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"Johannesburg, South Africa"

Letter from Bernice Lind to MLK

Thursday, December 14, 1961

On behalf of the First Methodist Church in Santa Monica, California, Bernice Lind requests a copy of a speech Dr. King gave at the local Civic Auditorium.

Letter from H. M. Joshi to MLK

Friday, April 7, 1967

H. M. Joshi of India communicates with Dr. King following Dr. King's address at Howard University on the subject of nonviolence. He informs Dr. King about Khan Abdul Ghafar Khan and his influence as a nonviolent soldier in India. Joshi also requests a combination of Dr. King's statements and publications surrounding nonviolence.

Statement Before the National Democratic Platform and Resolutions Committee

Saturday, August 11, 1956

Dr. King addresses the National Democratic Platform and Resolutions Committee on the issues of civil rights, segregation, and voters registration. He urges the party to join the crusade for social justice and equality for all.

Letter from Alan Geyer to W. L. Harriford

Monday, June 30, 1969

Alan Geyer informs W. L. Harriford that they do not have reprints of Dr. King's article from the October 8, 1958 issue of The Christian Century. However, Mr. Geyer has enclosed an excerpt from the book "Stride Toward Freedom."

Telegram from Ebenezer Baptist Church to MLK

Friday, November 3, 1967

Ebenezer Baptist Church offers support to Dr. King during his incarceration in the Birmingham Jail.

Letter from MLK to Reverend Leon H. Sullivan

Wednesday, October 31, 1962

Dr. King thanks Rev. Leon Sullivan for visiting Atlanta and delivering a powerful message. Dr. King had asked Rev. Sullivan to come to Atlanta and meet with local ministers to discuss the selective patronage program Sullivan developed in Philadelphia. This program became the model for SCLC's Operation Breadbasket.

Letter from Lee Wood to MLK

Tuesday, May 23, 1967

Lee Wood writes to Dr. King concerning civil and human rights. Mr. Wood seeks to create a third political party and asks Dr. King for any information that will help him meet his goal.

Letter from MLK to Ms. Susan Stauffer

Thursday, August 20, 1964

Dr. King expresses his deep appreciation to Susan Stauffer for her contribution to the SCLC. He states, "such moral and financial support are of inestimable value for the continuance of our humble efforts."

Letter from MLK to Murray Thomson

Friday, February 11, 1966

Dr. King regretfully informs Murray Thomson that he cannot accept his invitation to Toronto due to his prior commitments for the month of June.

Letter from MLK to Vera Jones

Thursday, December 2, 1965

In this letter, Dr. King thanks Vera Jones for her support of the Freedom Movement and the SCLC.

Telegram Request to MLK on the Kennedy Assassination

Thursday, December 5, 1963

This Western Union Telegram was sent to Dr. King from Tokyo, requesting commentary concerning John F. Kennedy's assassination for the magazine Midorikawa.

The Dilemma of Negro Americans

In this draft of a chapter for his book Where Do We Go from Here: Chaos or Community?, Dr. King offers an in-depth description of the plight of African Americans over the past few hundred years and how it will never be fully understood by their white counterparts. He recounts the issues associated with American slavery – the dehumanization of slaves and the destruction of the family unit. He ties what happened in the past to what is occurring in the present, explaining that because of these layers of oppression African Americans have to play catch up to be seen as equals in America.

Letter from Wallace Terry to MLK

Wednesday, April 11, 1962

Wallace Terry extends his appreciation for Dr. King's visit to Washington, D. C. and sends best wishes from Jack Eisen to Mrs. King.

My Jewish Brother

Wednesday, February 2, 1966

Dr. King responds to a recent anti-Semitic remark made by a fellow civil rights leader. He discusses the need for Hebrew prophets to revitalize the moral conscious of society. "Let justice roll down like the waters of righteousness as a might stream."

Letter from E.M. Fruchter to MLK Regarding Hotel Reservations

Monday, December 12, 1966

E.M. Fruchter is notifying Dr. King of the hotel accomodations made on his behalf. He list the cost of the rooms per night and request a fifty-dollar deposit from Dr. King.

Letter from Alfred A. Haesler to MLK

Wednesday, September 6, 1967

Alfred A. Haesler of Die Tat or "the fact," a publication in Switzerland, asks Dr. King a series of questions that revolve around the role of hatred in American politics.

From Reverend M. L. Jackson to MLK

Friday, May 4, 1962

Rev. Jackson expresses his appreciation and support for the work of Dr. King. Rev. Jackson pledges his dedication to the cause and encourages Dr. King to continue his monumental work.

Letter from Toni Harris to Mrs. King 4/5/68

Friday, April 5, 1968

Young Toni Harris, a student in NYC, wrote this letter to Mrs. King sharing her hope that Dr. King's killer would be caught. This letter is an example of the many levels of support shown towards the King family, from schoolchildren who loved Dr. King.

Letter from Coretta Scott King to the Women's Strike for Peace

Saturday, June 22, 1963

Mrs. King writes to the Women's Strike for Peace to extend her appreciation for their support in the area of civil rights.

Letter from MLK to William A. Rutherford

Wednesday, November 23, 1966

Dr. King encourages Mr. Rutherford that he would be a great asset to the S.C.L.C. and the Civil Rights Movement.

The Social Organization of Nonviolence

Dr. King breaks down the structure of a nonviolent movement. He describes at length the difference between "token" integration and true integration. He describes three types of violence that could be used to achieve integration to which he prefers the "wholesome," nonviolent choice. Lastly, Dr. King gives his opinion on the "evils" of war.

Letter from Pauline Lee to MLK

Monday, January 9, 1967

Pauline Lee withdraws her support from Dr. King due to his failure to withdraw support for Adam Clayton Powell.

Introduction to the Demands of the Freedom Movement

This document discusses the injustices and inequalities that Negroes are facing in Chicago's urban communities. The author outlines the struggles blacks endure in a variety of different arenas such as racism, discrimination, poverty, unemployment and segregation.

Letter from Kathy Sasso to MLK

Kathy Sasso, a student at Public School 30 in Staten Island, New York, notifies Dr. King that her class read his "I Have a Dream" speech and named him "Person of the Week." Sasso also requests a copy of one of Dr. King's speeches.

Telegram from MLK to Jack Greenberg

Dr. King informs Jack Greenberg that he agrees with a plan to dissolve the Leadership Conference.

Fiscal Facts about SCLC

This brochure outlines financial disclosure information regarding SCLC as a non-profit organization.

Excerpts from The Negro and the American Dream

Sunday, September 25, 1960

In this address to the Charlotte, North Carolina branch of the NAACP, Dr. King outlines five actions that Negroes must address in order to ensure their own first-class citizenship.

Letter from A. William Loos to James Farmer

Monday, July 19, 1965

A. William Loos expresses his agreement with the actions of the recipient, James Farmer, which lead to the reconsideration of a vote to remove United States troops from Vietnam.

Draft of I Have a Dream

Wednesday, August 28, 1963

This version of Dr. King's famous "I Have a Dream" speech reveals important changes to ideas and phrases that Dr. King chose either to alter or omit completely the day he addressed the throng gathered before the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, D.C. Dr. King's argument against the "normalcy" of bigotry remained a key message on the day he took the podium.

MLK Speech at 4th Constitutional Convention - AFL-CIO

Monday, December 11, 1961

This is an annotated copy of an address given by Dr. King at an AFL-CIO convention. Dr. King thoroughly discusses the working conditions of Negroes, and states the Negro unemployment rate is similar to "malignant cancer." He concludes that the two most dynamic forces in the country are the labor movement and the Negro Freedom Movement.