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"Jacksonville, FL"

Telegram from MLK to US Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach

Washington, D.C., Georgia (GA)

Dr. King writes US Attorney General Nicholas Katzenbach to inform him of the reports of "known election irregularities" he is receiving concerning the next day's Georgia Democratic primary election.

Letter from Bill Bennett to MLK

Wednesday, January 5, 1966
New Jersey (NJ), BERMUDA

William Bennett offers the suggestion that the phrase "dark skinned" be used to describe people of color. Bennett encountered the phrase while on a trip in Bermuda, and realized he should enforce the idea that skin color does not determine American citizenship.

Letter from Irv Kupcinet to MLK

Chicago, IL

Irv Kupcinet encloses a clipping on the Soldier Field Rally for Dr. King. Kupcinet closes by requesting the Reverend's appearance on his television show.

Presentation of the Marcus Garvey Prize for Human Rights

JAMAICA

Dr. King was a recipient of the first Marcus Garvey Prize for Human Rights. This award was issued by the Jamaican Government and was presented to Coretta Scott King due to the tragic death of Dr. King earlier in the year. This program outlines that event.

Letter from MLK to Mr. Randall Elias

Thursday, December 30, 1965
Illinois (IL), Chicago, IL

This letter is Dr. King's reply to Mr. Randall Elias's letter regarding a civil rights march from Chicago to Springfield. Dr. King writes that the SCLC is in Chicago, but is unaware of any planned civil rights march .

Barth and Brunner

Dr. King notes the views of Swiss theologians Karl Barth and Emil Brunner on God, making reference to Soren Kierkegaard (SK).

MLK Speech at 4th Constitutional Convention - AFL-CIO

Monday, December 11, 1961
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, Florida (FL), Louisiana (LA)

This is an annotated copy of an address given by Dr. King at an AFL-CIO convention. Dr. King thoroughly discusses the working conditions of Negroes, and states the Negro unemployment rate is similar to "malignant cancer." He concludes that the two most dynamic forces in the country are the labor movement and the Negro Freedom Movement.

Letter from John A. Race to MLK

Thursday, January 21, 1965
Wisconsin (WI), Washington, D.C., Mississippi (MS), Atlanta, GA

Congressman Race of Wisconsin thanks Dr. King for his letter concerning the seating of the Mississippi Delegates. Race seems to suggest that he was of the majority who "did authorize their formal acceptance" although he states that he was in the "minority."

Newsletter from The Knights of the Confederacy

Georgia (GA), New Orleans, LA, Atlanta, GA

The Knights of the Confederacy, a student organization that promoted segregation in public schools, used this flyer to recruit students who were aligned with their goal of protecting "white rights."

MLK Draft - The Weakness of Liberal Theology

Dr. King analyzes the problems associated with liberal theology. According to his view, liberal theology, "seems to be too divorced from life."

Letter from Dora McDonald to Alan J. Rankin

Tuesday, April 25, 1967
CANADA, SOUTH AFRICA

Dora McDonald writes Alan Rankin on behalf of Dr. King regarding a possible visit to McMaster University.

Letter from Abraham Ribicoff to MLK

Friday, October 14, 1966
Washington, D.C.

Senator Abraham Ribicoff, Chairman of the Subcommittee on Executive Reorganization, asks Dr. King to appear at a congressional hearing about the problems facing urban cities. He explains that the subcommittee does not understand the full psychological, social and economic conditions that challenge people living in urban areas.

Righteousness

Dr. King records a quote on righteousness from Karl Barth's "The Epistle to the Romans."

Letter from Alma Szatmary to MLK

Tuesday, April 11, 1967
New Jersey (NJ), VIETNAM, SPAIN

Alma Szatmary writes Dr. King concerning his stance on the Vietnam war. Szatmary writes that it should be prohibited for Puerto Ricans and African Americans to serve as oppressors in Vietnam when they are the ones being oppressed here at home.

MLK Handwritten Notes

Dr. King outlines some principles regarding 'Love' and uses Reinhold Niebuhr as a reference.

Letter from MLK to Mrs. J. T. Brent

Friday, August 9, 1963
Michigan (MI)

Dr. King responds to a letter from Mrs. Brent by explaining his views about love and its place in the Civil Rights Movement. He affirms that "it is through love and understanding that we approach the segregationist." He mentions that striking out in any act of violence is not condoned by leaders of the movement.

Letter from MLK to Rev. Charles H. Smith

Tuesday, January 30, 1962
West Virginia (WV)

Dr. King regrettably informs Rev. Charles Smith that he will not be unable to make an appearance at the First Baptist Church in West Virginia. Due to Dr. King's schedule and commitments to his home church, he finds it difficult to accept any invitations for the next several months.

Letter from Barbara Patterson to MLK

Friday, March 15, 1968
Michigan (MI), Detroit, MI

Barbara Patterson writes Dr. King thanking him for the lecture at Grosse Pointe High School in Michigan. She also encloses a letter that was sent to the Michigan Chronicle. The letter pointed out how great of a lecture Dr. King gave which ended in a standing ovation and how it inspired those that listened.

Letter From Walter R. McCall to MLK

Tuesday, January 3, 1967
Atlanta, GA

Morehouse School of Religion Director Walter McCall asks Dr. King for a contribution to purchase a piano that will be presented to Morehouse School of Religion.

Monotheism

Dr. King cites passages in the sixth century BCE Second Isaiah (chapters 40-55) as the first clear evidence of monotheism.

Letter from Ralph J. Bunch to Raphael Gould

Thursday, May 13, 1965
New York (NY)

Though Ralph J. Bunche agrees with the "Unique Value and Importance of Education for Peace", he is unsure to the effectiveness of the principle.

Letter from Maurice Dawkins to MLK

Friday, June 30, 1967
Washington, D.C., Atlanta, GA

Maurice Dawkins informs Dr. King that their meeting is being followed up with action in various regions and with cooperation of the OEO Regional Directors and Civil Rights Coordinators.

Letter from Beatrice Sutton Rogers to MLK

Wednesday, April 19, 1967
Illinois (IL), VIETNAM, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA, CHINA, Washington, D.C.

Beatrice Rogers writes Dr. King expressing her disappointment with his change in his position after he was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize. She encloses an article from the Washington Post in which critics discuss a speech King gave regarding Vietnam War.

The SCLC and Leadership of MLK

INDIA, Montgomery, AL, Washington, D.C.

The various protest mechanisms and action organizations serves as a long lasting contribution to the Negro community initiated by the movement in the South. The church has served as a location for organization which progresses community participation. During slavery, the slaves were allowed to congregate only at weddings and funerals. Many of these events were fabricated in order to create a means of collective communication between the slaves. The author asserts that it was in this tradition that the SCLC was formed.

Letter from Harry Walker to MLK

Thursday, September 14, 1967
New York, NY, New York (NY), Atlanta, GA, Georgia (GA), New Jersey (NJ), Washington, D.C., Philadelphia, PA, Pennsylvania (PA)

Mr. Harry Walker writes Dr. King to ask his appearance at Fairleigh Dickinson University in Rutherford, New Jersey to speak with the institution's new student body.

Anonymous Letter to John B. Oakes

Friday, August 26, 1966
New York (NY)

This letter to the Editorial Page Editor of "The New York Times" features an unidentified writer presenting a rebuttal to a previous article on violence and "young Negroes." The writer identifies himself as a "dark-skin, non white" and cites examples of racial violence in other areas of the world.

Letter to Joan Daves to Philip Hanson

Thursday, December 17, 1964
New York, NY

Here Mr. Hanson conveys his appreciation for the permission to include words from Dr. King's "Why We Can't Wait", in his performance "The Rebels".

Dr. King Sermon Outline

"A Constructive Use of the Sense of Shame" is the title of this sermon outline, prepared by Dr. King. The parable of the 'Prodigal Son' is the chosen text for the sermon.

Letter from Seventh Graders to Rev. Ralph Abernathy

Thursday, April 25, 1968
North Carolina (NC)

Five seventh grade boys wrote to Reverend Abernathy asking for information about the SCLC and the life of Dr. King.

Schleiermacher (Christology)

Dr. King outlines an excerpt from the author Schleiermacher in referencing an idea of Christ.