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Letter from Nancy Davison to MLK

Thursday, May 18, 1967
California (CA), San Francisco, CA

Nancy Davison writes Dr. King to thank him for his words published in Ramparts. She writes that she finds it thrilling to be able read his own words instead of quotations used by others out of context. She thanks him for the stance he has taken on Vietnam, for fighting injustice, and for "having the courage to reveal what is in your heart."

Holiday Letter from the Best Family

In this Christmas Card, the Best Family wishes all of their friends and supporters a Merry Christmas.

Letter from Katharine Gunning to President Johnson

Tuesday, May 2, 1967
New York (NY), New York, NY, Washington, D.C., VIETNAM, CHINA

Katharine Gunning of New York writes President Johnson and copies various dignitaries, including Dr. King. Gunning voices her opposition to the Vietnam War, in particular the bombing campaign, which she views as an escalation of the war.

Letter from James Lawson to MLK

Wednesday, October 16, 1963
Memphis, TN, Atlanta, GA, New York (NY), Birmingham, AL

Rev. Jim Lawson encloses a check on behalf of Protestant missionaries wanting to support the civil rights movement. He mentions that he taught nonviolence to these missionaries and notes that they wanted the contribution to assist in a scholarship for a student that participated in the Birmingham campaign. Rev. Lawson was the individual who invited Dr. King to Memphis on his final mission to help the plight of disenfranchised santitation workers.

Letter from Kerstin Lindblom to the SCLC

Thursday, September 8, 1966

A Student from Sweden offers to come to America to work for the SCLC. Her letter describes all the ways she wishes to help.

Memorandum to the SCLC Staff

Monday, April 1, 1968
Memphis, TN, Washington, D.C.

In a memorandum sent to the SCLC staff, just days before Dr. King's assassination, Tom Offenburger informs members of a meeting Dr. King had with his advisers. The main focus of the meeting was the march in Memphis which turned violent, as well as the future of the Poor People's Campaign. In spite of the violence, there remains plans to go to Washington and correct the economic racism the US faces.

Letter From Dora McDonald to Rev. Albert F. Campbell

Tuesday, May 2, 1967
Philadelphia, PA

Secretary McDonald writes Rev. Campbell on Dr. King's behalf, informing him of that Dr. King will consider his invitation to the next Men's and Women's Day celebration.

Letter from Robert Birley to MLK

Wednesday, March 20, 1968
London, England, Atlanta, GA

Robert Birley invites Dr. King to give an address at a program in London. Mr. Birley informs Dr. King of the four topics that will be discussed and requests that Dr. King address the topic of racial discrimination.

Letter from C. L. Evans to MLK

Thursday, September 7, 1967
Richmond, VA

C. L. Evans is giving a $100 contribution on behalf of the Baptist Allied Headquarters, to Dr. King for his work and organization.

MLK Examination Blue Book

Friday, May 23, 1947

Dr. King used this "Blue Book" to record answers for a Bible exam taken on May 23, 1947.

Non-Violent Procedures to Inter-Racial Harmony

Tuesday, October 16, 1956
New York (NY)

In this early speech to a NY Universalists' convention, Dr. King lays out his nonviolence method, based on Gandhi's. He outlines five of the six principles he will use later. They are: active, courageous resistance; winning the moral conversion of the opponent, not defeating him; attacking the forces of evil, rather than the persons doing evil; using love to avoid "internal violence of the spirit"; and faith in the inclination of the universe towards justice.

Letter From Octavia Wynbush Strong to MLK

Saturday, February 13, 1965
Missouri (MO)

Mrs. Strong offers Dr. King a copy of her play "Listen, America," with hopes that he might use it in his "wonderful work."

Letter from H. Rogosin to MLK

Tuesday, August 8, 1967
California (CA), Atlanta, GA

H. Rogosin writes to Dr. King encouraging him to read the enclosed material on "The Role of Psychologists in Helping Solve Problems of Intergroup and Racial Tensions."

Letter from Jameas Lucas to MLK Regarding Legal Help

Louisiana (LA)

Mr. Lucas requests Dr. King's legal assistance regarding a manslaughter trial against a white man.

Letter from Lillian M. Snyder to the Editor

Sunday, January 28, 1968
Maryland (MD), Baltimore, MD, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Lillian Snyder sends a letter to the editor of Sunpapers sharing her views on U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War.

Letter from Local 89 Members to Martin Luther King, Jr.

New York, NY

In this letter dated March 5, 1968, the Anti-Discrimination and Civil Rights Committee of Local 89 invites King to speak at their membership meeting on April 1, 1968. Albert Jenkins, Emil Ramirez, and Wendell are the members of Local 89 who sent this letter.

Letter from Leon Martin to MLK

Michigan (MI)

Educator Leon Martin expresses his dissatisfaction with individuals that are silent about civil rights for Negroes. He states that a lot of people do not care about civil right until it affects them personally. He also discusses the Christian church's continual support of the "status quo". He encloses a contribution on behalf of he and his wife and sends Dr. King his prayers and support.

Telegram to Dr. James Nabrit from MLK

Monday, July 16, 1962
Washington, D.C.

In this telegram, Dr. King invites Dr. James M. Nabrit to share the privilege of being a special guest with him at the National Press Club.

Telegram from Rev. Andrew J. Young to Mrs. Rosa M. Mcghee

Monday, August 9, 1965
Birmingham, AL, Tennessee (TN)

Rev. Andrew Young sends this telegram to Mrs. Rosa Mcghee apologizing on behalf of the SCLC for neglecting to invite the officials and members of the American Federation of Teachers.

Letter from David Cassat to MLK

Wednesday, October 26, 1966
New York, NY, New York (NY), Atlanta, GA

Mr. Cassat, Treasurer for the National Council of Churches, informs Dr. King about the benefits of the organization's Gift Annuity Program. He also encloses a brochure that outlines the various details of this innovative initiative.

Letter from Abram Eisenman to MLK

Georgia (GA), VIETNAM, New Hampshire (NH), Wisconsin (WI)

This was sent to Dr. King from Abram Eisenman, who is running for President of the United States in 1968. He asks for Dr. King's support in running for president and presents his case on why he should be president.

Speech to the Synagogue Council of America

Sunday, December 5, 1965
New York (NY), CHINA

Dr. King receives the Judaism and World Peace Award from the Synagogue Council of America and uses the occasion to speak about the Civil Rights Movement and international peace. He laments the vehement criticism of dissent and discussion of the Vietnam War and enumerates reasons why the Hebrew prophets are so needed today.

Response to Reasons Why African Americans Should Boycott Whitey's Olympics

Wednesday, February 28, 1968
LIBERIA, Chicago, IL

The writer responds to an article in The Post on why African Americans should boycott the Olympics. He believes that Negroes should return to Africa or form their own community in the US separate from whites. God did not intend whites and Negroes to live together, the author maintains, or would have made them the same color. Negroes should take responsibility for their own condition rather than blaming whites. test

Letter from Ed Clayton to Martin Gal

Wednesday, October 16, 1963
Michigan (MI), Birmingham, AL

Ed Clayton, Public Relations Director for SCLC, writes Martin Gal, Producer of WMSB TV, to inform him that Dr. King will not be able to make an appearance on his television production because of his focus on the Civil Rights Movement.

Walk for Freedom

Montgomery, AL, Alabama (AL)

In this article, Dr. King address the issue of racism occurring in Montgomery. It was here that African Americans, including Dr. King, were victims to humiliation and violent acts because of their race. Dr. King further promote nonviolent protest to combat this civil injustice.

Outline Written in MLK's Handwriting Entitled: Be Ye Perfect

The document, shown here, is a combination of a handwritten outline and notes for the preparation of a sermon. Under the title, "Be Ye Perfect", Dr. King described Jesus, in relation to rational and moral perfection.

Letter from MLK to Robert Wagner

Tuesday, March 3, 1964
New York, NY

Dr. King sends condolences to Mayor Robert Wagner consequent to his wife's death.

Letter from Pastor G. Murray Branch to MLK

Wednesday, June 7, 1967
Alabama (AL), Montgomery, AL

In this letter, Pastor Branch invites Dr. King to be the speaker on the 90th Anniversary of Dexter Avenue Baptist Church.

News Article "Who Creates Slums?"

J. Frank Lindsey reports Mr. Hilliard's views about how slums are created. The reasons cited by Mr. Hilliard include undisciplined children and landlords who don't take care of their property.

SCLC Sustaining Contributors Annual Card-1967

Sunday, January 1, 1967
Michigan (MI)

Warren J. Day submits his annual contribution to the SCLC. He adds a small note thanking Dr. King for taking a strong role in the peace movement.