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Religion

Dr. King quotes William Ernest Hocking's "The Meaning of God in Human Experience."

Birthday Card from Isaac Stotts to MLK

Isaac Stotts sends birthday wishes to Dr. King on his 39th birthday.

Letter from Aggie Smith to MLK

Tuesday, January 25, 1966

Aggie Smith invites Dr. King and his children to visit her school in Chicago, Illinois.

Forgiveness

Dr. King gives examples of what it means to forgive. Among other definitions, forgiveness means "that the past is overlooked" and that there is "a renewal of higher fellowship."

Letter from Joe C. Sullivan to MLK

Wednesday, June 10, 1964

Mr. Sullivan assures Dr. King of his and his wife's support for the Civil Rights Act of 1964. Sullivan, a white Baptist, also expresses discontent over the number of prejudiced people within his race and faith.

Post Card from Jerry Smith to MLK

Wednesday, November 1, 1967

Jerry Smith writes to Dr. King who is in the Birmingham Jail. Smith accuses Dr. King of not being a genuine reverend, but a communist hate monger.

Georgia Council on Human Relations: Program Highlights

This newsletter informs readers of the upheaval in the state of Georgia by reporting a variety of incidents around the state. The program focuses on events around Atlanta, including an attack in the Dixie Hills community in which two Molotov cocktails were thrown and, during the ensuing chaos, one man one was killed by a shotgun blast and three others wounded.

SCLC Newsletter: March-April 1966

This is an example of one of many SCLC Newsletters printed for public distribution. In this third volume, topics include: Bloody Sunday, Dr. King Thanks Sweden, Man with a Plan, Abernathy Tells Hawaii of Brotherhood, and several others.

Southern Christian Leadership Resolutions

Friday, June 30, 1967

Chauncey Eskridge sends Andrew Young resolutions related to the Southern Christian Leadership Foundation. Mr. Eskridge explains that an examination into the foundation's tax exempt status by the IRS prompted his letter.

Educational Conference Program 1967

Tuesday, May 2, 1967

Dr. King serves as a guest speaker at a conference sponsored by The Allied Educational Foundation. This program outlines the itinerary for the event including the presentations of other speakers namely Max Lerner, Harrison E. Salisbury, Senator Gale W. McGee, and Stanley Levey.

The Urban Coalition National Coordinator's Weekly Report

Friday, February 9, 1968

In the Urban Coalition's weekly report, the National Coordinator notifies members of the events that had occurred within the past week. The report covers local coalitions, legislation, private employment, and the steering committee.

Notes for an Address to Memphis Strikers

Dr. King drafted these notes, which were used in an address given in Memphis, Tennessee in March of 1968. "Dives" is a Biblical character who refused to give aid to the poor and was condemned for it.

Methodist Church Statement on Vietnam Conflict

The Board of Christian Social Concerns of the Methodist Church releases a statement regarding the conflict in Vietnam and possible outcomes and solutions. The board urges steps leading to a withdrawal of US forces from Vietnam.

One Vote for Every Man: Civil Rights Act

In this draft of an article for the March 1965 IUD Agenda, an AFL-CIO monthly publication, Dr. King recounts the progress made by the Civil Rights Movement and states that the issue in 1965 is the right to vote and the venue is Selma, Alabama. He discusses the pattern of exclusion, including the abuse of power by local sheriffs, illegal use of local and state laws, delay tactics of registrars, and literacy tests. He outlines measures that a Civil Rights Act of 1965 should include.

Letter from Henry Lee Gibson to MLK

Henry J. Gibson is aware of Dr. King's understanding of "God" and spirituality. Subsequent to a recent surgery, Mr. Gibson is now conscious of the meaning of being "born again." Praying enhanced his knowledge of God's presence in the human race which brought clarity for his perception of the "yellow man." Mr. Gibson requests to meet with Dr. King to further discuss his recent spiritual experiences and newly found wisdom.

Letter from Edouard Theis to MLK

Thursday, November 7, 1963

Mr. Theis makes reference of having spoke to a French group of non-violent Christians about Dr. King's struggle for freedom. Mr. Theis suggests a reproduction of "Letter From The Birmingham Jail" as well as the distribution of the French translation as a chapter in a French Nonviolent Action book.

We Shall Overcome Sketch

Charlie Cheese Carson's created this sketch which illustrates many notable civil rights leaders as chess pieces.

Letter from Otto Emil Geppert to MLK

Wednesday, May 3, 1967

In this letter, Otto Emil Geppert expresses his opposition to the Vietnam War and encloses a monetary contribution to Dr. King, in support of his nonviolent approach.

Letter from Rev. Grover Graham to MLK

Thursday, May 17, 1962

Rev. Graham writes Dr. King thanking him for a previous letter and sends his support for Dr. King's leadership in the nonviolent pursuit of civil rights

Letter from A. Philip Randolph to MLK about a Contribution

Thursday, March 9, 1967

In this letter A. Philip Randolph asks Dr. King for contributions needed to carry out the work of the National Advisory Committee On Farm Labor (NACFL). Randolph states, "NACFL stretches its limited funds far, but now at this critical point we must ask for your support".

Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty Members List

This document lists members of the Citizens' Crusade Against Poverty, Commission on National Programs and Policies as of December 1965.

The Crozer Theological Seminary Student Chapel - Order of Service

Friday, January 27, 1950

This order of service outlines the events taken place during student chapel at The Crozier Theological Seminary. The service was guided by presiding student, Fred Eugene Stom, and focused heavily on Christian affirmations and the reciting of the ten commandments.

The Citizenship Education Program

This newsletter serves as a platform for the Citizenship Education Program. The program is designed to help inform African Americans of their rights as citizens in the United States.

Philosophical Work

Dr. King outlines significant philosophical and theological publications from the eleventh to the nineteenth century. Thinkers whose work is referenced include: St. Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, Machiavelli, Thomas Hobbes, and John Locke.

Suffering

Dr. King writes that the view of suffering in Job 20 is fallacious.

The Birth of a New Nation

Dr. King compares the ongoing civil rights struggle in the United States to the Hebrews' Exodus from Egypt.

Letter from Miss Ethel Klemm to MLK

Friday, October 18, 1963

Miss Ethel Klemm, a retired white teacher from Mississippi, suggests that Dr. King ease on trying to push for intergration so rapidly. She recommends that, thru education and job training, Negroes will be in a better position to be accepted and integrated into mainstream society.

Scientific Method and God

Dr. King quotes Henry Nelson Wieman on the knowledge of God being unscientific. The content of this card appears verbatim in King's doctoral dissertation, "A Comparison of the Conceptions of God in the Thinking of Paul Tillich and Henry Nelson Wieman."

Letter from MLK to Miss Ethel Klemm

Wednesday, October 23, 1963

Dr. King takes time to write Miss Ethel Klemm and explain the reasons for the purpose of the Freedom Movement. He clears up the misconception that Negroes are just hastily trying to get their way by stating that Negroes have been patient for too long. According to Dr. King, "This is not a matter of gradualism in its most commonly accepted term, but it is a matter of morality."

My Trip to the Land of Gandhi

Dr. King documents his travel throughout India beginning in February 1959 with his wife and Dr. Lawrence Reddick. During his stay Dr. King reflects on the manifestation of Gandhi's nonviolent teachings in low crime rates amidst the impoverished living conditions. Dr. King also addresses the notion of a "divided India," a country deliberating the varying effects of Western modernization.