religious bigotry, economic injustice, and militarism.

Letter of Support from John Ladd to MLK

Wednesday, August 2, 1967
Massachusetts (MA)

In this letter, John Ladd expressed support to Dr. King and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Mr. Ladd referenced a desire that his enclosed monetary contribution be directed toward efforts to gain equality for Negroes.

Letter from Mark Raphael to MLK

New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

Mark Raphael, the President of the All-Square Student Congress Speaker's Bureau at New York University, invites Dr. King to talk about his priorities in America and plans for Washington.

Carlisle's Variety Shop Souvenir Booklet

Birmingham, AL

Carlisle Variety Shop produced this souvenir booklet advertising Negro businesses but also honoring Dr. King and other SCLC officials involved in the 1963 Birmingham campaign.

A Lack of Jewish Soldiers

Thursday, August 25, 1966
Washington, D.C., New York, NY, ITALY, VIETNAM

T.S. D'Amico writes Dr. King and others over what he perceives as a lack of Jewish men being drafted into military service.

Enclosure to MLK - A Call for a National Fast by CALCAV

This is an enclosure that accompanied a letter dated March 22, 1968 from John C. Bennett to Dr. King. Dr. King spoke often of the need of fasting to repent for the sin of Vietnam, and was closely associated with the Clergy and Laymen Concerned about Vietnam (CALCAV). Between the writing of this letter and the event itself, Dr. King would be assassinated.

Letter from Joan Daves to Dora McDonald about Dr. King's "Three Lives for Mississippi" Preface

Friday, May 7, 1965

In this letter to Dora McDonald, Dr. King's assistant, Joan Daves writes that she has received Dr. King's preface for the foreign editions of "Three Lives For Mississippi."

Letter from Ben-Zion Ilan to MLK

Thursday, October 15, 1964
ISRAEL, Atlanta, GA

The American Representative of the General Federation of Labor in Israel writes Dr. King to congratulate him on the Nobel Peace Prize. He also reiterates a request for Dr. King to visit Israel as the guest of Histadrut, the Executive Director of the organization.

Letter from Kenneth Barney to MLK

Monday, August 22, 1966
New York (NY)

Dr. Kenneth R. Barney sends this letter of support to Dr. King. Barney expresses his appreciation for King's interpretation of "black power" and admires his wisdom on the country's current state of affairs. He urges Dr. King to keep a "broad perspective" on the problems of American society and civilization. Barney believes that domestic and foreign policies can no longer be considered separately.

Letter to Rev. Ralph Abernathy from E.S. Baker

Tuesday, April 30, 1968
Atlanta, GA

E.S. Baker, manager of the Canadian National Railways, wrote to Rev. Ralph Abernathy requesting a copy of Dr. King's "I Have A Dream" speech. He began the letter by noting that he was an avid admirer of Dr. King and interested in acquiring some of his other recordings.

Letter from Robert F. Kennedy to MLK

Thursday, August 3, 1967
Washington, D.C.

Senator Robert Kennedy declines Dr. King's invitation to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference's 10th Anniversary Convention in Atlanta, Georgia.

Professor Andrew Blane Offers Assistance to MLK

Saturday, November 4, 1967
New York, NY, FORMER SOVIET UNION / USSR, Atlanta, GA

Andrew Blane, Assistant Professor of History at Hunter College, offers to brief Dr. King on the role of religion in Russian culture, particularly the Russian Baptists. He attaches along with his letter, a description of his "scholarly interests and training" for Dr. King to consider.

Nobel Peace Prize Lecture

Friday, December 11, 1964
Oslo, Norway, New York (NY), New York, NY, London, England, Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA)

This is a handwritten draft of the Nobel lecture. Dr. King delivered this lecture at the University of Oslo on December 11, 1964, the day after receiving the Peace Prize. Aware of the prestigious nature of the award and the global recognition it brought to the nonviolent struggle for racial justice in the US, King worked nearly a month on his address. He goes beyond his dream for America and articulates a vision of a World House in which a family of different races, religions, ideas, cultures and interests must learn to live together as brothers or perish together as fools.

Typical Theistic Personalism

Dr. King sketches notes on theistic personalism with references to Friedrich Leibniz, George Berkeley, Immanuel Kant, and Hermann Lotze.

103:24 General Correspondence 1967 (S)

Monday, May 1, 1967
Minnesota (MN), Atlanta, GA

Addressed to Sigrid L. Sharp, this receipt is forwarded to Minneapolis, MN for a donation of $3.00 to the Southern Christian Leadership Conference.

Letter from Frederic C. Smedley to Lyndon B. Johnson

Saturday, May 6, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, Washington, D.C., VIETNAM

Frederic C. Smedley, a lawyer and peace activist, writes to President Johnson suggesting a program to help end the war in Vietnam. Smedley urges President Johnson to implement the plan to bring an end to the longstanding fight.